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"11- ■ ..C tA-jZ- 



VOL. LXX. No. 2 



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MID-WEST NUMBER 



PRICE • 
20 CENTS^ 







Published Weekly at 1B4 Went 4<th 8t.. New Tork. N. T., by Variety. Ine. Annual aubacriptlon |T. Slnyla coptea t« eanta. 
Entered aa aecond claaa matter December 22. It05. at the Poit Office at New Yo rk. N. Y.. under tha Act ot March 2. 1871. 

NEW YORK CITY, THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 1923 v 



88 PAGES 




''The Blue Streak of Vaudeville'' 



* V A 11 I ET V ^ ; ^rsf ^rj M;>: . : .rr .Mf ^' Thursday. March 1, 1823 




B. S. IMR "LEVIATHAN" WILL 
HAVE SPECIAL DANCE MUSIC 




ping Board Engage* Paul Whiteman and His 
Orchestra for Ocean's Biggest Boat— Will Or- 
ganize Four More Bands 

; 4 



> 



>S'When the mammoth line, "Levia- 



i^ llian" takes lis maiden trip about 
r lune 1 as of the fleet of steamers 
^yperated by the United States ship- 

B^IUS board, It will carry as an extra 

■ attraction, Paul Whiteman and his 

■ fetfid. 

^H ^he Whiteman band has been es- 

IPIl^ially engaged by the shipping 

JNMTd to make the .Irst rrund trip 

•n the "Lieviathan," the ocean's 

biggest boat. The band will play 

dance music each evening. It will 

follow Whiteraao's London engage- 

rfirnt. with the musicians returning 

'Tto New York to keep the shipping 

/ board engagement. Following the 

. completion of the seagoing voyages, 

the shipping board has empowered 

Whiteman to organize four more 

j^ bands for others of Its passcnger- 

* carrying liners for permanent en- 

ir&gements. 

The "Leviathan,"" (formerly the 
German "Vaterland") Vss in the 
•ervice for the United States as a 
r transport during the war, taking 
thousands of American soldiers to 
<' the other side under all conditions 
|| without accident. It brought as 
I' many back af'er the armistice. The 
I enemies macje desperate efforts "to 
i get" the big boat while en voyage 
t^ 'with her fighting men, but repeat- 
K edly were unsuccessful. The entire 
K German secret service in and arounj 
^ l^ew York often concentrated upon 
Ji the departure of the "Leviathan" 
f ' ft-om this port. While frequently 
\^: authentically reporting its leaving, 
i the boat with its convoy always es- 
caped the dangers arranged for it 
on the ocean. 



TELLEGEN "FASCINATED" 
BY PEGGY HOPKINS 



Reported Actor Will Marry Af- 
ter Geraidine Farrar Ob- 
tains Divorce- 



^ Chicago, Feb. 28. 

It's quite safe to assert Lou- Teie- 
gen has serious intention of remar- 
rying, with his choice settled upon 
Poggy Hopkins-Joyce. Miss Hop- 
kins lost the Joyce end of her family, 
who is of this city, through the di- 
vorce courts. Tellegen is now await- 
ing his freedom from Geraidine Far- 
rar through similar proceedings 
pending against him In New York, 
brought by his wife. 

The source o^ the information 
states Mr. Tellegen has said that 
Immediately upon the decree being 
finally granted he expects to wed 
Miss Joyce; that he is fascinated by 
her. Tellegen and Miss Joyce have 
exchanged innumerable letters. 




PROJECT 



^v-^*, 



ProfeMional Entertainers to 
Be Paid-^^mple Instru- 
ment Can Be Hooked 
Into Service Wire Like 
Toaster — Charge for Ser- 
vice to Support Program 

Cost ' . ■:-^:v.-.V. 



1% TAX ON MAM GROSS 
REGARDED AS SURE IN N. YJ 



Bill Introduced in Legislature Putt New State Imposf 
on Amusements and Sporting Events — Baseball 



and Turf Hit 



f'.i .r.'. » , 



■l:;. 



INSTALLMENT SALES 






UNIVERSAL LICENSE 
REFUSED "TESS" FILM 



Only Adults May See It— No 

Reason Advanced by 

Lord Chamberlain 






^ 



London, Feb. 28. 
"U'ithout giving reason for the ac- 
' tlon a universal license has b«en 
Tdenied Mary rickford's "Tess of the 
!etorm Country" by tho Lord Cham- 
?4bcrlain. 

The ultimatum was served after 
the trade showing on Feb. 22 and 
means that only adults may witness 
the presentation. 



Miss Farrar Is now on a concert 
tour with a route laid out for 22 con- 
certs that Include ^ guarantee for 
each as her share, according to pop- 
ulation. She interrupted a tour to 
testify In the recent divorce pro- 
ceedings In New York. Mr. Tellegen 
Is playing In a sketch In vaudeville 
In the West. Miss Joyce Is not pro- 
fessionally appearing at present. 

Some while ago, when Variety 
published an Item Intimating the 
Tellegens had separated, Lou Telle- 
gen started an action against the 
paper for $100,000 .damages. Later 
he withdrew it on the stipulation 
that no mention was to be made at 
the time of the withdrawal of the 
action. 



PARISIAN COMEDY'S 
DETECTIVE AGENCY 



At Nouveautes — Favorably Re- 
ceived — One Character 
Speaks in English 



UNDRESSED OPERETTA 



"Dieux Ccmplotent" !c Risky Effu 
•ion on Antiquated Subject. 



t 



SMAKT KEVUE FAIK 

Paris, Feb. 28. 

R. FlateaU'Ia giving a series ot 
•mart shows at the Cigale, fre- 
quently renewing hia program. 
Again, on Feb. 24, he presented an- 
other well-dressed and witty revue, 
"Oul, ma Poupee," by Briquet and 
Sain t-G rangier, collaborators of the 
Casino' de 'Pafia productions. " The 
newest piece made but a fair Im- 
pression. 

Tho current cast Includes Montel, 
Jullien, Cassel, Bever, Magnard, 
Xlmes. Maxa, Gaby Montbreuse, 
Jenny Colder and the Dixie Girli. 



Paris, Feb. 21. 

**D I c u X Complotent" (formerly 
called "Orgle Devinc") Is a risque 
effusion In the broad operetta way 
that was rather nicely received and 
well Interpreted by Dorian and Si- 
mone Judic whcii presented Febru- 
ary 17 at the Apollo. 

Its book is by Maury WIchol with 
music by Fernand Masson. The 
high light of the production seems 
to be the undressed scenes the com- 
pany proceeds to Olympse. 

Meccano, an aviator, meets Nin- 
ette at a Paris dance resort. Mec- 
cano elopes with the girl In his ma- 
chine, going to Olympse where Jup- 
itor appropriates her. In amends 
Juno takes Meccans. 

With a broken machine and no re- 
pair shop, the mortals are obliged 
to forevor remain on Olympse. 

Other than the missing repair shop 
the subject is very antiquated. 



"COUSIN," LIGHT OPERA 

London, Feb. 28. 
"The Cousin from Nowhere" 
opened at the Princess Feb. 24. It 
made a favorable Impression. 

The piece is a light opera minus 
my chorus wbarsoever. 



COSTUMES 

Foremoft Mtkfr» of Stiijte 
Atttn for Women •nd Men 

We Invite Comparison of 
Design. Price nnd Workmanship 

BROOKS-MAHIEU 

Uit Bway N. ¥. City 



STOLL'S GARDEN FOR 8 WEEKS 

London, Feb. 28. 

Jean BcdIni .sailed on the "ila- 
Jestic" today. Before leaving he 
told the company of "You'd Be Sur- 
prised' at the Covent Garden he 
would return with additional ma- 
terial for the piece. 

Tho production has been playing 
to around $12,000 wt;t,k'.y. It is 
rumored StoH wiU not exerciKo his 
option on the house to continue 
after the prescribed run of eight 
wteks. 



"Little Bit of Fluff" Revived 
Ix)ndon. Feb. 28. 
Tho Aiul)assador8 revived "A L'S 
tle Bit of riufC" last week. 



What will probably develop Into 
the most gigantic radio undertaking 
yet la the plan now being developed 
by the North American Company, 
which la behind a "wired wireless" 
enterprise. It provides for central- 
ized broadcasting stations, with the 
entertainment arranged by an of- 
ficial director. This service will be 
paid for by the radio subscribers, 
and. accordingly, will bring into de- 
mand talent from al. spheres, which 
will be proportionately reimbursed 
for their services. 

It la the first ofllcial cognisance by 
the radio people that the talent must 
be paid for, and Is to be considered 
as a very important factor In popu- 
larizing radio. 

The plans are so far-sweeping and 
ambitloua that were It not for the 
fact that a corporation which has 
since proved its success In supply- 
ing heat and power to various cities 
and townships la behind It, It would 
aound like the colloquial "pipe 
dream.** The North American Co. 
has for Its basis the licensed pat- 
ents of Major-Gencral George Owt.i 
Squler, Chief Signal Officer of the 
U. S. A., now consulting engineer of 
the corporation. The wired wire- 
less is merely a patented device 

whereby the overhead aerial, 
ground wire and storage and dry 
battery cells are eliminated; the 
mere plugging in on the ordinary 
electric light wiring circuit aerves 
as the means to effect radio com-f 
munlcation. The plan is to sell the 
radio Instruments on the monthly 
installment basis, as the electric 
light companies sell electric toast- 
ers, irons, vacuum cleaners, etc. In 
addition, the small charge for the 
entertainment services Is added to 
the electric bill at the end of each 
month. 

A system of attuning to various 
wave lengths will permit the sub- 
scriber to tune Into any division de- 
sired. These divisions are divided 
as follows: Dance music, opera and 
symphony orchestra concert ser- 
mons and lectures, news reports 
anent sporting events, topical news 
of the day, weather and agricultural 
events, etc., and light entertalr- 
ment. 

Experiments conducted for two 
months with the Cleveland Electric 
Illuminating Co. h.-^vc proved the 
practicability of this new radio in- 
novation to the satisfaction of the 
North American Co. The latter, by 
Its license arrangement with Gen- 
eral Squler, has the privilege of 
sub-llcenslng to anybody It sees fit. 
All that is necessary, technically, 
are a simple crystal set and vacuum 
tube receivers to facilitate loud 
speaking. The Instrument Itself Is 
not much larger than the ordinary 
desk telephone, although' a bit more 
bulky and clumsier In appearance. 
On It are the various dials to per- 
mit switching from one wave length 
to the other. 

What effect on show buslnes?j In 
general this new device will have 
la startling In Its revolutionary pos- 
sibilities. Typical advertisements, 
advertising radio receiving Siets, 
reading aomethlng like, "No nee(l tc 

(Continued on page 3) 



Paris. Feb. 28. 
Following an excellent run with 
"Chouchou polds plume" at the 
Nouveautes. Mr. Roze presented 
Feb. 22 "L'Ecole dee Amants" ("The 
School of Lovers"), a new comedy 
In three acts, by Pierre Wolff. The 
play is a Well written piece of work, 
although differing from the author's 
usual style. It made a favorable 
impression. 

The theme has to do with an 
elderly beau who desires that 
women love him disinterestedly. 
Although of considerable means, he 
refuses to pay the debte of his son, 
^eorge, who squanders his allow- 
ar.ce and becomes ruined through 
fair -damsels. 

Xbe boy attempts to earn his own 
living by opening a lovers' detect- 
ive agency where the women are 
supposed to consult the psychologi- 
cal professor. Among the clients is 
a woman seeking to find a way to 
make an aged suitor jealous. George 
discovers she is bis father's mis- 
tress. 

Father and son become reconciled 
with the older man continuing to 
eclipse his offeprlng. He finally in- 
vites an English miss to dinner 
whom he has met at hlst son's es- 
tablishment with the finale bemg 
that the son takes his parent's mis- 
trees and the father ultimately se- 
cures George's. 

Albert Brasseur adroitly Imper- 
sonates the elderly beau and Lou- 
vlgny plays the son. Regina Ga- 
mier and Irene Wells are the 
father's mistress and the English 
girl, respectively, and Marguerite 
Deval was amubing ae a matured 
dame in constant search of loversw 

Miss Wells readc her lines in 
English during the early part ot 
the comedy, which is quite vogue, 
ay Britannic characters are consid^ 
ered most fashionable in the pree* 
ent Parfslan plays. 



M 



NEW MUSIC HALL 



y;: \ry:' \. Albany, N. T^ Feb. 28. 

A tax of six per cent* would be, 
levied on the gross receipts at' 
vaudeville performance^, motion pic- 
ture shows, concerts, baseball gamea, 
prize-fights, wrestling matches and 
other sporting events and amuse- 
ments of every character for which 
an admission la charged if a hill in- 
troduced In the Assembly of tho 
State Legislature yesterday by As- 
semblyman Charles P. Miller, Re- 
publican of Genesee county, ia en- 
acted into law. Assembb'man Miller 
declared the bill will be passed by 
the lower house, as It haa been ap- 
proved bjr both the Democratic and 
Republican leaders. The bill la de- 
signed to raise additional revenue 
amounting to between 15,000,000 and 
17.000,000 for the State. 

Before Introducing the bill, A.ssem- 
blyman Miller had a conference witti 
State Tax Commissioner John J, 
Merrill and certain exemptions were 
written Into the measure. Tl.ese ex- 
emptions would include such events 
as are staged by agricultural organ- 
izations, both State and county; re-* 
llgious. educational and patriotic so- 
cieties. All other "organizations* 
corporations or persons" conducting 
amusements would be taxed. 

Other provisions of, tho measure 
would require those conducting the .. 
amusements to post with the States*.! 
Comptroller a bond sufficient to in- " 
sure the State against loss of any of 
the taxes. The taxes would be made 
payable on or \)efore.Feb. 16 after ' 
the year ending Dec. 31. 

The major portion of the revenue 
probably vould be raised from pro- 
fessional baseball games In th« 
State, particularly at the Polo 
Grounds and the new home of the 
New Yprk Yankees in New York 
City. Sunday games in New York, 
it Is expected, would furnish tho 
principal tax. Big outdoor boxing 
shows that are staged during the 
summer in Greater New York, how- 
ever, also would provide a big share 
toward the revenue. The race 
tracks, too, would enrich the Stat* 
by thousands of dollars if the Mil- 
ler bill is passed. ' - '..,"* 

Before Introducing the meaiiure. 
Assemblyman Miller Is said to hive 
shown the bill to legislative leadfere 
of both parties. With one or two 
amendments, it was said at the Cap- 
itol today, the bill is almost sure to 
pass at this session. 

The elimination of vaudeville and 
motion picture shows from the pro* 
visions of the bill, it is believed, will 
have to be made by Assemblyman , 
Miller before it can be passed. 



La Palape, in Paris, Formerly Eden, 
Opened Bill Feb. 24 



•V 

* 



... Paris, Feb. 28. 

Oscar X>e£renne and Henri Varno 
having tak^n over the Eden, recently 
designated as the Theatre des Boule- 
vards, 4h« new house in the Fau- 
bourg Montmartre, on the site of 
Gaumonfs color picture house, re- 
opened it Feb. 24 as a music hall un- 
der the TT'ime of Le Palace. 

Tho initial bill is a revue entitled 
"Toutes les Femmes," by C. A. Car- 
pentler, Leo Lelievre and Andre 
Dahl. The revue is on the Concert 
Mayol style, but it is too early to 
decide if the tide of bad fortune of 
the Eden has turned, although the 
opening war nicely received. 

The production is splendidly 
staged, with Harry Pilcer having 
arranged the dances. The cast in- 
cludes Mme. Polaire, Simone Tilly, 
Nina Myral, Peggy Vere, Mme 
Ilahna, j Huguetlw Dfacy. Wlnnii 
Richmond, Claire L^lond, Siria, 
Ver^ Olcott, T)lanfe Bell, ' Crn.sto- 
Tffti^VTroupe, Mars Dancers and 
Pilcen 

High lights of the production re- 
volve aroupt^ the "Feast of Bal- 
thazar,* Ihje "Rain Dance" and a 
number called "Around the World 
In Eighty Dances." '^ 



ONE-HOUSE NIGHTLY 
SYSTEM MAY RETURN 



, v.-v 



< 



Variety Business in England 

Apt to Restore Old Time 

Policy 



London, Feb. 28. 

The one .''how a night system may 
return to the English halls. Busi- 
ness Indications warrant the expec- 
tation, say the vaudeville people 
over here. It's the old system of 
playing on this side when a turn 
would do five or six halls a fTte^t 
traveling to each In make up With 
appearances timed. 

If the ono show nitchtly does re- 
turn it is almost c« rtain to revive 
the "turn'.' playing. Tiiis may mean 
that many an act now off willrfind 
Itself in demarr<Tr"" — *— : : — — ^-f 



Barrymorc's Hamlet in London? 
Ix)tidon, Feb. 88. 
An unverified rumor wafting 
about this locale ^ays John iJarry* 
more may play ••Hamlet" in Loa* 
I don within the ii» .Tr future. 



.; 1.**^- wj 



•i 



Thursday. March 1, 1923 



VARIETY'S LONDON OFFICE p A R I P Q ^ ^t. Martin's Place, Trafalgar Square 

\^ r\ O Ls ili iJ 2096 R««ent 



>-*? 



■ ■ ■ 



.:=£:.x= 






GERMAN ACTORS PLAY 
FOR MONTH FOR $7.50 



• That's 150,000 Marks, Though 
, Price of Hotel Suite for 
One and a Half Days 

• •■''■ 

^- Th« average T/asc of actors la 
Germany during January waa 150,- 
000 mark* for the month, taking In 
all classes of professionals. Legiti- 
mate players there are paid on a 
monthly basis. The equivalent in 
American money was $7.50. 

While the value of marks in Ger- 
many is more than that indicated 
from the rate of exchange, in some 
ways the purchasing power Is no 
greater. One example is that of 
hotel rates, which fluctuate with the 
exchange. A traveler recently from 
Berlin stated he secured a suite of 
rooms at the Ailolon in November 
for 56,000 mark^^ per day. After sev- 
eral weeks on the Riviera he re- 
turned to Berlin, at which time the 
hotel was charsingr 100,000 marks 
per room a day. At that rate a C4er- 
man actor youUl stay at the hotel 
one day and a half on his entire 
salary for a month's work. 



MOGADOR SUDDENLY CLOSES 

Paris, l^eb. 28. 
The Mogador suddenly cl ^ed 
■with the c use attributed to a dis- 
agreement between Braxton and 
Ziebell. mar.tgers, over the policy. 



"PHARAOH' FILM COMMENDED 

London, Feb. 2S. 
"The Love.s of Pharaoh." screen 
feature, wa.s highly commended 
upon its opening at the Scala. 
Feb. 26. 



"Sign on the Door" in French 

Paris. FcK ^8. 
The French version of "The Sign 
on the Door" beinqr made by Andre 
Pascal (Baron Herri de Roth.schlkH 
will be produced at the Renaissance 
In the .spring, the lead belns held 
by Louis Gauthier. 



''Exciting Night" at Oxford March 8 

London. Feb. 28. 

"Battling Butler" will move to 

' the Adelphi March 8 to make room 

. for D. VV. Griffiths * One Exciting 

Night" at the New Oxford, which 

opens on that date. 



Haskell Cables for "Molly Darling" 
London, Feb. 28. 

Jack Haskell has cabled to secure 
the British rights for "Molly Dar- 
ling." ,, 

The Identity of the management 
behind the project is not knowa. 



Burke's Sketch Fairly Received 

London, Feb. 28. 

"Likes and Dislikes." a sketch by 
Edwin Burke, was fairly received 
at the Coliseum. 

What succeafi the playlet met with 
la generally attributed to the popu- 
larity of Renee Kelly. 



Not Much Doing in Berlin 

London. Feb. 28. 
Arthur Pearson has returned 
from Berlin, where he states there 
1« nothing worth while going on so 
far as theatricals are concerned. 



Wll.KTTE 



KERSHAW 

GUARANTY TKUST CO. 
fe!t Fifth Avenue New York 



WODEHOUSE SAYS--I 

SpMkino of "Molly Darlinfl" and 
•'Cabarot Girl" 



F»k U. 



Aiken. 8. C, 

Editor Variety: 

Owing to Gu7 BoKon (whom I 
hereby publicly denounce In the 
hope of bathing him In confusion 
and remorse) not forwarding on my 
mail as I begged him to do when I 
left Palm Beach for Aiken, your 
issue containing the article about 
the similarity between "The Cabaret 
Girl/' of which I am part-author 
with George Grossmith. and "Molly 
Darling" is the only number of 
Variety which I have missed In the 
last seven years. 

I gather, however, that a charge 
of plagiarism has been started, so 
perhaps you will allow me g.o give 
a few facta concerning the birth of 
"The Cabaret Girl." 

Somewhere In January 1922, 
Grossmith asked me to collaborate 
with him on a piece to follow 'Sally' 
at the London Winter Garden. He 
had mapped out a rougii scp.^arlo 
which, though other ideas were aft- 
erv.-ards added, contained the notion 
of a worthless ballad being jazzed 
and convene I into a song-hit. I 
read this in January. 

March 11 we sailed on the "Aqui- 
tania' to New York to see Jerry 
Kern about the music. The first act 
waf complet^'d before we landed, 
which was on March 17. Saturday, 
March 18, Grossmith and I went to 
a matinee of 'The Cat and the 
Canary" and to the evening per- 
formance of "The Rose of Stnm- 
boul," and vn the morning of Sun- 
day, March 19, we went to Bronx- 
ville and read Kern our first act. 
Kern composed the melody of our 
bt^iad -8ong-l.lt before we sailed 
back to England on April the first. 

Gros'smilh haf never seen "Molly 
Darling," and I did not see it till 
last September. , 

P. O. Wodchousc. 

^In Variety last week was a cab- 
led statement from George Gross- 
mith to th.c effect he had never 
seen "Molly Darling" and that "The 
Cabaret Girl' had been written a 
year ago.> 




POWERFUL ANH-CENSORSHIP 
READY FOR N. Y. ARGUMENT 



Hays and Senator Walker Will Urge Repeal of Law 
at Public Hearing in State Capital — Admlnistra* 
tion Bill Has Clear Path v 



JOAN BARRY HURT 



About 8:30 a week ago Tuesday, 
Dr. Quinn and a few of the regulars 
were waiting. They tell me Doc 
was beating at the brow and I was 
laughing and lending for sand- 
wiches. They tell me that all those 
around were crying and that per 
my wild raving I wanted my will 
read over and over. My mother it 
left in comfort for life. To a few 
certain pals all sorts of things dear 
to me. They tell me it's a great will 
and I'm putting it in a full page 
in the Variety, but one part will 
have to be left out. for it's a new 
addition I've added. It's a spot in 
a certain place I've left for one 
"gossipy" cad it was my great mis- 
fortune to have played with over a 
western circuit tour. While the ele- 
vator boys, porter and all those near 
were praying and crying and hop- 
ing, he was stopping people on 
Broadway to squint up hia catty 
eye. twitch his miserable mouth and 
mumble, for he can't speak out like 
a man. "I coulda told you that a 
year ago." 

FRANK VAN HOVEN 

March 1, Orpheum, Harrisburg: 
March 6. York and Reading; March 
11', Keith's. Washington, etc. June 
u^<l July. London and Paris: Aug. 
Jti. Orpheum Ciivuit, starting at 
Des Moines.. 

"You ran't Ueer* a good man down." 



Auto Crash May Disfigure H 
Crane and Hutchinson Unhurt 



London, Feb. 28^ 
While returning In an automobile 
from "location" Feb. 22, Frank 
crane, dVector, "Hurricane Hutch," 
star and Joan Barry, leading wo- 
man, collided with another machine. 
Miss Barry was thrown through 
the windshield receiving Injuries 
which may permanently disfigure 
her, while Crane and Hutchinson 
suffered nothing more than a vio- 
lent shaking up. ' 



SAILINGS 



March Z (from ^Xew York for 
London), Jimmy Hussey (Zeeland). 

Feb. 21 (from New York for Lon- 
don), Novelty Clintons (France). 



PICTURE SECTION 

On Pages 28 to 33 



fi 



THE TILLER SCHOOLS 
OF DANCING 

143 Charing Cross Road 
LONDON 

Director, JOHN TILLER 



BIG RADIO PROJECT 

(Continued from ]^nK^ 2) 
drc's up and go out In the coif' and 
.«»pend lot of money and come home 
worn out when you can i>ut on 
comfy clothes and pli£>perfl, sit by 
the fireside and let the best enter- 
tainers In the world amuse you," is 
a fair idea of wliat radio may mean 
to the theatre. The New Yorker or 
any inhabitant of a big city like 
Chicago, Boston o San Fi'anciscj 
has but little idea what a grip radio 
has on the country in general. Any 
medium-sized city under 50,000 pop- 
ulation best reflects the citl^enry•8 
reaction to the .new fad. The small 
town papers feature radio alniost 
daily, and It is to them it will have 
its greatest appeal — and greatest 
drawback, from the theatre's point 
of view. 

Wall Street heard of the under- 
taking first more than a month ago, 
and speculators plunged in the stock 
of the company, which was run up 
front $100 to (119 a share in a week 
or so before the public knew of the 
scheme. The high quotation has 
since been well maintained, indi- 
cating the belief in flnanctal circles 
that the project promise* impor- 
tant profits. 

The North American Company Is 
a trading and holding corporation 
with a broad charter under which It 
can engage In a variety of busi- 
nesses. It controls and aids in 
flnancing a number of street rail- 
way and electric light and power 
companies, including the entire rail- 
way and electric service system of 
Milwaukee and transit and electric 
service systems in St. Louis. It 
controls or is interested in the De- 
troit Edison, Kefitucky Coal Co. and 
the Kdison Co., Cleveland. 



ing a radio entertainment will be 
shown in a picture "Via Wireless." 

Shots for the film were taken in 
the Kansas City "Star's" operating 
and reception rooms and will in- 
clude views of the entertainers in 
action, different views of the am- 
plifiers, transmitters, microphones 
and other apparatus. * 

The film will be a complete story 
of the making of the different en- 
tertainments, which the radio fans 
have been hearing, without any 
Idea as to how it was produced. 
Following its showing here the film 
will be shown In other theatres in 
this territory. 



Kount Sisters at Coliseum March 12 
. . London, Feb. 28. 
The Kouns slster.s arrived on the 
"Berengaria" |and will open at the 
Coliseum, March 12. 



\ NEW ACTS 

Olga Kane, single (Cliicago). 

Al Borde niid Co. In a comedy 
sketch (Chicago). 

Pearl Brothers reuniting after ten 
years' separation; first time together 
since the act of Pearl Brothers and 
Burns. Ceorge P. Pearl has been 
In ftoek, and I.iew Pearl was with 
nobert;^, Poarl and Itoberts, and 
later with FoUette, Wicks and Pearl 
(Chicago). 

Vie Quinn is fr.iming a Jassz band 
turn of 10 people, seven of them 
musicians. * 

Leo Carillo uhtl! recently starring 
in 'Mike Angolo" which closed al 
the Morosco Feb. 17, will return to 
vaudeviUo wUhin a weak or so, ap- 
pearing in the Keith houses. 



"Plantation Nights" is turninj; 
out a big winner at the Mctropole 
Hotel "Midnight Follies." The show 
has become a society rendezvous 
and both the Prince of Wales and 
Prince Henry have visited it. 
Odette Myrtll goes as strong as 
ever and is wc'.l supported by Tubby 
Edlin. 



SKBESTSELLERSFOR FEBRUARY 



RHINESTONES 

THE LITTLE JOHNS 

226 West 46th St. New York 

Phon y ItKYANT 43.17 

PEGGY O'NEILL 

THEATRE ROYAL 
■ lla; murkrt. I.onilwn 



Kan?a? City, Fi»h. C?.- 
With tl'.e lifjpes of attracting some 
of the many who have deserted the 
movies!^ for the radio back to the 
film house.«J, the Newman Interests 
sti.rkd a cMmpaign this wee): u: 
til*' Royal, n'lich may prove i'tler- 
otin^ t»» tiiosM with tiie radio '•ui,'::." 
As a part cT t 'ie R(».vars regular 
I)io,':riini t veiy '}.hni-e of brondoa^t- 



FOSTERS AGENCY, Ltd. 



VICTOR RECORDS 

''When HaaKs Ara Young'* and 

''Journey's End" 

"Lost- and 

"Whera tha Bamboo Babies Grow 

"Thru the Niohf* and 

"Rad Moon" 

"Who Caras* and ' v 

"Time Will Tair 

"Will 8ha Coma from the East" an 

"Lady of tha Evaning" 

"I'm Through" and 

"Open Your Arms" 

BRUNSWICK RECORDS 

"Lost" and i_^ 

"Nallio Kally I Lovo You* 



"Greenwich Witch" and 

"Ivy" 

"You Gave Ma Your Heart*' and 

"The Snaak" 
•>"Dumbeli" and 

"Tha Thier 

"Rosa of the Rio Grande^ and 

"All Muddled Up" 

"Lady of tho Evening" and 
d"Pack Up Your Sins" 

Q. R. S. WORD ROLLS 

"Crinolino Days" 

«'A Kiss in the Dark" 

"Who Did You Fool Aftor All?" 

"Opan Your Arms My Alabammy" 

"Ona Night in June" 
"Falling" 



*. 



OROKC.r losir.K 



If. 




ilU)) 




IIMIMI rosTPt 



We Place All the BIGGEST ACTS in Epgland 

fOMMlMC.^Tr TaiKOI (.11 %VIII.I\M MOKKI.H \;.f<:N( V INC. 
list IIRU.%1>\VAV. riT.N.\.U lllll.DINU NKU YO^fK f IT^ 



Sheet music sellers have one big bit that Is undenlai^ly a tre- 
mendous popular Dumber: "You Know You Belong to fiomebody 
Else." The popular list Includes "Parade of Wooden Soldiers," "You 
Tell Her— I Stutter," "Carolina In the Morning." "Loving Sam," 
"My Buddy," "I Gave You Up Just Before You Threw Me Down," 
• Crying for You." "Rose of the Rio Grande," 'Who Did You Fool 
After AH? '/Lost, a Wonderful Girl," "Who Cares?" "You Oara 
afe Your Heart," "Why Down East In Maine," "Nobody Loves You 
Better Than M-a-m-m-y," "Aggravatln* Papa," "Open Your Arms 
My Alabammy." "Down Id Maryland," "Down by the Old Appl© 
Tree." "Call Me Baclc Pal o' Mine," "Dumbell," "Dearest." "No- 
vember Rose." 'Fate," "Carry Me Back to My Carolina Home." 
•'.Mother in Ireland," "Love Sends a Little Gift of Roses,' "World 
U Walling for Sunrise." 

Of the neu' mu.'lral hliows. "Bambalina, " 'Wlldnower" and "April 
filossoma" from "Wialflower" are blgr, particularly the first num- 
i.t; ' Wonderl'ii! You" from "Lady Buttrrfly" is showing up; "I've 
}'.( en Wantii ET Vou ' .^nd "That American Boy of .Mine' from the new 
Winter (Jardon Re. iie" are tlie be.st fcIlers of a prolific and varie- 
u'.ittd *»eoie; '.Mrm \n tlic Moon" from 'Catoline" is popular, while, 
Ipsideg the "Music B'-'.k Revue" and "rolllcs" quota, "A Kl.ss in the 
I'U'U" from Oti«!i'J[e nio«».'»onr-," •wiieu Jliaits Ar* TounR" from 
■ Lilly i.i KimiJif ■ ai.d 'Journrys Lud ' irom "I'p She Goes" ttrmd 
<.iit. 

BiiwiriCHH over the counter is reported bir. d^-npiie the fact a few 
<<f the puMlirhr:s iutve raised the v.'hoIe«ri!e \n'uv '_' cents per copy. 



Albany, N. Y.. Feb. 2§. 

Next week promises to be tha 
busiest one so far in the lft2S state 
legislative season. Scores of hear- 
ings are scheduled in both branchea 
of the legislature, one of the most 
important being that alated (or 
Tuesday afternoon on the repeal ot 
the law creating the state motion 
picture censor commission^ Thla 
hearing will take place before tha 
senate finance and assembly waya 
and ihoans committees. 

The date for tha hearing next 
week was announced today by 
Assemblyman Joseph A. McQinnlM. 
Republican chaimoan o! the waya 
and means committee, in the lower 
house. The -announcement followed 
a conference Mr. McGinnles had 
with Assemblyman Louis A. Cuvil* 
Her, democrat of Manhattan, wha 
introduced an "outlaw" movie ra« 
pealer early in the present saision. 
At the confab Mr. Cuvillier agreed 

to allow his repeal bill to be sched- 
uled for the hearing with t'e ad- 
ministration measure sponsored by 
the democratic leaders. Senator 
James J. Walker and Assemblymaa 
Charles D. Donuliue. A hearing am 
the CuvilUer bill ' had ba^i ortff- 
inally scheduled for today. 

It has been announced that WIU 
Hays, head of the motion picture 
industry, will head an army cf op- 
ponents of censorship to Albany 
next week. Senator Walker also 
will urge repeal of the law. Politi- 
cal observers at the Capitol soy 
•Jimmle." as the astute New York 
legislator is known on Capitol Hili, 
will finish far ahead of the "Czar" 
of the movies when it comes to 
oratorical fireworks. 

\\hilo tjie proponents of film cen- 
tjorship have not yet announced their 
spcakoiB, it is understood here that 
the reform leaders will do the orat- 
ing for them. Chief among tha 
speakers who will urge that the cen- 
sorship law be kept on the statute 
books will be Canon William Sheafa 
ChaHe of Brooklyn, representative of 
the International Reform Movement 
of Washington. D. C^ and George 
West and the Rev. C7 R, Miller of 
the New York State Civic League. It 
is reported. Former State Senator 
George H. Cobb ot Watertown. chair- 
man of the censor board, alao 
probably will speak for the continu- 
ance of the law in order to save hie 
Job. 




J 



CENSORING COLD IN lUSSOUSI 

Kansaa City, Feb. 21. 
There is little probability of any 
film censorship bill being passed at 
the present session of the State 
Legislature. The Senators who In- 
troduced the bill appeared before 
their Committee on Cilminal Juris- 
prudence and offered argumenta la 
favor of it. but did not request any 
further hearing. It waa apparent 
from expressions of diSerent mem* 
bore of the committee that there 
would be an unfavorable report oa 
the measure; A similar bill has 
killed by the Houaa Commlttaaw 



50 

I GOOD 

CIGARETTES 

lO* 



6CNUINC 

OURNAM 
TOBACCQ. ^ 



■4 



LEGISLATIVE 



Thursday, MarchJ| 1923 



-v— ~*. 



VARIETY'S MID-WEST NUMBER 

This Issue of Variety in its special articles and special advertising is 
flrvotea to niithllp-westerii vaudeville intcirstM, as mainly represented by 
the "Western Vaudeville Managers* A.ssociatlon and the B. F. Keith's 
Western (Chicago) OfUce. 

The Chicago vaudevillians together with Variety's Chicago staff ar- 
ranged for this week's dinplay. They requested that no previous an- 
nouncement In Variety he made o*f it. as it is Intended for a lypicai 
and representative mid- western repre.stiiiaiion in vaudeville. 

Clii.ago is a vau'leville center and has been, in fact, often teiined 
the axis of American vaudeville. F<ir the traveling vaudevilKaii, wli^re- 
ever he guts to or returns from, lea.hes Chicago. It's a center and 

The Icadin;.: \aude\ille interests of that city, although aligned, as well ns 
.'ifliliated, Willi the biggest vau<feviljf.' vu this si<le of the ocean head- 
(iu..rierin- in New York, feel that Chie.iKO stands out as u vaudeville '. se 
• iiid should ho ni;ide to stand out as well throughout the theatrical trade 
by this txpositiuu in Variety. 

The middle-west is a hummin;,' hive of vaudeville^ Its the .standard 
entertainment of that section. -More innovations havo been tried and 
)»ut over by vaudeville theatres of the middle-west than all the remainder 
i,{ the country together. 

The west's le.-iding booking agencies are the Association and Keith's 
Western, relatively compared to the Orpheum and Keith's booking offices 
In New Yo!k. of which they really are branches, but independently op- 
erated and independently booking. Their natural advantage is the em- 
lloyment of the K>'tJit supply of the better class vaudeville on the books 
cf their New York connection!*, while also controlling the great majority 
«f what are known us "western acts'' that their houses demand. 

Capably' directed for the business of theatres in botnungs with each 
an established Institution. Chicago and the west place the utmost con- 
tldence in its vnudevllle and jfs vaudeville liea<l:v— tliey want the be.s: and 
they u.sually f^^*i 'he b(>^t. 




BRADY TO GO THROUGH 
ON SUNDAY SUBJEa 

Sabbath Golf Playing One of 
His Intended Reforms- 
Equity's Interference 



A bill to legalize Sunday legiti- 
mate performances in the State of 
New York has been Introduced in 
the Assembly by Senator Levy and 
Assemblyman I'lynn. The mea.sure 
is the* result of the endeavor of 
W. A. Brady to place Broadway 
attractlon.s on the sarAc basis as 
Sunday baseball, pictures and* con- 
certs, which nre exempt from the 
•blue laws." Mr, Flynn is the rep- 
resentative elected from the theat- 
rical district and Brady stated it 
was right ho f-hould father the bill 
because the t'm'atres are the life 
and wealth of the d:c!trict. 

Tlie complaint against the man- 
ager for tlie iM'esentation of "La 
Flamme'' at the Playhouse on a 
Sunday night recently came up in 
the West Side Covirt Tuesday. 
Brady took issue with Equity for 
its position in the matter. F'quity 
sent out a statement it had "in- 
vestigated" the performance and 
found that tickets had been f=old. 
This was taHen as willful interfer- 
en<N; by the producer. 

"It look« as though ICquity re- 
gards the legitimate theatre.-* a.-' 
their enemies. Tlicy have not at- 
tempted to dictate in the Sunday 
attractions in other classes of 
houses. I understood the province 
of Equity stopped at the footlights 
but their investigation of the IMay- 
house makes it appear they are 
trying to take in more territory. I 
cannot seo what right Equity had 
to search out whether I sold tickets 
for the performance or not. Equity 
appears to have one ruling for New 
Y'ork and another for other cities 
where Sunday perforn»anoe8 are 
regularly given. 

"The prohibitions in the 'blue 
]aw.s' are so inclusive that every 
form of amusement or playing is 
not legal on Sundays. There is no 
mention of admissions and the Rev. 
Bowlby has no right to declare 
Sunday performances for charity 
were 'all right' and would not be 
interfered with. 

"As a land owner I resent the 
fact I am not permitted to do what 
another man is doing on Sunday. 
That is why 1 will carry the fic;ht 
to legalize Sunday shows for the 
It'pitimate theatres." 

Brady declared lie would ftart "a 
Lorfl's Day Allianeo of his owii." 
Afl soon as spring begins ho in- 
tends forcing the blue laws on the 
golf courses and tennis courts 
* withfn the city and Long Island. 
Brady never t-tated he would make 
an issue of the matter with vaude- 
ville- and plctuies. Words to that 
eflTect were put into his mouth by 
newspapers, h-^ said. His plan ifi 
Logical, Brady liKViring golf and ten- 
nis are recreation for the rich and 
if Interfe red wi th a modilication of 
the blue hiws wuuld be mure quick- 
ly forced. ' 
The manager has not taken th-' 
"dog In the manger" attitude. He 
believes results will be attained in 
the plan he has mapped cut. 
The blue laws prohibit all forms 



of itl.iying and labor and even the 
saliway.s could be forced to stop if 
the letter of the law were strictly 
adhered to. 

William A. Brady and tlnee of 
the cast of "La Flamme, ' the play 
produced at the Playhouse by Brady 
Sunday, Feb. 5. waived examination 
and were held in |2.500 bail for the 
C«}urt of Special Sessions, when ar- 
rajgn*^d in the West Sl<le Court 
Tuesday on a charge of violating 
the New Y^ork Sunday closing law. 
They are charged with .staging and 
acting in the "La Flamme" play. 

Brady was his own attorney in 
the magistrate's court. Testimony 
developed there were 59 paid admis- 
sjoiis at the Playhouse on the Sun- 
day in question. The total attendance 
was about 1,000, tho.se other than 
the 59 who paid being invited guests. 
Thy receipts were $150, The pro- 
duction cost $800 to stage. 

Brady stated he would carry the 
case to llie Supreme Court if neces- 
sa ry. 

Other developments in the Sun- 
d;'.y Lh).sing crusade that started in 
Ntw .Jt-r. ey seven weeks ago, and 
which crossed the river to New York 
.«ome tliree weeks ago witij »h^ Rev- 
erend Dr. Bowlbj' as the t-hief ex- 
ponent cf. the Sunday closing fa- 
natics were the lining of 3.3 East 
Sido f^hop keeiK-rs %b each in New 
Yoik. in the Essex Market Court, 
the 33 including butchers, haber- 
dasliers, etc. 

Tho District AUorney of Na:;.«4ati 
County, Ix)ng Island, announced 
Monday that action would bt» takeiv 
against the Hempst<'ad theatre, 
Hempstead, L. I., and .Strand at 
llo.-kvillo Centre, L. I., for alh-ged 
infr.actions of the Sunday law. }<oth 
houses play vaudeville, and were 
alleged to have had dancing on their 
bills last Sunday, the latter to he 
the basis of tho complarnt. 

The managers of seven picture 



ROXY LA ROCCA 

WIZARD OF THE HARP 

wants It known that he originated 
his style of act in 1903, then a .small 
lad in breeches. This ad Is fof the 
attention of those who don't know. 
Since returning to America, he has : 
been told that there are a few acts ( 
trying to work similar to him. But 
there is only one Roxy La Rooca. 
Wizard of the Harp and Wizard of 
an Audience. 

Kindly .submit all offers to H. M. 
Marinelll, Ltd. 



houses in Union Hill, N. J., several 
of the seven playing vaudeville, were 
iimded cimn'.onses for the thirl 
time last Sunday for alleged Sunday 
law violation. On the two previous 
occasions the house managers have 
been cited to appear before Record- 
er Hauenstein, the latter fined them 
11 each. The Union Hill houses af- 
fected include the State and Capitol. 
The Hudson County Grand Jury 
failed to bring in an indictment 
against Public Safety Director of 
Jersey City, William B. Quinn, last 
week, when the latter's case was up 
before them. 



PA. 1 PER CENT. TAX BILL 



All Public Entertainments Included 
Under New Measure Introduced 



Harrisburg, Feb. 28. 
A bill imposing a state tax of 1 
l)er cent, upon the gross receipts of 
all places of public entertainment 
was introduced last evening in the 
house by Representative Samuel J. 
F?rrY, phi'^'i"'pV'H 



The measure defines as places of 
public amusement all buildings, 
tents or enclosures used wholly or 
partly for dramatic or theatrical or 
operatic or vaudeville performances 
or t raged i-^s or comediee or farces, 
for the exhibition of fixed or mov- 
ing plutuies or sUTcoplJcon views. 
or for athletic exhibitions or games 
or for the exhibition of trained ani- 
mals or of circuses or menagerie?', 
mus >unis or Wild West shows. 

The^ tax is to be paid to the state 
t!-ea«urer by every i)erson, associa- 
tion, co-partnership or corporation, 
domestic or foreign, doing business 
within I*ennsylvania. Receipts to 
be applied to charitable, religious, 
educational or benevolent purposes 
are exempt. 





GLADYS HENRY 

CLARK and BERGMAN 

TOPICS OF THE WEEK 
Proctor's, Newark 

Such thievery in this business. Even Ingenues arc having their faces 
lift'd. 

H»^adline in evening ])aper: "First Division of Yankees Coes South." 
Thouglit that war was ov<'r. 

Seon along the Hndsoi.: I. < liinis(> aft< r i.ih(iii<«j all pa-'ke d. LooliS 
like \ an lloven intends to woik all sunmier. 

Wife's wardrobe. $3,000 (Made by mother). 

Man's wardrobe, $1,000 iPyge Guttenberg). 

Into song, "^^^len lis Income Tax Time in Vaudeville, I'll Tell by the 
Lie on Y'our Face." 

Next Week (Mareh r»V B. F. Keith's, Washington, D. C. While there 
will visit the dOLl' HOUSE. . V- 



:hjfe 1»2: 



FEDERAL INCOME TAX DEDUCTIONS 

In answer to a numher of querlea from professionals covering the 
items permitted to be deducted from gross- Income in making out 
forms for the Federal Income Tax, Variety prints the guide com- 
plied by th^ government last season. At that time a number of ex- 
penses in(5yrred by professionals were ruled aa legitimate deductions l*\ 
although previously they had not been allowed. There haa been no 
change for the y^ar ending Dec. 31, 1922, forms for which piust be 
filed by March 15. 

It Is only when a home Is maintained that a person Is permitted 
to deduct traveling expenses, arid then onl^ when In pursuit of 
busine.ss. T'nmafried professionals do not as a rule maintain homes 
while on tour and cannot make deductions for traveling expenses; 
neither can married couples if they do not maintain homes while 
traveling. Where a man carries his wife and the latter does not 
perform, he cannot deduct her expenses on tour, even though they 
do maintain a home. 

The deduction of traveling expenses (and In total) for those 
per«on« who maintain s hom« i«9 permitted because they are 
under additional expense while on tour. While those who do not 
maintain a home may also incur additional expense, the deduction 
of expenditure for meals and lodging Is not permitted. 

The laws reads: "Traveling expenses, including the entire amount 
expanded for meals and lodging . . .' while away from home on 
business." The explanations from revenue agents make it clear 
when and when not the living expenses can be dedv^cted. Persona 
taking dedtiction are required to attach a statement to the income 
tax form stating the nature of the business, the number of days 
away from home on account of business and the total amount 
expended incident to meals and lodging while away and the total 
of other expenses incident to travel and claimed as a deduction. 

Persons making the deduction, but not entitled to do so, will 
Incur loss of time and later questioning and required payment by 
the collector. In fact, a'.l claims for deductions referred to must be 
substantiated when required by the Commissioner of Internal Reve- 
nue, by records showing in detail the amount and nature of the 
expenses incurred. 

The item of railroad fares is, of course, deductible unless paid 
by the emplo.ver, and the other deductions for professionals are 
listed similarly to last year. 

Guide for Preparation of Federal Income Tax Returns 

Total number of weeks employed professionally from January 1, 

IDIjO to December 31, It '"i 

Salary received per week 

Y'ou may deduct the following: 

Advertising 

Business telephones, telegrams and taxis 

Commissions to agents T 

Dresses used exclusively in the play and lasting less than one year 

Express on trunks 

Fees to stage hands ' 

rirease paint, make-u:\ wigs. > ,. 

Hats and gloves 

Laundry, pressing and cleaners' bills 

Lingerie 1 1 ...• ............. t n • 

Maid or valei for theatre only 

.Scenery depreciation when you own trie act., 

Shoes and stockings 

Sleepers when not paid by employers , 

Transportation xshen not paid by employers 

Wardrobe for men when used exclusively In the play , 

After the deductions are made, the amount remaining is net in- 
come. F'roin the net income the fixed exemptions are subtracted and 
the remainder is the basis upon which the tax is computed. There- 
fore for^iarried persons who.se net income is $5,000 or less, the 
exemption is $2,500. If over $5,000 tho exemption is $2,000. That 
also applies for the head of a family* and where there are dependent 
j)ersons (under 18 and n m-suppoi ting or elderly) there is a further 
exemption of $400 for each such person. Single persons not heads 
of families are permitted $1,000 exemption regardless of the amount 
of net income a^>ove $1,000. 

The normal tax as stated in last week's issue is 4 per cent, on the 
first $4,000 of net- Income after the exemption has been deducted and 
eight per cent, on the remaining net income. • 



BILL FOR SUfiDAY SHOWS 

Proposed for Legitimate Perform- 
ance in New York and Buffalo 



STILL LEGISLATING 



'c*^ 



Albajiy, N. T., Feb. 28. 

Senator M-t-yer Levy, democrat. 
of the seventeenth senatorial dis- 
trict, the "Silk Stocking" section 
of New Y'ork city, yesterday intro- 
du«ed a bill in tiie upper hou^e of 
the «tate legislature aimed at 
abrogating the present prohibition 
against Sunday amusements. 

Following its introduction, the 
measure was referred to the com- 
mittee on codes. It prosides that 
the law against Sunday* perform- 
ances be amended to permit "legiti- 
mate, dramatic or theatrical per- 
formances in duly U^^^^s^d theatres 
in a flrPt-clase city." 

The bill is presented at a tlnie 
when the Lord's Day Alliance is 
waging a figlit in New Y'ork city 
for a stricter enforcement of thy 
law prohibiting theatrical perform- 
ances on Sunday. 



No Standees in Missouri 

Kansas City, Feb. 28. 

The Committee on Crimihal Juris- 
prudence in the Missouri Senate has 
reported favorably on the bill pro- 
hibiting the .^al« of theatre tickets 
after all sweats have been .sold. This 
bill is aimed at tlie picture theatres 
and popular- priced houses. If 
pa.ssed it will do away with the fa- 
miliar "S.H.O." announcements. 

The bill for licensing bill boards 
on a ba>»is of 10 cents a square foot 
of .space has been laid over for fur- 
ther consideration. 



■^ir. 



Limousines for Bulls 

^-~~ AUuiny, Feb. 

Tou'U have lo r;et your bull .! 
limousine (ir call a taxi if Senator 
Twomley's bill beromes a law. It 
prohibits driving calfle through thr 
streets of Nev York city except in 
enclosed •.ar.'* or ofhtr v%?liicles. 



To Control Prices for Races and t# 
Stop Fortune Tellers 

■ • ■■': Albatiy, Feb. 21. 

Tlie flood of bills to regulate all 
!*orts of things, continues In the 
legislative which nears its end. 
This week's allotment includes two 
measures to regulate the selling of 
tickets for races and wrestling and 
boxing exhibitions, one to make for- 
tune' telling a crime In Buffalo as 
it is in New York and one to pun- 
ish pu>j»lic drunks with a fine of 
$250 instead of $10. 

Assemblyman Cuvillier, who 

si'lurged with a conso'.ship repeal 

»)ill before the administration was 

ready, Is author of ft proposal to 
limit admission prices to the race 
track at $1 for adults and 50 cents 
for children but the jegulation 
doesn't apply to trots. Running and 
steeplecha.se events are spe<'ified, so 
that agricultural fairs wouldn't be 
affected. 

Assemblyman Hamill's idea Is 
that a law should be passed com- 
pelling promoters ef boxing and 
wr<>stling matches should be forced 
to do all their ticket selling at the 
box ofllce and thus put an end to 
ticket speculators. Senator Gibbs 
of Buffalo, Is the .sponsor of the 
fortune telling ide.a and the new 
penally for intoxication. 



NEDWKnnnM 

STUDIOS OF 

SIMEnAIKIIK 

2291fefr4Sl!>5tlltw\brk 




Thursday; March 1, 1923 



UDEVILLE 



_^n >. '•'^^. 



.';..■•• v.;; 



f; t-^ ■_,<trb 



y-'J ..W 'W- 



FAMOUS PLAYERS AT NEW LOW 



x 



iiV 



FOR THE YEAR; BELOW 87 



l^oew and Orpheum Make Good Showing After 
Orpheum*s Reaction Under 19 — Orpheum's 
r Statement Mixed \ ^ 



In the absence of new stock mar- 
ket developments Interest centered 
on the Orpheum annual statement, 

. which showed profits for the year 
applicable to common stock divi- 
dends at only a few cents a share, 
but this fact was. ove.-Hhadowed by 
the letter of President Marcus Hei- 
man attached to the statement and 
addressed to stockholders. It set 
forth that January profits of the 
circuit amounted to $200,000 and 

. prospects were for a great improve- 
ment over 1922 in ih? months to 

; come. „ ... .:v% :;: .' .:■ 

All Discounted 
Another detail in Mr. Ileiman's 

;' letter was the explanaliuu llial 
more than 81,000,000 had been spent 
from funds on hand for new con- 
struction and an additional obli- 
gation of 1200,000 in bank loans had 
been met since the period covered 
by the statement. The market gen- 
erally disregarded the statement. 
To be sure, early this week there 
was a setback, probably manipu- 
lated, which carried Orpheum to 
18^4, but the rally was prompt and 
"by Wednesday the stock had got 
back to 20, around its bet^t for the 
year. ;;-■;■• w^ • -.■ . -^- .• , _ 

Of course, these minor develop- 
ments had small relation to the 
statement, for all It contained had 
been discounted long before it got 
Into the open. The present con- 
eiderution is what will improved 
theatre conditions bring to the Or- 
pheum box office and how will the 
new management prosper? Per- 
haps the most discouraging item in 
the 1922 statement is the amount of 

^ taxes, which appear at $80,000, com- 
pared to the 1921 figure of $104,000, 
and 1921 was a poor year, the com- 
mon stock eirnlnij only about 45 
cents. 

Famous Dull 
Famous Players was sluggish, get- 
ting to a new 1923 low, fractionally 
under 87. Whatever argument can 
be urged on the bear side of Famous, 

. the market is firm in the belief that 
it ft in for an advance this spring. 

. A new note is coming into the con- 
sideration of the stock for the long 
pull — the growing view that Famous 
Players has developed pretty near 
Its peak, and that for the futur« it 
is llkelj* to stand still in growth or 
go back. This, of course, applies to 
the entire picture business. But for 
speculative purposes it seems to be 
enough for the trading mind that 
the' stock must for the present go 
up to give the pool holders an op- 
portunity for distribution. Thus 
momentary setbacks are generally 
disregarded. 

; Goldwyn Up * 
Late last week there was a move 
upward In Coldwyn. which got out 
of its old trading area, touching 7^. 
The move was variously Interpreted. 
It was presumed that if W. R. 
Hearst bought into the concern upon 

s the completion of his distributing 
arrangement for Cosmopolitan that 
transaction had been accomplished 
In the open market before the news 
capne out. and probably the urgent 

" buying that put the price up came 
from out.'<i«lor.4 who spizpi the op- 
portunity for a turn* It is hinted in 
certain quarters that the Ooldwyn 
P<»ople onconragPil the move in the 
hope of ro.ixing out some of the 
SamiiPl fJohlwyn holdings, but this 
is mere gup.«<slng. 

TI)f» piiirrr-f" of (raninctlcins Fc1» 2.1 to 
March 1. Ir'-'M='\r: 

STOCK EXCHANGE 

.'^.i osi.ir'gh !.o>,v.C':<>«ie. Chi?. 



THEATRE PEOPLE NOT 
WORKMEN, SAYS JUDGE 



Dismisses Indictment Against 
Winkler, Musicians' — 
President 



Chicago. Feb. 21. 

The punishment of union business 
agents who extract fines or penal- 
ties in jurisdictional labor troubles 
is rendered more difficult by the de- 
-cision of Judge Joseph B. David in 
the case of Joseph F. Winkler, pres- 
ident of the Musicians' Union, un • 
der the Extortion law of Illinois. He 
was fuund "not guilty" and the law. 
declared unconstitutional. 

Burt Earle has pushed the case 
against Winkler. The Indictment 
followed evidence he had attempted 
to force Earle to pay a fine of $225. 
Earle's evidence led to an indict- 
ment of Winkler. The case had 
been in the courts for over a year. 

Judge David's opinion that danc- 
ers, girl musicians and actresses are 
not workijog^irls in the purview of 
the law/^wak^i^d much interest in 
tliA case amongHjie theatrical col- 
ony. Jiidge David^ decision was 
based on the ground that the Ex- 
tortion net is special legislation in- 
tended to cover di^pulfs that arise 
between workmen, but not di?*putes 
that may arise between corporations 
or the ofllcers thereof. 



CANADIAN WRITERS' BILL 

Over Border Writers Suggest Pro 
tectiv* Measure Introduced 



~\K 



T-'ri.l.n --. 

Fnm. IVnr-I •_' ci'd *i7« . <ir PTi; 

Do pM •jo'i tr.*; j>.-.i.. f\r,\ 

CoUiw-yr} KVIOfi T'i r.\ fl"; 

I.oow. Inr Roo }f\~i, 1f»> 10'< — », 

OrnhPM'ii .'^iVi l!ii„ lO'j if>'_, — i,^ 

nof^ton mo\ I 'JM t»ii l)«»iii7i .'It V.*'n. ' 

1.KM1 



Ottawa. Can., Feb. 28. 

The Right Honorable J- A. Robb 
Minister of Commerce, has Intro- 
duced .into Parliament a new bill 
on the sugge«tion of the Canadian 
Authors and Composers' Society 
providing for the reimbursement to 
lyric writers and composers for the 
mechanical reproduction of their 
musical compositions. Heretofore 
no song writer or publisher re- 
ceived revenue for any music roll 
or record made, be he British, Ca- 
nadian or American. 

Like the British bill, the new 
amendment calls for a S per cent, 
royalty to the copyright proprietor 
based on the highest retail price 
per record or roll. If the bill is 
passed and approved as It Is, with 
the likelihood it will be, the royalty 
derived per disk or word roll will 
top the Americans* ratio, although 
the general turnover Is conversely 
out of proportion comparatively. 



FOE AGENCY LAW CHANGE 

Albany, N. Y. Feb. 28. 

Assenrvblyman CronIn of Brooklyn 
has Introduced a bill amending sec- 
tion 191 "Of the general busiTbss 
law so that the license comrilsslon- 
er may suspend as well as revoke 
employment agency licenses as well 
as revoking them. 

The employment agency statute 
governs theatrical agents (but not 
artists' repre.sentatives). but the 
bulk of hooking busines.s is handled 
outside Its provisions. The Cronin 
proposal also provides that the 
deputy commissioner of licenses 
may conduct hearings and act on 
apr»lications for licenses in tlif al)- 
sence of the commi.-sioner. 



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Lynn Houses Can Open at 3 

' Lyiiti. .\r.i>s., IVh. 28. 

Managers of tiie;jtrps in Lj'nn 
have l)ppn given p«in)i«Mion to op^n 
the doors of thfir theatri's at 3 
o'clock and start performances at 
3:30 o'clock Sunday aftcrnooiiS. 
The 8tat# law conrprning Siimlay 
shows stipulatp- that j>erlormaiifPs 
cannot be started before I oVIork. 



SrttUI(la\ 



THE CURB 

.'^.l.^vt t(..»ti H h'i i.o.v. <Ug. 



7^ 



Xo Ml iff*. 

MiriiJav — 
Tri;«'i(ri.. 

I'llm I Hi. .M... 

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JO 




EDNA AUG 

in "DREAM DAYS" 

"This is one of the best sketches 
ever presented In vaudeville. It is 
plausible, well written and well 
acted. The act opens . . . (fol- 
lows here description of act). Miss 
Aug's greatest moment comes when 
the tenor kisses her hand and ac- 
claims her a fellow artist; he 'at 
singing and you at makins the 
oi)era house nice and clean.' . . 
There the stage grows dark and 
when the lights go up we see the 
tenor in evening clothes and hear 
him render the prologue from Pag- 
liaccl in a very good voice. Miss 
Aug then comes on in evening gown 
and gives a selection about 'Nerves' 
that goes over like wildfire. . . . 
We caimot say enough for the very 
excellent acting of all the members 
of the cast. Miss Aug. herself. Is a 
revelation, but she Is ably sup- 
ported by the tenor, Mrs. Schultz 
and the Boss. There is enough 
thought and body to the act to 
make an entire play; in fact, many 
plajs have had less excuse for be- 
ing. The tenor has a good voice and 
the accompanist Is adequate.**. 

— C. C, NEW YORK CLIPPER. 



IND. FILM CENSOR OFF; 
SPORTS BILL PASSES 



Senate Defeats Steele Bill by 

Indefinite Postponement — 

Sports Passes Senate 



Indianapolis, Feb. 28. 

The Senator Steele bill was In- 
definitely postponed for further at- 
tention in the Indiana Senate Mon- 
day afternoon by a vote of 40 to 4 
That action defeated the movement 
for motion picture censorship In 
this state. 

By a vote of 53 to 38 also Mon- 
day afternoon the Senate passed 
the bill to prohibit commercialized 

sports in Indiana on Memorial Day 
and' the bill goes to the governor 
for his action. Hs will probably 
sign It. The sports bill will cover 
the Indianapolis Speedway and Its 
big annual race on May 80. 

More than a week had passed 
without action upon Senator 
Steele's motion picture censorship 
commission bllU The session closes 
March 6. 

Censorship got a severe blow 
when a gathering ©f prominent 
social workers from all parts of the 
state went on record against IL 



SPOKANE ASSN. FORMED 

Spokane, Feb. 88. 

The proposal of some of the 
solons >; the Washington state leg- 
islature, now In session at Oljmpla. 
to levy a 10 per cent, tax on the 
gross receipts of theatres resulted 
in the formation here today of the 
Spokane Allied Amusement asso- 
ciation. 

Every local theatre owner .was 
present at the meeting. Dr. Howard 
S. Clemmer. of the Clemmer the- 
atre was elected president. 



MAKE JILTING CHEAP 

Albany. N. T., Feb 28. 
Assemblyman Hackenburg Is 

.sponsor for a bill providing that a 
contract for marriage must be In 
writing and limiting the anfount of 
judjjmont for a breach of promise 
to six cerits 

The bright Idea Is to discourage 
advf-nturesses from suing poor mil- 
lionaires. 



""»% 



ORPHEUM ANNUAL STATEMEirr 



(Statement of Orpheum Circuit. Inc., Issued as of Dec. 31, 1922. and 
in comparison to. its statement of 1921). 



INCOME ACCOUNT 



• • • • » 



• • • • • » f « t 



• •••■•••••vtte 



GrO£!S Income * 

Box Ofllce Uecelpts. 
Rents, Concessions, etc. 

Expenses 

Artists' Salaries and Film Service 

Other Salaries 

Op. Expense & Theatre Overhead 

Net Operating Income Before Deducting De- 
preciation, Amortisation of Fed. Taxes.. 

Depreciation & Amortization 

Deductions 

Amortization of leaseholds 

Depreciation of Buildings and EQuip. except 
new Orph. Jrs. at Los Angeles and 

San Francisco 

Provision for Fed. Tax (Kstimated). ... 

Net Inconje to Surplus 



1922 

|L3.225,63« 
1,179,421 

5,586.530 
2.997,089 
4.313.714 

1,807,723 



1921 ' 

13,305,971 
783,667 

5.862,903 
2,708,624 
3,926^00 



702,156 



232,840 



740,447 

80.000 

55M36 



104,000 
785,143 



1931 



1921 



From the 1922 profit are to be deducted dividend payments (pre- 
ferred) amounting to |543,008, which leaves net to surplus of al>out' 
112,000, or a few cents per share applicable to common stock. How- 
ever, the president's letter to the stock holders puts a different com- 
plexion on this situation by the mention that more than $1,000,000 
was paid in 1922 on account of construction of new the{|tres out of 
funds on hand. This on the surface would make It appear that the 
company earned around |3 a share on the common, but reinvested 
considerable sums in new properties. President Helman'e letter 
also declares net profits for Januarj'. 1928. (following the period 
covered by the statement) were $200,000. In addition to which the 
letter says the company has paid $500,000 in hank loans since Dec. 
31, 1922, and has practically no open indebtedness. 

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET 

'ASSETS 

■ t 

Tangible ' ' ' . v' V 

}^nd »'i • ; t 

Buildings and I'^uipment 

Furniture and Fixtures 

Lease Deposits. .* 

Leasehold Rights 

Investments in Afl^llated co.'s 

Intangible 

Goodwill, contracts and Booking agree- 
ments 

Current Assets 

Cash on hand and In banks • 

Marketable securitioa ...» 

Miscellaneous Current Assets 

• Accounts receivable •. 

Sundry Advances and Deposits 

Supplies , 

Prepaid Insurance, rentals, etc 

Deferred Cha rges 

Total Assets '. 

LIABILITIES 

Funded Debt 

5-year convert, notes, i 

Bonds and Mortgages of sub.^ldlaries. . . 

Total '. 

Current Lfabllltles 

Notes Payable 

Accoutjts Payable 

Ten.ant.s Rental Deposits 

Accrued Interest, Rentals and Local 
Taxes 

Fed. Taxes for 1922 (Estimated).' 

Sundry Creditors, Accruals, etc 

Dividends declared In Dec. payable 

Jan. 1923 * 

Total 



$4,406,254 

15.236,126 

2.066,461 

256,000 

8,858,184 

621,781 


43t7,«74 

18^183S8 

1,80e,008 

821^31 


19,043,808 


19,043302 


842,908 
lM9i 

28,685 


387,008 
109.702 
113,986 


48,999 

6.628 


. 


129,418 

424,091 

52,081,261 


213,928 

614378 

60,423,020 


1.902,000 
6.394.300 
8.296,300 


•1,500,000 
6,384300 
7364300 


506,164 
78.126 
21,864 


406,164 

••••et*«« 


329,059 
80,000 


........ 1' 


• ••••••• 


342340 


133,052 
1,150,207 


748^04 



•The 1921 statement carried the notation of $2,000,000 of these 
7Va per cent, notes authorized, but $r>00,000 then unissued. It ap- 
peared that the full authorization has now been issued and this 
total has been reduced by $100,000 callable through the sinking fund, 
Jan. 1, 1923, 

In connection with the Income Account first above set forth, the 
gross Income for 1920 (tho first year of the consolidated account) 
was $15,563,814, and the profit for the year $2,816,958. amounting to 
$4.20 per share on the then outstanding comn-on stock. 



HUSSEY IN "MONKEY GLANDS" 

.Jimmy Ilussey has been added to 
the li.st of Americans engaged for 
the " Monkey (JIanda" revu* at the 
Knipiro Palace, I..ondon. by Albert 
de Cuurville. March 16. M. S. Ben- 
tb.'im ncgoilated the Hu?3ey engage- 
ment. 

HiiKr-««y .«;i:ls for London S.iturday, 
M.nrch :*., on iho Zceland. 




THE WIRTH FAMILY 

Ttnd ROY ST. LEON, PHIL'S COUSIN 







V A U D E V 1 L L E 



.■'>:fv;,; 



'A'--. fVjfl 'f H i'Mm-T' .W t. 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



VAUDEVILLE IN HIE MIDDLE WEST I 



END OF UNITS AND SEASON 
LOOKED FOR BY MARCH 17 



Quick Finish Follows Collapse of Shubert Vaudeville 
Shows — Act in Hoffman Unit Demands Salary 
• Weekly "Without Cut or Stalling'' 



The rapiil contraction of the 
Bumber of Shubert vaudeville 
houses following the collapse of the 
unit outfits is indicated as a step 
in an ending of the Shubert vaude- 
ville circuit and season by March 17. 
It was planned to replace the unite 
by straight bills, but that appears 
to have worked out unsatisfac- 
torily. * 

This week the Gertrude Hoffman 
unit show, strengthened by several 
acts, opened as a musical revue at 
the Majestic, Boston, the unit house 
there. "Tangerine" has been 
booked for the Garrick, Chicago, 
and Loew'a State, Cleveland, which 
was taken over for Shubert vaude- 
ville last fall. Is soon reverting to 
L.oew'8 vaudeville. 

The Hoffman show in revue form 
at Boston has a scale $2 top. I^st 
week it was claimed some of the 
cast received but half salaries. Joe 
Towle and De Haven and Nice are 
additions to the Hoffman show. 
Towle i« said to have told the man- 
ager he must be paid every Satur- 
day Just like the stage hand.<t, with 
no cuts nor stalling. Arthur Klein 
controls the Hoffjnan outfit. 



Boston. Feb. 28. 
A change of policy was announced 
for the Majestic Monday when Ar- 
thur Klein's unit show, "Hello 
Everybody" opens an engagement 
of four weeks at the hoime. 

Eight performances a week will 
be given instead of 14, the usual 
policy with the Shubert vaudeville 
units and biUfl which have been 
playing the house this season. 

The "Hello Everybody" attrac- 
tion will be followed by the pick of 
the remaining units on the Shubert 
circuit, the length of their stay de- 
pending upon the business and the 
success of the trail-blazer. 

The prices for the "Hello Every- 
body" engagement will be from 
Monday through Friday nTijht. $1.50 
top; Wednesday matinee. |1 top, 
and Saturday night, |2 top. 

"Hello Everybody" features C^er* 
trude Hoffman and has been play- 
ing the Shubert vaudeville circuit 
all eeason until recently, when the 
unit, to avoid "repeating," took to 
ijidependent bookings. 



LIKED "WILD WOMEN" 



Clyde Elliott Accused By Wife in 
Divorce Suit 



Chicago. Feb. 28. 
Mrs. Ma Elliott has sued Clyde 
Elliott, manager of the new Evan- 
•ton theatre, for divorce, charging 
desertion. She asserts her husband 
nnniKPd himsolf in entertaining 
"wild women." 

Mrs. Elliott states that her hus- 
band is the sole owner of the newly 
built Evanston theatre and avers 
farther that he owns 25 per cent. 
%f the stock of a $200,000 corpoia- 
tion. She a.«iks an injunction to re- 
strain him from disposing of any 
f'f this property. The couple were 
married in 1915. 



'CHEAPER TO MOVE" 

San Francisco, Vth. 28. 

Harry and Dolly Cramer, on a 
tour of the woild, traveling in a 
house Viuilt on a Ford chassi.", are 
in San Francisco. They have si«ns 
on the "flivver" declaring "it ks 
cheaper to move than pay rrnt." 

They are to sail with their hr.upr 
on whoels on the "Moana" Manh 
81 for Hawaii and the Orient. 



BOOKER BAWLS AT $50; 
REMINDED OF LONG AGO 



Chicago Booker Yells at Actor, 

Who Knew How to 

Shut Him Up 



V--' • '■■■■■ 

Chicago, Feb. 28. 

A little vatjdevllle actor out in the 

Chicago territory approached one of 

the regular bookerh on the fifth floor 

of the State-Lake building the other 

day and inquired "why" he couldn't 

get time. There were a number oY 

agents, managers and actors around, 

but no one close enough to hear the 
beginning of the conversation. 

The booker, who is detested 
through his nasty temper and 
bulldozing methods employed with 
both actor and agent, replied in 
a louder tone than was necessary 
that there was no particular reason 
why the act was not booked. The 
little vaudeville man approached the 
booker once more and this time 
quietly and without anyone seeing it 
tried to slip a $50 bill into the book- 
er's hand. That this had been done 
was made plain when the agent 
turned a second time, and in a loud 
tone bawled out the little actor. He 
waxed warmer and warmed and 
there promised to be a scene until 
the little actor .«shut him up by ex- 
claiming in a voice loud enough for 
all to hear: 

"You were not .<;o finicky six years 
ago when I used to wend you $15 for 
every weel; I worked." 



MERCEDES BANKRUPT 



Gained Notoriety as Bread Thrower 
and Wife Beater 



Chicago, Feb. 28. 
.\ft('r having acquired notoriety 
in the past a.** a bread thrower and 
wife bt^ater. M*. rcede.«, as he was 
known in vaudeville aithough not 
heard of in some time, is now re- 
ceiving piore public;ity as a bank- 
rupt. 

Last week, throujrh his attorneys, 
the Lotwenihal lirm, Joseph Mer- 
cedes, sometime called Jo.seph 
Cohen, filed a voluntary petition in 
bankruptcy in wluch he schedules 
his liabilities at "Tl 0,000 and assets 
Of $297. 

Mercedes or Cohen first came to 
light when associated with an In- 
ventor of a tran.smitting code later 
used in a vaudeville act. A girl 
nanud Meicedes, also an assistant, 
charged Cohen a.sFumed' her name 
In putting on the turn. 

Later Cohen or Mercedes was 
barred from some local cafes for 
throwing bread at amateur per- 
fomiers, and sometime after that 
he was reported having had an al- 
tercation with his wife, Mme. 
Stan tone who appeared with him in 
the vaudeviilo turn he then pre- 
8»'nted, and Ixating her. 

Amonif the creditors listed are: 
National FM-inting Company . .$1,250 
E.state of Edmund Town...^.. 1,000 

Delia Town ] ,000 

Arthur Coiin 800 

KliE.ibetn Town ' 900 

Amf lia Town 400 




I 



DANCER LOST STAGE LEG 

Bennington and Scott were oft ihe 
tfill at Loew'a r'alaoe, Brooklyn. 
Monday', due to a peculiar aorident 
Bennington is a monopedic dancer 
and lost his stage leg ou tlio way 
_to the tlieatroln a taxloa b. Felix 
Bernard t<>()k the vacancy, ' 

The fal.se leg {.■? a specially con- 
trived affair impossible to reii'aci.- 
on short notice and neeea.sary to 
the artiet for his stage work. OJT 
the stage Pennington uses anorlifi- 
false Ifg of ."irnpler construction. 



"Will i<p.iuse. Chicago 500 

Prinor.«s Wajiloika 300 

J. I). Leich^rson. Chicago 300 

y]vA. J. IX Lfi'-herRer 2oO 

Jt».' Cona;y. S'ln Kiancisco-. . . . 250 

Commonwealth Trar;sf(r 2r.O 

.Anna .McDonald 2.'i0 

K.dniiiM ■ Town, .Tr 200 

iloyd T >wn 200 

Arthur Cohen 150 

S.-infonl Cn\i l.",0 

.\las<.)«]:iiHi.tt.«: Bonding Co.... IOC 

H;ish I-irtlr.g Co.. Chicniro. . . lOd 

.\Ii-s. .S. rinkeNt*in 100 

H.irr.v C]»^iii« nt :....:... Kio 

.MorMnt r (.N'^^An . . .<» '. . TVtt 

Am : a Ci»m.nt 100 

.\r.ulia Ci.ij'n 100 

Krai.k Clemeu! 100 

Ne'.lle M*-rc» «le.s 100 

A»»o Coh^n 100 

I'linl; ^ W.-if,'*' nulls 20 



By W. S. BUTTERFIELD 



G. W. DUKELAN 

ALIAS "SLIM JIM'* 

What FRANK BACON was to 
"UGHTNINV G. W. DUKELAN 
la to "KUBEVILLE." 

After playing seven years with 
C. B. MADDOCKS "RUBEVILLE," 
during which time he never missed 
a performance, DUKELAN lately 
celebrated his seventy -ninth anni- 
versary in fitting style, — and was 
proclaimed the oldest member of 
the vaudeville profession. 



ANOTHER UNIT SHOW 
QUITS~$20,000 LOSER 

"Midnite Revels'' Ending at 

Detroit— Played to $4,000 

Gross at St. Louis 



Detroit. Feb. 28. 

The Henry Dixon Shubert vaude- 
ville unit show, "Midnite Revels" 
will close its Shubert' vaudeville 
tour this week at the Shubert local 
unit house. The show is winding 
up its Shubert unit season $20,000 
loser, -with 115.000 of that amount 
represented by its production in- 
Vestmrnt. 

Whi'le it is reported I. H. Herk is 
or was interested in this unit with 
Dixon it is also said the $-0,000 
loss Is represented by an ind«'bted- 
ness outstanding against the show, 
leaving the attraction as having 
played so far without an actual 
cash loss. 

Just how much Is d\ie to the ac- 
tors In the unit for salarj-" is un- 
known. About three weeks ago the 
company refused to continue unless 
salaries were guaranteed. It wafi 
then reported Lee Shubert had 
guaranteed salaries for the next 
three weeks. If so the guarantee 
will end Saturday. Neither is any 
one connected with the company 
aware what will happen after this 
engagement. Some say the show 
Will be taken east and us*^d for 
one nighters by the Sliubert legit 
booking office, but in any event it 
is expected Lee Shubert will have 
to transport the company when It 
is ready to leave here. 

The linlt came in to the local 
house limping after having laid off 
last week and playing St. Louis the 
week or so before to a total gro:=;s 
on the engagement, at the Empress 
theatre, of $4,000. In Tittsburgh It 
did $5,800 on the week. ' 



Henry Dixon's "Midnite Revels" 
wa*s not included in Vaiiety's list 
of Shubert Vaudeville unit .«how^ 
losses of $l,ooO,000 publislied la.st 
week, through the impression pre- 
vailing it was included in the unit 
losses mentioned against I. H. Herk 

As the Dixon unit was about to 
open in Pittsburgh tlie Shubert 
bookipg office sent on an act from 
New York as an extra attraction for 
it. Dixon refused to play the act 
and iiotifled the house manaj^'em^-nt 
if it insisted he would nut <ipon. 
The act did not play. 



HEADING CENTURY STOCK 

San Franci.sro. F(.h. I'S. 

"When the pre.vent oolor«^d show 
leaves the Cf>ntiu-y at the *n>\ of its 
run Ackerman *i Marriw may in- 
stall George LeMaiie at tlie h«-ad of 
the permaufry. (uli:i«') mw.«ic;il «om- 
edy stock organization (vh!t«-R). 

LeMaire In .•-aid to l»ave b*^en prao- 
tioally closed with, lie Tii)l have 
.fo'» rMiilljj)R with ].'.m I', r conudy, 
tlie couple to r* pi'i <lr.< ^^ the .scene" 
Le.Maire is idiiitified wiH). 



LEE KIDS, EXTRA ATTRACTIO?: 

The L«e Children will commenrr 
.Saturday, Mar<li 3. an enKaK*'nv nt 
of two we«k6 as special i.ttr.'.« tior 
in the pi<n\ne program .it Crai;- 
man's new Metropolilnn. 

Tljeir talmy Ih $2,0(m) u«<l?ly. 



Brotb»»rs Cir- 
others being 

Heiman from 

he was treas- 

Syracuse and 

with him; so 



To my way of thinking Chicago 
and the middle west have never 
been given ths position they are en- 
ytled to in the vaudeville and 
amusement world. 

Everybody not only in theatrical 
but commercial world, figures that 
New York city is the mecca for all 
markets; but when you talk of 
popular priced or three-day vaude- 
ville, I know Chicago and the mid- 
dle west were first to Introduce this 
form of amusement and originate 
the beautiful theatres of the three 
and four-a-day nhows. 

Well do I remember while tour- 
ing with the "Duster Brown" com- 
pany in 1904 <the last road exper- 
ience I had) how quickly this form 
of popular priced vaudeville sprang 
into existence. Through my pro- 
motion of the building of the Henry 
Boyle theatre in Fon du Lac, Wis., 
where I spent the summer of 1904, 
I came In contact with Mr. O'Brien, 
who. In those days, was forming the 
circuit of Jones &. O'Brien. Seeing 
the gi'oss business and profits made 
In Fon du Lac in a little store-room 
show, changed my entire plans of 
living and made the decision to go 
Ijito thia form of amusement. 

In*looklng for new fields to cov'er 
I came Into Michigan. Within two 
years I was the operator of six or 
eight theatres, playing 15 cent 
vaudeville and the records will show 
I never charged 10 cent adml.ssion 
at n ^ht. At the same time, while 
'. tii Icing myself up In Michigan. I 
watched the Jones & O'Brien Cir- 
cuit. Frank Thielen Circuit. Finn & 
Heiman Circuit, the Karl Hoblit- 
zelle Clrcyit, Allardt 
Cuit and several 
formed, i 

I remember Mark 
the early days when 
urer at a theatre In 
became very friendly 
much so that the early history of 
vaudeville will show 1 was the vir- 
tual silent partner in the firm of 
Finn & Heiman in the operation of 
the Oreen Bay Oshkosh. I^ockford, 
Davenport, Moline and Waterloo 
theatre*. Personally, I owned as 
much as the firm of Finn & Heiman 
did in any of those propositions. 
They were the interests tiiat my- 
self and Michigan aaso?iatC3 dis- 
po.«»ed of when the big Orpheum 
merger was made with the Finn & 
Heiman Interests. 

The progress of vaudeville: — 
We only have to point to the .stars 
now on Broadway, who in the days 
gone by (when they were lirst get- 
ting their start) figui-^d that when 
they "played Michigan for Butter- 
field" they could play any theatre 
in the United States. It soon be- 
came known Butterfield was will- 
ing to pay the top money he couid 
afford to pay for the best In vaude- 
ville, although the impression was 
always ou he drove a hard bar- 
gain whor it came to termr.. As 
an examplt't Frank Tinney 'to this 
day cannot forgive Butterfield for 
not paying him $85 when Butter- 
field thou/ht he was only worth 
$75. Acts like Charlotte Green- 
wood, Frank Van Hoven, Chic Sale, 
Harry Jolson, Marillyn Miller (who 
played with her sisters In an act 
known as the Flv6 Columbiiins), 
Patricola, Nan Halperln and dozens 
of others (hard for me to remember 
now without looking up the recTords) 
played in Michigan for their first 
«tart. And I shouldn't ivonder If 
Irving Berlin wasn't thinking of me 
when he wrote '"Michigan.'* 

In the days gone by, there were 
a half dozen producing manager:^ 
in Chicago whom all cf the cir- 
cuits encouraged in producing good 
vaudeville acts. When producers 
like Menlo Moor*-. Wm. H. Frif^d- 
landcr and Dan Ku.«seil, can go to 
Firoadway and proluce successful 
$2.f>0 and $3 shown, it proves the 
middle we.«t has fnrnishfd its share 
of the brains in the vaudeville 
world. If history could be wrlti^-n 
it Would be shown that lialf of tl»e 
current Nt-w York successful pro- 
'lucers, managers and ag»;nts are 
products of middle western cities. 
No Pop in betroit 
W lieu taiking of ))i»)iieers in a 
hu-^lness of any kind, •e.^pecialiy 
ih^'«atncal busines's, e\er\liody will 
;idmit Butterfield wa.s a ploncfr 
wlien he walked the streets of De- 
■ ruit some 18 years am'o Avith 
■v-iowlcflc-o and the fact stai-lntr 

-, t!v f.'Cf? that the'rc wa^ d. t a 
popular priced amusement of any 
kii..l in a city of 350.000 people. 
I'opular priced vjrudovilie and 
pictures '(the picture machine 
"ot been perf*»rted sufflcif-nt)y 
an evening's enJei tainm« nt). With 



him 



No 

no 

hnd 

for 



the knowledge popular priced vaude« 
vUle was established and a money 
earner in the extreme west and 
middle west, he walked the streets 
of Detroit trying to figure how h« 
could locate a theatre of that kind, 
but with hla limited capital felt 
forced to return to the original city 
in which he stopped on his inspec* 
tion t«ur of the state of Michigan—* 
Battle Creek. And it was in Battle 
Creek he spent hla few hundred dol- 
lars remodeling what waa then 
known as the old Hamblln. opepk 
house Into a vaudeville theatre. 

When you realize that in 18 years 
popular-priced vaudeville developed 
m Mich.gan from an investment (re- 
modelling an old Upstairs theatre) 
of $1,800 to a theatre and arcade 
building that cost $685,000 you may 
realize the growth of popular-priced 
vaudeville as a whole. 

"Necessity is the mother of In- 
vention," and I will have to confess 
that In the early start in these size 
towns the profit in vaudeville was 
so tmall it became the byword in 
the Battle Creek and Chicago oflnces 
that when Butterfield had an addi- 
tional baby in his family It was a 
siu'c .sign he was going to take on 
one or two more theatres to help 
carry the load. Being the father of 
five girls and having two grandchil- 
dren. It is easy for my friends and 
associates in vaudeville to under- 
stand why and with what object in 
view I have slaved for the past 18 
years to build up what holdings I 
have in Michigan. 

Pictures Bumped Vaudeville 

With the coming of pictures 
vaudeville seemed to take a slump. 
In the past six years (during the 
war and just after) vaudcvillo 
gradually kept going backward in 
our size cities until pictures had 
reached thel;* height, but in the past 
year the public has realized an eve- 
ning's entertainment was a better 
one when topped with three to five 
acts of good vaudeville and a good 
feature picture. Just. now I am of 
the impression that for some time 
to come this will be the popular 
form of nmu«ement, not only in 
Michigan, but all over the United 
States. 

Primarily a vaudeville manager, 
personally I h.ive been weaned away 
somewhat, owing to the success of 
the picture business, but feel that 
big pictures and vaudeville will be 
the form of amusement the public 
will demand from now on. In my 
close observation of the ever-chang- 
ing amu.sement situation the one 
thing that astonishes me most is 
that wo have drifted away entirely 
from popular price. To-day the pub- 
lic thinks nothing of paying 50c. 
single admis.sion for their favorite 
amusement, while as late as 12 years 
ago they were not satisfied to pay 
over 20c. to see five acts of first- 
cla^s vaudeville. 

- Public Is Wis* 

In vaudeville the theatre-going 
public in our size towns are as wise 
as those in the cities. I have had 
high-grade vaudeville artists tell me 
Michigan audiences, as a whole, were 
harder to please than the larger 
citle-s, where the shows were only 
two-a-day. This is easily explained. 
The smaller cities play to the same 
cla.<»8 of people week in and week 
out, while in the larger cities the 
bigger vaudeville theatres play to a 
variety of audiences and a great 
many travelers who come simply to 
be pleased. They are not of the 
"show me" class. 

Fortunately or unfortunately as It 
may appear from a theatrical stand- 
I)olnt, Mi<*higao is an automobile 
Slate. When automobiles are In fa- 
vor our busincHs is always on the 
right side, but when the slump came, 
some 18 months ago, and the auto- 
mobile jilants were closed up, the 
theatrical world easily realized 
Michigan was one of the poor show 
.'^tate"!. It wa.s then suffering more, 
f believe, than any other section. 

As to the value of vaudeville, I 
believe it Is going to get better, for 
(here is a tendency of all theatres 
owners to more or less look after the 
pr«HluctIon of acts. Or, in other 
words, with the acts that are sold 
hy the the.-'.tre owners themselves 
and witli the great encouragement 
tliar Im iit'W- lieing piven the artist 
by 3Ir. Aline and tlie other man- 
agers of tiio \tiix <ircuits, it is posi- 
tive vaudeville will surely go ahead 
and )<■'■■]])•' tii< u? amusement 
of the ilicuir.oal v. <>;:d; — — " — " 



Tony Si'derkum, the Nasliville 
ihe.'itre owner, wax in ,\ew Yorl< 
this we-^k, accompanied by War! 
Fpln. m.^iifigei* of tlie \endome in 
that city. 



m 



..;V-- 



t^ 



41 



11 



1 



t 



i 



»tj*% 



.•ftk'. 



/• 



Thursday, March 1, 1925 / 



VAUDEVILLE 






•*•»■!» •■■,♦ 



"•' 'f°S*-" ■''; 






W. V. M. A. PROTECTS MANAGERS 

By EDWARD C. HAYMAN 

PreMenl Kedxie Amutement Co. 

\::Ked%ie Theatre and Kedxie Annex, Chicago • 



. ;. ' Chicago. F«b. 26. 

Tl»e golden opportunity for inde- 
pendent th*>4tr«» managers to book 
with a big corporation never was 
80 ready to be plucked aa tt is to- 
day, alnce the Western Vaudeville 
Managers' AHsociation of Chicago 
had reorganized and is solidly back- 
ing the individual who owns his own 
theatre and does business with the 
greater organization. 

As an independent manager In 
this territory for a number of years 
and president of the Kedzie Amuse- 
ment Co., wluch 0!>erate3 the Kedzle 
Avenue Avenue Theatre and Kedzie 
Annex. I have seen buolUng ocgan- 
ization.s come and go, but this is 
the flr.st tlmo In the history of West- 
ern show business that there has 
been such a chance for the individu- 
ally owned theatre to exist. 



employ. I feel I am better qualified 
than many another independent 
manager to express his views of 
tlie backbone of Chicago vaudeville. 

I have sounded numerous other 
managers who have had opportu- 
nities through years of business to 
fonnulate opinions of Western 
Vaudeville and its methods. One 
was Nat. J. Blumberg, manager of 
the Rialto at Racine. Wis., who un- 
qualifiedly expressed hira.self as yet 
having to find a complaint he could 
not adjust to his satisfaction by 
correspondence or a visit to the 
booking floor. 

Managers Agree 

Then there is William Slattery of 
tlve Majestic. Cedar Rapids. Mr. 
Slattery is a manager wh» believes 
in l)ooking bit attractions, antl 
rarely refuses an Orpheum act of 
recognized name and quality. While 






II 



Better acts, solid support, book- ! boosting for better act.s recently Mr. 
ers who attend t«) their busine.-i.s and I S.'attcry declared that no sooner di<l 
have the welfare of the man.igers ' the Association bookers know he 
at heart, and greater co-opcratl(»n \ was in the market ft-r such attrar- 
and perfect understanding amorR ; tlons than they opened negotiations 
the managfiy lhem.«^elves— these are ! v/ith many big timers. That's what 
the factors now winning more and j Slattery calls "pcr.^onal service." 
more independent managers eachj He's getting the l»Ig acts now and 
day to the Association's fold. j is rapidly eduratingr his patrons to 

A big corporation Is looking after : the best there is. 
the manager'.s needs with a fatherly | Jake Rosenthal, at Duburiue, is 
interest. Tiiis corporation is backed j another independent wh ) i.:n't afraid 

>r , to'take a chance on the l»iK safa- 



r!cs. He plays about as many as 
Mr. Flattery and says he get.i the 
same co-operation cm the bookers' 
part. 

M;inagcrs In this region could be 
named in atiy numlier who recom- 
mend their best friends in the show 
business to bonk from the Asrsocia- 
tlon. With this persi.-tent volun- 
tary boosting and the even redou- 
bled vigilance now exercised by 
chieftains of the organization, the 
time looms close when Western 
Vaudeville will be the most sought 
entertainment item in the West. 

When I know a good thing I like 
to pass It along. Tht* article, writ- 
ten at the request of ^'ariety's local 
representative, who wanted an hon- 
est exprcHsion on this subject, is 
designed as a tip to the wise. Let's 
hope it will be sufllclent to swing 
some more independents from pic- 
ture or small time policies to the 
one real thing in this field of the 
show business. 



COAST N. V. A. SHOW 



by the greater Orpheura Circuit, foi 
the AssociiJtlon — as everybody con- 
nected with the fihow business 
knows — Is a subsidiary of the Or- 
phenm. guided by the same brains 
that piloted the big time to supreme 
success. 

The managers have not been sU»w 
to realize these points in favor of 
the Association. Throughout this 
region, as well as around St. Louis 
and surrounding points, they are 
flocking to the Association's books. 

With leaps and bounds the Asso- 
ciation's route is growing. And ar-^ 
more managers join, happier it is for 
those who already liave entered their 
houses as units in this happily gov- 
erned organization. "The actor wins 
out, too. With more houses to play, 
the better become the routes that 
are offered the performers. 

Better Acts Are Listening 

In consequence of this fact the 
better acts are hearkening to over- 
tures from the A.ssociatlon l>ookers. 
Constantly the list of big time at- 
tractions on the A!?sociation books 
grows better and better. 

A glance at the "Bills Next Week" 
pages In any issue of Variety is con- 
vincing proof of the extensive num- 
ber of theaters booked by the As- 
sociation. This list does not show 
scores of one-day stands nor the 
recent additions to the Association's 
Chain. 

At this moment the A.s.sociation 
has its field men scouting through 
Far Western and Coast States, lay- 
ing out a route from Chicago to 
Seattle, then down the Coast to San 
Diego and back to Chicago, through 
Nevada, Utah, Colorado and Kan- 
sas. 

When this route is completed and 
In operation the Association will be 
a power to be reckoned with. Play- 
ing a second fiddle only to the' Or- 
pheum Circuit, and, at that, holding 
a niche not far removed from the 
greater big time, the W. V. M. A. 
will occupy a place in vaudeville 
which will ccimmand respect from 
every Independent manager in the 
States it serves. 

Fair and Square Oealinge 

Always notable for fair and s»iuare 
dealings, the Association enjoys the 
managers' confidence. They, in 
turn, know it always holds their in- 
terest first. 

Right nr»w. with 100 mile? of Clii- : 
cago are s-veial cities v.iih two the- 
aters fitted for vaudeville. One ha.« ! 
l»eeii plriying Association attrac-i 
tions. Both \v:iiit the.'^e show s. Th"^ , 
Associ.itiou could l>ook both the- j .lack Norton ai;.l Lucille Ifaley 
aters and the manaf^'crs would c(»ni- i were married .Tunc 1^3 1922. at thf 
pete with the s.uum anmninltion. j church of the \ ircm Mary on West 

But doe- the A.-.;-o«-iati..n di» it'.' 46'h .street. New York. They arc 
U doe-i not. It stai.dH alor.f frc.ni j j,, the .lad; Norton atul Co. act in 
such practice.-. It give:-! its .^hcws \iuil. villi-. 

to th ' ir.»;i vho d.<l busini-s.-^ on llie tj,,. i.%.|, j- i^^,,o of Variety. men- 
Association .s fioor in tlie days when Itjotied Mr. and Mrs. Norton a.s hav- 
there was only one house in a town, j,,^ |,p,.„ niarried two w^eks before. 
Tor tlii.-; (!.• -d iilui.e tlj- ^^'••^^l• rn , ^,,,. >;,„.j, ,, . ,,i,| ,}, ,, (j,^,, 
Vaudev ul- Managers' As.-i.oiatio:. , i,,^^ the tntire fau.iv. 
uoiiiil liaw, won tliC r'-spci-t f;nd 
idiiliueiic.' (i cviiy maniger in tiiij* 
serlu ii. I'.ut tliiv w i^ > r.\y on> In- j 



4 



~jak-> 




JANET m SEVENTH HEAYEN' ? 

Although vaudeville acclaims her 
as a c»m«»dienne. Janet of France 
says she would prefer a dramatic 
role like that of "Diane." the li'tV 
French girl in "Seventh Heaven." 
played so artistically by Helen 
Menken. 



VAUDEVILLE IS VARIETY 

By C. E. BRAY 
General Manager, Western Vaudeville Managers' Asc.i. 



Chicago, Feb. 2«. 

"Vaudeville im here to stay. It Is 
and Inis been one of the standard 
amusements. 

Othrr forms may be in vojrn** nnd 
pas8 out of the public interest tem- 
porarily or for all time, but vaude- 
ville maintains its merry way. 

It provides a variety of enter- 
tainment of such a diversified char- 
acter that therein lies its lasting 
hold upon amusement patrons. 

Its programs are made up of 
singers from the grand opera or- 
ganizations of the world, stars and 
their satellites from the musical 
com< (lief, miniature spectacles from 
extravaganzas, the black-face min- 
stre'.** from that unique and old- 
:n\o factor of amu«ement. the 



CHECKING THE REPEAT EVIL; 
COORDINATING FILM AND ACTS 



Keith's Office Rules on Big Time Acts in New York — 
Reed Albee Assumes Charge of New Department 
for Presentations 



• • 



? 



In an effort to elimlaate repeat j will be held to an average expendl- 
I engagemei t •. the Keith ofilce has in- j ture and. if neces-sary. the vaude- 
I structed the bookers and agents that ^ villo portion cut to fit the picture ex- 
I no act. particularly headliners, Is to |..ndauro or vice versa, 
be held over at a Keith New York ' 



Benefit Performance April 15 in Lot 
Angeles 

Log Angeles, Feb. 28. 

For the first time the west is to 
stage an N. V. A. benefit, April 15, 
at Philharmonic Hall here under 
the auspices of Marcus Heiman, the 
new president of the Orpheum cir- 
cuit. 

Harry Singer and Ben Piazza, 
western Orpheum representatives, 
have secured the hall for that date. 
Fred Stone, president of tho N. V. 
A., will be playing in "Tip Top" In 
Los Angeles the week of April 9 
and Is to be tendered a luncheon by 
the picture and vaudeville people 
interested in the benefit. It is his 
first coast tour since tiie "Wizard 
of Oz." 

According to present plans the 
entertainment will be the biggest 
thing of its kind attempted on the 
Pacific Coast. The co-operation of 
picture stars and vaudeville acts 
api>earing in the vicinity has been 
assured. The proceeds will be 
turned over to the N. V. A. Club 
for its sick » and benefit fund and 
will be the west's contiibution to 
the annual benefit f^chednled for the 
Hippodrornc and Manhattan opera 
house in New York City Maj- 15, 



houfce for over two weeks; no act 
! is to play Nev/ York City fur over 
three weekf. con.'^ecutivcJy before go- 
ing out of town, and in future all 
Imported featured turns and new 
acts of importance are to nnpear at 
the I»alace. New York, before play- 
ing any other Keith house in Greater 
New York. 

The repeat" evil has become an 
obsession, particulai'y with the band 
and revue craze that has struck 
vaudeville. It has resulted in in- 
numerable complaints from patrons 
of neighborhood houses, who claim 
they see the same acts in the same 
sequence and the same type of 
vaudeville shows in most of the 
vaudeville houses they attend. This 
di.scoarages the vaudeville patron, 
who would ordinarily see two or 
three shows a week at different the- 
atres. 

The ruling designating Keith's 
Palace. New York, as the first choice 
house for new features was prompt- 
ed by the experience of the booking 
oflflce with several acts that went 
Into the Palace from other Keith 
houses. The acts in question wore 



CHINESE Aa MURDER 
IN PANTAGES, L A. 



Manager of Choy Ling Foo Act 
Killed by Its Contortion- 
ist — Uproar in Theatre 



Los Angeles, Feb. 28. 

Choy Den. fire eater of the Choy 
Jiiiig l''oo Chinese trouiK-, was shot 
and killed in the I'antages theatre 
Saturday night Just before the act 
w;;s to go on by Choy You Chung, 
th*» contortionist In the .same act. 

Den was the manager of the com- 
pany and chided Chung for tardi- 
ness. There had been bad feeling 
between the two for some little time. 
Chung x)ulled an automatic after the 
lecture had been adnunlstered and 
sliot Den dead. 

The shooting caused u sensation in 
the theatre. The act was headlining 



the bill. The remainder of the com- 
big hits at the Palace and received pany have cancelled all of their 



CORRECTING MARRIAGE DATE 



t paiuc 



f-' 



NAT KAISHFm MARRIED 



vtri;». .< 11 ;-i-.t. 



A.s .ill iiaU-v'*!"b'nt fjariaf.jr w .j«i 
h.is cnjoy< ti .vcajs of <'(»nstnnt deal- 
ings witii tiie As.soci.ili"!! I kiiikw 
Wli'ie.f I si»e.ik. Situ.itcil in Ch'- 
cago and having been in ciMse touch 
i^i»h every m;in in the Associalion 



! g.r » «4 li Mi n v b i . t it i i 't; — n vin t Mff 't 



of ihf (>ri)li "'ui^ .luiii'ir circuit un- 
<l"i- the stiiicrviMiou of >^;ito KaM 
\.a, niirricd TliMr?i(l»iv iV"U. L"J' 
l(» Esther It.*-* 'niu'rij. noji-proft* j- 
sion.il. , ' 



publicity that could have been util 
Ized advantageously In other houses 
which had already been played by 
the acts without any advance pub- 
licity. 

The importance of a Palace en- 
gagement and the advertising vahte 
of it were not realized, as the act 
had appeared previously In other 
local houses cold and taken the ed^e 
off itself. 

The Keith people are also working 
out a booking co-ordination scheme 
between the picture booking men 
and the vaudeville bookers. It will 
tend toward an economy of time and 
money in cost of the shows. In run- 
ning time and pre.'^entation. A new 
dep.irtment to work out details of 
pre.-'entation has been promulgated 
under the sMper\ision of Reed Albee. 

The 81st Street Theatre has been 
sot aside as the showing house for 
the v.Tudeviile managers to see Afr. 
Albee's presentation ideas applied 
practically. 

Heretofore the pictures on the 
progiiim have beetj refjrarde<l ;i.s 
merely so many feet of film. No 
effort has been made to enhance the 
value of the picture or create "at- 
ni(».-i»here." The lack of co-ordlnn^ 
tion between the p cture bookers and 
the vatidevilN' men has also resulted 
hi shows <»f abnormal length, the 
\aiidexjih' men booking their usual 
!crii;th bjll.s in tlir» rombinatiou 
I'.oriu". eemingly not knowing how 
ir>!i;; tlf picture would run. 

l!t th" fuHirr (}if ruriuini; time f>f 
th e ^n i Mb ' V -Ul*' f^^^r-tia^t of t hi* I'ill } ' 



wit! be ru;uifM| unr after tJic vaude- 
ville booUer h.'is rec<Mve<l the length 
j and impel '.Mice of tho picture fr«»m 
I that depailment-. nl-o the cost. Th* 
last will be important, for Ih^ bill 



i>ooklngs and are sailing for China. 



DORIS RANKIN'S SKETCH 

Starring in Vaudeville Return After 
10 Years 



, One of the most important v.iude- 
ville appearances from the ranks of 
tl'.e legitimate will be the starring 
of Doris Rankin, who in private life 
is Mr«. Lionel Rarrymore, in 
a sketch written by S. Jay Kauf- 
man and produced by I^wi.s & Gor- 
don. The Barrymores were report- 
e«l divorcing several weeks ago. 

Miss Rankin, who is of the noted 
I>icw-Rankln families, is to head 
the cast of "The Business of Life." 
This playlet was originally slated 
for Carrol McComas, but the latter 
will feature another Kaufman turn 
instead. Miss Rankin ap|)earcd In 
support of Ethel Rarrymore In 
Koye Rernd" during the fall. Her 
oiiginal vaudeville appearance wah 
about 10 years ago. 



WANT COUPLE OF DIVORCEES 

Chicago, Feb. 28.- 
Two of the actions for divorce 
> itrted this week in local courts are 
tbove of Frederick (J. Hitchcock 
atrainst Helen K. Palne-Hitchcock. 
•I! d Fr -d Renjamin Kink.aid against 
.Miiiiel I'ields-Kinkaid. 



UNIX FOR PAH OPENS SUNDAY 



Chicago, Feb. L'8. 
.\t the Chateau here Sunday, the 
\N "Imt & Fricdirinder unit ren.ino'd 
'i'op of the World" will «.|I'mi its 
I'lUl.Mges Circuit tiip. 



world's best violinists, 'celllsta. 
pianists and other instrumentalist*. 

Dancing In all its forms, from the 
classical ballet to the old-fashioned 
cIoB ttnd jig inuneuvera, acrubaUi. 
contortionists, trapeze and bar acts 
from the circus, trained animala 
and birds. Jugglers and magiclona. 
monologlsts and so-called stump 
speakers on every subject tha. can 
prwiuce laughter. 

All thone, together with Innumer- 
able noveltlea. go to make up a pro- 
gram so varied that all will please 
some and some will please all. 

These various factors of vaude- 
ville entertainment and tho palaces 
of amusement which the vaudeville 
interests have erected," together 
with the admirable manner of prea- 
entatlon. make this form of enter- 
tainment the leading and most last- 
ing of all. 

In recognition' of Its popularity 
with the amu«ement seeker, many 
picture programs are strengthened 
by the adding of vaudeville fea- 
tures. 

Vaudeville Is th« Best 
Vaudeville is. therefore, a com- 
bination of the best of all forms of 
entertainment, and the Western 
Vaudeville Jdanagera* Association - 
has command of the best of vaude- 
ville. 

. The coming seasoh promise* to 
be a briniant and moat profitable 
one for the vaudeville field. Ail 
signs point to a revival of busi- 
ness conditions throughout the 
I'nited States and Canada^ and the 
West in particular. 

The Western Vaudeville Mana- 
gers' Association is making great 
preparation« to meet these business 
conditions and reap the fuUwat 
benefit. • 

This association in the Orpheum 
circuit's chief subsidiary organisa- 
tion and is now booking the Or- 
pheum Junior houses of that com- 
pany as" well as more than 150 In- 
dependent houses throughout the 
West. 

The aame organization has re- 
cently entered Into a campaign of 
effort to extend Its service to the 
Pacific Coast. 

It being the largest and most Im- 
portant booking agency in the 
West, it is in a position to offer 
unexcelled service to those who re- 
quire vaudeville attractions of 
merit, whether for houses devoted 
exclusively to vaudeville, or for 
tho.se m.aintaining a mixed program 
of vaudeville and moving pictures. 
its Faciiittea 

It is owned by the great Orpheum 
circuit. 

It is affiliated with the Keith 
circuit. . i * 

It has the resources of these clr- 
cuit.«j to draw from. 

It maintains an army of employes 
in Its booking service. 

It is in a position to. and do<»», 
book attractions for theatres, cir- 
cuses, clubs, fairs and moving pic- 
ture houses. 

It has no tither purpose —no axe 
to grind — than to supply to the 
amusement world the great number 
of attractions It commands. No act 
is too great or too small that it 
cannot receive attention for the 
benefit of the association's clients. 

All these facts emphasize the as- 
sociation's superior advantages as 
a booking organization and the re- 
liability of Its service. 

Independent agents may come 
and go, flourish to4ay. and expire 
tomorrow, but the Western Vaude- 
ville Managers' Association will, 
from tho very nature of Its organ- 
ization and connection*, be here to 
serve the theatre manager, givlnip 
him not alone quantity and qumlUy 
of acta, but a service that can be 
thoroughly depended upon. 

The extent of Its business and 
the fact of its reliability bring to 
its command every act of any coa- 
8e«nH*nce. -* 

With Its parent organisation, tlie 
Orpheum circuit, and that organi- 
zation's force of managers and 
agencies extending over the entire 
world, and that force of agejats 
scouring every field of amuseonmt 
venture, one can readily reaUse 
that the association is the great 
clearing house for ail vaudeville at- 
tractions in the West, Northwest 
ind Southwest. 

in the extension of th is perftct 
service lo the Pacific Coast, em- 
br.acing intermetllaiy cities, the cir- 
cuit will maintain the »ame degre • 
oT perfecl itMi that has cb'^racterlxcd 
Its effirts in the pa^t. 



J5| 



XI 



■■^ 



p- 



VAUDEVILLE 



Thursday, March 1, 1023 



I. a HERO AFFILIATED CORP. 
LEAVING SHUBERT UNIT aRCUIT 



This Week Final for Operating Company — Disposi- 
tion of Affiliated Theatres — Hov/ Affiliated 
Started 



The ending of ihls week will mark 
the end of the ottlcial relations that 
have existed betwee^ 4he Shubert 
vaudeville unit circuit and the Af- 
filiated Theatres Corporation. The 
disconnection Is reported having 
been ordered by Lee Shubert. 

Shubert la said of late to have 
advanced moneys for the cun-cnt Af- 
filiated expenses. To protect his ad- 
vances, the banner bearer of the 
defunct Shubert vaudeville units 
reserved for himself a lien or claim 
to the equity in some of the the- 
atres operated by the Affiliated for 
the unit shows. The equilie.s were 
held, according to report, by the 
Affiliated or Its officers or both. 
Among the latter being I. H. Herk, 
B. Thomas Beatty and Max Si»iegel. 

The arrangement from accounts 
on the possession of the Affiliated 
theatres was 50 per cent, held by 
the Herk bunch and the other 50 
per cent, by Lee Shubert. Shu- 
bert's Hen or claim for advance.^ 
was against the 50 per cent. Of the 
others. 

Among the theatres controlled by 
the Affiliated are the Princess. To- 
ronto, and Keeney's. Newark. Other 
theatres It also hold were the State, 
Cleveland, and Empress, St. Louis, 
besides the Buffalo house and per- 
haps another or two. Lee, though, 
tenaciously hung onto the other 50 
per ef^nt. only in the Toronto and 
Newark theatres. He seemed In- 
different to the fate of the others, 
even the State, Cleveland, over 
which he is said to have assured 
Marcus Locw the Affiliated would be 
thoroughly prt-pared to continue its 
tenancy at |4,000 a week. The latest 
report is that the Affiliated and Leo 
are letting the State sl:de right 
back to Marcus. 

From incomplete storie.^ of th** 
fla?co'rt flni.sh, about all the Affiliated 
will have left wheri the blinds are 
j^ led down Is Its name. Mr. Herk,' 
W r> originated the operating plan 
un-'cr the corporate title, is reported 
to be the owner, personally, of the 
ofJico furniture In the suite oocu- 
pl.'d HH headquarter.^. Some of the 
recent rent paid for the space is 
yim-.in.',' the moneys repo:i«vl ail- 
vancoil by Lee. 

Herk Outlined to Lee 

Ilvrksj scheme was outlined to 
Lee, while Herk was about to re- 
linf;ui.sli ail pliysical Inter^-st in the 
Anurican burlesque wheel. Herk 
Wii.s .stiictly a burlesque man at that, 
timo. Ai'tf-r ho explained his plan 
to Lrn, Lee mentioned something 
about how strange It was tliat a 
man witli Mcrk's ideas should have 
remninril in burlesque. Herk, not 
realiziuLc he was then on the verge 
of leaving burlesque, reciprocat»'<l 
by informing Lee what he liad lieard 
about Leo Shubert. Herk said all 
nice things and in fact H"rk still 
believes some of them about I.,ee. 
Herk also believed Lee. When Herk 
was told Lee was a ])retty \\ise guy 
around the front of a theatre, Herk 
answered with one of those "1 in- 
there-myself-kid' shrugs. 

Herk's idea was splendid — Lee 
told him, but that wasn't sufllcient. 
evidently, to warn Herk. Herk sug- 
gested a jilan that only caused Lee 
to think for the moment about 
something new in "extras'* until 
Herk y.ot to the point wliere he 
mentioned the terms would be 50-50 
straight. Lee almost leaped out of 
his chair and asked Herk to .?ay that 
last line over again. 
Lee's Word and Bond Department 

Herk has the reputation of being 
a very straightforward and honest 
showman. He ha.s borne that repu- 
tation since the days whoa people 
like Herman Fehr, Mort Singer and 
Rud Hynicka accepted his word 
as his bond. But Hcrkilidu't know 
that Lee doesn't carry on a word 
and bond department, r.or did ho 
know there might be a million dol- 
lars behind that startled jump cl 
Lee's. 

Ilerk wn9 from burit;»«.|ilv ainl 
"Ihaf.s til- w.i" they«^#^it th.-re. nf> 
It meant nothing extrdrtrdinary to I. 
H. "Vou Interest me hugely. Pro- 
ceed," said Lee, as ho lo 'kcd I. H. 
over and wondered how far ho could 
go with him. Nothing like Herk 
ever had walked Into the ,Shubert 
offic*. 



Then Mr. Herk got down to cases, 
"It's so simple, Mr. Lee," he said, 
"that I'm surprised you never 
thought of It yuurMflf." Lee hastily 
interrupted to say he had so much 
to tliink of, with the Equity, Brady. 
Erianger and the rest of that mob, 
not to mention Arthur Hammer- 
stein, the youth who speaks so 
plainly. So many names in one 
breath staggered I. H. for the nonce, 
but he didn't forget the object of 
his visit — he was going to make 
money for Mr. Lee. and Anally Mr. 
Lee got the thought. 

The Herk plan grew more definite 
as the hour grew late. There would 
be a corporation formed by Herk 
and his associates, who would hold 
50 per cent, of It, while Lee couM 
have the other 50. Then there would 
be shows produced by Herk and his 
associates and some more shows 
produced by Lee and his associates 
It's the first time in Lee's life that 
a storehouse visualized itself to him 
as a gold mine. 

After that, said Mr. Herk. the 
corporation, which would route the 
shows, would charge each show and 
each theatie $50 a week. At the end 
of the fl.st week or season or any 
time the board of directors decided 
they could cut up the melon. 

By this time Lee became a bit 
worried. Was this man wild to offer 
him all of those things? So Lee 
says, says he, "Your proposition 
sounds all right, but is it all right? 
fiet me .some men who understand 
mo.e about It." And the next 
morning Lairy Weber and Max 
Spiigel were at I^e's door before 
the elevator man showed up. 
Larry Weber Declares In 

"Leave it to me," said Larry, "but 
first I want four of those shows and 
I want a piece of the corporation 
and a j)iece of the booking office, 
and if I'm going to advise you 1 
want a piece of anything else there 
is to have a pieco of." Spieg^ didn't 
seem to bo anxious, having a .side 
graft at that time, but he voted 
witli Weber, and Herk stood behind 
both. 

The movement swiftly proceeded, 
although Lee first threw In his 13 
houses In the 13 best cities in the 
East. In tliose 13 cities were about 
eight that pos.sibly could do a gross 
of $10,000 a week at the Shubert 
vaudeville scale. Herk didn't seem 
to have time to figure that out. He 
told all of his producers from bur- 
lesque tiiat every one of the 30 
towns on the Shubert circuit would 
do $10,000 average gross weekly. By 
and by Herk briieved It and so did 
all of the produoer.s, excepting Lee 

Lee coinmenced feeling pretty 
good about the new Shubert vaude- 
ville, the unit circuit. Ho passed 
up a Ivii'.eh now and then to cat with 
Weber. Weber told him everything; 
held out ni>thiiig. Weber told him 
ho knrw all about burlesque and 
vaudoviilo. too. Leo knew Larry 
kne\»- a lot because Larry had gotten 
into many a side street theatre, 
making it easy .street in doing it. 

Every so often Lee's steady 
luncheon pal had to again eat alone 
because Lee wanted to eat with 
Herk. Lee knew he could take a 
chani>o on the pal, but catch Lee 
pa.ssing \jp Herk— then. Suppos- 
ing Albee go: to Herk! Thoy say 
Leo woke up one night after having 
dreamed It, and couldn't sleep until 
Herk assured him over the phone 
everything wa.s still o. k.. or. as they 
say away from the Shubert office 
(where they have never heard It). 
on the up and up. 

Arthur Klein Hung Around 

Once in a while Lee would allow 
Arthur Klein to hang around tlio 
lunch table in the Astor. Arthur 
was growing worried. There was 
too much Herk moving right into 
Shubert vaudeville. Arthur thougb.t 
he had paid for the exclusive rights 
to Lee's vaudeville companionshii) 
by hard work, according to Arthur's 
idea of hard w^ork. In booking 
vaudt'ville. Arthur's hard work is 
Icnov.iM- whicli agents to pick out 
(<» r- f ;»'tS i 




But by Aug. 1 all was set. It wa.- 
i;<'tting close to rehe.ir.'al time. nn< 
fvoe added three bookkeepers in his 
auditing department to figure eu 
prospective profits. They were siil 
working on It a« the producer: 
started to start their companies. Jot 



HACKETT and DELMAR 

Colonial, N. Y., Next Week, March 5 
Jeanette Hackett and Harry Uel- 
mar return to New York next week 
In their miniature dancing revue, 
'The Jewel Box." The act has Just 
completed thirty weeks, Keith and 
Orpheum circuits, now playing the 
Eastern Keith theatres. Assisting 
Miss Hackett and Mr. Delmar axe 
Madelane Lane. Irene Griffith, Betty 
Kerr. Mildred Anders, Manny Mor- 
ris and Lou Winthrop. Under the 
Direction of 

RALPH G. FARNUM 

(Edw. S. Keller office) 



Galtea cam« around one day and 
tofd Lee it didn't look so good and 
he guessed he'd blow, but Lee said 
that it was too late. As "Take It 
From Me" had what looked like a 
good western route, Joe revereed his 
opinion. 

Then the season opened with the 
AflUIated Theatres Corporation now 
covering the Herk-Shubort operat- 
ing crowd and the 'producers waiting 
to count up. Lee counted first. His 
auditors are said by this time to 
have nearly compiled their reckon- 
ings. The first Item was the Shu- 
bert own unit revues, with no pro- 
duction cost, since the equipment 
came from a storehouse. Lee knew 
that any producer who could make a 
set of costumes pass through five 
musical comedy choruses would 
have no trouble in outfitting a dol- 
lar unit from the warehouses. And 
the Shubert theatres — no store- 
house productions for them, and Lee 
looked over the list of other unit 
pioducers who had started to work 
for Leo Shubert without salary. 

Each of the producers wanted to 
show Lee Shubert what a good pro- 
ducer he was, whether from bur- 
lesque or 48th street. So they 
bought new eciuipmont on credit, 
promised to pay high prices for acts, 
looked up their routes and said "Let 
'er go." 

The Affiliated officers were very 
busy those days. Everyone came 
In to see Herk. Herk saw them all. 
He's congenial, so much so that 
when Variety, In September, printed 
that Herk had a piece of the Bar- 
ney Gerard units, Herk wouldn't 
deny it, but when, In January, 
Gerard's units went Into bankruptcy 
and Variety mentioned Herk had a 
connection, Herk called up to say 
that was a helluvathing to print 
about him. 

J. J. Kept Out 

Meanwhile the unit circuit was 
working with everybody connected 
with it al-^o working. Lee woiild get 
reports as lato as 2 a. m., but al- 
w lys about the Shuberts' o^^n the- 
atres. J. J. Shubert long since had 
taken himself out. Lee was satis- 
fied to let J. J. go out of the vaude- 
ville end, for Lee probably thought 
J J. didn't know as much about the 
inside as he did. Maybe J. J, diJn't, 
but the returns are now proving he 
did 

How Lee a.i(^ J. J. .split on the 
vaudeville subject was very .''•im]>lo 
Th'j brothers were in conference one 
night when a dispute aros.?. Lee 
salj something, J. J. answered and 
Lea wanted J. J. to tell him if .1. J. 
thought Lee didn't know what ho 
was i.-i iking about. Being brotherly 
at all times, the argument was 
merely wordy. J. J. answered it by 
telling Loe he could have the vau'le- 
ville all to himself; he (J. J.) wanted 
none of It, which be^i.Tie tine, as all 
J. J. got out of it was • Sal'y Irene 
u'l 1 Mary," at the Ca«.ino. 

One evening while Lee was talk- 
ing vaudeville in his office, J. J. 
walked into the Winter Garden, 
watched tho Dowling vaudeville 
unit there, saw the Eddie Dowling 
sketch called ".S;illy, Irene and 
AlarjV and while Lee kept on talk- 



knows the more about vaudeville 
when he sees it. 

As the Affiliated started to op- 
erate the units commenced to vamp. 
No one had figured that, not even 
B. Thomas Beatty of Chicago, 
charged with being the biggest cash 
Individual loser on the unit cir- 
cuit, because Mr. Beatty played his 
with coin; the other erected charge 
accounts. 

Herk held faith and persisted. He 
1? known to have had a.«» many as 
! eight Affiliated creditors In the Affil- 
iated office at on time, a solace In 
a way, as It prevented anyone want- 
ing to sell him something from get- 
ting m. While Herk could see the 
Affiliated slipping, he wouldn't take 
water himself and continued to hold 
out for the unit cl^'^ult — even Lcc 
Shubert, often agreeing with Lee 
when Lee was wrong, which was 
often. 

Hotel Astor Only Winner 

The good old unit days at the As- 
tor may never return, but the Astor 
has Its lunch profit tucked away, 
while Herk may yet figure It out and 
Lee is still hanging onto his the- 
atres with the latftet reports, as 
previously quoted, stating that he is 
finally adding two houses to the lot 
he started off with. 

While many will mourn the deser- 
tion of the Affiliated from going con- 
cerns and others are conjuring up 
how to make a living after Shubert 
unit vaudeville, It hardly can be said 
that Lee Shubert's peace of mind is 
disturbed; he came through without 
guaranteeing anyone, without loaing 
anything anyone yet has heard 
about, not even giving a play or 
pay contract to any other producers' 
acta; retains his health and, barring 
a dent In his vanity when an actor 
advertises what happened to him in 
Shubert vaudeville, it looks like a 
glorious season for Lee, though he 
must yet have $4,999,999 left out of 
that $5,000,000 he threatened to 
spend to put over his vaudeville cir- 
cuit. The "busted" producers are 
trusting that when Lee lets loose tho 
rest he won't overlook them; any- 
one of them will be satisfied with 
the $99 on the end. 



WALKER BANKRUPT 

Agent Owm $1,603 and Has Ass«lt 
of 1976, Mostly Debts 

Harry Walkor, theatrical agent* 
of 835 IClghth avenue, New York, 
with an office In the Astor Theatre 
building, filed a voluntary petition 
In bankruptcy this week, setting 
forth liabilities of $1,603 and assets 
of $975. , . 

Tho liabilities consist of a $453 

judgment due Dorothy Edwards on 
a b.each of contract claim; and 
loans for $750 ar^d $400 to Bernio 
Foyer and James Thatcher, re-- 
spectlvely. The assets, besides the 
exempted two suits of clothing and 
an overcoat valued at $125, are 
moneys due from Billy Sharp. $210; 
Miller and Mack. $145; Leslie Twins, 
care of the Monte Carlo cafe, New 
York, $77.50; Florence Mackey of 
the Park Musical hall, $51.50. and 
other sums from the Dixdn Sisters, 
Boweh and Alban of the Walter 
Manthey act; Elaine Gordon, Irene 
Stone, Doris Leslie. 

Judge Learned Han»' Wednesday 
adjudged Walker a bankrupt and 
appointed Harry K. Davis receiver. 



. " LOEW-PAN DEAL 

Lottw's, Hamilton, Ont., Booked by 
Pantages 



MAILING TIME SAVER 

Metered Mali System in Keith 
Office 



The Keith office this w.eek estab- 
lished a centraliz'^d mailing de- 
partment v.hich will simplify the 
present mf ihods for handling out- 
going mail and effect an economy 
in stamps which rvms into ihou- 
.sands of dollars annually. 

The now department wi;l func- 
tion on the fourth floor. All out- 
going mall will be prepared from 
this ofllce on a Pitney Bowes Post- 
age Meter, which will seal, stamp, 
obliterate postmark and stack mixed 
mail at the rate of 250 pieces per 
minute. •"' ,,■; • '-.■":/,■..'.■■■ 

The system known as Metered- 
Mail not only makes it possible to 
prepare letters for the post office 
far more rapidly than by any other 
known mechanical sjstem, but by 
simultaneously performing two time 
saving post office operations (to 
which all mail bearing adhesive 
stamps must be subjected), a delay 
of from three to five hours at the 
post office Is eliminated, and letters 
will, as a result, reach tlielr des- 
tination from one to 24 hours 
quicker. 

Stamps and stamped envelopes 
heretofore used by different depart- 
ments of the Kolih organization 
have been collected and will not be 
required in the future. 



Hamilton, Ont., Feb, 28. 

Through the pooling arrangement 
effected between the local Loew 
and Pantages houses the Loew 
hous? will return to vaudeville be- 
ginning March 17. 

The Pan/uges has been playing 
the Pan road shows and will book 
the vaudeville In the Loew house 
through an arrangement where- 
by the Loew office will supply three 
acts weekly from Loew's, Buffalo, 

The Loew house will be rated as 
a full week stand on the Pan cir- 
cuit. Several months ago through 
a pooling arrangement It waa 
agreed that Loew was to play pic- 
tures at his house. This was done 
to eliminate competition between 
the two houses as far as posj'ible, 
both then suffering from a slump 
in patronage. 



SINGER COLLAPSES 



DuFranne Drops on Rochester Stage 
After Second Song 



TWINS STILL EVEN 



Both Married in Frisco and Both 
Now After Divorces 



ing vaudeville, J, J. talked to Eddie. 
As 'Sally, Irene and Mary" this sea- 
son has been the .Sluiberts' be.st on 
Broadwaj', running all season and 
moving to tho 44ih Street (where 
It did $15,811 last week), It's still 
debatable whether J, J. or Let- 



San Francisco, Feb. 28. 

The final chapter in the wedding 
romance of the Love Twins was 
started last week when Lucille be- 
gan divorce proceedings against her 
husband, A. K. Munson, Jr. 

The Love Twins are playing the 
Orpheum Circuit. During their last 
engagement here four months ago 
Garnette filed her divorce action. 

Both girls Wf-re married when 
m'»mborH of the Harry Carroll act, 
which layed here le«s than one 
year ago. 



Boche>rter, N. Y., Feb. CS. 

Following his second song Mon- 
day matinee at the Temple, Georges 
Du Fianne collap.«5ed, falling to the 
stage. The tenor had cont?-a?ted 
what he thought was a slight at- 
tack of grippe in Pittsburgh last 
week, coming In here and not feel- 
ing well but attempting to go 
through his turn. 

Mr. Du Franne Is resting here 
and expects to be In condition to 
open at the Palace, Chicago, next 
week, said his pianist, Carl Stetzel, 
who left for Chicago yesterday to 
arrange for It. 

The Honeymoon Minstrels were 
despatched from New York Monday 
nitrht and filled in tho vacancy ycs- 
teiday matinee. 



In the announcement for the 
newspaper ball of New York to be 
held tomorrow (Friday) evening at 
the Hotel Ritz-Carlton, New Y'ork 
(at $5.50 to get in), "Bugs" Baer, 
as chairman of the Committee on 
Arrangements, said among other 
things: "Annual Indignation Meet- 
ing of the Overpaid and Under- 
worked Newspaper People — It will 
be a masquerade, so bring your 
busiest look with you. — The be.st 
jazz band In New York will furnish 
what tlicy think Is music. — Hints 
for masqueradeis: — Beautiful but 
economical costumes. — For Chinese 
mandarin, let your finger nails grow 
and wear the cover off tho parlor 
lamp.— Cleopatra, If her no-^e had 
been loiiger history would have 
been changed. For this character 
use nose only. — Napoleon, keep one 
hand inside your ve.st. But don't 
scratch. — Acliilles, he had sore 
heels. Make yourself at honie. — 
Dress to understudy and historical 
character you know of and oui^ 
Committee on Insults will tell you 
whom you repiesent." , 



Lillian Fitzgerald Loses Jewelry 

"' ■ Chicngo. Feb. 28. 

Lillian F!t7.i;crald, with Eddie 
Cantor in "Mai^e It Snappy" at the 
Apollo, Chicago, took off hor r!ng«^ 
in the dres.-ing room tl e other night. 
Now they are mi.sslng. 

Th(> rings are valued at mor 
than '1,0CQ. 



Hazel Boy no has left New YcrH^ 
.'or California in search of her hu.s- 
hand and vaudeville ])nrtner, Don- 
ald Vj. Boberts. wh.o dL'^appoared 
uddcnly several weeks ago without. 
notifylnr- her. The couple appeared 
together for the past fwo yoars as 
•T. douhle act and are reportod inter- 
ested In real estate on the Coast, 
where, it l.s under.'itood, MoberU has 
gone. 



•^L, M V 'VV . 



Thursday, March 1, 192S 



Q 



V A U U t V 1 L L 



T^-'^ 



LOEfS, CLEVELAND, REHIRNS; 
AGAIN LOEW-WEEK STAND 



Shubert Vaudeville Giving Up House- 
$5,000 Weekly— $4,000 Weekly. 
Cleveland, Closes "^ 



-Grotf Fell to 
Rent — Miles, 



Cleveland. Feb. 28. 
The State, originally Locw's local 
vaudeville house for which $200,000 
annual rent wa.s asked, will revert 
to the Loew circuit again, taking 
the Loew bills beginning March 5. 

The State will be evacuated b\ 
the Shubert vaudeville circuit >sh()st 
attractions It has been playing th;*= 
season. The unit and straight vau- 
deville gross has dropped below 
15.000 weekly since tho opening of 
B. F. Keith's Palace next door to 
the State with a seating capacit.v 
of 3.200. 

The Shuberts* subsidiary organ- 
ization. Affiliated Theatres Corpora- 
tion, which started the seafon as ih. 
operator of the Shubert vaudcvlllr 
unit circuit, took the State f:on^ 
Loew's upon a guarantee of $4,000 
weekly, although Loew's is said to 
have made their own holding." 
secondary to local banking interest.*^ 
concerned in the theatre. The unlti= 
plajcl the State with the under- 
standing that from their share of an 
equal division of the receipts. $1,000 
waK to be deducted, besides the 
"extras," toward the payment of tb( 
$4,000 guarantee. 

The hou.«e averaged about $l.").00l 
weekly when It first opened with a 
total money capacity of $35,000 at 
the scale charged. Of late with the 
falling grcsaes it mostly has beeti 
'playing Shubert straight vaude- 
ville bills. 

Through the deduction of the ex- 
tras and 1.000 no unit has been re- 
ported netting any profit of amount 
at the State. One instance was of 
a show that played to $13,000 on the 
week and left Cleveland with a $2G 
profit, made minus through the unit 
having spent $39 In telephones to 
New York for money. 

C. II. Miles was reported as 
negotiating for the State early this 
week. Miles will close his own the- 
atre here next month, playing I'an- 
tages bills, following the arrange- 
ment to transfer hit' 99-year ground 
lease on the site to the Cleveland 
Trust Co . 

The Loew shows wilA travel 
Intact from Loew's Tfiyton Into 
Cleveland, the house nmaining a.«? 
before the Shubdrt vaudeville policy, 
a full week on the Loew Circuit. 
Six vaudeville acts will be the 
policy with feature pictures. 

The return of the house to Loew 
was said to be due to the unwilling- 
ness of the local bankers to gamble 
further with the Shubert attrac- 
tions. The Affiliated guarantee of 
the lea.se was not looked upon with 
security and it was deemed im- 
probable the State cotild Increase 
Its gross by playing bi 
against Keith's Palace. 



PALACE ALL SUMMER 

:;■ ^. ■ ■ '. ■ 

Orph«um Circuit's Big Timer in 
Chi. Running Right Through 



ACKERMAN & HARRIS 
ENTERING W. V. M. A. 



y . •'■ 



. Chicago, Feb. 21. 

The Orpheum Circuits only big 
time vaudeville theatre here. Pal- 
ace, will play the summer without 
changing policy. 

In previous years It has been cus- 
tomary -for the Palace to revert to 
musical comedy in the hot months. 
Then there was another Orpheum'.s 
big timer, Majestic, now playing 
pop vaudeville. It leaves the big 
local field solely to the Palace. 



DEMAND NOW FOR TABS 
BY OUTSIDE MANAGERS 



One-Hour Musical Show Less 

Cosily Than Five Acts — 

Often Played with Film 



time bills 



SHADOW-McNEIL SUIT 

Answering the breach of contract 
and $8,800 damage suit begun by 
Bert Shadow and Lillian McNeil, 
Lew Fields alleges the team vio- 
lated Its contract by not adhering 
to the script and material supplied 
them In the "Rl.tz Girls" Shubert 
unit show. Shadow and McNeil 
worked eight weeks in the unit and 
are suing for 22 weeks' balance on 
a 30-week play-or-pay contract at 
$400 a week. 

I'njust dismissal is alleged. It 
differs somewhat from the usual al- 
legations <»f unit acts that have 
brought suit for breach of contract. 
Althouirh the '•Ritz (lirKs" have 
since closed, it continued for a few 
weeks following Shadow and Mc- 
Neill's di.-missal. 

Alfred r.eekman. of llou.'Je. Cross - 
man <Sr Vorhau.«. is acting for FicMs, 
and Kppstein & Axman for tlio piM- 
forniers. 

BOB NELSON BUYS RELEASE 

l!r.b Nelson lufs i>urf hi.'^ed his r*-- 
lease on a contract v.ith Davidow 
& iK'MMire. the independent agents. 

Ne!s(Mi was a mf mbei « f the Shu- 
bert vaudeville unit. ' Kchoes of 
Broadway," i^roduced by the FtvitW-r 
F.state. His contr;i< t w th Divid.iw 
St LeMairc had or.'' :•• " t.' tim. U 
is under.'^tood it guaranteed him 3o 
weeks' baoKing yearly Jit a lalary 
of $6r.O a week. 

Nelson was ff»rmerly of the Nelsrn 
and Cronin act. later doing n'sinule 
lurp in tl;e Keith houses. He left 
vatnlevillc to enter a musical rem- 
edy. .,r • 



A domar.d for musical tabs lias 
been in evidence in the independent 
vaudeville office during the past 
few weeks from out of town man- 
agers. The tab shows arc wanttd 
in many instances by managers of 
small-houses which have been play- 
ing pop vaudeville. 

The managers are desirduj; of se- 
curing tab companies to gi\e one- 
hour performances wit4» a picture 
used for the balance of the show. 
This policy is said to have proved 
profitable with several. Many have 
found it cheaper to use a tab than 
to play a vaudeville bill of five acts. 
Several houses which have been In 
the habit of playing split week 
vaudeville have taken the tab com- 
panies for a full week, the majority 
being equipped to play two different 
pieces during the week. 

Several out of town houses wli!oh 
have been unable to secure travel- 
In gattractions are giving the tab 
polii-y a try. Many are tied up v.ith 
picture contracts and play the tabs 
in addition. When the tabs are 
played on a percentage basis, often 
the case with houses given over to 
road f^hows, the manager of the tab 
and the house share the cost of the 
picture. 



Pacific Coast Houses Booked 
From Chicago — Meeting 
.1 Thursday 

• V 'j/-y. Chicago, Feb. 28. 

A meeting is to be held here to- 
morrow (Thursday). It will be at- 
tended by Irving Ackerman of 
Ackerman & Harris, the Paciflc 
Coast vaudeville managers. Others 
will be representatives of the Or- 
pheum eir'^uit and rharlfts K. Bcay. 
general manager of the Western 
Vaudeville Managers' Association, 
the Orpheum local booking branch. 

It is virtually settled the A. & II. 
coast houses will be booked through 
the Chicago association. An asso- 
ciation booker will take charge of 
the zoutii'.g book for the coast the- 
atres. The present A. & H. booking 
repretentative In San Francisco, 
Mrs. Klla Weston, will not be dis- 
turbed. 

The deal is mutijally advan- 
tageous. It gives A. & H. an east- 
ern source and the a.saocIatlon an 
important coast IT\iIi to lla proposed 
Far West circuit, Ackerman & 
Harris have a vaudeville houses in 
nearly every large coast city ex- 
cepting Los Angeles. They are re- 
ported about taking one there. 



PAN AFTER SUN? 



Gets Jam«t, Columbus — After Buf< 
falo and Louisvill* Houses 



k 



Chicago, Feb. 28. 

The Pantages Circuit has entered 
into a borking agreement for Ave 
years with Willlajn James, of the 
James theatre, Columbus. It staifts 
April 1. 

It is understood Pantages through 
local rei>resentatlves is trying to 
.secure a theatre in Buffalo and 
I.ouis\i'le to play the Pan vaude- 
ville. 

At present it looks as though Pan- 
tages is seeking to erect an opposi- 
tion to the Cu« Sun bookings in the 
territory. . / 



NO ORPHEUM STAFF CHANGES, 
SAYS NEW PRESIDENT, HEIMAN 



Concentrating at Present on Expanding Circuit— | 
Deals On in Several Cities — Vancouver Turried \ 
Into Winner • - .i 



H 



GYP CLUB AGENT 



Act Payroll Padded and Agant 
Pockets Diff«r««ic« 



Clubs desiring vaudeville talent 
that .depends upon independent 
viudeville agents of the "gyp" typ* 
are being mulcted for "big dough" 
by the 'gypH,'* At a benefit tcccnt!y 
several acts were on the bill, en- 
gaged by an independent. 

The modus operandi of the gyi>per 
was to ascertain the artist'.^ salary 
for the occasion, then beat hiin 
down to a much lower flgun* on the 
plea it was his first benefit book- 
ing and a charity, and finally in- 
form the act that he (the agent) 
was going to. "put you down for so 
much," naming a sum In excess of 
the act's salary, which it was un- 
derstood was to go the agent. 

One take was |L'5 on a $100 act, 
and |10 on another, which was 
about the average. 



GAITES* UNIT NOT BOOKED 

Josei'h Gaites denies his Shubert 
unit show has been booked by the 
Pantages circuit. The producer 
seated he offered the attraction to 
the I 'an booking office, but that the 
deal apparently fell through. 

Caites' proposal was that the cir- 
cuit pay him |aOO weekly for the 
use of the revue book and the pro- 
duction. When the unit closed It 
was reported part salaries had been 
paid with I. O. U.'s. The company 
clof^cd in the middle west and the 
money due the players was paid 
by c; a ilea when they reached New 
Yolk. 



LEO ^{TZGERAID SUSPENDED 

Leo Fitzgerald was suspeiuled 
from booking privilege In the 
Keith office this week for an In- 
fraction of the booking rules. Fitz- 
gerald is a member of the Marinelll 
?taff, booking under the Marlnelli 
franchise. 

The suspension Is said to be 

temporary pending an InvestJgttion 

of^the circumstances now being 

Tonductod by W. Dayton Wegefarth, 

Keith broking manager. 



Tiif 



cTi»se 



HOUSES CLOHNG 

IJ. F. Alboe, Providence, will 
ifs vaudeville season week 
M;irch 2(>, with stock following. 

Tiie Temple, Roch -ater, N. T., 
will end Its vaudeville season April 
30. I'ictures or stock will play over 
the summer. 

The Colonial, Erie, Pa., — full week 
Keith booked — closes" March 17. 

The Congress, Saratoga, N. Y., 
di-scontinued vaudeville Feb. 12, due 
to light attendance. ^ The house 
pltyed Keith pop vaudeville the 
firht half. 



LOEfS METROPOUTAN MGRS. 
NOW REPORTING ON PROGRAMS 



First Time Since Circuit Organized — Formerly Only 
Out-of-Tov/n Loew Managers Reviewed Split 
Week Bills — Order Issued Two Weeks Ago 



The r-s'iNMit managers of the 
I.oew circuit theatres in the Create;- 
Xew York territory are now send- 
ing in weekly rcport.s of the f-plit 
week v.iiKb'viUt program^ pljyiii^ 
their houses. 

It l.<t ih^ n r !- [ t li i iu till ' liM ' ai iiwn 

manafters have been calU-d llIW»n 
to perform that duty sincf th» 
Loew circuit org.inlz*^ d. l'revioii«!y 
to tl".e i.s.su.'ince of the di«U;- for 
managers to repoit two weeks ago 
only Ijoew-book'-d hou.^e.-< av. a> 
from lh;.> metropoll.s returned ihew 



reviews of tlu- playing programs lo 
tlie home offlie. 

The sy.stem in vogue in vaude\il!e 
cjperafion since there were vaude- 
ville Circuits has been for the 
house manager to Inform the book- 
ing <»ffk^ what his opinion of the 
bill and ltd Individual acts on It 
was. He Uoually forwards the re- 
port based on the flr.st or second 
p^i rortnance of the engagement. 
Tl'.e r 'Ports are supposed to be for 
ib.e Itiforrnation of the booking of- 
fice stalT and of Ihc other managers 



• , DIVIDED ON ACT 

Testimony Taksn in GaKaghor and 
8h«an Action 
The trial oi the Shubert Tiie'- 
atrical Co. «ult aqrainst Gallagher 
and Shean for alleged breach of 
contract was starttd before JuMtict 
Delehanty in the New York Su- 
preme Court Monday and will 
probably continue for the major 
portion of this week. The Shulierls' 
Contention that .he team ia "unique 
and extraordTnary" was supported 
by a numV»er of show people, who 
testllied In the'.r behalf. Among 
them were Arthur Il.'immerstein, 
Morris Gest and \Villiam A. Drady. 
in addition to Lee Shubert. 

The alleged contract was for a 
period cf three years, from Septem- 
ber, 1921. at |7jO a week for the 
first two years, and $1,000 for the 
laet year, with 3.* weeks minimum 
yearly guaranteed. Gallagher and 
Shean, now in the "rollies," where 
they receive |l.r»00 a week, jvere 
alleged by Ciiarles II. Tutilo. of 
counsel for tiii.' Sluiljerts, to have 
got $1,000 from the JCeith circuit 
when lea\jjig the Shubert^. Th* 
motion for a preliminary Injunction 
was decided in the act's favor Bome 
time ago. 

Arthur Hammersteln's tcftimony 
Tuesday wa^ iljat the t.?am*s per- 
sonality made them "one of the 
greatest drawing car»(.s on the stage 
today." The following «tatement 
interprets the producer's attitude 
on personalit.N : "Cavalieri came to 
America the most . beautiful of 
women with a gorgeous figure, but 
she had no personality and was 
singing for $300 a night when Mary 
Garden got $J,500. Mary Garden has 
about the wor.st voice now on the 
stage, but she had persijnalit-y and 
she has been one of the greatest 
hlt« In opera since my father signed 
her up many years ago." 

Of the witnesses for the defenise, 
Will ttogers, who does a travesty 
with Andrew Tombes of Gallagher 
and Shean in the •Tollies" was 
first directed by the court to 
park his gum. Obeying, he said. 
"It's all in the song. The song 
Isn't so much either. Tell you 
the truth, Volstead and Bryan 
would make juht as much of a hit 
»<Inging that sung ab Gullugher and 
Shean.'* Answering to the question 
whether he (Rogers) regards him- 
self as an .actor, he replied, "No. I 
sing rotten and Tombes Is woiwe, 
but we can beat Gallagher and 
Shean at that. It'.s hard to tell just 
where the hit I.s. It's ju.-'t like a 
game. Success comes in some- 
where." 

George W. I.ederer testifled the 
defendants were oidin:uy vaude- 
viiiians and ^aiu that the net they 
Ufif'd governed thoir ftu-jcess. "Out- 
side of that I would pay them no 
n)ore than I pay my chaufTeur, $40 
a week." 

William Klein is attorney of rec- 
ord for 'he SliuWerts and Tobias A. 
Keppler for Gallagher and Sh^an. 



No changes are contemplated Just 
now in the personnel of the Orphe- 
um Circuit staffs, Reoor*llny to M* 
new president, Marcus Heiman. 

Mr. Heiman Informed a Variety 
roi>resentative that concentration 
is now being focused upon the ex- 
pansion of the Orpheum. New or 
acquired Orpheum' theatres. h« 
said, will be secured In St. Paul. 
Omaha and Oakland, while the new 
big time Orpheum theatre for Chi- 
cago was settled upon some time 
ago. 

Asked where he intended making 
his headquarters. New York or 
Chicago, Mr. Heiman replied in t>oth 
cities, probably dividing ^ia time 
between the two. 

The new Orphcum's president U 
a young man, not over 40 If thaL 
He is a native of Syracuae, N. T., 
as arc Sam ^ahl and Asher Levy, 
two other important Orpheum ex- 
ecutives whose headquarters are in 
the Chicago offices of the circuit. 
Mr. Heiman is roild mannered but 
talks decision and without hesi- 
tancy. His private office in thf 
Orpheum'8 quarters In the Palace 
theatre building. New York, is the 
siime room occupied by his presi- 
dential predecessor, Martin Beck. 

In answer to a question whether 
the Orpheum intended to re-enter 
Salt Lake City where its local 
house recently closed for vaudeville, 
M^-. Heiman replied the Salt Lake 
Orpheum had been leased to local 
interests and that the Orpheum did 
not intend to build there, although 
retaining the name of Orpheum 
under agreement for that city. "We 
may return to Salt Lake In the 
future. " he fald. "It will be a good 
town for us under certain condi- 
tions." 

The somewhat odd policy of tl»« 
Orpheum, Vancouver, where legit 
shows are played for two days 
weekly and vaudeville the reniain- 
der of the week had satisfactorily 
worked out, Mr. Heiman answered 
to a query r bout the town. "It*« 
funny, too," he said. "We were 
doubtful about .that propo«ition, 
splitting the week in the way we 
did but Vancouver l\ad been a loser 
with vaudeville only and we were 
forced to an extremity. The new 
shift appears to be liked and so 
far Vancouver has been a winner 
with it." 

Mr. Heiman mentioned there are 
several deals pending he thought 
would be for Orpheum's betterment 
but he preferred not to mention 
them before their consummation. 

It wai» reported this week and 
confirmed by the Orpheum's book- 
ing departtnt'nt that Fannie Brice 
is to start an Orpheum circuit tour 
March 19, opening at Kansas City. 
It is said Miss Brice is receiving 
$2,500 to $3,000 wepltly on the tim*. 
Her engagement is hailed as an 
augury the Orpheum Is gofhg after 
a name-headod bill. It has certain 
points like Chicago, San Francisco 
and Los Angeles which call for a 
drawing card with other important 
cities of the circuit to be giver* to 
the big name acta engaged. The 
Duncan Sisters are also said to have 
been booked for Orpheum time. 
They will Jump direct to Frisco, 
opening there about March 25. The 
sisters want to first play the coast 
through the illness of their father 
who lives out there. 



4 



% 



Musical Stock at Ps^n, Memphis 
:Mf nii>l»i.s, Feb. L'S. 

It Is rejtorf»d I'antnges c<»ntem- 
plutes a niu^ic^l ^t•)ck policy, com- 
mend i;" .April 1. It Is now i»laying 
taudevill<». 



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Variety, New York 



10 



VAUDEVILLE 



.jit'T i' 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



WESTS FA VORITE-RAE SAMUELS 



-^-: ^' —'. Chicago Feb. 2C. 

'' Jlae Samuels has been generally 
•elected In the Chicago territory a8 
most representative of the vaude- 
ville spirit of the great west. There 
was some discussion provoked as 
to the artist entitled to the llrst 

page distinction in the flrst mid 
■west Issue of Variety. It wj«h 
agreed Mi.«8 Samuels shiould have 
the honor for these reasons: 

1. She Is a Chicago product brolce 
Into vaudeville here and while a 
Buccess all ov*»r tb* country, hor 
Interest always has been centered in 
the west. 

2. She Is the only single woman 
iporth more than 11.000 per week in 
salary to the small cities of the 
mid west, such as Madison. Wis.; 
Peoria, 111.; Springfield, 111., and 
towns of that size. 

3. She has headlined the Orpheum 
rlrruit more times than any other 
vaudeville act and Is always the 
only featured artist, the billing 
reading "Hae Samuels and an all- 
•tar bill." 

4. She was the ftrst headliner 
held over a full week at the Engle- 
wood theatre in Chicago, the newest 
Ori)heum house, possibly empha- 
sizing more than any other inci- 
dent In her career her standing, as 
this was a rectnt liMppcning last 
week. 

It is doubtful If there Is an artist 
more popular with vaudeville peo- 
ple of the west. Rae Samuels is 
pupular with manager?, theatre at- 
tache.?, ' musicians, stage employes, 
newspapermen, booking agpnts, 
vaudeville fans and professional folk 
as well as with the public. There 
Is not an Orpheum or "We.-^te'n 
Vaudeville Managers' association 
theatre she enters without stirring 
a feeling of Joyous return among 
the house staff. She has toured 
the Orpheum circuit 18 times and 
there is no evld«>nop of her wearing 
out her welcome. When Miss 
Samuels facetiously remarked at the 
Palace recently and at the Engle- 
wood she expected to keep on re- 
turning to Chicago until 1940, no one 
accepted It as "kidding." Her 
friends see no reason why she 
should not remain a popular favor- 
ite for 20 years more. 

Twelve years ago Rae Samuels 
eang In the Alcazar, a little picture 
house - on Madi.son street, Chicago, 
managed by Andy Talbott. Charles 
E. Bray dropped In one night and 
heard her. Mr. Bray was impressed. 
Always Interested in talent wliich 
promises showy development, Mr. 
Bray booked Miss Samuels 'at the 
Lyda theatre, then managed by 
George H. Hines. He gave Hines 
an Intimation of what he felt re- 
garding Miss Samuels' ability and 
was pleased when Hines phoned in 
after the second day, wanting to 
hold her all week. At the conclu- 
sion of this engagement Miss Sam- 
uels called on Mr. Bray, who was 
then, as he Is now, head of the 
Western Vaudeville Managers' asso- 
ciation. 

'How would you like to go into 
vaudeville?" Bray asked her. Miss 
Samuels was appearing in pict^.e 
houses at that time considered of 
lower grade i the amusement scale 
than the smallest vaudeville time. 
She received C40 and >45 a week. 
' -I tMnk I'd like to." replied Miss 
Samuels. 

"I guess I can work you right 
along excepting possibly Juno, July 
and August, and I will give yoi 
$100 a week when you work," said 
Mr. Bray. 

Miss Samuels often tell.s how .she 
wafted herself out of Mr. Bray's of- 
fice in a haze. She even pinched 
herself. She had never dreamed of 
such royal compensation. She had 
no Idea tliat 8h<' had mannerisms, 
charm, per.«onallty and those quali- 
ties which make v.'iudeville head- 
liners. 

Not long afterwards Miss Sam- 
uels wi^s headliner at the I*alace 
and once more she pinohed herself. 
The impression all professionals 
have vanity certainly has its ex- 
rf'ption in Rae Samufls. She had 
npver thought of herself as a he.id- 
liner. Thf" vaudovillo power.s be- 
gan to tell hor .she ]acl<<d ronHdcnre 
in herself when the booming be- 
gan. When Jack Lait. then editor 
of the Chicago "American." named 
her "The Blue Streak of Ragtime' 
she accepted it a.s .i coinjilimont and 
" not as a bUli?»g that would live to 
later become familiar with theatre- 
goers all over America. 

"I shall never forget the first 
time I saw my name tip as head- 
liner at the Palace," Miss Samuels 
confesses. "From a picture huu.«e on 
Madison street to the goal of am- 
bition of every singer of my style 



was somo jump. And to accom- 
plish It In such a short tim.! There 
is no use telling me that the big 
men of vaudeville are not interest- 
ed In developing acts!" .. 

Miss Samuels had not been plaj'- 
Ing In vaudeville very long when 
Plo Ziegfeld offered her an engage- 
ment In "The Follies" at a salary 
of 1250. She remained with the 
show for a season and scored, but 
was induced to return to vaude- 
ville. 

Miss Samuels' success ia attribut- 
ed by Chicago vaudeville author- 
ities 10: 

Sense enough to grasp opportu- 
nity. 

A cheerful disposition, ambition, 
talent, health and a knowledge of 
how to dress. 

That seldom encountered quality, 
a lack of egotism. She is believed 
immune from "swellheadedness." 



BUROICK, GEN. MGR. 

Succeeds Brentlinger as New Man- 
ager on Consolidated Circuit 



Chicago, Feb. 28. 

C. E. Burdick, formerly asso- 
ciated with the Ralph Dunbar at- 
tractionfi, has succeeded A. F. 
Brentlinger as general manager of 
the Consolidated Realty & Amuse- 
ment Co. With the change in gen- 
eral manager there has been a 
change in managers in every city 
in which the corporation has a 
theatre, excepting Richmond, Ind. 
Warren Jones continues booking 
manager with headquarters at Chi- 
cago with the B. F. Keith circuit. 

It is reported here that the board 
of directors asked Mr. Brentlinger 
to move his ofllce from the Con- 
solidated building at Indianapolis, 
to Chicago, with a view of reduc- 
ing expense by combining the gen- 
eral ofTlce at Indianapolia and the 
booking office at Chicago. Mr. 
Brentlinger declined to do this. 
Under the new arrangement the In- 
dianapolis office has been done 
away with. 

The circuit, the largest In In- 
diana, has several vaudeville houses 
booked through the B. F. Keith of- 
fice in Chicago. It Is announced 
In connection with the changes 
made in management that the Vic- 
tory theatre In Evansville, Ind., is 
being rebuilt and will play road at- 
tractions and pictures and that 
vaudeville will be moved to the 
Strand, now pictures. The an- 
nouncement is made of a new the- 
atre and hotel building at Fort 
Wayne. Ind. 

The managers who have replaced 
former onee are: Fred Le Comte, 
at Terre Haute; Bill Meek, at 
Evansville: Otto Hoffman, at Fort 
Wayne; Howard Mack, at Kokomo, 
and J. C. Anderson, at Clinton. 



SMALL TIME AGENT 
MUST MAKE GOOD 



Al Dow Booked Act Manager 
Didn't Play— House Could 
Not Pay Salary - 

A complaint of Rhoda and Cramp- 
ton, a vaudeville act, filed with 
Commissioner of Licenses against 
Al Dow, an Independent small time 
vaudeville booking agent, for al- 
leged breach of contract, was de- 
cided in favor of the act last week. 

Dow Issued a contract to the act 
calling for a week's engagement in 
Bristol and New Britain, Conn. 
When Rhoda and Crainpton re- 
ported at the theatre In Bristol they 
were Informed they were not booked 
there. Showing the house manager 
a contract he Informed them he 
could not afford to play such ex- 
pensive acts. 

The Commissioner notified Dow to 
make good the amount of the con- 
tract. 



ECKL GAINS TWO 

. The Frankfort, Frankfort, Pa., a 
suburb of Philadelphia, started split 
week vaudeville Monday, playing 
five acts each half, booked by Jo- 
seph A. Ek^kl of the Reliance Agency. 
Dave Rafael, formerly booked the 
bouse. The Astor, Philadelphia, 
switches its vaudeville bookings 
from the Sheedy office to the Re- 
liance, commencing next Monday, 
playing five acts each half. 



CHICAGO BOOKING BIG HME 



DRY BATTLE IN SENATE 

Albany, N. Y., Feb. 2S. 

The "wet" and "dry" forces of 
the state of New York will clash 
In the senate Monday night in 
preparation for the final battle of 
this session over the proposed re- 
peal of the Mullan-Gage state pro- 
hibition enforcement Taw. 

The battleground that will decide 
the ultimate fatje of the "dry" re- 
pealer was assured to the senate 
today following the action of the 
codes committee of the assembly 
yesterday in refusing to report out 
the bill to repeal the state dry act 
introduced by Assemblyman Frank 
A, Miller, from Mayor Hylan's dis- 
trict — the twentieth of Brooklyn. 

Another dry repealer, presented 
by A.ssemblyman Louis A. Cuvillier, 
is in the excise committee of the 
assembly. The Cuvillier proposal 
probably will remain iin committee 
unless the "wets* In the assembly 
can muster enough votes to win a 
battle to discharge the committee 
from furjthcr consideration of tha 
bill. ■. ;■ , . . 'r^ 






;'»'• 



ST. LOUIS' UNIT HOUSE STOP 

St. Louis, Feb. 28. 

The Empress, playing the Shubc rt 
vaudeville unit shows, has posted 
two weeks' notice of closing. 

Its house manager, Zack Hani.s, 
says It's customary to pott two 
weeks' notice during Lent, but at 
the local stage hands' headquarters 
they say that two w«»eks' notice of 
closing means closing. . . 



BOOKED FOLLOWING TRYOUTS 

Two more acts have been routed 
by the Keith Circuit after appearing 
at professional tryout performanoes. 
"The Phenomenal Players," after 
"showlngr'* at the 23rd Street, were 
booked consecutively, and John and 
Mabel Love have been playing since 
appearing at Proctor's 125th Street. 



FROM CABARET TO VAUDE 

Margaret Irving and William Sea- 
bury will double frohi the Monte 
Carlo restaurant Into vaudeville via 
the Keith circuit next week. The 
couple will appear In a turn With 
the Monte Carlo Orchestra opening 
at Keith's. White Plains, N. Y. 

The new combination will play 
th£ Palace, New York, week of 
March 1^. Ralph Farnum arranged 
the vaudeville bookings. 



Fall River Cuts Down BilJ 

Fall River, Feb. 28. 

The Academy of Music, Fall 
River, Mass., will cut Its vaudeville 
bill next week from seven acts to 
three. The house Is a full week 
booked through an Independent 
agency (Sheedy's). 

Poor business and local vaude- 
ville competition Is believed to be 
the reason for the elimination of 
the four acts. 



PUBUSHER RUNS AWAY 

St. John, N. B., Feb. 28- 
Julee Levine, publisher of the 
'Motion Picture Review," a weekly 
publ-cation published here, has dis- 
appeared, and has with him about 
Jll.OOO belonging to individuals of 
both sexes who entrusted their sub- 
scription fees to him. 

Levine had operated a publication 
of similar nature in Montreal and ! 
had been forced to leave that city 
by special invitation. Levine an- 
nounced weekly "contests" in 
guessing the ecores of English foot- 
ball games. Levins published the 
"Motion Picture Review* merely as 
a blind to cover the football "con- 
tests." Subscriptions were sought 
to the "Review" at four weeks for 
25 cents. For each quarter a per- 
son was allowed one guess. 



DsWald «t Empire, Fait River 
Fall River, Mass., Feb. 28. 

"When Keith's starts Its vaude- 
ville, six acts and pictures, at the 
Empire, purchased last week. It will 
be managed by J. J. D^Wald, now 
of Keith's Colonial, New York. 

J. J. Collins will book the house 
In the Keith office. 



DANCE HALL AND THEATRE 

Harrisburg, Pa., Feb. 28. 

Pete Magora opened a new dance 
hall and l,500-8eat theatre this 
week. The dance hall, above the 
theatre, is to be known as Magora's 
Exposition Hall. The theatre Is 
called the Regent. , 

Straight picture bills will 
played. 



be 



Pantages, Memphis, Cut to 25 Cents 
Memphis, Feb. 28. 
The local Pantages has reduced 
Its matlnetf top from 40 cents to 25 
cents, the latter the matinee scale 
at the Orpheum. Pans held to the 
40-cent charge from its opening In 
the face of losing business. '^ ■ " 



NEW RADIO PROJECT 

A new radio device is about to 
be exploited in a big way. It is 
backed by the 160.000,000 North 
American company, a holding con- 
cern which engages in general 
trade, with headquarteis at 60 
Broadway, New York. It controls 
municipal traction and public utili- 
ties In towns like Milwaukee and 
practically owns several of the 
Edison light and power service com- 
panies in the middle west. 

The company Is not yet ready 
to make public the details of its 
radio innovation, but in Wall street 
It is reported the proposal Is to 
furnish a broadcasting service 
which can be heard on an ordinary 
telephone. 



Palace Prices Up for Week -End 
Clucago, Feb. 28. 

Prices are to be raised for the 
Palace for Saturdays and Sundays. 
The big business done at that house 
the last three or four weeks has 
br(»n;;lit about this tleci.sion. 

Tiie prices will be increaed to 
$2.L'0 for first fioor and boxes, and 
$1.C5 for the first five rows of the 
balcony. 



Manager Goble Transfers to Colonial 
Luther E. Goble, as.sistant to 
Manager W. B. Kerrigan at the Or- 
,pheum, Brooklyn, has been trans- 
ferred to Keith's Colonial. New 
York, becoming manager of the 
houso Monday. 



1st "Amateur Follies" in Chicago 

Chicago. Feb. 28. 

The initial "Amateur Follie.s" will 
be presentetl here at the Rialto the 
week of March 12. 

.lone?*, Linirk and ^fhnf*f{rr will 
preeent similar turns in all of their 
local houses. 



Everett Hayes Managing Majestic 
Chlca^'o. Feb. 28. 
Everett Hayes became resident 
manager of the Majestic last week. 
He succeeded W. Williams. 



JUDGMENTS 

(First name Is judgment debloy; 
creditor and amount follow.) 

Alexander Film Cosp.; C. A. Hr)- 
dek et al.; 1902.35. 

Edgar Allen; E. Evedon; $99.20. 

Emmy Destinn; K. IJergor; cost 
1110.87. 

Loch Sheldrake Amuse. Co., Inc. 
>. •: al.; D. Shapiro: S78G.77. 

Francis X. Bushman; Durland Co.* 
$130.90. 

Select Pictures Corp., Lewis J. ant' 
Florence A. Selznick; C. (<o' 
$5.553.E2. 

Small's Theatrical Enterprjtcs 
Inc.; GImbel Bros.. N. Y.; $7,364.4^ 

Charlotte Walker; Wilmington 
Realty Corp.; $269.92. 

Lee Kraus; L. H. Kaplan; $12:!. .'i.' 

Same; 1493 Broadway Corp.; 
$256.46. 

Jacques Bustanoby; C. Heiirlqurs; 
$86.70. 

Harry Saks Hschheimcr; Aguilar 
Corp.; 1^22.12. - ' 



DROP USELESS LAWS 

Albany, N. Y., Feb. 28. 
Assemblyman Frederick L. Hack- 
enburg, of the 14th district, New 
York, who during the past few years 
has distinguished himself as the foe 
of blue law legislation and the ex- 
ponent of personal liberty, on Tues- 
day night offered a resolution cre- 
ating a legislative committee, with 
an appropriation of $10,000, to go 
over the laws of the state and rec- 
ommend to the next legislature the 
repeal of useless and archaic laws, 
especially those interfering with 
personal liberty, oppressive Sab- 
bath provisions and other laws 
which affi'ct the personal conduct 
of the j>eopIe. 



MUSIC m COURT 

Si\ii Francisco, I'tb. 28. 

Police Judge Sylvnin Lazarus of 
Snn Fr.nncjj^co \a «>htaining pub- 
l.ciiy for himsj'lf aH a result of 
opening his court each day with mu- 
Hical sd'ctionM. He u.sci ever> - 
thinK, from phunoKrai)hs to jazz or- 
chestras. • 

.ludgc l.a'/.arus contends th.at mu 
.-ic li*-li>s to sturt the day right. 



Chicago, Feb. 26. 
Chicago has taken on more lm« ^ 
portance as a booking center for 
first class vaudeville playing mater- 
ial this season. Every Indicatioxt^ 
points to still greater booking prom- 
inence for Chicago. The bttoklngs 
In Chicago this season have been 
notable through the number of acts 
given routes on the Orpheum cir- 
cuit and with the policy which has 
been outlined for conduct of that 
chain* of theatres in the future this 
Chicago booking will increase In 
volume. 

The booking of acts for the first * 
class houses In the western terri- 
tory formerly depended .upon the 
approval of eastern representatives 
of the Orpheum circuit. The close 
afniiatlon of the eastern and wes- 
tern vaudeville booking powers at 
present Insure that acts playing the 
Keith time in the east can go over 
the Orpheum circuit on the ok by 
Chicago booking^representatives o^ 
that circuit who will be clothed 
with sufhclent power, rather than 
through the tedious requirement of 
an endorsement from eastern rep- 
resentatives. This is expected to 
also lead to extensive booking of 
acts for the lesser important time 
from this city. 

The decision of the Western 
Vaudeville Managers' association to 
extend its bookings to the Pacific 
coast suggests that the. bookings of 
small time vaudeville will be de- 
veloped until there is every reason 
to believe next season will see Chi- 
cago c:uite as Important In the 
world df smalltime vaudeville as It 
ever has been in the past. Many 
other circuits are said to be al- 
ready planning to secure bookings 
out of Chicago In the event that 
the association plans as announced 
are carried through. 

Tha booking of first class mater- 
ial by the Orpheum circuit otit of 
Chicago and the booking of acts 
suited for the small time by the 
association Is expected to boom Chi- 
cago. 

Acts routed over Orpheum time 
for the full circuit from Chicago 
this season, by Sam Kahl's office, 
denotes what Is possible in the way 
of developing Chicago as a book- 
ing center. This list Includes: 

Roscoe Ails, The Arleys, Jean 
Barrios, Bennett, Crystal and Co., 
Bravo, MitchelinI * and Trujillo, 
Bernivlcl Brothers. Cliff Clark, Four 
Camerons, Dougal and Leary, De- 
marcos and Sheik- band. The Flor- 
enls, Farnell and Florence, Four of 
Us, Fries and Wilson, Glanville and 
Sanders, Gibson and Connelli, Gar- 
dell, Pryor and Co., Gibson, Jack 
and Jessie, Jack George, Duo, Ern- 
est Hlatt, Bert Howard, Bobby 
Hcnshaw and Co., Fred Hughes and 
Co., Hall and Dexter, Moore and 
Kendall Co., Minstrel Monarchs 
Five, Jack Osterman, Rubin and 
Hall, BUI Robinson. Katherlne Sin- 
clair and Co., Jimmy Savo and Co., 
Stan Stanley, Seattle Harmony 
Kings, Royal Sidneys, Selbini and 
Grovlnl, Patsy Shelly and band, 
Whitfield and Ireland, and Wonder 
Girl. 

There Is encouragement for Chi- 
cago vaudeville folks in the deter- 
mination of the Orpheum circuit to 
give Chicago Importance as a book- 
ing point and every reason for con- 
gratulation In the preference pre- 
sumed to be Intended for Chicago 
on this score. 

The certainty that other circuits 
will follow in the lead of the Or- 
pheum circuit in thi.H department of 
vaudeville activities is ailniitted by 
close observers. 

It is predicted the nunxber of 
first grade acts to be booked out 
of Chicago next season will total 
I as high as any year in vaudeville 
. history and it Is expected the num- 
1 ber of small time acts booked next 
i season will compare favorably with 
] any record established in past 
ycar.«. . . . 

' • ' ■ ;a. 



MARRIAGES . 

Kutli Itomrs «ln iMivato lifp Ruth 
>'chaef(r) to Donald .MoLord. bolli 
in vaudeville, Feb. I';?, !i th»' (.^nr f n.*- 
iN>u>tt y (iVi — ¥t> Mt»ri ..!■-;«' 1... « n . 
lUircau. 

Arthur LaD'Mlc fvaudcviHc) t' 
Melle I'rovost, piirnu dunna, in Fan 
Francisco. / 

Ray Ke1f»ey. chorister in Davc 
.Marion show, to Frank Doyle, prop- 
erty man with the company, at Cit^ 
Hall, New York, Feb. 27. i 



Amelia Hemmerle, who was 'the 

moilur of itutii Hcmmcrle, harpist, 
with Henry's Melodious Sextet, left 
a net estate of $ J. 029.^1 when, 
without leaving a will, she died May 
9. 191'2. IcaviuK her il:iui;hf r-r as only 
!«urviving heir ;tt law. The gross 
v.ilue cf llic • :.if left b y Mrs.^ 
Hrnunerlc amounted to $r»,487.5l. It 
(■opsisj.cd of equity in realty 
$1.9X7.03; cash, on hand, and in 
l»ankR, $121.13' personal effects and 
Jewelery, $25ar and In securities. 
$128.7."). Mi.«s Hcmmerlf. residing at 
30 Rulton road, Bronx, is the ad- 
uioistratrlx of the. proper tyi^^j.^ , - 



Thursday, March 1. 1923 



? '? VAlilET Y* v^ 



■'•.'j-y 



11 



Werner Amoros Trio 
Bobby Adams 
Alasaka Duo 
Alfredo A Janett* 
Four Bards " 

Bell A Wood 
Bellclalr & Francet 
Browne & Lavelle 
Blum Bros. 
Baxley A Porter 
Carney fii. Rose 
Davis & Bradner 
Dual & Symonds 
BlUy A Edith Deverlex 
Downey A Claridjre 
Firman A Olsmlth 
The Fofltos 
Fisher A Hurst 
Maida Firman 
Gllroy, Haynes A Mont 

gomery 
The GaWierts 
Tonle Grey A Co. 
Humbert© Bros. 
Robt. Henry Hodge 
Dancing Humphreys 
Hurio 

Hazsard A Oaks 
Chic A Tina Harvey 
Al A Mabel Joy 
Harry Jolson 
Kennedy A Martin 
Geo. lioveti 
Althea IjUcjis A Co. 
The Leiglitons • 

Sid Lewis 
Mack & Velmar . 
Morton Jewell Co. 
McMahon A Adelaide 
Four Nightons 
Novelty I.,arkir!.s 
Jerry A Gretehen 

OMera . « 
Octavo 

Perrone A Oliver 
The Rosa i re. ♦ 
Schepps Comedy Circus 
Jean Southern 
Walter A 3Iae Siegfried 
Beatrice Sweeney 
Sinclair A Gray 
Tints A Tones • 

Toy land Follies 
Wilbur £: Adams 
Mack & ^f a belle 
Joe Mclvin 
Monroe A Mae ' 
May A Hill 

Marc MacUcrmott A Co. 
Mur:ay*H American 

Be<iutieM 
Jack MeCowan 
Will Morris 
. Ned XorwortVi li Co. 
Neilan A Bailey 
Oakes A Del.our 
Prtjslun A Yhobel 
Percival-Noel A Co. 
Puppet.s of 1922 
Bill Robintjon 
Rinaldo Bro^. 
Harriet Rempcl A Co. 
Reddlngtou A Grant 
Scanlon, Denno Bros. A 

Scan Ion 
Lillian Steele A Co. 
Smith A Barker 
Sandor Trio 
Silver. Duval A Klrby 
' Vera Sabina A Band 
Sonia A Escorts 
Sherman. Van A 

Hyman 
Telephone Tangle 
Van A Maxie 
Welch. Mealy A 

Montrose 
Clifford Wayne Trio 
Weir A Crest 
Charlie Ward A Co. 
Wolgast A Girlie 
Wayte A Cee 
Yes Means No 
Angelo Armento A Bro. 
Adelaide A Dwyer 
John Alden A Co. 
The Act Beautiful 
Peggy Bremen A Co. 
Brown, Gardner A 

Trahan 
Baltus Trio 
Brown A Harrow* 
Charlotte De Burge A 

Girlis 
Willa A Harold Browne 
Browne Sisters 
Connolly A FrancU 
Crevo A Moro 
• Call Sister.s 

Dewitt A Robinson 
Alice De Garmo 
De Voy A Dayton 
Paul Decker A Co. 
Dan Downing A Buddy 
Frank De Rue 
Doyle A Elaine 
Ferguson A Sunderland 
Mrs. Eva Fay 
Prescott A Hope Eden 
Ford A Price 
Sgt. Bennie Franklin A 
Co. 
- Anatol Frledland A Co. 
Galettl's Monkeys 
Douglas Graves A Co. 
Green A Burnett 
Galettl's Monkeys 
Lillian (Jonne A Co. 
Billy A Kddle Gorman 
Green A Myra 
Rita Gould « 

Edwin George 
Gllmour A Cady 
Haveman's Animals 
Mark Hart A Co. 
Arthur Hnward A Co. 
Harris A Lyman 
• Hera.s A Wills 
HendrickH A Sheer 
-Leroy A Mabel Hart 
■ Jonia's ITawaiian.s 
• Kinzo 
Kennedy A Nelson 
Roy La Pearl A Co. 

jolAn, Ijeary A C a, 
Love ^t Wilbur 
Manteir.s Manikins 
Williams A Ko.scoe 
Wolf A Ward 
Wild A Sedaii-i 
Musical Zanos 
Zarelll Duo 
Knight A Juno 
Klrby A Brytn 



»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦44»»»»»»» H 



Aci9 playing thU geason in housms hooked through ihm 

WESTERN VAUDEVILLE MANAGERS' ASSOCIATION and B. F. KEITH'S 

WESTERN Offices: 



Keefer A Alberts 

Kramer A Johnson 

James Kennedy A Oo 

Jack Lyle 

LacoAte A Bona we 

Lehoen A Dupreece 

La Temples 

Lazerav A Jackson 

Lee Hlng Chin 

Lamorrow Trio 

Medley A Duprey 

Carl Manello A Co. 

Johnny Maber 

Milton A Lehman 

Mascot A Co. 

Michaels A Paulie 

McNally . 

Nlng Toy > 

Oliver A Lee 

Oriole Trio 

Otto. Bardell A Otto 

The Parker.H 

Ploner's Alpine Singers 

Pot Pourri 

Tom Post 

Price A Gilmore 

Reed Hooper Revue 

Ray Reed - 

T''.e Roycea 

Roval A Valentine 

Roth A Slater 

Will Sternad 

Smith Bro.y. 

Sty'.ei A Smiles 

Sherman A Deli .-■'* 

Seven Flashes 

Musical Shermans ' - ' 

Seymour A Healey 

Stuart A Grotty 

Sandor Four 

Jack Symonds t 

Skating Siiiclalrs 

Lillian Sieger Trio 

Sonia C: Escorts 

Swartz, A Wagener 

Spencer Sisters A 

Wilbur 
Nellie Sterling A Co. 
Twentieth Century 

Fonr 
Wilbur & Lyke 
Johnny Wright A 
Douglass SisltTH 
George & ivy Wheeler 
Walker A West 
WheHtoii A Boyd 
Josephine Worth A Co. 
Violet A Lewis 
Three Alverattas » 
Austin A Cole 
Great Arnesen 
Auetin A Russel 
Arthur Abbott A Co. 
Adams A Birkemo 
Agoust A Paulette 
The Astellas 
E. T. Alexander 
Appier A Appier 
Bradley A Stevens 
Chas. Barney A Co. 
Barr A Lamarr 
Harry Bewley A Co. 
Billy Below 
Joe Baldwin A Co. 
Bell A Leelalr 
Bell Trio . 

Three Bangards ^ 
Coden A Luken 
Crltchley A Dodge 
May Cooley A Boye 
Cress Moore Four • 
Cushlng A DavU 
Case A Weston 
Cortclll A Dowd 
Catherine Camerom • 
Clifford A Leslie 
Cowbells 

Chas. Diamond A COt 
Drapler A Hendrie 
Cutcher Bros. 
Marlon Drew 
Lew Diamond , 
Elmore A Esther 
Edmunds A LilllJUi 
Archie Foulk 
Four Stars A Stripe* 
Farnell A Florence 
Billy A Edna Foster 
Harry Foy 
Oreenoff A Tlno 
Haverly A Mack - 

Paul Howard 
Hart A Francis 
Harris A Randall 
Jerry A Gene 
Jensen A Bell 
Joe A Marie 
John A Agnew 
Johnson A King 
Four Songsters 
Sullivan A Mack 
Thomas Trio 
Tyler A Crollus 
Ray A EMna Tracy 
Vlllanl A Villanl 
Vanity Fair 
Woods Mules 
Youth A Melody 
Three Ander Girls 
Aleva Duo 
Angle A Fuller 
Bluebird Revue 
Thref Buddies 
Crystal P>ennett Co. 
Cook A Valdare 
Czlganne I»ancer.<) 
Chapman A Ring 
Collin.s A Dunbar 
Jimmy Di^nn 
Majflie De Long 
Dave Tressie 
Kugeiie Bros. 
FAiuillo X: Maybelie 

Edwards A Kelli 

Gu.s Krdnian 

Freel>an(l I'ros. 

Dorothy F.'trr!."v-i A Co. 

CJetie (ireen 

Gene Green * n;»nd 

(Jmnt & Wallace 

Holly 

Hackeft A Beachr 

Howe & Fay 



Hayden. Goodwin, Rowe 
Ernest Hlatt 
Johnson Bros. A 

Johnson 
Kublick 

Willie Karbe A Girlie 
Kelly A Kozie 
I^mberti 
Lubin A Lewie 
Les Arados 
Hugo Lutgens 
Jas. K. McKurdy A Co. 
Morgan A Ray 
Moher A Eldredge 
Monte A Lyons 
Lloyd Nevada Co, 
Norman A Landee 
Rose O'Hara 
Powell Troupe 
The Philmers 
Raines A Avey 
Martha Ruseell A Co. 
Rawls A Van Kaufman 
Royal Sydneys 
Revue Resplendent 
Billy Allen A Co. 
Cleveland A Dowrey 
Current of Fun 
Cliff Clark 
Craig A Catto 
Dunlay A Merrill 
Granville A Fiejds 
Gruet. Kramer A Gruet 
Gifford A Morton 
Hebert A Catto 
Eddie Hume A Co. 
Knight A Sawtelle 
Alle«» Lake A Co. • 
I^uis London 
Moore A Shy 
AHJe. Daisy A Stein 

Dros. 
Newport, Stirk A 

Parker 
Powell-Gilmore A Co. 
Phe.'oy A Powell 
Savoy & Copps 
Irene Trevette 
The Wonder Girl 
T^ree \'olce3 
Wright A Sidelll 
Zelda Bros. 
Lambert A Fish 
Arthur Lloyd 
Walter Manthey A 

Girlies 
Marhh A Wllliame 
Maxson A Brown 
Mahatma 
Dave M«nley 
Maxon ^--Morris 
Willie Misaem A Co. 
Mason A Rooney 
Murphy A Lockmar 
Maxfield A Golson 
Moree A Fields 
Nippon Duo 
Nel»on'.«» Patience 
Flying Nelsons 
Chas. A Mary Ann 

Olcott 
O'Connor Sisters 
Laurie Ordway 
Bennee One • 
Pigs Is Pigs 
Page A Green 
Pickards Seals (Harry) 
Roshier A Muffs (Jack) 
Will A Mary Rogers 
Neil A Witt 
Shireen 

St. Clair Twins A Co. 
Bert A Hazel Skatelles 
Jimmy Savo 
Sullivan A Meyer* 
Thavma 

Wanzer A Palmer 
Three Weber Glrle 
Zelaya 

Grace Ayer A Bro. Billy 
Van A Carrie Avery 
Adair A Adair 
Bayes A Field 
Burns A Lorraine 
Burns Bros. 
Nancy Boyer A Co. 
Harry Bussey 
Chong A Moey 
Hughie Clarke 
Coecia A Verdi 
Collins A Hill 
Harry Coleman 
Corradini's Anima!s 
Stanley Chapman 
Cas.son A Klem 
Ray A Emma Dean 
Doree's Celebrities 
Delmore A Moore 
Arthur Devoy A Co. 
Edwards A Edwards 
Fox A Mack 
Follis Girls 
Flanagan A Morrison 
Fisher A Gilmore 
Force A William.^ 
Fifer Bros. A Sieter 
John Geiger 
Happy Harrison 
Halkings 
Heim A Lockwood 

Sisters 
John A Winnie Hen- 

nings 
Henoy A rjrayte Harvey 
Bobby Hentihaw 
Great Howllrd 
Jack Hughes Duo 
I.shikawa Ilros. 
lone A Kingsbi ry 
Jason A Harrigan 
Hal Johnson A Co. 
Kurt Ac Kdith Kuehn 
Kerr A lOn.Hjgn 



Three White Kuhns 
Keloo & DeMoiule 
La Gracic'H.i 
l.ffniiq^''-l! iVc l.f'<^T\ 
1 a'lrel Lee 
Lyl*» A \'ir.Tin::i 
I'iHi! A Wnlter La\'arre 
Three Lees 
Paisley Noon A Co. 



Norrls's Simian 

Workers 
George Okura A Co. 
Jack Osterman 
OMalley A MaxHeld 
Four Mortons 
Oliver A Olp 
Primrose Four 
Boris Petroff 
Huston Ray 
Rice A Werner 
Petty Reat A Bro. 
Ramsdells A Deyo 
Hosle Rifle A Co. 
Pour Roeders 
Rialto A La Mont 
Eddie Roes 
Four Reddings 
Three Regals 
Regdon Dancers 
Rossow Midgcls 
Carl Rosini 

Harry A Kitty Sutton 
Smith's Animals 
Catherine Sinclair 
Al Shayne 
Santucci 

Shattuck A O'Neill 
Shriner A Fltzsimmons 
Seymour A Jeanette 
Selblnl A Grovini 
Sealo 

Will Stanton 
George Stanley A Sister 
Samoroff A Sonia 
Shadowland 
The Seebacks 
Swor Bros. 

Stanley, Doyle A Reno 
Paul 8ydell A Spottie 
Tas^ano Bro«. 
IT. S. Jazz Band 
Van A Ben 
Ward A Arnold 
Porter J White . 
Wilhatts 

Whitfield A Ireland 
Dave Winnie 
Willie Bros. 
Charlie Wilson 
Hibhett A Mallfe 
Hanako Japs 
Hyams A Evans 
Nine Military Hussars 
Octavia Handsworth 
Hans Ilanke ., 

Bob Hall 
Herrin A Arnsman 

Dave Harris A Band 

Hickman Bros. 

Jean Jack«on Trio 

JarvisA Harrison 

Jack the Wise Hound 

Ja Da Trio 

Kane. Morey A More 

Kalalwhl's Hawailans 

Keno. Keys A Melrose 

Dancing Kennedays 

Frances Kennedy 

Joe A Martin Kennedy 

Knight A Knave 

La Paierica Trio 

Lady Alice's Pets 

Nate I^ipzig 

Jerry Lawton 

Listen Lester 

Lyman A Barton 

Pat A Julia Levolo 

J. C. Lewis 

Lft France A Byron 

La Vernicia A Co. 

Al Lester A Co. 

Geo. A May Le Fevre 

Leonard Andereon A 
Co. 

Lee A Cranston ^ 
McGood-Lenzen Co. 
McDonald Trio 
McRae A Clegg 
Mlllership A Gerard 
George Austin Moore 
Victor Moore 
Marmein Sisters 
Bert A Florence Mayo 
Smiling Billy Mason 
Martini A Maxmillian 
Miss Merle 
Senator Murphy 
Beatrice Morrell Sextet 
Miniature Review 
Michon Bros. 
Norton A Melnott 
Nevlns A Gordon 
Mile. Nadje ',. 
Norris Springtime / ^ 

Follies 
Four Aces ■■'.:. 

Three Arming 
Alexandria 
Sensational Arleye 
Five Avallons 
Andrieff Trio 
Jack Lewis Adrian 
Gretta Ardine A Co. 
Neal Abel 
Allen <fe Lee 
Wm. Armstrong A 

Maudie Smith 

Blrdland F(»llics 

(Bartholdi) 
Barry A I^ayton 
Harry Breen 
Bird Cabaret (Max 

Rose) 
Barclay A Chain 
Beeman & CJrace 
Bell A Eva 

Barber A Jackson / 

Burke A Durkin 
Camille Trio 
Chief r.lue Cloud A Co. 
Edith CUfTord A Co. 
Chov Lir« I 'oo Troupe 
Ci ],:: ' OS. 

(.'hit-;.' .V Bennett 
Collier A De WaM 
Cnstinp: C>mi) e!l.^ 
Carnival of Veni«-e 
Cameron A O'Connor 
Coley fz Jarksitn 
CreiKhttiu K- Dare 
Frank De Voe Cz Co. 



De For Boys 
Daniels A Walters 
Dunlevy A Cheelei^h 
Driseoll, liOng A 

Hughes 
Diamond A Brennan 
Joe De Kos Troupe 
Edmonds A La Vellie 
Earle A Edwards 
Miss Elly 
EI Rey Sisters 
Frisco 
Four of Us 
Dave Ferguson 
f^gg A White 
Douglas Flint 
Walter Fishter 
Golden Bird 
Andy Gump 

Pepltas Granddoe A Co. 
Les Gellls 
E. T. Alexander 
The Bimbos 
Bernard A Erma v 
Blnn* A Grill 
Burnum 

Carlos A De Fries 
Billy Single Clifford 
Sammy Duncan 

Ethel Dare • 
laz Monks ' 
Three Eddy Sisters 
Fit«gerald A Carroll 
Gulfport A Brown 
Cecil Ofey 
Glencoe Sisters 
Galloway A Garrette 
The Gladdenbecks 
Four Harmony Boys 
Bert Howard 
Harris A Gilbert 
Arthur Howard A Co. 
Jewell's Manikins 
Karl Karey 
Fred Lewis ,• , 
Jack Llpton 
M'lle Llngarde " 
Mason A Scott 
Man -Kin 

Mercedes *" . 

North A Halliday 
Reed Bernard Co. 
Rube Band • 
Rexo 

Sawyer A Eddy . ,, 
Low Sully ' (, ; 

Sturm Bros. ,V 

Dorothea Sadller ' .:\ 
Harry Sykes Co. : • 
Teddy 

Vallal A Zermalne 
Marin Van Bergen 
Will J. Ward '..-. > . 
Ward A Zeller 
Walters A Goold 
Ameta 

Armstrong A Phelps 
Awkward Age 
Annabelle 
Bell A Caron 
Bollinger A Reynolds 
Burke. Larry A Clifford 
Bill A Blondy 
Effle Burton 
Walter Baker 
Billy Beard 
Bernlvlcl Bros. 
Cooke, Mortimer A , — 
Havey 

Cantwell A Walker 
Caltes Bros. 
Clinton Sisters 
Cortez Sisters 
Crandell's Circus 
Larry Comer 
Clifford A Stanford 
Creedon A Davis 
Daly A Burch 
Ducos Bros. 
Gladys Delmar A Boys 
Ed A Wynne 
Maude Ellet A Co. 
Falrman A Furmaii 
Parrell Taylor Trio 
Ethel Gilmore A Glrle 
Harry Garland 
Olrl In the Moon 
Steve Green 
Glanville A Sanders 
Jim A Gladys Gullfoyle 
Hunniford 
Hlnkel A Mae . 

Six Hassans 

Hollins Si«ters 

Murray Kissen A Co. 

Kilkenny Duo 

Johnny Kean 

Kelly A Pollock 

Llghtelle A Coffman 

Don Lannlng 

fJreat Leon A Co. 

Larimer A Hudson 

Great Lester 

Luclen Lucca 

Bernivlci Bros, 

Lew Cantor Road Show 
"The Manicure Shop" 

Johnny Coulon 

Dressier A Wilson 

Chas. Gerard A Co. 

Musical Hunters 

"Honeymoon Ship" 

Hyams A Evans 

Ishikawa ProA. 

Larimer &. Hudson 

Fred Lin'lsay 

Moore ^ Arnold 

Melville /fr Rule 

Maxrtf'ld & (toldson 

Miisiriil Lund.v 

Milton PolhM-k & Co. 

pii-kairl's: S<>;il'-; 
J'atsv Shelly &. Bund 

Sfcri't.!- MldRATS 

Sehi ii[) ; C'om<*dy 

CI reus 
Tlu;lma 

"Tango Shiien" 
\'ernon 

Jioy* e Combs Co. 
Newli(»rf & Phelpa 
Ball & Moore v...... < 



Gilbert Wells 

Margaret Hustings 

Jarrow 

Louise Lovely 

Bob La Salle A Band 

Elaine A Marshall 

The Sheik 

Carl (tardner 

Dorothy Ferris 

Arthur West 

Effle Burton A Co. 

Kobnn Japs 

Gene Green A Band 

Vadi A Gygi Co. 

Cantor ITnit Shaw 

Mike Donlin Co. 

Bachman's Band 

Stanley A Wilson 

Sisters 
Parks A Clayton 
McGreevey A Jefferies 
Sawyer Girls 
Denoyer A Danle 
Delmore A Moore 
Ruth Glanvillo A Hal 

Sandeiw 
Musical Hunters 
Mack A Maybelie- 
Carl Gardner '" 

Harry Gilbert 
Mike Donlin A Co. 
Chas. Gerard A Co. 
Julia Edwards Co. 
Koban Japs 
The Rosa Ires 
Sigsbee's I>og8 
Jimmy Sax Duffy Co. 
Dancing Shoes 
Three Little Maids 
Vaughn Comfort A Co. 
Billy Arlington Co. 
Gualino A Marguerite 

Mind Reading Act 
Harts A Flowers 
Avery A Tudor 
Foster Ball A More 

Billy A Edith Devereaux 

Mack a Mabello 

Oliver A I..ee 

Three Madcap« ■ 

Mack A Salle 

Rube Jazz Band 

Benson A Johnson 

Julia Edwards 

Lund Sisters A Harvey 

The Nelloa 

Clifford A Stafford 

Burk A Llletto 

Four Old Soldiers 

Sweet's Band 

McCormiek A Irvlnif 

John Alden A Sandell 
Sisters 

Bender A Armstrong 

Walter Baker A Co. 

Chic Supreme Co. • 

Five Chapins 

I>enyle, Don A Everett 

Francis A .^rank 

Anna FcajmbIs. 

Grew A Fates 

Eddie Hill 

Hanley A Howard 

Frank A Ethel Halle 

Johnson Bros. A John- 
son 

Little Jim A Co. 

I.Ane A Harper 

James McCurdy A Co. 

Marslon A Manley 

Morris A Block 

Jessie Millar ^." 

Pardo A Archer " 

Sylvester A Vance 

Ted Schwab 

Time A Ward 

Three Wilson Girli 

Waiman A Berry 

Six Anderson Sistera 

Arita Ransom A 
Wikl Bird 

Five Ballots 
Briscoe A Austin 
Brown's Syncopator* 
Burns A Francis 
James A Jesslo Bums 
Demarla Five 
Donna Darling A Co. 
Degnon A Clifton 
Delight A Marmon 
Echoes of Scotland 
Emma Earle 
Four Erettos 
Fenwick Girls 
Bob Ferns A Co. 
Flske A Fallon 
Frazer A Bunce 
Frloe A Wilson 
Flagler A Malia 
Ferry A Hawthorne 
Hazel Green A Orches- 
tra 
Green A Parker 
I/eona Hall's Revue 
Jack Hanley 
Ben Hassan Troupe 
Hamlin A Mack 
Henodee Troupe . 
Hill A Quinnell 
International Seven 
Jessie A Hubert 
Johnson A Mcintosh 
Josselyn A Turner 
Korwin A Krayona 
K. T. Kuma A Co. 
Lelghton A Duball 
The l..e Rays 
Margret A Morrell 
McConnell & West 
John Neff 
The Patrowars 
ThH Par.'imount Four 
Princess Leona A Co. 
Three Kom.itvv^ si. -iters 
Royal VeneiMU i'ivo 
•Sankim ^ Sylvers 
Seven Soils Bi-os. 
Three Taketaa 
Tyler A St. Claire 
h'our Volunteers 
•- Ankar Trio 

Bekcfl Dancere , , 



Berri A Bonnl 
Elliott A West 
Francis Ross A Du Rose 

Grlndell A Esther 
Charles Gerard A Co. 
Martini Singers 
Morgan A Woolley Co. ' 
Maley A Singer 
Joe A Clara Nathan 
Olive A Mack 
Otto A Hammer 
Songs A Scenes 
Warden A Mack 
Joe Williams -. 

Anderson A Goines 
Bowen A Baldwin 
Bixley A Leiliri 
Chapman's Highlanders 
Cal Dean A Co. 
Hubert Dyer A Co. 
Fulton A Mack' ,vi - 

Georgia Howard , ' -,: 
Hayes A Lloyd "\^ 

Hugh Johnston 
James Kennedy' A CQ. 
Let's Go , :,i^ 

Mann A Mallory 
Mack A Brantley 
Naio A Rizzo 
Evelyn Phillips A Co. 
Skelly A Heit 
Swift A Daley 
Frank Shepard 
Stan Stanley 
Wyoming Four 
Buddy Walton 
Walmsley A Keating 
Ryal A Early 
Brady A Mahoney 
Jack Benny 
Dana A Loehr 
Carl Emmy's Pets 
Embe A Alton 
Flanders A Butler 
Malx'l Harper A Co. 
Hamel Sisters 
Jerry A Piano Girls 
Johnny's New Car 
Sidney Landfleld 
McKinley Sisters . 
Melnotte Duo 
Mowatt A MuUeii 
David Quixano 
Rubin A Hall 
Joe Regan 
Shannon A Qordoa 
Six Tip Tope 
Dallas Walker 
Wylle A Hartroan 
Ward A King 
Zeck A Randolph 
Kimball A Goman 
Pantheon Singers 
Harry Von Fossen ; 

Waldron A Wlnslow 
Worth A Willing 
Almond A Hasel 
France A Jerome 
Anna Vivian A Co. 
The Two Crawforde \ 
Marie Correlll A Co. ^ 
Ford A Packard 
France A Jerome 
Jack A Jesele Gibson 
Harry Garland 
Gardner A Revere 
Jean Germalne 
Hardy Bros. 
Ruth Howell Duo < 

Kingston A Ebner 
Lester. Bell A GrlCfen 
Muniford A Stanley 
Miller. Packer A Selz 
Parks A Clayton 
Roattfno A Barette 
Russelle's Minstrels 
Vardo 

Weiser A Reiser 
Walker A Brown 
Tom A Dolly Ward 
l^w Wells 
The Yositos 
John Alden St Co. 
Burke A LlUette 
Harry L. Cooper A Co. 
The FlorenkB " 

GraduaCtlon Days 
Leo Haley 

Kurzene A Vonia - 

Kimuwa Three ^ 

Geo. La Shay 
Moore A Kendall 
Seattle Harmony Kings 
Anderson's Revue .-^^ 
Ambler Bros. 
Harry Antrim A Co. 
Bits of Dance Hits 
Broadway to the i 

Bowery 
Birda of Paradise 
Cotton Pickers*^ 
Collier A De Walde 
Cliff Bailey Duo 
Heniy Catalano A Co. 
Dougal A Leary 
Billy Doss 

Dorans _•' :*^.-^i^ 

Dreams T". . ""/^ 

Eary A Eary ' ' _ -i-t 
Four Cheer-Upn 
Four Kings A Dad 
Favorites of the Past 
Gabby Bros. 
Golden Butterfly 
Billy Gerber Revue 
Jack George Duo 
Inez Hanley 
Charles Keating 
Keefe A Lillian 
Wanda Ludlow A Co. 
Jack Lee 

Lloyd, Herbert A Co. 
Luster Bros. 
Minstrel Monarchs < 
Jack Moore Trio :" 

Marcus A Lee 
Moran Sisters A Nor< 

man 
Miller A Ralney 
Mason A Scholl 
Norman A Paul 
Polly, Charles A Helef 
Payne, Babe A Tommj 
RalnlMw's End 
Roberts A Clark 
Singing Thre«— — ' — -^ 
Sturart Girls 
Stranded 

Smith A McGarry 
Three Little Maids .-^ 
\'^rnon 

""'alentine Vox 
Ada Weber 
(Continued on page 17] 



r 



M 



OUTDOOR AMUSEMENTS 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



3i«MB 



MASS. FAIR MEN ASK STATE 
TO REGULATE MIDWAY FEATURES 



Want Central Authority to Decide What Is Per- 
missible — Seek Standards Governing Local Police 
Censors to Save Trouble 









May Use Trade Paper to Ease Up 
Qrifters 



^i 



I. 



ir 



in- 

'•J 

V 



*• Chicago, Feb. 28. 

Anticipating "easy money" that is 
likely to be forthcomlitg In or- 
ganized attempts to oppose un- 
friendly legislation directed toward 
carnivals, a bunch who are thought 
by some to be seeking a "slush 
fund' to be spent on "jollity" by 
those on the "inside," arc circulating 
the highly improbable story that 
motion picture Interests are a part 
of the forces working against car- 
nivals. ^ 

It Is declared that some speakers 
went So far as to bring this angic 
before recent gatherings of outdoor 
showmen In Chicago and to claim 
that they had "tangible proof" that 
that is the case. 

The plan, view^ed as having possi- 
bilities for a big "lark" if the story 
is swallowed, has been assured the 
editorial backing of at least one 
trade paper, widely known as a me- 
dium to reach the "grifters." 

It Is emphasized in this call for 
coin that "the picture men h.ave a 
- lot of money and spend It," which is 
meant for a hint. 



Boston. Feb. 28. AFTER EASY MONEY 

Fair association ofTlclals of 
Massachusetts favor a law provid- 
ing that all outdoor amusements at 
county fairs and •agricultural ex- 
hibitions, particularly midway fea- 
tures and carnival attractions, «hall 
b« passed on for approval or dis- 
approval by commissioners of pub- 
lic safety before local authorities 
■lay Issue licenses. 

This was demonetrated yesterday 
at a public hearing on such a 
measure pending before the com- 
mittee on legal affairs of the state 
legislature. In substance the fair 
men are anxious to got rid of the 
troublesome question of what Is 
permissible In a midway feature, 
handing the problem over to a con- 
•tltuted authority and relieving 
theoMelves of the responsibility of 
guessing in advance what the local 
police would do. 

It U also likely, although this 
<01d not come out, that the fair offi- 
cials would be glad of some en- 
actment that would put some meas- 
ure of discipline on carnival peo- 
ple without involving the fair as- 
sociations. A state law would whip 
all the fairs and all tho carnivals 
Into line for cleaner midway attrac- 
tlona and squarer wheel operations 

A hearing was held before the 
legislative committee on legal af- 
fairs Tuesday on the bill to pro- 
▼Ids that all outside amusement at- 
tractions at country fairs and agri- 
cultural exhibitions must first be 
approved by the commissioner of 
public safety before local authori- 
ties may iasue licenses. 

Fair officials told the committee 
that one local officer would call a 
game of skill a "gambling device" 
and another officer would call a 
gambling device a "game of skill." 
It was also intimated that one 
officer would call a muscle dancer 
a classical artist, trhile a classical 
dancer might be banned. All agreed 
that central supervision of all at- 
tractions would simplify their 
problems in conducting a midway 
at agricultural fairs in particular. 

Alfred W. Lombard, representing 
the Massachusetts Agricultural Fairs 
Association, related how the police 
ruled out a number of attractions 
at one fair which forced the man- 
agement to refuse conceesion fees 
of $1,250. 

Walter Rapp. vice-president of 
the Brockton Fair, told how one 
attraction thrown out of the grounds 
as "immoral" brought suit and the 
directors of the fair were obliged 
to settle the suit in full. 

Charles P. Morey of Lynn related 
how the police censorship had cost 
the management $1,200 In one year 
and George H. Haywood of the 
Gardner fair told how a recent 
legion carnival show outraged the 
patrons by the class of attractions 
offered. 

Bertram Durrell of the Worcester ^ "«^v checking system, intro- 
Fair Association told of the Incon- -^"ced last season and being pushed 



BERT BOWERS PREDICTS 
GOOD CIRCUS SEASON 



Reports of Employment, High 
Wages, Good Crops, Make 
Rosy Outlook' * 

Bert Bowers, manager of the 
Ilagenback -Wallace circus made a 
hurried trip to New York this week, 
leaving for Indiana Tuesday on the 
Twentieth Century. He gave out 
the show's opening date as April 
28 in Louisville, and said advance 
reports of conditions over the coun- 
try justified the expectation o( a 
more than ordinarily good season 



CAflNIVAL MEN SATISFIED 

» ■ 

All Thoss at Chicago Convsntion 
Wsrs "Clsan," So Thsy Said 



Chicago. Feb. 28. 

Carnival men from all parts of the 
country in convention here last 
week disclaimed any responsibility 
for the basis of the present agita- 
tion against carnivals. Universally 
it was admitted by those who gath- 
ered here they had "always run 
clean shows.'* 

Just how the feeling against qar- 
nivals should have spread through- 
out the length and breadth of the 
country was not made plain, but it 
was emphasized that in taking a 
stand for "clean shows" the coming 
season the carnival men have no 
cause for "apology." 

Any complaint that may have 
originated against carnivals Is not 
due to carnivals at all, according to 
the carnival men. Although opinion 
Is that carnivals are not always 
moral, elevating and honest are 
without the least foundation, it was 
urged carnival men generally and all 
concerns dealing with carnival men 
should contribute to a fund, which 
has incidentally been "underwrit- 



ing in so as to yield a splendid re- 
turn. ,■■.".'■ .■■■•• 



r 



▼enlence caused by the different in- 
terpretations of good and Illegal at- 
tractions and Walter Barry of the 
Barre fair asked that the law be 
enacted "so that some latitude 
would be allowed to put 'pep* into 
the midway." 

As things stand. It was intlmnted, 
a conscientious fai.* manager 
doesn't dare contract with any cer- 
tainty for anything more enliven- 
ing than what would go at a Sun- 
day school picnic. 



' 1600,000 FAIR BUILDING 

Albany. N. Y.. Feb. 28. 

The measure appropriating a half- 
million dollars for the construction 
of a stock-Judging coliseum on the 
State Fair Grounds at Syracuse was 
signed by Governor Smith yestorday. 
The bill became chapter 4 of the 
laws of 1923. 

It is the intention to have the 
~fltructure completed so that the 
World Dairy Congress may go to 
Syracuse next October. 

Although work on the building 
Will b« rushed, it is not expected it 
will be finished in time for the State 
Fair, ths date tor which Is gener- 
Aily the second week in September. ] purposes. 



SHOWMEN'S LEAGUE ELECTION 

Chicago. Feb. 28. 

The annual election of the show- 
men's League held Feb. 20 resulted 
in the selection of the following of- 
ficers: 

Edward P. Neumann, president; 
Fred M. Barnes, first vlce-pre^dent; 
Con T. Kennedy, second vice-presi- 
dent: Walter D. Hildreth, third vice- 
president; C. R. (Zebbie) Fisher, 
treasurer, and Tom Rankins, s^re- 
tasy. 

The personnel of the board of gov- 
ernors is as follows: Larry Boyd, 
Edward C. Talbott, Fred L. Clarke. 
Edward F. Carruthers. A. H. Bark- 
ley. Harry O. Melville. Walter F 
Driver, S. H. An.schell, Louis Hoeck- 
ner, Col. Fred J. Owens. Charles G. 
Kilpatrlck, Baba Delgarian, Edward 
A. Hock, Fred Wagner, Sam J. Levy. 
Joe Rogers. Rubin Gruberg, Felice 
Bernardi. James Campbell, Bert 
Earle, Fred Beckman, Thomas J. 
Johnson, Ben Benjamin. T. A. Wolfe, 
Steve A. Woods. Harry Coddington, 
M. L. Callaha n. Milt/ Morris, Ed- 
ward Ballard, Charles Hall. Bert 
Bowers, James McGrath, Charles 
Browning, A. J. Zlv. Charles Sparks, 
Harry McKay, , Henry T. Belden, 
Guy Dodson. Beverly White. 



for the big tops. 

The forecast is based on the fact | J*-., by aTeTtaln "few wim'The" as 
that employment at higher wages guranco that money will come flow- 
is universal in the United States; 
that farmers are prosperous from 
last season's crops, the steel indus- 
try is more active than at any time 
since the war period and wages 
and selling prices for products are 
higher than for several years. The 
general run of crops are in excel- 
lent shape and copper production 
Is on the eve of great production at 
high prices. 

All these things, according to 
Bowers, indicate that the country- 
is entering a period of prosperity 
and the statistical bureaus of the 
government show a high average of 
money circulajtion. 



CARNIVAL MEN OBJECT; 
SEEK "COOCH" DANCERS 



Meeting in Chicago Develops 
Fad for Finding Fak^s-^ 
. Milt Morris Talks 



"de- 
s to 



RETRENCHMENT AIMS AT 
SMALL PENNA. FAIRS 



CIRCUS' HIGH LICENSES 



Biii 



Introductd in Maine for State 
> Tax - 



Budget Proposals in Legisla- 
ture Would End State 
Aid 



CHECKING "REPEATS" 



Device Designed to End Holdouts 
and Prevent Tax Troubles 



this year, promises to check "re- 
peat" ride fares, preventing "hold- 
outs" and furnishing park manage- 
ments protection against govern- 
ment tax inspectors' misunder- 
standings. 

It Is a standard cash register elec- 
trically connected with an auto- 
matic sign displayed prominently 
above the entrance to the ride. The 
strip tickets take care of the people 
entering, but this does not furnish 
a check on "repeats." For that pur- 
pose a girl is stationed within sight 
of the arriving and departing cars, 
and as each car moves from the 
unloading station the girl registers 
the passengers remaining on her 
cash register. The figure is repro- 
duced on tho signboard where it 
is visible to the park inspector. In 
addition the cash register is locked 
and it automatically keeps a record 
of its own by the day, week and 
Honeon. 

Heretofore the government tax 
ofTloe has kept careful watch on 
park rides and because of hold- 
outs on "repeat" fares the govern- 
ment records and the park records 
did not Justify. By the new device 
it Is claimed the park management 
will hold a complete record for tax 



Augusta, Me.. Feb. 28. 
Circuses which come to Maine 
^ill have to pay a state license fee 
of $500, in addition to a municipal 
fee. If the bill Introduced in the 
House of Representatives by Rep- 
resentative Keef of Vajiceboro be- 
comes a law. The license shall con- 
tain the provision that if the per- 
son or corporation operating the 
circus shall allow any of its per- 
formances, any gambling or fakir 
games, which are prohibited by the 
laws of the state, the license shall 
be revoked immediately. 

The penalty for a violation of the 
act is the forfeiture to the state 
the sum of $1,000. Municipal courts 
in all the counties shall have Juris- 
diction. 



PUBILLONES SHOW OFF 



Performers Scatter When Tour Ends 
Suddenly in Cuban Interior. 



The Pubillones show, after about 
three weeks in the interior, closed 
its tour suddenly, and the perform- 
ers with the outflt scattered, secur- 
ing engagements with other native 
organizations. 

The Borell Circus took over a 
number of turns. Including Hough- 
ton and Houghton. The Pubillones 
show played four weeks at the Na- 
lionale in Havana, and then went 
on toor. The close of the show was 
decided upon when the railroads de- 
clined credit for transportation. 

Other turns with Borrell ure Wal- 
ter Beckwlth's Animal Circus, fea- 
turing the trained lion, Jim, used 
in the stage and picture productions 
of "Tarzan" in the States. This act 
is featured. The Clark -Flazzillian 
troupe Is also with Borrell. ' 



Mardi Gras Winter Circus in Chi. 

Chicago. Feb. 28. 

A Mardl Gras winter circus is to 
be presented at the Second Regi- 
ment Armory for eight days open- 
ing with the Sunday matinee April 
1 by the Woodmen. 

It is being booked by J. C. Mat- 
thews. 



Bohler Revue at Live Stock Show 
Chicago. Feb. 28. 
Charles Bohler is presenting a 
Bohler Terrace Garden revue, two 
circus acta and a big bailer, at the 
Live Stock Show, which is to be 
held at Oklahoma City, Okla.. 
March 11-23. 



Frank Wlrth departed from the 
New York Tuesday for a week or 
so of golf at Pinehurst, N. C. 
Winh's brand of golf requires ideal 
weather conditions. 



Proposals in the form of budget 
appropriation bills before the Penn- 
sylvania Legislature threaten to put 
the smaller county fairs out of busi- 
ness, according to amusement men. 
who are mobilizing to oppose the 
passage of these measures. 

The principal item in the mass of 
appropriation legislation involves 
the policy of discontinuing State 
subsidies aft(-r this year, but amuse- 
ment interests are confident that the 
proposals cannot be enacted for 
several reasons. The principal 
argument against the economies 
suggested is that the budget pro- 
posals include several for cutting 
down the State subsidies to hospi- 
tals, and this provision has aroused 
violent State-wide opposition. Sev- 
eral important hospital trustees and 
boards of directors have gone ot\ 
record to the effect that if the ap- 
propriation is cut down tbey will 
resign forthwith. 

It is probable that the fair appro- 
priations and the disbursements to 
hospitals will be brought up together 
in the same measure, and both will 
be voted on together. The hospital 
proposal is regarded as doomed to 
defeat, and the stoppage of fair sub- 
sidies is almost sure to be defeated 
at the same time. 

Another circumstance that stands 
In the way of enacting the legisla- 
tion is that it would be pretty cer- 
tain to arouse the indignation of 
the farmer vote, and neither of the 
parties cares to invite trouble from 
that direction. The way the fair 
men look at the propositions is that 
the present Administration, having 
been elected on a campaign pledge 
to retrench in public expenditures, 
is setting up a drastic budget cut, 
but with its fingers crossed and 
reconciled to the defeat of its pro- 
gram. 

In fair circles the retrenchment 
plah of Gov. Pinchot is discounted 
largely because most of the impor- 
tant fair associations in Pennsylva- 
nia are on a sound financiar basis, 
and the comparatively small spms 
granted by the State must be re- 
garded as negligible. The custom 
of State premiums granted fair as- 
sociations limits the amount to 
(2,000 for each county. Last season 
the records show that no one fair 
received as much as thftt. In many 
counties there are fliree or four 
fairs, so that the |2,000 allotment 
must be divided. 

The division of the premium for 
each county is not split evenly In 
proportion to the number of fairs 
held within the counties, but accord- 
ing to the claims made. It is noted 
that the amount of claims is consid- 
erably in excess of the xiremium ac- 
tually given. Last year one county 
had four fairs, so the premiums 
could hardly count as vital revenue. 
Few fairs are given as much as 
$1,000 by the State and most are 
under tliat figure. Last season there 
was $138,000 claimed by the 74 fairs 
within the State, and the total pre- 
miums paid amounted to $55,000 . 



" ■ Cfhicago, Feb. 28. 

At a recent meeting of outdoor 
showmen, which had pretense of 
seriousness, the subject of "clean 
shows" was brought to the front and 
a "definite expression" was 
manded" from carnival men 
their "public attitude.". 

Milt Morris, of Castle & Morris, 
who represented himself as spokes^ 
men for the "carnival men following 
declared that "absolutely nothing 
objectionable will be tolerated by 
the carnival managers in the fu- 
ture." It was noticed that he did 
not say "positively." 

This may be attributed to the fact 
that the carnival men with whom he 
Is on most intimate terms were busy 
during the Chicago meeting seeking 
hootchie kootchie dancers, Hawaiian 
dancers, sure Are games and all 
kinds of next fakes. 

The anti-carnival bill in the Min- 
nesota Legislature provoked tre- 
mendous agitation among the car- 
nival and fair men when the pro- 
hibitions in the measure l>ecam« 
known. / 

It was termed the worst bill ever 
aimed against outdoor amusements. 
Report said that it is 90-10 the bill 
will be passed. As many Western 
States are believed to follow Min-' 
nesota's lead in legislation, that 
brought another fear to fhe show- 
man, although Mlnnescta itself al- 
ways has been fertile ground for 
traveling carnivals. 

Many of the fair secretaries at 
the convention attempted to prevail 
upon carnival owners not to ex- 
hibit under the auspices of an 
American Legion lodge. The youth 
of the order was pleaded as a rea- 
son, but the carnival people would 
not commit themsel/Vs. 



The anti-carnival bill Introduced 
into the Minnesota Legislature with 
women's clubs of the State as rep- 
resented by a central body at Min- 
neapolis principally supporting it, 
prohibits carnivals entering Minne- 
sota, declaring them to be put>Iio 
nuisance. It provides penalties 
for violations in the form of fines 
and imprisonment. 

The measure is sweeping In Us 
coverage, including any travelling 
show or exhibition In the open, ex.? 
cepting exhibitors licensed by in- 
corporated municipalities for not 
over two days in any one calendar 
year (taking in circuses). 



DIP-LO-DO-CUS RIDE 



New Jazz Coaster Modelle<| en 
Shaps of Prehistoric Animal 



A new ride design is being built 
at Idora park. San Francisco, for 
introduction to the trade under ths 
name of the dip-lo-do-cus. It is a 
roller coaster embodying new prin- 
cipals and is offered at a cost of 
approximately $29,800. ' 

The structure hp!*embles a coaster 
except that the structure is covered 
and painted in tropical scenes. It 
has about 1,500 feet of trackage. 
The car* is circular and divided Into 
thr^e compartments, each compart- 
ment holding two persons. These 
cars are hooked Into two-car trains 
and each car. In addition to its 
downward motion, swings laterally — ^ 
on its own center In eccentric mo- 
tions that provide all sorts of 
thrlll-s. 

The title of the ride is derived 
from a prehistoric monster, that 
roamed South America and a model 
of "Which is exhibited in the Car- 
negie museum and tho idea that 
current Interest in prehistoric dis- 
coveries can be capitalized in an 
Ingenious ballyhoo. 

It is declared in th«» prospectus 
just mailed to park managers that 
numei-ous types of standard coaster 
rides can be converted into the new 
pattern by a change of minor 
equipment details. Three trains of 
two cars each can make 4Q trips an 
hour apiece with a total capacity of 
9C0 pas.*3engerj nn hour. 



THREE FAIRS SIGNED 

Tlie Frank Wirth office has signed_ 
for the fr'^-e shows at the county 
fairs at Horncll, N. Y.; Lelghton, 
Pa., and Norfolk, Va. 

The same ofTlce will supply the 
acts for the Elks indoor circus at 
Magaro's New Exposition Hail, 
Ilarrisburg, Pa., April 2. 



■J':- 



-"-•'• • ...... k..,-.iL...'XT,ji5;«..'Ui,;.- 

Thufsday, March 1, 1B83 



■»"-^'' 



•r t-mr^-vfif^j^r. i_t^<f^v7 



. y.-'.-t.'r:jrfHimi<^ 



OMII^QOR AMUSEMENl^ 






■l^- '-TW^Sr^.': .'^TT'^X?!^' 



..■vK 



la^ 



"^ 



NEW 1923 PARK IMPROVEMEirrS 
HGURED AT NEARLY $2^1,000 



iT 






»i' 



:-V 



1. 



Only Standard Rides and Like Features Are Repre- 
.:^ scnted — Business All Signed and in Progress — 
Opposition Park in Kansas City 



A canvass of new summer park 
cotistruction on the books of the 
Miller & .Bake/ company, design- 
ers and builders, of standard rides 
and buildings^ shows an estimated 
total of business under contract or 
in progieas totalling $2,500,000. 
This does not include the probable 
last minute buslneifs which is 
merely^' in nogotiatloft aiid takes 
. into consideration only a small 
amount uf work outside the Miller 
& Baker office, such as whips and 
similar devices being handled by 
other firm?. Miller & JBaker deal 

only in. ccanter and like rides for 
which John A. Miller holds patents, 
ev Th« busluess is divided roughly 
as follows: ,^„ .: ^ 

25 roller coasters at |40,- 

000 each.' «-<trf...|l„000,003 

8 dodgems of $22,000 each. 176,000 
6 dome roof dance halls 

averaging $40,000 each.. 
6 aeroplane swings at 

$9,000 each 

Changes at Euclid park^ 

Cleveland, i :.>. . 

8 old mills averaging $25,- 

000 each 200,000 

C whips at $8,000 each... 48.000 



SHOWMEN'S LEAGUE 
TO FIGHT LEG15.1ATI0N 



-4^ 



iv Ut..--t 



Subscription Fund Raised at 

Chicago Meeting — Tom 

Johnson on Committee 



200,000 



64.000 



100.000 



Total .$1,768,000 

The same firm is laying out 

Fairyland, Kansas City, which will 

represent an ' 

Inve.stment of $500.000... $500,000 

And' the new project at .; 

Monticello, N. Y 225,0<J0 



'\ 



t, , Total ... $2,493,000 

»i. This volume of business is reck- 
oned as more than 50 per cent, in 
excess of that for the f-apne period 
of 1922. The conspicupus increase 
in o|>erations has several interest- 
ing angles, chief among them .be^nrj 
the fact that : pmall lesort owners 
such as picnic groves, bathing 
beaches, etc., In towns where there 
Is a flourishing park, or even two, 
have been so impressed witn the 
possibilities for profit that thcfy 
have entered .into plans to expand 
their equipment sufficiently to 
make a contest for the crowds. An- 
other Influence is the comparative- 
ly new discovery that the same 
park can duplicate Its most popular 
amusement devices and make 
money on both. • 

A conspicuous example^ot a neW 
park project in a town already sup- 
plied is the Fairyland enterprise i^. 
Kansas City. That towrt alieady 
has the successful Electric park 
which has continued Its prosperity 
during all the years of the summer 
park slump. It is recorded that 
Electric park last season built a 
a«w roller ride at a cost of $72,000 
and grossed $100,000 on the first 
season, more than getting back the 
investment on the first year. 
Revere beach. Boston, put in a new 
$80,000 ride in' 1920 and gross ad- 
missions for the two seasons of its 
use total $200,000. The circulation 
cf amusement business gossip of 
this kind is believed to .have given 
the development of j;)ark properties 
the current boom. 

The Spring Brook fair property 
at South Bend, Ind.. which was de- 
veloped several years ago into a 
modeft park proposition, has start- 
ed a like movement among the tair 
association?. There are now at 
least four fair associations who 
operate actively during the sum- 
mer, bringincf the season to a close 
with the usual fair. They are at 
South Bend. Milwaukee (state fair 
grounds). Springfield. 111., an' M.m- 
phis. The last named deve'oi)ment 
is now under 'ciinstruction. One of 
the things th.it hwakened the wes- 
tern fair men to the possibilities of 
amusement devices was the ex- 
perience of the Milwaukee manage- 
ment. The.v built an old mill a.s a 
permanent feature of the fair it- 
Relf. It ran only the eight day.s 
of the roguliir event, but in tlinl 
time w;i.s i>'iM>rted to have done 
negrl.v $l5,0(tO. returning a hand- 
some yield on the investment. At 
Spring iSrooi; they invested alK)iJt 
$10U,1>U0 additional capital and tlx- 
return is described as "excellert." 
from the \ery outset. 



• ( C'hii'ago. Fob. 28. _ 

The need of a concerted effort to 
oppose legislation which is 'injuri,- 
ous to showmen is felt to be so 
urgent that at a mee'tins held by 
-the Showmen's League of America 
for this purpose the other riight. 
which was not widely announcec), 
there was between $4,000 and $5,000 
raised. A found of from $20,000 to 
$30,000 Is contemplated. 

While the Showmen'** League ]m 
a social organi^cation, a. subsidiary 
committee is planned to make a 
flght against the legls^lation in 
various states which showman feel 
is dangerous to outdoor Interests. 

E. C. Newman, the president of 
the leagu6. will be chairman of the 
committee, and Tom Johnfton. law- 
yer, well known in theatrical cir- 
c!e«. will be an important working 
member of the committee. The 
other members of the corrunlttee 
will be named this weei^i, ; ; 



<.t 



\ ••/{/. •:«•' 



BIKTHS 

Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Dixon>Freeman 
at Grant Hospital. Chicag'ix:Feb< 17. 
daughter. Mrs. Freemaji Is .profes- 
sionally Jessica Dixon; ."^h« Over- 
seas Girl," and Mr. Preemfin, "That 
Minstrel Fellow." >.„v- 2*.a;-«<.v» r: t 



— * * ^ 



INDOOR CIRCUS DATES 

Bob Morton's Outfit to ConllniM Vrx' 
der Canvas — Has 20 Wefkt 



A number of carnival men have 
gr:vbbed off indoor clrciui or "ba* 
zoAx*' dates fok- the late winter and 
early spring, working under the aus- 
pices of fraternal organizations. 
Three new bookings were made 
kikuVvn tills wwk. 

Bob Morton will start March 12 
at Albuquerque, N. M., with a week 
stand for Shriners. He has 20 
weeks laid out, moving out of ex- 
hibition halls under canvas when 
the weather permits. The route 
lies through Texas and Louisiana, 
artd then move's West. Morton has 
been identified with Western terri- 
tory until this year. In his bill, 
among others, are the Beckman- 
Todds. Orville and Frank, and 
Fisher Sisters. 

Irving I»ollock. who operates the 
World nt Home shows and th* Pol- 
lock big shows, opens an indoor cir- 
cus at New London, Conn.. March 
5. with four more weeks to follow. 

John W. Morton, whose indoor 
show has been out all winter, has 
eight more weeks to go, following 
the week stand In Baltimore March 
5. The outfit has been changed 
somewhat since it showed In New 
York at the Shriners* show In the 
Seventy-first Regiment Armory. It 
now has. among others, the Flying 
Millers, Aerial Crorawella, Nelson 
Family. Mike Cahlll, Leidy and 
Leidy, and the Belford troupe. 



Frank' Cromwell of the Aerial 
Cromwells and P. H. Moore of the 
Aerial Bclmonts, both circus acts, 
have formed a partnership and this 
week opened a shop for the sale of 
radio apimratus. 

' ■ -■' ' ' 

IN AND OUT 
Hcaly and ^Croes and Dolly Kay 
(two nets) were out of Proctor's, 
'Newark. N. J., bill Monday through 
colds. Harry Richmanln his new 
turn with a pick, and Hall and Dex- 
ter substituted. 
. Ciccollnl, the operatic star who 
haf been headlining at Loew's State, 
,LiQfi. AngeleSj was forced to relli'e 
from ^he show for* two days, due to 
critical iUness Jn his family In San 
>Franci8Qa.. j.v,, ^. •.,.:> ^_. -, , ^.t^ 



TENT SHOWS FROM WEST 



^ .^ 



•<i 



REPORTED FLOODING TO EAST 



fs, 



Estimate Eastern Territory as Now Fertile Through 
Close Watch on Carnivals — Dramatic and Min- 
strel Organizations Without Attachments 



DUNBARSTAKEUPROUTE 
OF SHIPP & FELTZ SHOW 



i,i.i«' 



Aerial Act Buys Equipment 
for Own South American , 
^*^< Circus 



«.' 



One of the women members of the 
Flying Dunbars left New York a 
few days ago for South America, 
after completing the {purchase and 
attending to the shipping o^ a com- 
plete circus equipment of canvas 
and seats. This will be used for a 
new clrcuM touring South America 
beg:lnnlng this spring, headed by 
the Dunbars and featuring Bchrey- 
er's Trained Animal show. 

The Dunbars have been In South 

America for a considerable time 

with tfaeir own show and traveling 

with various native outflti. With 
the end of the current season the 
old nrm of ^hlpp Sk. Flets. which 
has toured the Latin-American re»" 
publics for years, will be disbanded, 
the principals, old showmen of the 
State.*?, retiring. The Dunbar show, 
according to present plans, wUftake 
up the Shipp A Feltz routes, which 
covered the whole southern conti- 
nent and usually covered two years 
or more. \ ''*•'- " 



L. Harry Raymond, for three 
years manager of the Colonial in 
I'iftsfleld. Mass., has become man> 
ager of the Capitol. Sprinflgeld. 
MitnA. He succeeds Walter M. Mer- 






OBITUARY 



I t ' 



■^■' ' ."V 1 



FREDERIC DE BELLEVILLE 

Frederic De Belleville, legitimate 

actor with a career covering some 

50 years, died at his home, 322 West 

72nd street. New York, Feb. 25. 
Mr. De Belleville was 68 years old 
and was born in Liege, Belgium. A 
coincidence was that the date of 
his birth was also that of his last 
theatrical appearance, Feb. 17, as a 
member of the cast of "The Hum- 
ming Bird" with Maude Fulton at 
the Rlt«. Tn his youth Mr. De Belle- 
ville was an officer in the Belgium 
army. He played with European 
companies for several years before 
coming to America, appearing In 
London and Paris. He also-jrtayed 
for several seasons In Australia. 
His first engagement was with "Fair 
Rosamund" in London. He came 
over here about 40 years ago. For 
a number of seasons during the 



IN I.OVINO MEMORY 

OF MT DARLTNQ MOTHER 

MRS. EMILY STANTON 



Who departed this earth FetJ. Kth. in 

London. England, age 77 years. 
AHIiougti you hiTB vm» from our Tlaton. 

In meiiionr you'll alirayi Ttm*(n: 
In Oi'i lorlnf care you' will rcrt peic«fii] 
there. 
Awnj from all forrow and pain. 

Moarnrd and Mifised bjr Your I.<»«lni; 
Sou. 

WILL STANTON 



nineties he starred in "Hoodman 
niind," before that having played 
with A. M. Palmer's Union Square 
Stoclc, and the leading theatrical 
orKanizalions of the day. Among 
Uie fahious plays in whi li Mr: Df 
Belleville toured were the ''Silver 
King." "Corsican Brothtrs." "Lights 
o* I^dndon." "Two Orphans."' and 
•"Mi'tite Cri5to." He stirtod with 

saiBBBBBBsannmHHB 

l»K\. \\. l>.\\Vf*ON 

M.-irh ttt'. l"** 

\T.«niorjr tet tlif Ic** of a frc«t I'j), 



H rrM] 
Utin* h« If j 

•«i|injTiii :t i'«iir'y f"r iil» ^l^llM■^ gir*ti'>t vi^u, 
'li«t lij< rfiiia^io ije <1i«"'« J 9( hf lif' >.-mt\-hl 
"■ii-itil sikI piirtiior. BILL LtMAIRf, lia*! 
l«-,n fttltltleil , 

f; <1 MrM yuil. Ben. P.Mt In {irtrf We utMI 
iiiniini f'f you «tid yiu an" m'wA b^ n.Mtrj 
If rr in rnliroriiU. 



Clara .Morris, Rose Coghlan. Minnie 
Maddern Fl.ske and Margaret Anglin 
at. various times. He was a charter 
member of the Lambs, member of 
the Players. Actors Order of 
Friendship, and Actors' Equity. A 
wife, Emmy De Belleville survives. 
The funeral will be from CambcU's 
Funeral Parlors at 11 A. M. today 



OUR DARLING 

INFANT SON OF 

Bert and Vera Morrissey| 

DIKO MAKCH 3d. ItM 
He Budded oo Earth to Bloon ta H«a?Mi 



(Thursday), March 1. Among the 
pall bearers listed are George Tyler, 
Daniel Frohman, David Belasco, 
William Morris, H. Cooper Clirre, 
Robert Edeson, Francis Wilson. 
Henry Miller and Frederic Warde. 



EUGENE WOOD 

Eugene Wood. 82. died at his resi- 
dence, 105 East 90th street, New 
York, Feb. 28. Death resulted from 
pneumonia. Mr. Wood was the 
father of Peggy Wood, musical 
comedy star. He was born In Belle- 
fontafne. Ohio, and educated at Ohio 
Wesleyan University. Mr. Wood was 
well known as the author of sev- 
eral popular books, among them 
three groups of short stories col- 
lectlvelj' called "Back Home," 
"Folks Back Home" and "In Our 
Town." He was also a playwright 
v»ith several sucoosses to his credit 



t JOHN MORRISON 

John Morrison died suddenly Feb. 
16 at Taroma of pneumonia. He 
was 4.5 and a ainger of Irish melo- 
dies, living at Portland, Or*. Qolng 
to Tacoma with the film, "Silver 
Threads Among the Gold." he was 
rushed to the hospital there before 
Riving the performance. The Ta- 
foma thofitre whore the picture was 
to have shown turned Itself ovei 
fur two days as a benefit for the 
widow of t lie .deceased. *-;^ 

CONSTANCE E. GLOVER 
Constance K. Glover (Mrs. Car- 
roil 'Daly) died Feb. 3 at the Elm- 
hurst s.'inltMrlum, Holbrook. Mass, 
after a severe' Illness. The decea'^ecl 



had been retired from the stage for 
a number of years, but in her early 
career appeared with Olga Nether- 
flole and Mrs. Pat <5ampbcll. 



The aunt of Mrs. Billy Noble 
(Noble and Brooks) died Feb. 13 at 
Parkersburg, W. Va. Mrs, Noble 
had been looking after her aunt for 
three months prior to her death. 
Noble and Brooks will remain in 
Parkersburg until the estate is set- 
tled. ::'• 



'F#r<J F. Hohn, 80 years old, was 
found dead in his bed at a hotel in 
Kansas City. Feb. 20. He was a 
theatrical electrician and a membw 
of the local union In that city. 

The brother of Grant Gardner 
died Feb. 24 at Springfleld, Mass. 



James Lilley, who assisted la the 
dcdi^tion of the New Bedford, 
Mass., opera house, now tho New 



in I^VINO MEMORY OF 

JOHNNIE HOEY 

iWlio pasted away February 21. IfSO 
^\v/itym remembered by hia partner 

JEANNETTE MOZAR 



Bedford theatre, died Feb. 22 at his 
liome In Falrbaven. Mass. He was 
a well-known musician.- 



Max Dody, brother of Dan and 
Sam Dody, died at his home in New 
Vork, Feb. 24. He was 49 years old. 



IN lX>VINO MEMORY 
OF MY lirsllANO 

BILLY CRAIQ 

Paan^d Thia t.lf»» Feb. 17lh. 1123 
nOIIHY HARRIH 



L 



I 



Doalh followed three years of 111- 
iies.s, and was du e to a complica- 
tion of diseases. A widow and 
three children survive. 



Tho father of Harry Fentell died. 
»ve<l 76. at his home, Hamburg, N. 
v.. Feb. 22. 



A flood of tent showa Is expected 
In eastern territory during the com- 
ing sftnKon ar(>ording to the pUns 
of several owners' of organizatlonc 
of this order from the south and 
west. The tent show managers con- 
template entering virgin territory 
being under the impression easy 
money is to be acquired in parts 
of the country especially in the e«Bt 
where the authorities are expected 
to closely watch carnivals. 

The tent show org»nisatlons 
travel without carrying outside at- J 
tractions such as wheels and other * 
devices Invariably linked with' car- 
nivals. 

These organisations include 
dramatic companies and minstrel 
troupes, the former includlmr" R^v* 
eral dramatic pieces In their reper- 
toire. Many are legitimate com- 
panies which have appeared in the 
south and west successfully 'for 
years. 

It Is believed that the entrance of 
these companies fnto new territory 
will remove the stigma which has 
been treated against outdoor amuse- 
nr»ents hy carnivals during the iMltt 
few years. 

I'lint-^ iVi » III • 

HI AND EVJUBEB 

Mrs. Jessie Sfoner Cullen, wife of 
the manager, is reeorerlng at St. 
Josephs' hospital. Kansas City, from 
an operation for appendicitis. 

Nicholas M. Schenck, the Loew 
executive, underwent a tonsil oper- 
ation in New York last week. 

Catherine Cheevers of the East- 
eVn Theatre Manager's Association 
has been confined to her home for 
several days, due to an attack of 
grippe. 

Illness necessitated the al>sence of 
Helen Annie Aron from the Loew 
olTlce this week, 

Edwin Boots McKlnna, a dancer 
with the U. S. Jats Band sprained 
his back while dancing^ at the 
Grand, St. Louis, last week. He 
ma^r resume next week. 

Frank Vincent, Orpheum Circuit 
booking manager, has been con- 
fined to his home since last Sat- 
urday with an attack of frlp. 

Elviah Bates has recovered from 
an attack of the flu. Miss Bates 
recently secured a booking partner- 
ship with Wenonah Kenny. 

Harry Norwood ( Norwood and ' 
Hall) has recovered from pneu- 
monia. The act was forced to can- 
cel two weeks of their Keith route 
which it takes up this Friday at 
Far Rockaway. 

Bart McHugh, Keith's Philadel- 
phia vaudeville agent Is at Plne- 
hurst, N. C, suffering from a ner- 
vous breakdown. McHugh col- 
lapsed In the Keith ofHce recently 
and was ordered away immediately 
by his physician. „ ^^^ 

BUI Lykens, Keith vitidevllle 
agent, has been operated upon in a 
New York hospital for a stomach 
disorder. He will rest for pome 
time at Atlantic City following hl» 
discharge from the hospital. i 

Cleo Rufty, of the Crystal Bennett 
Co. playing the Orpheum, Oakland* 
this week, suffered a broken crm 
during the matinee Sunday. The act 
l|i continuing without her pen ling 
the arrival of Alia Bennett froni the .., 
east. ''?" '■'" '■''■"^•;'^iC;.?\^i 

, The WIrth FamHy opened His ^ 
week in Kansas City, appearing ^ 
without Stella Wlrth, who was at- 
tacked with influenza at Detroit two 
weeks ago. She Is recovering but . 
was advised by her physician not to i 
appear until entirely convalescent. 

Adda Gleason retired from "Tiger 
Rose" at the Morosco, Los Angeles, ^ 
because of illness. Francesca Cap- 
pellano, who toured In the piece on . 
the road, succeeded her. She is the ^ 
wife of Ben Piazza, who was man- ,. 
ager of the HHl Street. Los Angclea, | 
until a year ago. .M 
■■- •■^- -^^ 

ENGAGEMENTS 



Grace Hayes, for the Empire. Lon- 
don, revue, "Monkey Glands.** 



■i 



John Trutie has resigned as man- 'i 
ager of th** Supreme. In the Browne- -• 
vllle section of Brooklyn, to take 1 
over the management of the Pre- '^ 
mier Palace, a new S.GOO-seat house J 
in the same locality. The Palace 
will open the latter pa^t of MurcH 
with pop. vaudeville. 



^|...^!t4U^lv;.}1[-:' *;■ i»#^#» iminm-^fl^til^t^ 



r 



14 



OUTDOOR AMUSEMENTS 



.w. ,. r 1 



t f A^f^tm w^x- i 



■^i.M*' 



Thursday, March 1, 1^23 






3*7: 



1923 FAIR DATES 



I. ... 

l The following Ave states are the first to complete tho line-up of 
fair dates for 1923. In most of the othor slates the lists are being com- 
piled and will be Issued In from two weeks to two months. The avail- 

'■*blo list* follow: » ,; •■ . -: ^"-V'..^' ^.^■ ..^.■:/ ; ''';.. ■/^■' 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Society. Location. 

ftl^on •• •• •••••••••flttt*e«t«t** •ACion . t • « 
Rrnstabl* •' Bamsiable 

BlATkftOBe VtU^y. ^i Uxbrldxe • 

Brockton •••••••••••••t*«f«*«»« Jirock ton •••••• 



• • • • • 

• • • I 



Sept. 21. 22. 

.Auf. 2M-3U. , 

.H«Vt. 21. TJ. 

Aid. 2-0.... 



DMrtleld Valley Charlemont 

■••tem State* Expoaltlon Hprtnirfl<'Id. 

Bmmz .Top.iticld. . . 

Frank-Un Counti Gri'enfleld . . 



I • « < 
* • • 



.Sept. 6, 7 

.Ht'pt. 10-22... 

, .Sept. 19-22 

..Sept. 10-ia 



Oardner Drivlnff and RldlngGardner 

Club 

Greater Lynn Lynn 

Groton Farmers' and Me- 

chanlcs * Groton 

Banapahtre, Franklin and 

Hanapden Nort hempton . . 

Richland iliddletli-Id. . . . . 

HlUalde Cummlnstoii . . , 

Boosao Valley North Adams. . 

Housatoni« Ot. HarriiiKlun, 

Marshneld Marshfleld 



Sept. 14, 15. 

, 8»pt 11-14. 

.Sept. 27-28. 

Oct. 2-4 

.Aug. 2'.». 30. 
.Sopt. 2.\ 'M. 

. Sfpt. 20-22. 
. Sept. 2- -28. 
. AuK 22-24. . 



Martha's Vineyard W. Tlsbury Sept. 18-20. 

liassachuaetts Horticultural. .. .Boston Nuv. 2-4... 



Kantucket Nantucket Aug. 22. 23. 

Oxford , Oxford >»ept. 12, 13. 

Plynjouth County BrldK^'water Sept. 12, 13. 

Bouthtboroush Fair South borough Sept. 2t(. . . . 

Union Blandford Kept. 12 

Ware Ware Sept. 7. 8. .. 

Weatport .W est pur t Sept. 2S-28 . 

WVymouth .■^'eymnnth Srpf. 

Worcester .Worcester jjvpt. 



o-O. . . . 



>«•••..' 



J''lt''hbus(f. 



Woireeter, North ... 

WorceKer, Northwest Atbo! Sept. 3. 4 

Worcewter, South Sturbridse R^'pt. IS-l.".. 

Worcester County, West. 



• ••»•* 



OHIO 



Cotinty. PostofTloe. Time. 

BIcbland Raln»bf>ro July 10-l.t. . . 

Oreen .Xenia Julv .ll-Au^. 

Rlcbwood Trl County Richwocd Auic. 1-4 

Pike Piketon Auff. 1-4 

Wilmington Fair Co.. Wilmington Auir. 7-10. . .. 

Champaign Urbann A uff. 7- 10. . . 

I^eesburg Highland ; .Leesbura .Aug. 7-10. .. 

Overnsey-Noble .Seneca ville Aug. 7-10. ... 

Hamilton Clnciiui.<ttl Aug. 8-11 

Muskingum * Zaneirvllle Aug. l-t-17. . 

Clark \,t Sprlngfleld Aug. 14-17. . . 

Hardin. ...••••....<••..■ Kenton . . . . • Aug. 14-17. . 

Ashtabula.. Jefferson Aug. 14-17. . 

Fayette.. Washington O. II. .Aug. 14-17.. 

Clermont Montesay Aug. 14-17. . 

Madison Tjondon Aug. 21-24. . 

Darke J^t^w Madison Aug. 20-21.. 

Pertay*.... Ravenna Aug. 21-24.. 

Allen Lima Aug. 21-24 . . 



J. 

, r>. 

, H. 
. H. 



SAVkM^fte ••••••e»*«ee*e«*se««ss« ^^ lITlffl ■ 



Knos Mt. Vernon Aug. 

Athens Athens Aug. 

liawrenca ProctorvlUe Aug. 

Clinton •••«.... Blanchester Aug. 

Wellington t....'^>111ngton Aug. 

Kinsman .Kinsman sAug. 

Ohio State Columi>us Aug. 

Benryj^ .....Napoleon Aug. 

Aug. 



Aug. 21 -'24. 



nvn fj. i.iai>ui<-v7> 

Anglane. Wapakonela . . 

Huron .........i....... Norwalk 

^1 ooie. . a. ......... .........«..'^a iQ wei J ... a • 

Trumbull .Warren 

Montgomery Dayton 

Van Wert Van Wtrt.... 

B'Ai K ■•••••••*ee*e*e«*«ese*eeeB'--Aril"D> •••••« 

■rlc. .^ Sandusky. ... 

Lorain. Elyria. ..;.... 

Crawford Bucyrus.!. . . . 

Hartford Central Crotan 

Union Jkfarysville. . . , 

Hancock Flndlay 

Fulton Wauseon . 



21-24 

21-24 

21-24 

21-24 

21-24...:, 

21-24 

27-PPi.t. 1 

28-31 

28-31 

28-31 

28-31 

28-31 

•S~4 •••••• 



•Aug. 
■ .Aug 
• AUK 
. .Sept 
..Sept. 3-7.. 
. .Sept. 3-7.. 
. Seivt. 4-7. . 

. .«;.;pt. 3-r... 

. J?cpt. 4-7.. 
..Sept. 4-7.. 
.Sept. 4-7.. 
..Sept. .^-8.. 
. .Sept. 4-«. . 



Perry J<Iew Lexington. . . .Sept. .% 

Mahoning Canfleld Sept. 4-7 

Wsuhlngton Marietta Sf-pt. 

Ca>-ahota, Ea«t fhagrin Kails Sfpt- 

Lake Paincsvllle Sept. 

Wood Bowling (jreen. . . . Sept. 

Ashley Fair Anh'.ey S<-[>r. 

Licking .Newark" .'^«I.t. 



fJhelby Sidney 

Summit Akron 

Wyandot Upper Sandu«ky . 

Bolmont St. CUIi'«vji;e 

Williams ^ ^fnntpf•llrr'*. . • • . , 

Cuyahoga, West JT. North (>l:n»i»?ad. 

Warren » I><l>nnon 

0«auga Burton 

Morgan .Mci 'oniieij\ , :•?. . 

Vinton MrArthur 

Colun^blana Listx>n 

Trl Co. Delphos Dclplioa 

Ptitnam. 0:tuw« .'^♦'pl. 18-22. 

Miami Trey .Sept. lH-21 . 

Marion Marhm ^'< pt. l«-22-. 

Defiance Hi(k<«vii;.> Sept. l.'<-21 . 

Medina..* Mrdlna ' Fej.t. l.««-2<'>. , 

HarilMon Cadiz .'>>;.?. lS-20 

Bandu.sky Fremont Sept. 18-21. 



.^«pr. 

Sept: 

.5ii'pf. 

Kfpt. 

,Si-pt. 

, Si'i'f. 

, .^♦•pt. 
..'^Vl)t. 
. ."^I'pt. 
.S.«pt. 

S»«pt. 

«.pr. 



3-«... 
3-0... 
4 7... 
10-14. 
11-14. 
11-14. 
11-14. 
12-1.%. 
11-14. 
11-14. 
11-14. 
11-14. 
n-14. 
li-14. 
11-14. 
11-14. 
11-l.T. 



.Knton ^sept 



I » • • • • I 



PreiMe 
Tuscaranas 
JefferB<>n. , . 
Morrow. . . . 
Guernsey. . , 

Logan 

RW hiand. . . 

Butler 

Attica Fair, 

Wayne 

Coshocton. . 

Can-oil <'arrollif>n. . 

Brown fJoorgetown 

Fairfleid Lancastfr. . 

Pauldlnff , .Toledo 

Lucaa Paulding. . . 



Dover. 

SmithfleM 

Mf. tiilead 

.Old Washington. 
. Hellefontalne. . . . 

. MancrteUl 

.Hamilton 

. Attica 

. Woo.ster 

, Coshoctoa 



Sept 

.Sept 
. Sept 

.Sept 

Sept 
.Sept 
. t>ot. 

.Oct. 
. Oct. 

.0:t. 
. O. t. 

.(v-f. 

.Oct. 

I 



21-28... 

24-27... 

2'\-2». . . 

2.'.-2*'... 

2.'i-2S. . . 

2.'.- 20. ., 

2.'.-28... 

2-0 .. 

•>-S 4 

A .1 a a a ■ . . 

2-S 

2.5 

te-.f . a . a . . 

2-5 

10-12.... 
»^s not 0*^1 , 



Date.? not s«t . . 



Secretary. 

.Bertram D. Hall. 
, Alarcus N. Harrla 
Dr. M. R. Sharp*. 
.1'. u. Kiint, 

45 Emerson St. 
. .St<'phen W, Hawkes. 
.('. A.»NaBh, Manager. 
alt. H. Gaakllla 
a J. H. Murphy, 

Greenfleld. 
, .Charles F. Rogers, 

Oardner. 
. Kdward D. Teatona 

a Heibert W. Taylora 

.Sterling irrWhltbccka 
F. A. Cottrell. 
, .S. <1. Shaw. 

Swift Itlver. 
.S. W. potter. 
Jos. II. Malopey. . 
. Albert A. Cciley, 

North Peinnroke. 
.Ulysses K. Mayhew. 
. AVm. P. Rich, 

8iMI Mass Ave. 
.Joslah F. Murphey. 
.Walter A. Lovett. 
.Alice O. Leach. 
.Herbert K. Banflll. 
.A. H. Nye. Ruuell. 
.Dr. J. K. Kennely. 
. Mrs. Chas. R. Tallman. 

South Westport. 
. M. C Sproul. PreSa 
. Bertram Durell, 

406 Main St. 



,..r. E. Smith, Box 234. 
aa.F. n. White, 

5 Starret Ave. 
, a. E. M. Clemencea 
. John L. Smith. 



Secretary. 
C. A. Beaver. 

Robert Bryson. 

F:. (Igan. 

S. Daily. 

D. Pennington. 
.-. M. .Saxbe. 
Hert>ert S. Johnson. 
. J. T. Day, 
. D. L. Sampson, 
a R. Y. White. 
. Elmer Jones. 
. Geo. W. Schlnderwolf. 
. Jay Young. 
. G. H. Hitchcock. 
. J. K. Christy. 
. l^amar P. Wilson. 
. Frank Noggle. 
a F. W. Knapp. 
. G. D. Creroean, 
. O. L. Rakeetraw. 
. Charles L. Rermont. 
a Frank Riddle. 
. H. W. Ash. 
. Aetna Lavmon. 
.C. E. Diriam. 
. Gon. G. Johnson. 
. .Kd. S. Wilson, Mgr. 
. John H. Ixjwery. 
. A. K. .*^chaffer. 
. Fmnk <1. Jonea. 
. J. W. Matheeny. 
. Homer C Mackey. 
. .1. L. Ilolderman. 
.W. A. Marker. 
.Charles A. Fromm. 
..George D. Beatty. 
. .H. C. Harris. 
..Jay W. Haller. 
. . R. II. Stumph. 
. . W. C. Moore. 
..Tell Thompoon. 
..Car! Orth. 
. . Ed. Jllowerth. 
. a E. R. Zieger. 
. .F. L. Christy. 
. a E. W. Riidd. 
. . Ch.irlrs Grey. 
I . R. S. Sweet. 
. . D.'ive Sherwood. 
Hairy H. HaJe. 
, .H. M. Martin. 
. . M. H. Warner. 
. Iva T. Matte^on. 
. J.'hn D. Hays. 
. A. C. Hou^e. 

. . t:. \v. coe. 

. . Kd. S. Conkl'.n. 
. . W. .s. F.ird. 
. . J lin I) narkhurs*. 
. . P. n. Martlndill. 
. .H. v.. Mar.vden. 
. . Al J. FlT^nk. 
. .W. H. Tobias. 
. .C. W. K.ine. 
. . J. IT. I'lvm.'^n. 
. . E. I.. Kimb.e. 
. . K. M. rUnk. 
. . Sam F. D;ckerm^n. 
. .<'. A. Hochrnedel. 
. . H;irry D. Silver. 
. J. D. Craig. 
. .J. O. H:iyn». 
. .W. K. WIelanJa 
. ..T. F. St. «'lalr. 
. . Don .\. Deiiricha . 
. . W. H. .'^hvr'.ck. * 
. . M. 1). Urmston. 
. . '"arl n. (^arpenter. 
. . Walter c. Foster. 
. .W n. Miller. 
a..T. V. Hooth. 
. .K. A O'tinlan. 
. .W. T. MeK'lenagan. 
. Harrv Rratfaln. 
. .B. Ward Beam. 



INDIANA 



Co. 



Hlpley Co 

Henrj', Madison anc: 

Jennings Co 

Northern Ind 

Dubois Co 

No. Manchester.... 

Muncie 

IBdinburg 

Crawford Co 

Henry Co 

Warren Trl ( 
Poaey Co ... . 
Bartholomew 
Klkhart Co... 
Ksyette Co. . . 
Johnson Co. , , 

Hendricks Co 

Clinton Co 

Intt-rMate Fair 

Ru< kport 

Salem 

Montgomery Co ... . 

Jay Co 

Harrls<>n Co 

iJi Porte Co ' 

Shelby Co 

«'c vingtiin 

Tippecanoe Co 

Miami <'o 

A l len Co.« ......*j.a.A^ 



Del. Co. 



ft • ••••■* 



• •••••« 



• •••SI 

• • • • • 
« • • • t 

• • • 



ny 



.a .... , 



I 



.O^ood 

. Mlddletowi: 

. North Vernon. . 
Decatur. r 

.Huntlngburg. . . 
No. Man<he»ier, 

.Munrie 

.Kdinburg 

. Marengo 

, NewcastU- 

, Wsrren 

.New Harm' 
Columbus. 
/Ooehen 

.«'oimeri>vlile. , . 

.Franklin 

. Danville 

, 1-Ynnkfort 

..South P'-ijtl... 
. Ro< kporf 

.Salem 

. <'ravvfort»NVille, 

. Portland 

. C<T>'liin 

a Lal'orte 

-Sh ■ll.vville 

. I 'ovingtcn 

. L.iFav< tie 

a <'oii\»-r>»- 

Huntei tow n , a . 



XendQilvllte. 

Huntington Co 

Lake Co 

('a.«a Co 

Fall Festlvnl 

Convmuntty Fair 

War.saw 

Bourbon 

Rvansville >> 

fiutt Fair... 



»••••#••• 



• ■ • • 
• s • • 



K.-n.l«llsi:!e 
. Huniltiptxn . . . 
. 'I'.w t, }•, int . . . 
. Logao.'-piM t 

.II trtfonl C.iy. . 
a rnl.-n ''Ity 

.Warsau- 

.Ilourhon 

Anpola 

, EsMtisv i!i»'. . . . 
. Ii>dI«nfai/ol.9. . t, 



. July 

• Aug. 
■Aug 

• Aug 

. Aug. 
•Aug. 
. Auif 
■ .Aug 

..^ug. 
. Au'.:. 
.Auu. 
.■\\1K. 
. Au'<. 
. .Aug 

a Aug. 

. Aug. 
. ..^Ug. 
. Aug 

. -VUsf. 

. Auk. 

• A UK. 

, .-A'lg. 

, .A\lg. 
. Aug 
. / up 

. .^up 

. S»-iit 
, . S.-|,f 
. .-Vpt 
. S<-pt 



2:»-28..., 

1-4 

1-4 

1-4 

7-12 

8-11 

8-11 

l» 11 

14-lH... 
l.n-1N... 
l.«.-1S. .. 

1.'.-1.<I... 

1.%-lS. .. 

i.'i-in. . . 

22-2...... 

22-2...... 

22-2.-.. .. 

22 - 2.- 
22-2iv '.'. 
2n-2fi.. . 
22- •.'«!... 

•.:s..«4pf. 

2^--5ept. 
2.S-Sr.r't. 
'.»!•- Sept. 
2!t-.-.< pf. 

.'..;» 

. n 1.*..., 

12-'.-.... 
, I 2- HI. .. 



..-■■•Pt. 

.*.'el't. 
<l'lit. 

.S'pt 
, Sept 

,o t 
o t. 



TV-2 ? . 
rt-22. 
r.i 2."?. 

ll»-23. 
V.i'J?.. 

ir»-u".. 

lit i;3. 

.1 

3 0.... 



. o. R. Jrnklns 
.K. A. Wl.^ehart 
.W. <:. .Norrls 
.Col. F.ed Reppert 
.Gil C. ijjndgrcLe 
.John isenbarger 
. K .1. Clnypoci 
.r:ol)t. Porter 
. M M Terry 
. R.iy Davis 
. ChSH. Barnes 
. I'drar iJonahl.son 
. K. M. Overstn et 
. Jny Co' 4<e 
.c. K. Edwards 
.n M. Core 
. 1) H Jones 
.Min-hnll Thatcher 

C'C-t V. H'-p''>r 
.C. M. Partridge 
. < 'h!i«. It. .^forrH 
. r.id>t. MiClMmioi h 
. .la«! V (era\*-9 
. T,. 15. Wolfe 
. .Ins. .\. Terry 
. O'to W. Hani' 

.(Uo. P. Schwin 
. ." W Travis 

.Will W. Draper 

IT. <'f. Erwin 



>j,t 4-0. 



.r c. Itrn^iw — 
. .M. I'urvinn f? 
Kre-l A. Uuf 
.G. I>. Cnster 
.«'. J T.I.ImT 
. 'rK Vernon 
.W. S. Rogers 
. .M. MMterk 
.. \. K. Elaton 
J M Johnscn 
.1. N< wl Ilrow.n 



ILLINOIS 



County. Jyocatlon. Date. 

Adams Quincy Sept. 3-7 

Boone a....... Belvldere 

Brown Mt . Sterling 

Bureau Prin<-eton Aug. 28-31... 

«'arn>ll Mt. Carrull. ...... .Aug. 21-24... 

t ^hampalgn Urbana Aug. 21-:M. . . 

Christian THylorville Sept. 8-10. . .. 

Clark Martinsville Aug. 21-2S... 

t.'llntOD • Breeae Sept. 25-SO. . . 

Coles (*harle8ton Sept. 1 1- 15. . . 

Cook Palatine Aug. 20- Sept. 



• • • 

• a • 

• ■ • 

• • e 

• • • 

3.. 



> • e • e < 



is*««»«««e 

> e • • e « • • 



(Cumberland 

kja wilt* ••••«••••••••••••••%•• 

!*•• u i^fl r* • •••••••••«•••#••••••••< 

•mO Wttrua»«*»s««aaa«eaeaae*»a«« 
A* rd nKl«n»stae ••••« e see ••••• •• • 

F UllOfl* •••««•«•••••••••••••••• 

iaJ ft I la llDea«»«»*«t«t»«e*««t«s»»< 
Km I 60nO • •••••••••••••««s«aeee«* 

Grundy • 

Hamilton 
Hanctx'k •• ••• 

HAfiCfjok 

H anoock 
Henry. .< 
Henry. .. 

iroquols 

Jackson. •• 

Jetterson 

Jersey 

Jo I»avicss. a. 
Jo Daviess, a , 

Johnson 

Kane 

Kankakee 

Knox 

Knox 

Knox. 

i^aKe, ........ 

La Salle .■ 

La Salle.. ...a 
Liwrencea 

Livingston , 

i-'^K'^n ■•••••« •% ••••••••«•• 

Macoupin « 

Madison 

•''»rion ••••••••• ti* *•••*»•« 

AlASOn •••s««a«as««s» 

Menard 

MiTcer 

Mi'Uonouffh.. 



»••••*,# ••••••e 



reeeasseeesess seees ' 
>eees»se«aee*««*«aft 



> » • e • • • s I 



■ • e • • • • I 



I • s • e • • I 



> e s • « 



I • • 



Mc Henry 

McI..oan. , 

McLeana 

McLean 

McLeana. 

Morgan , 

Ogle 

Peoria 

Perry 

s vi I y « ••••••••• tM • • 

*^iaH*ee»e«ee««« •• • • 

Putnam 

Randolph 

Richland 

Ro<!K Island 

Saline 

Schuyler , 

Shelby ,a 

OLUiK* • ••••••••••••! 

ol. V,ia]f»»«««««*a*a« 

•^COl la aaaaaacvsaaaaa 

Taxewell 

Union 

Vermilion 
Wabash. . 

White 

Whiteside 

* V llJasaa •••••««•»«• 

■ • l*»a aaaaa e«*e*««s« 

Williamson 

Winnebago 

Woodford 



....... 

.............. 

........ 



» . . . . 



...............I 



. . 



.................. 

.................. 



, Robinson. ..;.... 

Greenup 

iUindwicb , 

.Clinton. .,...*.... 

. fans . a.......... 

.A J Dion .......... 

Benton 

Lewistown. a ;... 

.SbawneetowDa .. , 

tl'arrollton. ...... 

.Mas<m 

McLeansboro. . . . 

Augusta 

♦""srlhage 

La Hwrpe , 

.Cambridge 

.Kewanee 

a Watseka 

. Murphysboro. . .. 

.Newton 

. Mt. Vernon 

.Jersey ville 

■Ga lena ...,....,. 

. .Warren 

.Vienna 

..\urora 

. Kankakee 

.Galcsburg 

.KnoxviKe 

.L;i Fayette 

. Llb«rtyvlllo 

.Mcndota 

.Ottawa 

ilridgrport 

. Aniboy 

J''airbury 

Atlarita 

<*arliTfVille 

.Highland 

.Alma 

.Mason City 

.Petersburg 

I Aledo 

.Macomb 

a Woodstock 

• Dan vers 

, Hey worth 

, Le Roy 

.Stanford 

Jacksonville 

.iiregon 

.Peoria 

Pinckneyville. .. . 

Du Quoin 

.Atwood 

liriggBxl le 

Golconda 

Mc.Nabb 

j'narta 

Olney 

.Joslin 

.Harrisburg 

Rushville 

Sheibyville 

W'yomlng 

.Belleville 

.Winchester 

. Morton 

.Anna , 

. Danville 

.Mt. Carmel 

.Carml 

. Morrison 

.Monee 

Peotone 

.Marion 

. Pecatonica 

. El Paso 



. -Aug. 
. Aug. 
. Sei^t 
. Auv. 
. sept. 
..Sept 
. .Oct. 
..Aug. 

• • • a a I 

.X)ct. 

. Sept 
. .July 

. «Sept 
..Aug 

. Aug. 
, . Sept 
. .Sept 
. . Sept 



13-17 

28-Sept. la 

> 4~la«a«S**l 
, O'di a • • • • • < 

11-14 

14-17 



Secretary. 

C. C. Mast. , 
J'rank Gllroy. 
.Walter Manny. *, 
Ja F. Fawcett. 
.Cal M. Feeser. 
J. M. Peters. 
dair Ea Hay. 
A. H. Hlx*. 

A. W. Oruni. 
W. O. Glasaco. 
Chas. M. Kennedy, 

Gen. Mgr. 
•Herbert At hey. 

B. J. McDonagb. 

C. La Stlnsou. 



• • • • 

I • • * • 



a Sept 

aSCpt 

a Sept, 



l-5a 

31-Aug. 3a 
. 12-14. 

28-Sl 

13-17 

. 18-21.... 

( al'Oa •••••< 

t 0*0 a • a • • • I 

• •aaavaaas* 

4-7 

25-2U 

0"T a a • a a • . 



.Aug. 
■ Aug. 
.Aug. 
.Si-pt. 

.Aug. 
.Aug. 



. JSept 
a Sept 

.Aug. 

.Sept 
• Aug^ 
. Sept, 

a Aug. 
.Aug. 

.Sopt! 

Aug. 

.Aug. 



28-31 . 
21-24. 
17-2.^. 
10-14. 

28-31.! 
29-31.., 



11-14. a. 

11-14... 

14-17 

4-8 

21-21..., 
25-28..., 

20- Sept! ' 
28-31 . . . . 

Vo'-iV.".'.', 

21-24 

28-31 . . . . 



L. T. Al Ihur. 
Ben li. Mayne. 
K. B. Nolen. 
.Austin L. Onion. 
J. L. Goe«tzman. 
S. E. Simpson. 
F. A. Murray. 
.W. K. Severs. 
, Charles O. Phelps. 
.Ellis E. C«x. 
Ja W. Minnlch. 
R. A. Blomgren. 
JA. S. Cnilg. 
W. R. Nightingale. 
.George Gray. 
C. G. Batman. 

E. B. Illnman. 

F. D. McMahOHa 
.G. C. Bllsh. 

J. W. Richardson. 
.George Gray. 
.C. R. Trimb;e. 
Len Small. 
aK. P. Robson. 
.F. S. Walll< ha 
.F. F. Qutnn. 
.J. G. Wirts. 
.R. Katzwinkel. 
W'. N. Strawn. 
M. A. Arvin. 
.William La Leech. 
E. W. Powers. 
.E. W. Montgomery. 
George W. Denby. 
.R. A. Ruegger. 
, S. L. LasweU. 
.H. A. MoCreery. 
.Struble Battcrlon. 

G. C. Bowers. 
JS. A. ThompMon. 



.Aug. 

-Aug. 
. Sept. 

.Aug. 



20-31. 
14-18. 
11-13. 
28-31. 



Sept. 2»-Oct. «. 



Mgr. 



Sept, 
..Sept! 



26-28. 
V»-"22'. 



Sept 
Aug. 
.Aug 
.July 
Aug 



18-21. 
28.31. 
28-31. 
24-27. 
7-10.. 



IOWA 

County. Location. Date. 

Adair Greenfield 

Adams Corning 

Allamakee WauUon Au?. 14-17. 

Audulwn AudulKin Sept. 10-14. 

Henton Vinton Sei>t. 3-0. . . 

Itlack Hawk Waterloo Sept. 24-30. 

00<>ne ••••■••••••••asaasa*** aa .i JKU^'Il .(.aaa^aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa 

Hremer Waverly Aug. 13-17. 

Kuchunaii .JVun-.r.i Sopt. 4-fl. .. 

Buchanan Je^up .\ug. 22-24. 

Buchanan Independence. 

Buena Vista .\!ta 

IJufler jMlison 

Calhoun Mnn<'.>n Aug. 28-31. 

C.-vlhoun Rockwell City 

Carroll Casroll 

♦ -'arroll Coon Rapids 

>'aH« Atlantic 

«>dar Tipton 

Orro Gordo Mason I'ity. . . 

i"lii(ka.*'aw ,Na.<hu.t , 

Clny Sp<.?ic( r 

Clayton National 



Hepl. 4-8 

.Sept, 11-14 

.Sept. 12-14 

.Aug 2H-.11 

. Aug. 26-Sopt. 1 

.Sept. 18-22 

.Aug. 21-25 

.Sept. 4-7 , 

. >!ept. 2«-2« 

.Sept. 10-22 

.Sept. 11-14 

a Aug. 21-24 . 

• Aug. 2U-Sept. 1..H. H. Baker. 



. .C, C. Brown, 
. ,D, D. McKay, 
a C, B. White. 
, .Harold Welch. 
, .E. D. Landers. 

aWm. J. O'Mara. 
, .Harry Wilson. 
, .J. H. Metten. 
. Charles Erhardt. 
, .R. P. Farrand. 
. Thomas F. Phelps. 

,J. Tunier Mills. ' 
a Robert D. Hood. 
, .<^'harlea Vancleava. 
. .J. C. Mose. 

aC. .S. Wills. 

, .W. S. Henderflbn. 
. .B. W. Kerr. 
, .E. Arganbright. 
. Hy VIehniann, Jr. 
. W. J. Moore. 
. A. R. Johnson. 
. James Norris. 
.George M. McCray. 
a E. Guy Mundya 
. »ed c. Puntney. 
. Paul F. Boyd. 
. Harry J. Conrad. 
. Fred Caraiens. 
. George C. Campbell 



...Sept. 3-7. a. 
. Aug. 2.8-31. 
a .Aug. 11-17. 

"..Sept ."20- 28. 



• • « » 
a a • a 



Clayton 

«'ia\ ton 

I'liiiirin 

Crawford. . . . >. 

Crawford 

D;i!l.».s 

DavN 

I)r< a:ur 

Delaware. ..... 

!>>'.« .Moines. . . . , 

Dubuque 

KayHte 

Kreniont 

i I'.-eene 

Grundy 

• lutlirle 

Hamilton 

Hancock 

Hardin , 

Hardin 

Harrison 

H«'nry 

Henry 

Humboldt 

JackHon 

Jasper 

Jeffertion 

Jone.-* 

Jonen 

Keokuk 

Kofr«utb , 

Lre 

I^'e 

Linn 

Linn 

r>>uisa. a ,^ 

i.u.-as. . , 

Lyon 

Mahaska 

•Marion 

.Marsh.ill 

Marshall 

Mfll!* , 

.Mitchell , 

Mon-na 

Mgitroe 

Muscatme 

oUrien 

I'l'ge 

Page 

Plymourh 

Pocahonta.s, . . . 
I'ott.iwattai'ilea 
Povvf<«iiiek 

I'OWf "jU'eka a .'a a 

Srate Fair 

Ktorv ,,, 



. Ell;ad.>r 

. ."^ir-nwl-erry Poln 

.Do H i!t 

..Schl* .Hwlg , 

.Ar ion 

Perry 

. r.loomJW Id 



>pt. 



1. 



.Sept 



, S-pt. 

Sept. 



4-7.,, 

Vi'-iV. 



lO-l-t. 
3-7... 



»■••••< 



..Vug. 
Sept. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



. . .,Manchi'?ter .\ug. 

a . .P.ur:!n.:;ton Aug. 

, . Dyfr« ville. . , 

. . Wont Union. 
. a Hn'nl)urg. . . 

. . Jeff.T'wn 

. . ' Irundy Crnt» r 

a a Guthrlo Cen'.cra a . . Sept. 
. a .Wi'bxter ClTv .'^ept 

.. Brut... 
...Kid .ra. 
. . ..\ck;» ;•. 

. . . MiMH.'uri Valley 

a...Mt. Pleasant Aug 

. . .Wlnfielil .Nug 

, . . Humboldt 

. . Ida tJrovo 

, . .Maquoketa 

. . Nexvton 

..Fairfield 

. . ,\namos.T 

, . Mfintlcello 

. . What I'heer. . . . 
. . .-Mgona 

. . I»onnell.«on 

. . West Point 

, a . iVntral <*lty 

, . . Marion 

a .Columbus Junct 

. ..Drrhy 

. . .Rock Rapids. . . 

, . . O.<ikaloosa 

. . .Knoxviile 

. . Mnr.shalltown. . 

. . Mar.'halUown. . 

. . .Malvern 

, , .i (sage 

. . < maw a 

. . Albia 

. . .Went Lib- 

. , Sheld n. . 
. . .Clarinda. 

, . .Sh<.nand'):ih 

. , . !.•> .Mjir^' . . 

. . .Fon l.'i 

, . . A voi a 

. , Malconi 

. . Hc<»"Ul>'n 

. . . Dos .Moine* Aug, 



28-31 . 
0-11.. 



Aug. 20- aM. 



17-21. 

3-7aa 



• Sept. 4-7., 



H-17 

:n Sept. 3 



2«-31 . 
18 2:5. , 

«-io.. 

7-10... 



.Aug 
July 



7-10 

31 -Aug. 3. 



■ny 



ion 

, .. iJept. 

.,,Sept. 
. . . Aug. 
. . . .Sept. 
a . . D9C. 



.Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 



4-7... 

V-'lV.*. 
20-21. 
10-14. 
11-13. 



2!l-23. 
20-24. 
20-24. 



*2 31.".' 



Tama , 

Ta> lor 

Van Dur* n. 
Wapello, , . , 

Wan en 

v\'n\ne 

U i-l.«ter, . . , 
Wli'neb.Tgo. 
\Vinnei«h!ek. 
Woodbury. . 



A wi - . ., . 8 * pt . 18 . 2 1. 



. He.lf. r.) 

. Keo^nufiua . . 

. .K'.don 

. hidiiiDoia . . , 
, . < 'oi y dfi'i . , , , 
. .Fort Dodge., 
. .Forest <'ity. 
. Dicornh. ... 
, .Sijux <.'i(y. 



Sep'. 4-7.., 



Secretary. 

.F. A. Gatch. 

.Harry .Scott. 

.C. (i. Helming. 
, R. D. Hawks. 
. D. L. Bryan, 
a E. S. Estel,' 

.J. C. Pii>er. 
, Joe P. Grawe. 
a C H. Gould. 
. J. P. Hess. 

E. A. Giles. 

.Rov H. Wilkinson. 

J. C, Carter, 
. J, C. Hoag. 
, .A. L. Johnson. 
, .Charles H. I'nrsons 
, .Paul H. Kinnick. 
. Orl E. Hoffman. 
. .C. F. Slmmermaker, 
..Charles H. Barb«r. 
, .Norton Bloom. 
. I... W. Kmery. 
..A. J. Kregel. 
Gani.ivillo. 
a Raymond G. Tledt-n. 
. .G. F. Wheeler. 
. G. H. Christensen. 
, .H. .A. Bftysen. 
, .E. T. Ma lone. 
. H. C. Modlln. 
. F. C. Young. 
, .A. .\. .\rney. 
. .E. W. Williams. 
. .C. W. Boud (Acting). 

.C. F. Ferring. 
, H. .M. Stafford. 

.W. H. Rageth. 
. .E. C. Freeman. 
, .R. R. <lark. 
. H. .\. Covault. 
. H. M. Evans. 

L. T. Nutty, 
a .1. B. Siarr. Jr. 
. L. A. Hembd. 
. .J. J. Owen. 
. .Frank Price. 

.TtuK«ell Canby. 
..C. Skow. 

R. Kerrigan. 
A. Phirips. 
J. Fallor 
H. Alexander, 

.lAiyd \V. I'-urns. 

.H. M. Cralpen. 
. .Gtorge A. Poff, 
, .S. D. «iuarton, 
, .H. B Happ. 
. .John Walljafipfr. 
, .E. E. Hendr r.son. 
, .E. E. Parsons. 

.H. L. Duncan. 
, L. W. Snm^k. 
, .W. ii. Smith. 
. Ray E. Rowland. 
. .C. .M. Gll.son. 
. W. M. Clark, ' 

.W. A. Buchanan, 
G. H. White, 
, .R. C. Carr. 
, .A. H. Hoffman. 
, .E. C, iJardner. 
. .Walter Light. 
. .Vv'. S. Avers. 
, J. C. Beckner. 
, .E. It. Woodf.>rd. 
. .G. L. Gunnersf n. 
..James I.,. ^)'Keefe. 
. .Frank Wine. 
, .Wi.iiam .McClure, 
. .J. N. Carl.^on. 
..A. R. t*orey, 
Des M>iin' •». 
K M flravei. 



.F. 
E. 
E. 

L. 



. -X Ug. 

. .\»>g. 

.A Ug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 



21-24. 
14-17. 
20-24. 

21-24". 
7-10.. 



F 

.C. 
.A. 



L. Whitforl. 
.N. Nelson. 
J. Seoor. 



.L. W. Hall. 



I • a ■ • f ( 



c. 


M. 


TrimlH'l. 


.F. 


B. 


Se.by. 


H. 


S. 


Stanbery 


T. 


1:. 


InAcrson, 


K. 


J. 


Cui-tin. 


V. 


V. 


Moure. 



INCORPORATIONS 

Albany. N. Y., Feb. 28. ' 

Combined Thtatr* Corp., Manhat* 
tnn; capital, 140.000; directors, 
Samuel Hoffman, H. D. Moftus and 
Ruse Haberman. 

Alexander Koaheea Ukrainian Na« 
tional Chorus, Ino., Manhattan: 
capital, $50,000; directors, Alexander 
Kcshctz, Max KablnofC and Daniel 
VV. Wootton.. 

Oante, th« Magician, Ino^ Manhat« 
tan; capital, $600; directors, Harry 
Jensen, Howard Thurston and L#. W. 
EffRersman. 

F. X. Picturoa, Inc., Yonkers; cap-' 
Ital, $20,000; directors, I. Kaplan, P. 
Cohen and S. Kills. 

Harry Lyons Realty Corp., Man- 
hattan, pictures; capital, $10,000; 
directors, L. C. Whlton, Florence 
Block and Pauline Berger. 

Miracle Theatre Corp., Bronx: 
capital, $10,000; directors, Joseph 
Jame, Abraham Janie and D. Gold- 
stein. • 

Prudential F i I n« Distributors 
Corp., Manhattan; capital, $10,000; 
directors, Charles A. True, M. E. ; 
Graef and Eslli^r Epstein. 

Fascination Pictures, Inc., Man- 
hattan; capital, $10,000; directors, 
L. K. Bangsbe^^g, H. S. Douglas and 
E. C. Christensen. 

J. Parker Read, Jr., Producti.'ns» 
Inc., New York; capital. $5,000; dl-- 
rectors, Isabel Kaplan, Pearl Cthen 
and J. Parker Head, Jr. 

Help Yourself Producing Corp., 
Manhattan, theatre and managers; . 
capital, $50,000; directors, K. B, ' 
Miller, J. P. Shea and M. J. Pfelffer. 

John Golden, Inc., New York, pic- 
tures; capital, $500; directors, Anne 
Eichel. Marion Elkln and L. I. Fink. 

Verity Film Co., Inc., New York; 
capital, $50,000; directors, Joseph 
Ornato, Anna Ornato and Pasquale 
Ornato. 

United Producers, Manhattan. 
Pictures; capital, $750,000; dlrectc.3, 
R, A, Schwartz, H. G. Kosch and 
Mildred Gerst. 

Gate Amusement Corporation, 
Brooklyn. Theatres; capital. $8,000; 
directors, 1^ M. Brill, A. Weics ai.d 
J. Goldstein. 

Good Pictures, Manhattan. Capi- 
tal, $20,000; directors, Arthur Ellery, 
A. E. Cobb and A. H, Ring. 

nckmann and Reutter, Manhattan. 
Make pictures; capital, $5,000; direc- 
tors. William C. and S. W. Eckmann 
and Ka J, Reutter. 

Los Angeles- Biltmore Amusement 
Corporation, Manhattan, Theatri- 
cal; capital, $400,000; director.-, 
Abraham L. Erlanger. Ja P. Biclcer- 
ton. Jr., and E. S. Goldlng. 

O'Neil-Doulberry Company, Man- 
hattan, Pictures; capital, $10,000; 
directors, F, R, Doulberrv, Joseph H. 
O Neil and William Gitskey, 

Shore Road Amusement Company, 
Manhattan, Theatrical; capital, 
$250,000; directors, H, Ea and E. H. 
Puloh and .7, B, Berger. 

Walton Burnside Amusement Cor- 
poration, Manhattan. Capital. $fOO; 
directors, B. E. Weil, Matie Ham- 
morstein and David Blum. 

Melody Danceland, Manhattan. 
Operate dance hall and studio; capi- 
tal, $10,000; directors Joseph .A. 
Doyle. D» sider Guernsey and R. S» 
Alovy, 

Wilkes Theatre Corporation, Man- 
hattan. Capital, $5,000; directors, P. 
X, McKcnna, T. K. and G. M, Don- 
ovan. 

Skooter Ride Corporation, Man- 
hattan. Capital, $16,000; directors,' 
L, Gordon, E. Gordon and R. Lusse, ' 

FrancKise Holding Corporation, 
[Manhattan. Operate theatre; cap- 
ital. $2,00f; directors, H. C. Murray, 
Joseph Riibie and S. Sa Jalkut. 

New Wayburn Studios of Stage 
Danrjng, Manhattan, Capital, 

$1,000;, directors, William Xewsome, 
E. Brett and- N. K. Wayburn. 

Yonkers Playhouse, Yonkers. 
Capital, $rjOO: directors, W. P. 
Barkpr, W. Bigelow and C. W. 
Goiild. 

Thtf Man Who Met God, Inc., Man- 
hatt.m, pinures; capital. $500; di- 
!»>( tor.«, Eugene Walter, II. B. Day 
and C. J. Tevlln, 

Saxton-Gerard Co., Inc., Manhat- 
tan, the.itrcs, etc.; capital, $."»00; dl- 
roctors-, F, II. Butehorn, R. Aa Mac- 
Lpan ahd H. B. Hollanda 

Mack Hilliard Theatrical Corpora- 
tion, Manhattana Capital, $30,000; 
dir«>»norH. Mack Hilliard, C. H. Mun- - 
ster and R. C. Richtcr. 

Benjamin DaVid, Inc., Manhattan. 
Play producing; capital, $50,000; di- 
rector.s, Benjamin Davi<l, Benjamin 
S'bwartz and MIrl.Tm Zunser. 

Koch, Mulier A. Hayden, Inc., 
l'"ioral Park. Theatres{ capital, $5,- 
000: ill re. tors, A. Ma Koch, H. G. 
Miilbr iiod .Joseph Hayden. 

Albany Clinton Square Theatre, 
Inc , Albany. Motion pictures and 
vaud. ville; capital. $50,000; direc- 
tors. .Jacob T.arsches, Christopher 
II. liucklcy !tnd Samuel Caplan. 

Permolin Film Corporation, Man- 
hattan. .Motion pictures: capital, 
$500; dir<cti»rs. Marjorie M. White, 
S. M. MofTit and Howard Devlin. 

Go-Go, Inc., .Manhattan. Theat- 
rical ni)d motion pictures; capital, 
$.35,000; jliiTctors. Solomon Good- 
man, P. ,S, Goodman and Robert 
W,ilkcr, 

Visit Hollywood, Inc., Manhattan. 
Moving i»ictuio making t.\po.sition; 
capit.'il, .!.'■>. (lOO; dirrctoi-.s, F. Vallo, 
Rfiliert .Mili.r and ('. Wet/.loi-. 

S. Ra nkin Dre w Post Productions, 
Inc. ~%l n It h:\ t ( :i n. Dram?! tic a ihT" 
ni'isic'G J i-o»htiM i(;ns; «nj)irr)l, $;l,t»00: 
dlrcclor."^, Glinn Condon, ii. B, Purl 
an«l .*^. < ;. •;uin)"M tz. 

Lighthouse Films, Inc., Mr.iili.nt- 
tnii. M'ltion i>ict>n'e LiisincKs: cap- . 
ital, $.*<tO; directors. R. B. Blan-h- 
ard. K. K. Shipley and Kale Rowley 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



BURLESQUE 



15 



PEOPLE'S, dNdNNAn 
OPENS ON PROSySE 



Mutual Promises Shows Will 
Be Censored — House 
: Reopened Feb. 22 

' ■ Cincinnati, Fob. 28. 

Mayor Carrel rescinded his re- 
vocation of the licenes for the Peo- 
ple's here last Thursday (Feb. 22), 
the house reopening wIthManheim 
& Vall'a "Jazztlme Revue" after 
dark since Feb. 16 at which time It 
■was closed by the Mayor on com- 
plaint of the Law and Order Com- 
mittee of the Cincinnati Federation 
of Churches. The latter charged 
the People's with pivlnp: shows de- 
scribed as "vulgar, indecent and im- 
moral." 

The closln;? order came from the 
Mayor after a number of the Mutual 
Burles(nje Circuit attratlons had 
been witnessed by the Mayor's 
secretary, Newbold L. Plorson. Tom 
Sullivan's "Mischief Makers' was 
the ftttrattluik at th« PeopVs when 
the house was closed. 

The revocation followed assur- 
ances to the Mayor by William 
Vail, the Mutual Circuit's General 
manager, the shows would be strict- 
ly censored for the balance of the 
season. 

Thomas J, Xockter is Democratic 
leader of Cincinnati and owner of 
the People's. Rud K. Hynl-ka, 
treasurer of the Columbia (wheel) 
Amusement Co., Is a political power 
In Ohio and a Republican. The 
Columbia circuit house in Cincin- 
nati is the Olympic. 

Joe Jermon, manager of the Peo- 
ple's, is a brother of John G. Jer- 
mon (Jacobs & Jermon), member 
of the Board of Directors of the 
Columbia Amusement Co. and a 
stockholder in the Mutual to a con- 
siderable extent, according to re- 
port. Vail is said to be the lessee 
of the People's from Nocke. 



MUTUAL NOT CLOSING 

Wheel Headquarters Deny Report — 
Manheim Houses Out 

A report current In burlesque 
circles this' we^ that the Mutual 
burlec>que whe^l would close opera- 
tions shortly was vigorously de- 
nied at Mutual headquarters. A 
'statement accompanying the denial 
of a cessation of operations gener- 
ally on the Mutual wheel branded 
the story as ridiculous and credited 
It to a disgruntled producer who 
had been recently disciplined. 

It waa further stated the Mutual, 
while It had no intention of clos- 
ing: until the end of the regular 
burlesque playing season, would 
Issue a four weeks' notice to all 
shows and hou«es should It decide 
to close for the season. Lent has 
hit the Mutual wheel shows pretty 
hard in spot, but at the Mutual 
headquarters It was said the Mu- 
tual now has 18 playing weeks, and 
the weak spots were being strength- 
ened as rapidly as discovered. 

"The 'Band Box, Cleveland, of the 
Manheim string, playing Mutual 
wheel shows, drops off the circuit 
March 3. The Mutual shows will 
continue to play the Empire, Cleve- 
land, the latter controlled by W. J. 
Vail. The Empire and Baad Box 
were too closely located in Cleve- 
land to make the playing of both 
houses profitable in the same town. 
The Band Box will probably play 
stock burlesque or tabs. 

With the Lyceum, Columbus, O., 
also controlled by the Manhelms. 
out of the Mutual wheel M:irch 3, 
that leaves the Manhelms with no 
Mutual wheel houses. The Man- 
helms two shows on the Mutual 
wheel. "Laffln' Thru 1923" and 
"Band Box Revue," continue on the 
Mutual circuit. 



Sam P. Lewis Managing Warburton 

Sam Pool A..ewis has been ap- 
pointed manager of the Warburton. 
Yonk< -8. N. Y., representing the 
Mutua Burlesque wheel interests 
which nave taken the Warburton 
for burlesque as a Ihrt-e-day stand 
opening March 12. 



New Britain as Mutual Split 
The Lyceum. New Britain. Conn., 
starts as a split week on the Mu- 
tual wheel. March 5, playing the 
Mutual shows the flrHt three days 
of the week. Pop vaudeville and 
pictures the last half. 



BURLESaUE CHANGES 

* Mlrkey McCabe has Joined "Social 
Maids" (Columbia.) 



TWO SHOWS DROPPED 

Mutual Removes Tom Sullivan's 
Companies From Wheel 

"The Monte Carlo Girls" playing 
the second time around the Mutual 
circuit as the "Rosey Posey Girls," 
and the "Mischief Makers," operat- 
ing under the title of "Chick Chick 
Girls" the second trip around, have 
been dropped from the list of Mu- 
tual wheel attractions. Both are 
owned by Tom Sullivan and both 
were not up to the Mutual standard, 
it was said. 

The "Rosey Poseys" closes March 
8 at the Lyceum, Columbus. "Chick 
, Chicks" closed last Saturday (Feb. 
24) at the Broadway, Indianapolis. 

"Mischief Makers" was the attrac- 
tion at the People's, Cincinnati, the 
week of Feb. 12, when the author- 
ities closed the house claiming the 
People's during that particular 
week and previously with other 
Mutual shows had been giving "in- 
decent, vulgar and immoral per- 
formances." 

The two Sullivan shows may con- 
tinue to play Independent dates 
until the end of the season playing 
in the smaller cities not having 
whei^l houses and on the one night - 
ers In Pennsylvania and the middle 
west. 



SECOND JAFFE ATTACHMENT 

The George JaflPe Columbia Wheel 
show, "Step Lively Girls," was at- 
tached for 1900 by Wash Martin In 
Jersey City while playing. the Ma- 
jestic this week, Martin bringing at- 
tachment proceedings on the claim 
that the |900 was due him for man- 
agerial services. Martin was man- 
ager of the "Step Lively Girls" for 
several weeks recent\>'. The Martin 
attachment made the second for the 
.Taflfe show within a month. Lew 
Reals having attached "The Step 
Lively Girls" at the Orpheum, Pat- 
erson. several weeks ago. Reals was 
company manager preceding Mar- 
tin. 

Both attachments grew out of al- 
leged unej^pir^d contract claims for 
salaries. '■•- • 



COLUMBIA'S MEETINO 

The regular quarterly meeting of 
the Columbia Amusement Co. will 
be held to-day (Thursday) at the 
Columbia offlces In New York. In 
addition to the usual routine busi- 
ness several matters of importance 
regarding the Columbia shows, such 
as the allotment of productions for 
next season tp non -franchise hold- 
ers who operate with leasing ar- 
rangements will be discussed. The 
closing date of the current season 
will come up for settlement. 

The majority of the Columbia pro- 
ducers appear to favor an early 
closing this year, the same as last, 
around April 15. 



MUTUAL BEINSTATES SHOWS 

The officials of the Muttial bur- 
lesque wheel have rescinded their 
original intention of not renewing 
the franchise of the Julius Michaels 
show, "Runaway Girls." Michaels 
has been extended the privilege of 
putting on a new show. 

The other show, Frank Damsell's 
"Pace Makers," also announced as 
among those which would not have 
Its Mutual franchise renewed for 
the second trip around the circuit, 
is likewise scheduled for reinstate- 
ment within a week or so. 



FINNEY'S SHOW, 2D HIGH 

The Columbia, New York, last 
week did the second highest busi- 
ness of the season with Frank Fin- 
ney's show getting $10,100. Wash- 
ington's Birthday, with two sell- 
outs, the matinee getting slightly 
under $1,500 and the night slightly 
over that, helped the week's gross 
materially. The Jlmmlo Cooper 
"Beauty Revuo" the previous week 
at - the Columbia, New York, did 
$9,890, Lincoln's Birthday, Feb. 12. 
also boosting the business for that 
week. The Gerard "Follies of the 
Day" holds the current season's rec- 
ord at the Columbia, New York, do- 
ing $11,500 In a week without a holi- 
da3'. 

Other Columbia gros.sos last week 
were "Knick Knacks." Yorkvilh*, 
New York, $1,390; "Follies of tbf 
Day." Empire. Providence. $8,500; 
Dave Marion's Show, Worcester, 
$5,855; Cooper's "Beauty Revuo, 
Empire. Brooklyn, $7,200; "Ta4k of 
the Town." Lyric, Dayton, $4,520; 
"Let's Go." Majestic. Jersey City 
$3,410; "Big Jamboree," Empire. 
Newark, $8,170. ^— — 



Stone and Pillard Cast Changes 
St. Louis, Feb. 23. 

While the Stone and Pillard show 
was at the Oayety last week, four 
principals were repl. -ced. 



STOCK IN JEESEY CITY 

The Majestic, Jersey City, drops 
oft the Columbia wheel March 26 for 
the rest of the season. It will go 
into burlesque stock. 

The Majestic has been a bad stand 
for the Columbia shows the present 
season. The gross has averaged 
about $3,500 weekly this seaj^on. 



Columbus Off Mutual Wheel 
The Lyceum, Columbus, O., drops 
out of the Mutual Burlesque ^Asso- 
ciation route Saturday, March S. It 
will play combinations thereafter. 

The Lyceum is controlled by the 
Manheim Interests, who also have 
four shows on the Mutual wheeL 



15 YEARS AGO 

From Variety of March 1, 1908. 

Vaudeville salaries were high ow- 
ing to competitive bidding between 
the U. B. O. and the K. Sc E. oppo- 
sition, but performers were nervous 
over the growing number of houses 
being turned over to pictures. The 
Keith-Proctor Twenty-third street 
and Union Square were announced 
for the screen policy the following 
Monday, Wilmer & Vincent's Or- 
pheum in Reading. Pa., was another 
and from the west reports came that 
a score or so of family theatres 
would follow suit. Percy G. Wil- 
liams made it plain he would con- 
tinue vaudeville at his minor houses 
like the Novelty and Gotham, but 
show business was worried about 
the development. Variety devoted 
its editorial page to a discussion of 
the subject, pointing out that the 
change of policy so far had af- 
ftscted only the weak vaudeville 
theatres and^he form of entertain- 
mrnt had not been threatened in a 
big way. 



Even that far back grafting agents 
were receiving attention. At the 
United Booking Offices a startling 
notice had been posted. E. F. Albee 
declared that any performer who 
sent presents to employees of the 
Keith booking office would be barred 
from further time. At the same 
time a sample letter from an act 
enclosing money was posted on the 
bulletin b^ard and Mr. Albee de- 
clared ho had scores of others in 
his possession. 



The picture business was receiv- 
ing a lot of notice. The producing 
and distributing trade had JUst been 
realigned under a license system 
based on the newly liquidated cam- 
era patents of the Edison company, 
but the Biograph people under Jere- 
miah Kennedy and H. N. Marvin 
had stolen a march on Edison by 
buying the Latham "loop and shut- 
ter" patent and went Into the li- 
censing business on Its own ac- 
count, Issuing patents to George 
Klelne of Chicago, Williams, Brown 
& Earle and the Italian Cines. This 
was the situation which ultimately 
led to the formation of the Patents 
Company or "trust," with its sub- 
sidiary the General Film Company, 
which subseqtiently for a time mo- 
nopolized the exchange trade. 



Harvey Watkins. former as.^lstant 
manager of the Barnum & Bailey 
circus, was put in general charge of 
the Keith and Proctor picture en- 
terprises. 



William Morris, In Europe, cabled 
he had signed Harry Lauder for 
another American tour, comprising 
all the Scot's "open time" in Eng- 
land and an additional six weeks be 
had arranged to defer. At the same 
time the Morris office denied that 
arrangements had been made to take 
25 houses of the Stair A Havlin cir- 
cuit for vaudeville. 



Eva Tanguay and Vesta Victoria 
were the Joint headliners the week 
before at Proctor's Fifty-eighth 
Street which piled up a record gross 
of $11,000. The Lincoln's birthday 
performance alone * reached nearly 
$3,000. 



Sydney Wilmer was running the 
Wilmer & Vincent circuit alone, 
Walter Vincent having gone bouth 
in search of health. 



Bill Lykens and Jack Levy were 
partners. They had Just booked 
Edward Ilarrigan and Annie YA|^ 
mans for Keeney's. Brboklyn, In k> 
revival of "Cordeli.T'g Aspirations." 
Alf T. Wilton, Mrs. Yeamans' agent, 
was also interested in the booking. 



, Fred Henderson of the Coney Isl- 
and music hall, was on a trip to the 
Pacific Coast with Martin Beck. 



Ben Cotton, oldest living minstrel, 
died in New York. He was born in 
Pawtucket in 1827. 



A group of eastern burlesque men 
were made defendants in the suit 



H OLD HOKUM BUCKET 

(^ome of the "releases" compiled by Sam Tishman of Chicago frtym 
various vaudeville hills seen by J^r. Tishman xoilhin the past three years.) 



Have you seen the neii\flve dol- 
lar gold pieces? 

I haven't seen any of the old 
ones. ^ 



How did your father meet death? 
He didn't meet It, it overtook 
him. 



To bald headed man: 
Put on your hat, you're 
naked. 



half 



Do }'ou know an engine has ears' 
What do you mean? 
Engineers. 



"We generally get applause for 
that." 



Why do you call him "Hen?" 
Because he is always laying 
around. 



What are you trying to do, make 
a monkey out of me? 

No, nature has saved me the 
trouble. 



Do you comprehend? . 
Who copped the hen? 



Song entitled: 

"If every man was as true to his 
country as he is to his wife, God 
help the U. S." 



What Is an egg? 
A chicken not yet. 



Soup should be seen and ntft 
heard. 



Do 3'ou take me for a fool? 
Correct, sit down. 



How old are you.' 
Thirty-five. 
Are you wooing? 
No. n^i. 

How long ha\t> you been out of 
woik? 
Thirty- a vc years. 



of the Sparrow Company of Can- 
ada in a dispute growing out of 
the former Traveling Managers' 
Association's participation in the 
split of the two burlesque circuits. 



The, team of LeMaire nd Le- 
maire split and a new combination 
was formed of George LeMaire and 
Frank Conroy. Conroy had been 
doing the blackface comic In the 
act of Hayward, Conroy and Hay- 
ward, called "The King of Black - 
wellis" and he claimed ownership 
of the vehicle, thrratenini? arti*»n if 
it was used by H.iyward and Hay- 
ward. 

A widespread revival of illus- 
trated songs was in progress, but 
with a difference. There was a 
famine of "slides.'' Previously they 
hod. been handled by the music 
publishers and offered free for use 
to managers, but the makers began 
to sell them to the theatres and to 
singers and there weren't enough to 
go around. 



The merry game of legislating' 
against Sunday performances was 
going on briskly. Four or Ave bills 
were pending in the New York 
legislature and the New York city 
board of aldermen had recently 
enacted an ordinance restricting 
shows. One of the Albany bills 
proposed local option. 



Willie Hammerstein's ' s u d d • n 
flight to Europe was explained 
when the Victoria theater exhibited 
a brand new parlor set In "three" 
and three now house drops. The 
regulars at "the corner" knew the 
house equipment by heart and 
couldn't believe their eyes. It didn't 
look like the same old place and 
for several weeks acts on the bills 
got credit for carrying special sets. 



I'll have you tooken out of here^ 

Where la your grajnmar? 

She's dead. 

No, no, I'm surprised at the lan« 
guage you use, you should havs 
said, "I'll have you broughtened out 
from here." 



I was III a show ca11e(| ^ '^fhy 
Girls Leave Home." V ^ 

What part did you play?"^' « 
The reason. 



Woman }s an Improvement over ^ 
man. 

That's the reason all the boys 
are looking for Improvements. 



I'll have some Italian chicken. 

What's that? 

Guinea hen. ' 



I had a Job in a department store 
and a young lady came in and 
asked for carters. I asked her the 
kind she wanted and she replied: 
"Rubber." I said if I do I'll loss 

my Job Well, after I lost my 

Job 



You're very eccentric 

How am I eccentric? 

Well for instance which hand do 
you stir your cofTee with? 

My right hand. 

That's where you're eccentric, I 
use a spoon. 



I used to sing in the State Priaoa 
but the prisoners resented It be- 
cause they said it wasnt tn thtlt 
sentence. • 



Courtroom <Judj?e to rti'oncr): 
How did you get here? 

I was in heaven and slid d^wn 
on a rainbow. 

Slide up for thirty days. 



What's the difference between a 
watermelon and a carrot? 

I don't know. 

You'd be a hell of a guy to send' 
to a irrocenr store. 



What's an optimist T 

A man that don't card Irhat hap- 
pens as long as It don't happen to 
him. 



What's a pessimist? 
A man who has lived with an 
oi;AlmiBt.- 



Here lies the mother of twenty <• 
eight: .there might have been mors 
but now it's too lata. 



I loved mother and hated to leav« 
her but what can you do with 
typhoid fever? .* 

— ,.^ -1 

Were you ever engaged? 
. Yes, once to a shimmy dnncej*, 
but she wiggled out of it. 



Th*»re wa.«i a man nnmed Worth 
Was born on the day of h'» birth 
Warn married they say on his 

wedding day 
And died on his last day on earth. 



That man was so stlngV that hs 
put green goggles on the horse to i 
make him think it was grasn. i 



"We don't get much money but 
what we get is good." 



Don't you think I'm light on my 
feet? 

If your're not careful you'll light 
on your head. 



Variety'* Chicayro correspondent 
took occasion to observe that "The 
Follies of 1907" at the Auditorium 
was really only "dressed up vaude- 
ville" and was opposition to the 
regular variety housc3. It yv'as play- 
ing 75 cents top. 



More about pictures. A billiard 
room at Bleeker and Thompson 
streets. New York, which had been 
piecing out a slim living •ith the 
aid of a fituse ,ame on the side, 
suddenly blossomed out undei the 
management of one Tony Lowrle 
as a picture theatre at 5 and 10 
cents. It played to 1.800 people the 
first da>. The overhead was $40 a 
day, and profits went to fou • iiin«'S 
.he revenue of the billiard room, 
the "cut" on the stuss g.jmc in- 
cluded. 



To plant in audience: Come up 
here if you think you can do belter. 



My but you're fat. .:^ 

I was built for comfort not speed. ^ 



My father Is a union tnan and 
works sixteen hours a day. 
Impossible. 
Sure, he belongs to two unions. 



''i 



Don't let that worry you, women 
know everj'thlng. 

That's the reason men stay out 
«n night, tr>lng to find out some- 
thing, y**- 



All the great men are dying olt 
and I don't feel so good myself. 



My uncle died. ' 

What was the complaint? 
No complaint, everybody satls< 
fled. 



J 



BURLESQUE BOUTES 
wii.r, ui: ruuM) os page 

Thirty-four in This iJtSH". 
^ - - -' 'J 



10 



VARIETY 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



LIFE INSURANCE— AND ITS WORTH 

By NELLIE REVELL 



::xj|i 



(PermJiBsfon is rtfusrd for the use of this article or any part of it for 
advertising purposes.) 



No, I am not trying to se'.l Insurance. - 

But I would like to feci that my four years of hell might be of benefit 
to someone. And if even one person profits through my suffering X shall 
Xeel that It has not all been in vain. 

Please do not get the Idea I am trying to force advice on anyone. I am 
merely scattering the seeds of experience, a sort of harvest from my many 
errors and omissions, with the hope that they fall on fertile ground and 
that some of my friends not only profit, ^iut profiteer through them. 



CABARET 



•? V 



For ten years previous to the time I became so chummy with doctors 
and nurses I had been paying |45 a year on a sick and disability Insurance 
policy, providing for payments of $2S a week through the first year of 
disablement. There was no time during that period when I could not 
Just as well have paid four times that amount. •...., .:vv *- . . • > 



My insurance agent begged me to Increase the amount of my policy. I 
refused. I remember one particular Instance.' I was getting Into an auto- 
mobile one day with a party of friends to go to Long Beach for dinner. 
The agent, who was also a good friend, approached and asked me if I 
would not Increase that policy, giving him $90 Instead of |45. 



H certainly was not the psychological moment for such a request. 1 
was In perfect health, had never felt better; In fact. I can now recall 
that I almost had that smug feeling of "sitting on the world." Sickness 
seemed remote. So I told my agent friend. In a gentle, but Arm. way, that 
he was perfectly welcome to Join the party, but that he must not talk 
Insurance. - ■ . 



He didn't. I wish he had, for that $25 a week was a life-saver the 
last month before the benefit arranged for me by my friends. While I 
had some money when I came to the hospital, day and night nurses, 
specialists, consultations, .operations. X-rays and plaster of parls casts 
•oon ate It up. I also had a life Insurance policy for $2,000 which In case 
of disability pays $200 a year. That Just about pays for my bandages 
now. There' was no reason In tho world why I should not have had a 
$10,000 policy. I was always working and at a fair salary. 



In return for the $45 paid in annually for 10 years (^j^Mie disability 
policy — a total of $450 — I received $1,200 the first year I was here. It was 
only for a year. For very little more I could have taken out a policy 
that would have paid me $50 a week for life. It was Just thought- 
lessness, carelessness, procrastination and the belief that I was Immunt 
from disaster that kept me from doing so. 



Unless a man has unllmtted means I do not think he should marry 
without giving his wife the security of a life Insurance policy. Even the 
man of unlimited means is not exempt, for who can say how long 
those means will last? Fortunes have been swept away In a night. A 
paid-up policy In a good insurance company Is not subject to such sudden 
dissolution. 



As for a disability policy, no one who has to work for a living, no one 
who is dependent on his own resurces, can afford to be without one. He 
may argue that he can not squeeze the payments out of his salary. But 
If he can not scrape together the premium while he Is well and working 
how much less can he afford to lie In bed, sick and with no Income at all. 



At last WlUiam H. Andervon. ea- 

perlntendent of ibo Antl-Saloon 

League, of New York, will be 

brought before a court of law. A 

subpoena was Issued for the State 
"dry"' agitating coin-getter, order- 
ing him before Justice Ellis J. Staley 
of the Supreme Court. The court 
order was Issued last week, and 
Ander!K)n was to have appeared be- 
fore the court Monday, but he could 
not be located In time. The action 
was brought by Col. Ransom H. 
Gillett, former "wet" assemblyman, 
through five taxpayers at Troy, to 
declare the "dry'-' league a political 
organization, and as such be com- 
pelled to file a list of its election ex- 
penses and receipts with the Secre- 
tary of State. 

Anderson Issued a statement from 
his home at Yonkers, N. T., Sunday 
and Monday, said he had no "official 
information" he was wanted in 
court. That the subpoena for him 
had been Issued was published in 
the papers Friday. 

At the hearing Monday It ap- 
peared from the testimony the "dry" 
chieftain evaded service of the 
subpoena. At the next hearing Fri- 
day, Col. Gillett will question Mr. 
Anderson. This promises to be the 
hottest grilling ever held In a court 
in the United States. The papers 
and books of the Anti-Saloon 
League, now in the possession of As- 
sistant District Attorney Pecora. of 
New York, as the result of Ander- 
son's mix-up there, al.sp will be pro- 
duced at the local hearing, they hav- 
ing been subpoenaed by the court. 

Witnesses at Monday's hearing 
did not divulge much information on 
tho workingsi of tho "dry" organ- 
ization, Mr. Anderson knowing nil 
and everything concerning the 
league, according to thd testimony. 

\Vitli the order to appear here and 
the announcement by Pecora that 
he would present Andei sen's case 
to the New York Grand Jury, these 
certainly are troublous' times for 
the "people's champeen." 



made a big bit The principals 
In the new show are Carolina 
Ross, aoubret, who dofsn't touch 
Peggy Davis, her predecessor; 
Adele Jeanne, danscuse, and a 
crackerjack; Pat Ivory, specialty 
dajicer; Eddie Mathews, eccentric 
dancer, retained from the last show, 
and Ted Loper, prima donna, raised 
to this position from the chorus. 
Miss Loper, who Is a tall and well 
built brunet, is a good looker and 
wears clothes well — and, after all," 
in a cabaret show, voice is a minor 
consideration. It is noticeable 
Billy Rankin, staging the shows, is 
getting much better work out of his 
chorus than heretofore. Several of 
his present numbers are Intricate, 
especially the 'Tally Ho" bit, but 
with the help of Elizabeth Fried- 
man's Ellda Ballet of eight girls the 
other girls have caught on to the 
rapid stuff and are working well. 



The Peek Inn at Broadway and 
48th street opened Monday. Dan 
Dody staged a floor show for It 
called "The Pepper Box Revue." 
The show has George Riley, Alice 
Boulden, Betty Lee, Dolly Marsh, 
June Carter and Jim Buckley. 



Over 200 Federal injunction pro- 
ceedings against places charged 
with liquor violations have been pre- 
pared by the United States district 
attorney's office in New York, it is 
said. Action is to be shortly taken, 
if not already started. All of the 
proceedings will be directed against 
places In Greater New York. Among 
them are reported several Manhat- 
tan mid-section cabarets, taking 
three or four on Broadway, besides 
others on ilu? side streets.. 



If Molly Fuller had taken the precaution to acquire a disability policy, 
she would now be receiving $50 a' week. If her late husband had been 
as good a business man as he was an actor he would have left her a 
large Insurance policy. If my late beloved contemporary, WIlMam Ray- 
mond Sill, had had a policy. If I, myself, had worried as much about me 
as 1 did about tho production.^ I was helping get over, there would have 
been two fewer benefits to be given. There was Bert Leslie, one of the 
greatest comedians ever, but another whose business perspicacity did 
not measure up to his talent. There was Dorothea Antcll, now helpless 
and without funds. The list in the profe.«slon seems end^ess. 



The latest lobby to come to Al- 
bany, N. Y., is the one for \he hotels 
of the State. The newest lobby at 
the State Capitol swung into action 
yesterday, when Frank A. K. Bo- 
land, counsel for the Hotel Associ- 
ation of New York city, came to Al- 
bany to oppose measures introduced 
in the State Legislature intending 
to prohibit bootblacks and barbers 
from working at their trades on 
Sunday. At present the bills are 
In the Judiciary Committees of the 
Senate and Assembly. Counsellor 
Bo'and alao deolar*d he wo-jd pro- 
test against the bill of Assemblyman 
Alfred J. Kemctiy. Democrat, of 
Queens, proposing that hotels be 
subject to Inspection and regjlat'.on 
by local boards of health. 



The Oklahoma state legislature 
has passed a bill making the 
sale of poison booze murder, pun- 
ishable with death in the electric 
chair, and the measure has been 
signed by Governor J. C. Walton, 
making It the m"ost drastic law 
againt the bootlegger of any -In the 
country. The bill makes it murder 
to sell liquor that results In death, 
with the ma.-imum penalty death in 
the electric chair according to the 
circumstances of the case. < ., 



Lying here, seeing so many transferred from private rooms to charity 
ward, the'crying need of insurance cornea home to me more strongly 
every day. It would be so easy to take advantage of It, particularly for 
tho men and women of the stage. They are entitled to live well and dress 
well, for they work hard for good salaries, but it would be a matter of only 
one fine dress, one gay party less a year to insure that thCy shf^il continue 
to live well and dress well, come what fortune may. ' ' . 



Many show people are provident and have tangible results. We all 
know that. Also is it known that many professionals take a reserve from 
their earnings and have cash available at all times. It's human nature. 
Ijowever, for any person to want to Invest savings, .safely, for a certain 
return. To me life insurance Is a gamble. Wo gamble wUh the com- 
panies, on the length of our lives— but we can't lose, for the amount we 
are Insured for must be paid, whether we live or die. If we live to the 
maturity of the policy (if endowment insurance) meanwhile we have the 
privilege of borrowing money on the policy at any time after three 
annual premiums have been paid. That may be obtained quickly and 
without annoyance, besitles the other benoiHs derived from it. Saving 
up for the premium becomes a habit. We nre aware this American public 
saved more during the war to pay for Liberty Bonds on the Installment 
|.lan than thl.s country ever before had saved. That practice of saving 
acquired during the war, when there was an objective, had more than 
a little to do with the business depression that followed. It had made the 
public thrifty and they continued it. 



The "Extra Dry" is a place in At- 
lantic City that has always been 
noted for its good food. Located on 
Atlantic avenue, the main thor- 
oughfare in the city proper, visitors 
to the beach front hotels never find 
It, but it has always drawn steady 
business from the initiated. -The 
thirsty name, taken from the almost 
extinct champagne phrase, was car- 
ried out in the dining room deco- 
rations, which had numberless 
strings of wine bottle 'corks. The 
only reminder is now carried on the 
back of the present menu cards. 
Thereon is printed "Our wine list 
was:" and then follows the tabu- 
lated list of the liquors as before 
the war, but the price columns are 
ihissing. Above the lip smacking 
list of drinks Is the notice: "Good 
fellows — here your eyes may feast 
upon the names of those 'deceased'." 



A cabaret opened lately in 
Montreal under the name of 
"Bagdad." The establishment was 
formerly known as Giro's, the latter 
firm hrtvlng gone bankrupt some 
weeks ago. Elmer Floyd Is in 
chargo of the new place. It opened 
with a epectacular production, "The 
Jewel Box Revue," staged by Floyd. 
Al Friedman's society orchestra Is 
engaged. The atmosphere of the 
place is Arabian and Oriental deli- 
cacies are set forth on the menu 
cards. The couvert Is $2. 



established .it Immediately, alsei 
Prior to that the "Chauve-Souria^ 
outfit had made the Blue Mill, « 
little dairy place on Central park 
west, near Sixtieth street, by. 
nightly grouping there, so much bo 
that a national society journal com« 
mented on It. The Petroushka 
charges a $2 couvert until 1 o'clock, 
when an upstairs room is opened 
and another couvert goes on. There 
is a gypsy orchestra for dancing. 
The Eagle has a European string 
orchestra and features spontaneous 
entertainment by theatrical patrons 
at the tables and the Russian spe- 
cialty performers who flock there. 



The cabaret at Henry Fink's Lit- 
tle Rltz Club, Brooklyn, Includes 
Max Stamm, Dorothy Spring and 
Harry Tanner, with Fink acting as 
master of ceremonies. Nat Mar- 
tin's orchestra supplies the dance 
music. 



Sam Paul, formerly of the Bal 
Tabarin, has taken over the man- 
agement of the Nightingale, at 
Broadway and 48th street, New 
York. 



William J. Kupper, 64 years old 
and prominent hotel man of Kan- 
sas City, died at his home in that 
city on Feb. 24. He had been in ill 
health for nearly a year. 



*n'he Cave Follies,'* at the Grune- 
wald Hotel, New Orleans, ended its 
engagement last week. It's an 
Ernie Young revue, and has been 
booked under a guai'antee from the 
Masons for a week each at Moline, 
Fort Wayne and Terre Haute on its 
way back to Chicago. » 



Sam Salvain returned to New 
York this week after his visit to 
London. He is going over again 
about March 21, probably taking at 
that time the people of the "Planta- 
tion" colored floor revue. While In 
London Sam was mute on his opin- 
ion of English cabarets and cabaret 
entertainment, but he did mention 
to a Variety representative there 
he had to wait In one restaurant 45 
minutes before a waiter appeared 
to take his order. Neither could 
the New York restaurateur under- 
stand why, when he ordered grape 
fruit, ham and eggs Qj\<i coffee for 
breakfast, he could not secure them 
in that way. Instead of first getting 
ham and eggs, then grapo fruit and 
then coffee. Variety's London man 
said that while Sam coulCn't un- 
derstand It, the English did, as they 
have been doing it that way for a 
few hundred years. 



Lew Gold and orchestra open at 
the new Club de Ville, New York, 
March B. 



To me It's much preferable to save for an insurance premium than to 
Invest In jewelry on the thcM.; jewelry la always a quick asset, or merf^ly 
to deposit a small amount weekly in a savings bank because It Is always 
there for Immediate use, paying Interest besides. The same Interest paid 
by a savings bank becomes an accumulative dividend on an Insurance 
policy. Life insurance, therefore, works two ways, if not more. It gives 
"you something while you live — protection— and gives s«imcthlng to those 
you love best if you pass out before the policy becomes payable In full. 
Meanwhile you can do both, save for your premium and keep up a savings 
bank account. 



E. Van Shillagh says he succeeded 
to the orchestra psivilege at the 
Clover Gardens dance place. New 
York, following Joseph C. Smith 
and that Leslie J. Stevens, who now 
has the orchestra privilege there, 
succeeded him (Van Shillagh). It 
was reported Stevens was direct 
successor to Smith. 



Some sacrifice may 1 e required to make the payments. But It's worth 
It, for an insurance policy Is always the best policy. And next to friend- 
ship it Is tht> best Investment in the world. 

We have to do sotnethlng for a rainy day besides buy umbrellas. 



HuQhie Barrett's jazz band opened 
an eight weeks' engagement at the 
Trocadero restaurant, London, Feb. 
4. and are featured under the tiH" 
"Hughie Barrett's Trocoragfeers." 
They are booked from America by 
Percy Riess for eight weeks with 
an option of an additional eight. 
They play afternoons and evenings 
and were very well received, with 
every indication the option will be 
exercised. There are si.x young 
chaps in the band and the names of 
the five othera in addition to Bar- 
rett are John Wade, E. P. Ward. 
F. N. Smith, Ted Stenzel, Al Payne. 

Ernie Young's latest show atop th. 
Century theatre, Baltimore, got its 
send off mondfly night and was fea- 
tured by a big en.semble number, 
"S.iy It With Pearls." In this num 
ber tho girls of the chorus^ were 
garbed in costumes made of pearls 
The other ensemble numbers 
were "Tally Ho," "Bold Pirates.' 
"Back to Baltimore" and 'Pogo.' 
The Pogo stuff Is retained wisely 
from the last show, where It 



An aftermath of Morris Gest's 
hand-made Russian craze is reflect- 
ed In a trend toward Russian « afe.- 
springing up cverj- whore, tho two 
most Interesting being the Russiii: 
Eagle at Fifty-seventh street, near 
Madison avenue, and Club Pe- 
troushka (Russian for Punch and 
Judy) at 50 East Fiftieth street 
The Eagle has the official patronagi 
of Gest, the accepted leader of the 
Ituss movement. The rival one ha.« 
the name and backing of Nicholas 
Rennlzoff. the decorator who paint- 
ed th. "Chauve-Sourls" sets and 
the Century roof for the presenta- 
tion. 

Gest Is said to have severed rela 
tions with Rennizoff aft^r tlie ar'.i.^t 
had his name put up over the :k*w 
restaurant and Gest learned he had 
decorated It in somewhat similar 
style to the Century. 

The I'etroushka is flnanclally 
spon.sored by a Russian who made 
a great business success In the war 
in association with Rennizoff and 
Fred Mclsaac, the former Boston 
critic who cast off to produce plays 
In New York. It had a prosperous 
opening. 



The strongest bids ever known for 
patronage in cafe opposition Is now 
on on the north side of Chicago 
where managers appear to have 
thrown discretion In the discard 
and are determined to outdo their 
rivals regardless of cost. Ernie 
Young, prominent in the manage- 
ment of the Marigold Gardens, has * 
had the edge on the others owing 
to the splendid revues he has Stag- 
ed. . Young's entertainments have 
been popular in spite of the disposi- 
tion of the management to give a 
bad deal to patrons at all times and 
to overcharge as a stated policy. 
Fred Mann opened up his new mil- 
lion dollar Rainbow Gardens this 
season and his following has de- 
veloped many tremendous crowds 
with Ed Beck's revue and Frank 
Westphal's orchestra to bolster up 
the interest. Green Mill Gardens, 
recently passing to new manage- 
ment, long a favorite resort with 
the younger set, somehow' or other 
has not gotten its stride under the 
new control. 

The Rodezvous, Ilehry Horn's 
place, has been getting a fine play 
in the last three months and being 
conservatively managed Is making 
hay while the others fight. 

The situation would not be ex- 
pected to bring developments In 
the way of improvements in at- 
tractions at this time of year but 
that Is far from the case. "To break 
th;"ee matinee dansant.s are being 
added to the regular performances 
and the admission charge Is being 
raised from $1 to $2.20. Ralnbo 
Garden opened a new revue Feb. 
27 with Ruth Etting, one of the 
stn>nge."^t floor shows there. 

Valentino was sought by Ernie 
Young when he cnmo to Trianon. 
When there was a break between 
Andrew Karzas, manager of the 
palatial Southside danco place, and 
V'aletitino, It whs n4>t long untU- 
there came the announcement that 
the "sheik of sheiks" was to be seen 
at the Marigold. Chicago womea 
have lost all restraint In their ad- 
miration of Valentino. There is no 
question but what he Is the biggest 
card that amusements of any kind 
have known In all the period of 



I 



d) 






^ 



••■ir 



■ • ■*■■ 



■i 



1 









Gest, however, took his Moscow 
and Balieff players to the Eagle and commercial entertainment here. 



^7 






j'"\\-f,(,y'j 



«^' A- ,""V»*v.- -\V ' 



Ihursday, March 1, 1923 



vO 



VARIETY 



l^-T.".-*-",ft> r^ ; 



17 ■^. 



SPORTS 



One of the blpgest cocklnff mains 
held In America recently was dis- 
closed in Baltimore last Sunday 
mornlngr. when police raided the 
home of Spot Mitchell, near Back 
River, and arrested 35 men on a 
chargre of disorderly conduct. 
Several times that number escaped 
over the Ice on the river, eluding 
the police. Fighting cocks from 
all over the country were entered 
in the main and many thousands 
of dollars were bet on the affair, 
according to a local newspaperman 
who witnessed it all. The cock 
fighting was preceeded by a stiff 
*'seat game.'' whicli is played in 
putting two huge dice in a barrel 
and then casting them out. -with the 
upper numbers counting. Men from 
Boston. New Yoric. Philadolphia and 
other cities were present and the 
main fight of the CNt^ning was 
between a bird from A'irginia and 
one from Maryland. But ant t her 
chicken gave the affair away. One 
of the cocks refuwed to llgiit. and 
was put back into' his bag. There 
he began crowing. All efforcs to 
stop him were uselos.s. The police 
heard the bird crowing and made 
the raid. Intimations that such an 
event was to have been held Iicre 
had been floating around In sport- 
ing circles for some time. The 
men who were arrested were fined 
$6.45 eacli. The S. P. C. A. and 
other humane organizations have 
begun "investigations" of the affair. 



The decision of the judges and 
referee at Madison Square Clarden 
last Friday night wlien (.Jone Tun- 
ney was announced tiie winner over 
Harry Greb. wliich meant tl.ut Tun- 
ney regained from the Pittsl)urgh 
battler the iiglit- heavy wcifrlu cham- 
pion^liip. was the most unfair of tlic 
season. The fight bugs are ttill 
talking about tlie "robbery." and will 
for^some time to come Clreb is no 
sweet lily in the ring. He uses all 
the tricky tactics »>ossible. the wear- 
ing down stunts of a wr*>sHer, nnd 
lias little regard for tiie rub r. Also 
he stepped into the ring with a ma- 
jority of U)Cal fans fi'ling the Garden 
hoping he would lose. 

Yet most of them turned in his 
favor as the result of that awful 
decision. Seeing Greb in action 
against Tunney explains the Pitts- 
burgher's methods. No doubt about 
Harry taking advantage of an edge, 
no doubt about his holding and hit- 
ting in the clinches. But that is 
the only way he knows how to scrap. 
Greb is a born fighter, a marvel of 
Btamina. He was never in trouble 
during the fifteen rounds of fierce 
milling, and actually en his toes for 
every fighting second. That proved 
his superb condition, and rarely has 
a boxer been in better physical 
Ahape. He did virtually all the lead- 
ing and landed to Tunney's head 
countless times., It he possessed a 
real soak Gene would have dropped. 
Greb took severe body punishment 
because of his style. Neither man 
went down, and so there were many 
persons present who were amazed 
at the decision. Referee Haley 
warned and argued with Greb to 
modify his tactics; in fact, became 
so angry he was on the point of dis- 
qualifying him. That the crowd 
would have stood for, but not tliat 
decision. The passing of a cham- 
pionship under such conditions can- 
not but be unsatisfactory. 

The "wise' money angle figured. 
Insiders had been trounced in the 
betting two weeks hand running — 
the White-Kansas match and that 
of Carl Tremalne and Johnny Cur- 
tain. The "boys" were down on 
Tunney, who was even made favor-, 
Ite for some wagers. Funny how 
the betting mob guessed the answer. 

Patsy Haley's stock as a referee 
fell many points In the eyes of Hghf 
experts as well as fans. H|s con- 
stant warning of Greb and the al- 
tercation with him during the 12th 
round were not called for in light 
of foul tactics also indulged in by 
Tunney. Gene started getting rough 
as early as the second round and 
later on when Greb outgamed hiJn 
In that department, started com- 
plaining. CJreb's head was often On 
Tunney's chest. That is the on'y 
way he could have fouglit a man 
so much taller and it is a fact il^it 
most of the times Tunney*.s head 
went back, it was becauj«.'' of Greb's 
stiff RtraiRlit left .Inbs. Tiinrey is 
known as a rough worl:or liiniself. 
I>an Morg.'ni. manager rf Hatllin-t 
Levinbky. former titl*.' h-ji-Jor oi" t'"^ 
division, decl.irtd tliat when ihc 



ag€ asked many Tunney followers 
If their man had won the tight. 
They invariably replied he had not. 



That he had been offered the 

presidency of the Boston National 
League club two weeks before 
Christy Mnthewson was elected; 
I hat John McGraw, manager of the 
CJiants, had "tipped" him to the 
opening; that McGraw apparently 
suggested Mathewson's name when 
he declined; that he would proba- 
bly line up with the "independents" 
should the threatened war in base- 
ball break; and that one-half of the 
$250,000 he had earned outside of 
Troy during his baseball career had 
either been lost or stolen from him 
'n unsuccessful investments or 
business ventures in Troy, were the 
high lights in an address made by 
Johnny Evers. famous second ba-*e- 
man, at a smoker of the Holy Name 
Society of St. Bridget's Church. 
Watervlirt. N. Y., last \^^ek. After 
voicing his delight over the return 
Df Mathewson to baseball and his 
belief that Matty would make good 
in his new job just as he had won 
in his desperate fight against ill- 
ness, Evers explained tlie offer to 
head the Boston Braves. "Mathew- 
son's appointment," he said, "illus- 
trate« what gratitude John Mc- 
c;raw has for a player who has 
oeen loyal to liim. He certainly did 
not need to show any gratitude to- 
ward me. because practically every- 
thing I did on the baseball field 
f was against him. The night of 
I Feb. 5 the 'phone run:; in my house. 
I When ^ answered it McGraw was 
on the wire. He said, 'I am leaving 
for Havana at 8:30 tomorrow morn- 
ing, but as there is something 
doing, I want you to come to New 
York tomorrow and a party will 
meet you at 4:30 in the afternoon.' 
I went to New York the next day 
and met Judge Fuchs. We had 
dinner together and went to the 
theatre, during which time we dis- 
cussed the impending Boston deal. 
He told me if I could raise $150,000. 
the presidency of the Boston club 
was mine. However, I had to in- 
form him that it would not be pos- 
sible for me to raise;^the money. 
If I did not take tho position my- 
self, I would sooner see Mathew- 
son have it than anyone else. When 
I saw he had been appointed no one 
was more pleased.'' Ever* declared 
McGraw is one of the greatest men 
in baseball today. Discussing the 
threatened war in baseball circles 
during the coming season, Johnny 
said he had just come through one 
war and was ready for another; 
that from the treatment given him 
for the last few years, when the 
time arrived, he would probably be 
found in the camp of the Independ- 
ent«. In speaking of the big sal- 
aries now paid players, he stated 
that while a member of the Advis- 
ory Board of the Chicago team he 
received $1,000 more a year than he 
had aa a player. 



^tanrrr: 



Augle Ratner goes against Jack 
Delaney of Bridegport at the Com- 
monwealth Saturday night. The 
boys are guaranteed a good house, 
as this Is their third meeting and 
it may possibly be Ratner's last 
fight around New York for some 
time. They want him abroad. 
Within the past week he has re- 
ceived cable offers of three fights 
abroad, with a guarantee of $10,- 
000.' The men that they want to 
ma.tch Ratner with are Todd, who 
just won the title of English wel- 
terweight champion from Ted "Kid " 
Lewis; also with the latter and 
with Mike McTeague. Ratner is 
working up considerable of a fol- 
lowing In picture circles through 
his association with young Philip 
Rosen, who is more or less sponsor- 
ing him. 



battler was defeated by TuiiIkv. t:ie 
latter kept j^libing liis tli.iml.s i!Uo 
l^evinr.!;y's ( yes for the lust tbree 
rounds., Tlie battler told >forgnn 
between voWr.ds tb.at Tui;ih'\ was 
tryinfi i :,i:.l liim.. Atier tlie liplu 
la. «<t !•';•. . ;• .-.li^lit. one k»' -a person- i 



The harmony engine of the New 
York State Basketball league, which 
was to hit on all sixes thi season 
in its travel along the road to pros- 
perity, sputtered badly montlis ago 
and has now been forced to detour, 
if not actually to go into the ditch. 
Its owners realize that the machine 
cannot be put I' condition to send 
it over the finishing line strong, 
but hope sulTlcicnt repairs can be 
made to liav? it complete tlie race. 
Following on tlie heels of many 
other troubles, has come the an- 
nounc-emcnt of William H. II"i».n- 
^ta!!. manar.or of Albn^v, lliat he 
v.f>uld tran.-fer the fran cliisc to an- 
other city because the tans lailed 
to suppotf tlir* team, llepinstall or- 
ganized the league and Albany ha« 
been one of it." main bnlwarks. In 
romm'^i-.tincr on a gutne playe.l be- 
tween an "iniporiOfV lenrn fi'orn 
Ci»h(»»'S and a "i(»cai" tea:ii from 



Troy last week (In which Cohoea 
only won by a point), Bat Wright, 
sporting editor of the "Times," said 
the league must come to local play- 
ers, if it wished to continue. Ha 
declared that the salaries paid to 
New York City stars were toi) large 
and that their playing was fre- 
quently bad — they were either rest- 
ing up for an important game el«e- 
where the next night, or were tired 
out from a big game somewhere 
else the previous night. Wrigbt 
frankly said that the league was 
uu the vei'Ke uf disrupliun. 



The will of Henry Buermeyer, one 
of the founders of the New York 
Athletic Club and the first amateur 
champion heavyweight boxer of the 
United States, who died Oct. 10, 
filed for probate In the Kings County 
Surrogate's Court, gives his entire 
estate of less than $2,600 In person- 
alty, after all debts are paid, to his 
widow. Mary A. F. Buermeyer^ of 61 
Clark street, Bsooklyn, she, with- 
out bonds, being abo the executrix. 

Mr. Buermeyer, survived also by 
a brother and five nieces and 
nephews, died a victim of pneumo- 
nia. He was born at Broad and 
Market Field streets. New York, in 
a house destroyed in the great fire 
of 1845. He graduated from the 
Mechanics' Institute School, In 
Chambers street, where the Munici- 
pal Building now stands, and for 
two years worked the bellows and 
swung the hammer in Isaac Hall's 
shipwright shop in Front street. Af- 
ter that he was a shipping clerk un- 
til the Civil War, when he enlisted 
in the Ninth New York Regiment. 
He fought through the war, was 
wounded at Antletam and again in 
1S64, the last wound sending him , 
home. When he was a shipping clerk 
he began visiting Ottignon's gymna- 
sium In Crosby street, and before 
he went to war had developed con- 
siderable ikill as a boxer. In 1868 
he, with William B. Curtis and John 
K. Babcock, founded the New York 
Athletic Club. Buermeyer became 
amateur heavyweight champion of 
the United States in 1878 by scaring 
the first knockout over recorded in 
Madison Square Garden. In 1890 he 
retired, but hung out his shingle In 
John Wood's gymnasium, and an- 
nounced that he would be there 
every Wednesday night, so that If 
anybody felt like fighting he could 
be accommodated. 

At one time Buermej-er was said 
to have been the most powerful 
athlete In America. He was able 
to put up two 98-pound dumbbells 
at the same time, and could run 
100 yards In lOVi and lift 1,250 
pounds from the floor. He held over 
50 medals which he had won in ath- 
letic events of various sorts. He 
was also an expert swimmer. 



BEDSIDE CHATS 

By NELLIE REVELL 



If it took old King Tutankhamen 3.000 years to shake his bed of con- 
crete, stone and water, I guess I haven't much kick coming. My sojourn 
and Egyptian draperies have been awarded much space In the papers and 
maybe If I stay 3,000 year* 1 11 get as many front page stories as King 
Tut did. .',-;..■ /■•■■■'■ .■;.^'v':.\"- .'"■•;•:,;■;■:• -^v 

According to a morning paper, a Vernon. N. T., cloak and suit manu- 
facturer has applied for the right to call his new Egyptian models tho 
"King Tutankhamen" brand. It he had only come to me four y*ara 
ago I could have shown him a concrete gown built on the same general 
lines as an Egyptian mummy case, and he could have used my name 
on the brand without charge. . ' j ' 

■,.;„... .■ ,: '■". ^; :■.,'■■ ■■■^^■••■■.■W.\^ • :...-vy 

Oliver Morosco sent down something effervescent with. which to ceT«- 
brate my bl^tliday next week, supplemented with some sparkling poetry 
about mx My long Internment has made me rather suspicious and I 
wasn't any too credulous before I came here. By the way of precaution 
I decided to read the poem first, while I stlU had my eyesight and then 
concluded that if what he sent me had Inspired the effusion. I would 
rot celebrate until I get out of here because the alcoholic ward, one* 
so popular, has been discontinued. .' : »* 






'4 



George O'Brien, the vaudeville 
agent, is manager for Johnny Dun- 
dee, the Junior lightweight boxing 
champion. O'Brien had booked 
many acta with Shubert units, but 
the units picked up a disappointing 
habit of closing, with O'Brien tak- 
ing over hla fighting friend foi» 
managerial purposes. 



After a tour 'Of the Orient during 
which they made a six reel film, 
featuring the All Star American 
Baseball Club, O. L. Sellers, presi- 
dent of the United Picture Com- 
pany of California, returned to 
San Francisco last week, accom- 
panied by his wife and two daugh- 
ters. Mm. Sellers took a leading 
role in the film under the name of 
Hazel Dunnfng. 



Some of the newspaper and theatrical men who have visited me have 
had some good stories to tell of the alcoholic ward, formerly maintained 
by the hospital In the years A. "V. (Ante, not Antl-Volstead). At one 
time St. Vincent's was known from the Battery to Harlem as the place 
whose soothing influence best put to rout the army of purple elephants, 
pink snakes and red Imps which had been mobilized by a four or five-day 
tour of Cafeland. In those days It was not an uncommon sight to see 
a leading lawyer, a subway guard, an eminent actor and a haber- 
dasher's clerk lying side by side in the ward, and the number of profes- 
sions represented by the lift of patients was limited only by the tot»l 

number of professions. 

One such story concerns a well-known criminal lawyer from Kansas. 
Once each year It was his custom to come to New York and his first call 
after getting off the train was always on the sister in charge of the 
alcoholic ward. Resplendent In frock coat, tall hat, carnation and silver- 
headed cane, he would march impressively Into the hospital. 

"Sister," was his usual greeting, "reserve me a room for — say- 
Friday." 

Let it be added that he never failed to show up on the appointed 
time, but with his finery a wreck and his dignity a memory. 

Another periodical guest was a broker with ofTlces at the Hotel 
Waldorf. His visits occurred oftener. One particular time his recexvery 
was unusually rapid and on the fifth day he was up nnd about, though 
still dressed in the pajamas and bathrobe, which was the uniform of the 
patients. Down deep within him was tho conviction that if his throat 
was not Irrigated very shortly It would wither up and blow away at the 
next hearty breath. v . 

Pleading with sister got him nothing. Those who came to be curM had 
to stay ten days. He had five more to go. No. he certainly could not 
have his clothes. And just as he was doing bis most impassioned plead- 
ing he was interrupted by the arrival of the grocery boy. Sister went on 
about her duties and so did the grocery boy. However, the latter had 
made the mistake of leaving his horse and wagon standing In sight 
jnst outside the gate and in the time it took to drive over llth stj^eet 
to Fifth avenue that dignified thoroughfare was treated to the specfacle 
of the broker, bathrobe flying, one slipper off, pajamas bare to the wind, 
driving the wagon passionately in the direction of the Waldorf bar. And 
he wasn't missed at the hospital until ho was brought back into the 
ward dead to the world two hours later. 



In Frank Woodward. Just pur- 
chased from the New Haven East- 
ern League club, the Chicago 
Americans get a fine pitcher but a 
player with the temperament of a 
grand opera prima donna. 



A Rhode Island athletic commis- 
sion will have charge of boxing, 
racing and other sports. It is to be 
created as soon as a committee ap- 
pointed by the House t'^is week 
completes the drafting of a suitable 
measure. This Is the first time that 
legislation of this character has 
been considered in this State. 



Norval Baptie of Baptie and 
Lamb, a fancy ice skating set, now 
playing outdoor and Indoor dates In 
eastern Canada, has not a very high 
opinion of his fellow ice skaters. 
He said while in St. John, N. B., the 
skaters are to blame themselves for 
the unrcmiineratixe conditions pre- 
vailing. He state? they are gyppers 
and doul>!e-crosser.s and they have 
phiced liim in wronjr on fcveral oc- 
casions. In future he says he will 

u ' o r :; un.iKBocia t ea xi ;m\ t i iM s e ?kat - 

ers. It is his Intention, he asserts 
to of?rani'/.e an ire musical comedy 
for n?xt winter. He plans on hav- 
ing at least 20 peopU- in tlie show, 
iri'.U.iling a ciiorus. Tl** inteiKL^ to 
(Continued on i»ago 41) 



There was, too, a well-known Irish monologlst. " whose occasional 
weakness it was to attempt to corner the output of the Irish distilleries. 
He just missed success each time and Invariably landed in St. Vincent's 
full of sour mash and plans for a new campaign to down the Demon Rum. 
The seventh day of one of these visits saw him looking wistfully out of 
the window In the direction of the saloon on the corner. He had reached 
that point of the tapering-off process where one drink per day was / all 
he was allowed, and that had come so many hours before it had been 
forgotten He felt that unless the hospital staff was to witness a strong 
man in tears he must have a bracer. But how to get it? Five minutes 
later sister was confronted by an Irishman with a subdued twinkle In 
his- eye. 

"Phwat do ye mean," he demanded, "be havln' no statue av me phathroa 
saint here. 'Tls an outrage, I till ye. and I'm one of your best cus- 
tomers." 

Sister tried to placate him. Probably, she explained, no one had 
donated the money for one. ^ 

•'Thin I'll do It," he announced, "Give me me check -book. Mind ye, get 
a good, big wan now," and wrote out a check for $500. However, he 
failed to Inform sister that as soon as his wife arrived that evening he 
was going to have the check stopped. 

"Now. sister," he wheedled, "do ye not think that should deserve wan 
drink?" 

Sister did. So, also upon being approached privately, did two nurses, 
the Irish porter, three doctors and the chaplain, and when his wlf* 
arrived the comedian was so much under the weather she refused to 
speak to him and the check went through. Now the sisters point with 
pride to a fine statue of the patron saint, presented, they say. by thftt 
eminent scholar and gentleman, the Irish comedian. 






/J 



Broadway still remembers a certain press agent, both for his genluc 
as a space-getter and his ability to live for days on a simple cognao \' 
diet. Due to his talent in the latter direction, he was very much down ' 
and out one day when he appeared In the office of a well known producer 
who was about to open a show out of town. -',;',•; 

The publicity man's condition would have melted the heart of a po1Ic« W^ 
Judge, and the producer gave him the job of advance man with the show 
on his oath that he wouldn't touch a drop. He didn't — until the show 
hit Washington and there he fell off the wagon so hard and bounced so 
high his clothes were out of style when he came down. 

On the third day he came to Just long enough to realize he was in 
no condition to appear in New York when the show opened there unless 
he took strenuous measures in the meantime. Somehow or other he 
got to N 'w York and came through the door of St. Vincent's trying to 
band his suitcase to the ce- Ise Imp who had so kindly come all the 
way from Wasliington with him. 

The orderlies ^ot him to bed and he was given the usual counter- 
irritaiit. paraldehye. But he couldn't shnp. He lay there and watched 
thn radiator chnrtTre into n rnt Ktnalty ttir cat Jtimppd out of the wind ow ■: 
and a green goat appeared at the foot of bin bet, smoking a champagne 
bottle. Tiie press agent was^ interested. Tliis. he felt was a phenomenon 
he oupht to share with the rest of the world. So he leaned over and 
tou<'!;ed the bark of tlie man in the bed next to him. , 

Tlie man in tlie next bed turned over and looked up, and the presm agent 
f.iir.ted. U was his boss, the producer. 



■.v.- 



1» 



VAUDEVILLE 



'r>-,i^.- 



-•>. r ■ ^ . ,. . 



Thursday, March 1, 192$ 



INSIDE STUFF 



ON VAUDEVILLE 



There apiuaia little doubt Cut that the vamlcville venture by the 
fihubcrts has limited the sphere from which they mny secure vaiMleville 
■ets wanled. Tlie failure of the uuit hhows ploying under \\\<i Sh»i»»ert 
vaudeville name is mainly responsible. Especially unbtaraV)le to the 
Shubcrts who claim the failed units were not Shubcrt-owned shows. 
\n that acts setm to be increaning Liieir »«alaiy when the Slvabcrts sccc 
ihcm for a production engagement. . 

The favorite persuader for the Shubcrts in years past was to jjr'sent 
in a glowing account the «>pportunities of a vaudevillian In a Shubert 
l»roduction. The t^hubert booking office advertised Rhubert vaudeville a.s 
•The Circuit of Opportunity." The "opportunity" plea must have lost Its 
effect or at least it d«^e« not hold th** glamor of yore if the increaainc: scale 
of salary prices by the vaudevillians is any guide. It may be though 
the Shubcrts are suffering now from the salaries the unit producers 
promised to pay. Some of them did pay for a while. 

When Varieiy pointed out some months ago, shortly after the Shubert 
unit system started, that the sharing terms were ruinous for the pro- 
ducers, the entire Shubert outfit tried to howl down the paper, asking how 
the theatres were goint to live with more percentage of the gross for the 
producer? Even I. H. Ilerk, who should heartily have been in favor of 
the hlKher percentage, strongly disagreed with Variety. Herk was in- 
formed, as the Shubert bunch was also told, that the producers couldn't 
fctand up with the Shubert clamp on their throats. Variety was asked 
by a Shubert ally why it didn't let the producers do the talking; what 
was Variety mixing in for? He was told the producers let A'ariety know 
with the expectation Variety would print ir; that they couldn't tell the 
Shuberts nor anyone .'onnected with them b»'cause nobody else would 
JJfiten to them. 

The producers knew that with 10 per cent, more of the gross they 
could cut down the cost of their sliows about $1,000 weekly and then with 
the "extras" out, they had a chance, but they couldn't do one without 
the other. Meantime the Shuberts were Tinlojullng their le;non contracts 
on the unit men, .saddling "extra attractions" that never were "extra" in 
anything but the Shubert office (for somebody else to pay) and the 
producers also knew the Shubert-owned units were "hooked up" cheaper 
than anything else on the circuit, besides which Lee Shubert had had 
ro investment cost. The producers also found out later that Eee Shu- 
bert had been working the unit circuit on a cinch, while they had been, 
on a shoestring; that the Shuberts couldn't lose and that the producers 
must. 

The evidence is that even the units which have played to date, doing 
That through the season, by getting enough to pay their weekly overhead, 
have not been able to accumulate any money toward their production 
cost. The lowest loss to date on a Shubert unit not owned nor operated 
directly by the Shuberts is $20,000, taking in production. 

rroductrs talked these things over with their actors after the circuit 
started. The producer? had to give some reason why they could not pay 
salaries. The actors were quite agreeable in most instances to anything 
proposed, but the producers couldn't propose anything; all they could 
see was the blank wall that had been erected for them in Shubert vaude- 
ville before they opened and which they knew they must run up against 
KO«ner or later. "With most it was sooner. 



booking on a route that prevents the act from taking the gamble of giv- 
ing the bands members contracts until renumerative booking la assured. 
Meantime the plaint states the larger' musical organizations, those 
enabled to engage musicians unlimited through operating many combina- 
tions, come along, making offers to this or that player in the act's band. 
They often induce one or more to leave through more salary. That 
usually happens just about as the route is secured. It leaves the act 
up in the air for further rehearsals with the substitutes who must be 
immediately engaged. The acts admit there is no protection but think 
lliat since the heads of these organizations are vaudevillians themselves 
in a way. iin> should have profession.tl courtesy In mind and lay off 
the disruption tactics or tell their organizations to stop it 

rni-«^ <_ _ w'.» w.ooi' /r... ToVin Pui^U m^nasTPf of Proctor's 5Sth Street. 
It's a triple play for John all aroujid, and he is going to have a hard 
time t-atthinK up with himself after it is all over. John was 48 ycara old 
yesterday (Wednesday), today (Thursday) will be the 25th anniversary of 
his marriage and atop of that is the fact this week will also round out 
his 2«lh year in the Keith and Proctor employ. There is a fourth event 
scheduled a little time later this year, but that is more or less of a secret 
at this lime, bjt the lip-oft Is that there is a possibility that John is 
yoing to be a grand -daddy. 

Over in Corona, where the Bucks have their home and where the local 
Elks think John is the biggest man anywhere, ihey are planning a few 
things which may surprise John, especially as the 25th anniversary is to 
bt celebrated Saturday instead of today. 



NEWS OF THE DAILIES 



I 



Georgie Price may be surprised to hear the report around about what 
they did at the Central. New York, after he walked out. But as the 
Central is a Shubert house and Georgie ho'ds a Shubert contract he 
may not be surprised. Young Mr. Price walked out because he was 
not properly billed, according to his contract, when ordered into "The 
Blushing Bride* unit show (Shubert owned) last week at the Central. 
Price walked out just b'^fore the niallnee. His billins: railed for an out- 
^ide display over anything else in the theatre where he played, known 
a«» "headline billing." 

The rep«»rt sa>s Georgie upon leaving the house neglected to have 
a photograph*>r take a picture of the front of the theatre, showing he was 
not bilk'l there, according to his contract clause. But the Shuberts' 
representatives were not so negligent, .^ays the story. After I'rice left, 
they placed his name in the signs on the Central's mai-queo, had It 
j.liotographed, then immediately removed his name, while Mr. I'rice and 
tlie show went on their respective ways. 

That "The Blushing Bride" called for an extra attraction, as Price 
was supposed to be. should be Information for Arthur Pearson, who is in 
2'urope, driven there to avoid creditors from his Shubert vaudeville unit 
Khow adventure. 

Ijean and Majfi'^ld are the stars of "Tho Blushing Bride" as a unit, 
playing with the unit uniler Lee Shuberts own direction on a percentage 
apreem*^nt. "When Lean and Mayfleld (in it the Astor theatre with the 
Shubert l^'git attractloji, "The Blu.«4hing Biide." they iieid an unfulrtlled 
.Shubert production contract at $1,500 weekly. Lee Shubert ordered Lean 
and Mayfleld Into the Pear.son unit, "Zig Zag," at the Central as an extra 
attraction, obliging Pearson, whose unit show had been attached the 
week before <whi< h Lee knew) to pay $750, one-half of the couple's 
salary. The Central that wcej< did $700 hss business than it.s average up 
to that date. 

But Lean and Mayfield. on a percentage contract with the Shuberts for 
their own unit, the same "Blushing Bride, ' must have an extra attraction 
and another turn with a .Shubert production contract (Price), nnd with 
Pearson driven away beiNijjse he didn't want to go into bankruptcy 
through his Shubert \>nit debts, hoping in time he will be able to pay 
his creditors every dollar he owes them. There's a square guy— mean- 
ing Pearson. 



The appointment of Martin Beck as chairman of the board of direc- 
tors of the Orpheum Circuit, upon his resignation as president of the 
Circuit being accepte.l with his successor named, seems to be looked 
upon by the vaudeville men around as a meahs found by the Orpheum 
people to fulfill Beck's contract with the circuit. Beck as president Is 
said to have given himself a contract for 15 or 20 years at $60,000 an- 
nually. Recently when business wasn't so good on the Orpheum time, 
Beck reduced his salary to $30,000 a year, but Insisted upon the term 
standing. Other high salaried Orpheum men have al.so reduced their 
salaries, according to report, though the circuit is reported to be carry- 
ing several at good sized pay who have contracts issued when Beck 
was president. 

Beck retained his peculiarities to the finish. One always had been that 
no story about Beck or the Orpheum Circuit was right unless he gave 
it out himself. For years Beck has denied stories concerning either or 
both appearing In Variety. Invariably the stories were correct but Beck 
would become incensed through he not having been consulted by the 
paper regarding them. It was that way with Variety's report of his 
resignation. Beck denied up to the minute of sailing he had resigned, 
alth0U|?h his resignation was written out and handed to the western 
Orpheum men when they bought a portion of his Orpheum stock. Beck 
even went so far as to tell Variety it "lied" about his resignation with 
Variety knowing the western men then held it, to be presented at the 
Chicago meeting. He sent out a deni.-.l to the theatrical papers which 
printed it but, however, omitted Variety from those the denial was sent 
to. 

Similarly about a year ago when Variety published the story of the 
forthcoming Orpheum changes Beck uenied it in writing over his signa- 
ture, although the single statement in the story that Orpheum's booking 
office might move to Chicago is the only change predicted that has not 
come about. 

Beck could do these things, however, without arousing resentment 
among those who knew him. With tho.se his vagaries went unnoticed, 
for there were many things about Beck in his favor. One had to know 
him and his former associates (not present Orpheum directors) to realize 
how much Beck was really hampered for years In his ideas for tJie ad- 
vancement of vaudeville and the Orpheum Cir^it. A great deal could 
be written of Beck In connection with vaudeville, but it Would only In- 
terest the Intimate of Beck's acquaintances. However, to many. Beck 
now appears to have the right idea. As he remarked shortly before sail- 
ing: "I worked for years an have got mine. Why shouldn't I enjoy it? 
Let the young fellows go in and work now to get theirs." 



The Ringling Prothers have de- 
cided not to appea' In Brooklyn this 
season, due to their Inability to se- 
cure a proper location. The former 
circus lot at Third street and Pifth 
avenue has had several garages 
built on it during the past years, 
which leaves only a location in the 

Rldgowood section for the circus. 
l)(]e to poor rapid transit facilities, 
the Kulgewood location wiii not b« 
used, and Brooklyn will bo passed 
up entirely this season by the circus. 

Bankruptcy proceedings •in the 
case of Max Spiegel, who has been 
confined to a Connecticut sanita- 
rium since December, were resumed 
Monday before Harold P. Coffin, ref- 
eree in bankruptcy, Spifgel is said 
to owe about $1,000,000 to 200 cred- 
itors, and is alleged to have issued 
fraudulent stock certificates to cover 
many of his loans. A. J. Ward, 
president of the Broun-Green Co., 
printers, told of order* received 
from Spiegel for printing stock cer- 
tificates, and identified voting trust 
certificates which had been printed 
for him. Frances Kalischer, secre- 
tary to Spiegel, denied she had ever 
seen her employer sign the names 
of other people, but admitted he 
borrowed a lot of money. She tes- 
tified that her employer had a num- 
ber of bank accounts. 



Rowland Ratcliffe, an actor, was 
shot in the left thigh Monday morn- 
ing wJien held up by two men in 
Riverside Park, New York. Rat- 
cliffe told the bandits he had no 
money and then made an outcry. 
Following their caution not to make 
another outcry he refused to adhere 
to their demand and was shot by 
one of the bandits, who immediately 
fled. 



A. L. Shay. Inc., a new producing 
firm, of which Anna Lambert Spen- 
cer is president, has accepted a new 
musical play by William Gary Dun- 
can and Joseph Michael for spring 
production. 



"The Greenwich Village Follies" 
will terminate its engagement at the 
Shubert, New York, in two weeks. 



In one of the vaudeville theatres built through public sub.scription to 
the stock and where the subscribers received a life pass to the theatre, 
with many of them going on the board of directors for the operating 
company, a girl act recently appeared. It wasn't long before the people 
back stage noticed an unusually large number of men seemed to be 
Inspecting the stage equipment. Inquiring who they were the informa- 
tion revealed they were the native stockholders and directors, of course 
all men. Some found It necessary to inspect the theatre behind the cur- 
tain several times during the engagement of the girl act and always as 
the girls were about to start their act. Previously and from the opening 
of the house no such interest had been displayed by the holders of the 
stock, but previously also no girl act had played the house. 



Oliver Morosco has accepted for 
pix>duction "Just Off Broadway," by 
Frederick and Fannie Hatton, which 
will have its Initial showing on the 
Coast. 



Decision was reserved Monday In 
the Supreme Court in the applica- 
tion of Arthur Hammerstein to have 
stricken from the records of the 
Reglater"3 office an assignment of 
the Hammerstein Amusement Com- 
pany's leasehold of the Republic 
Theatre. New York, to Mrs. Oscar 
Hammerstein. Mrs. Hammerstein 
appeared to oppose the ajiplication. 



Van and Corbett aro going to separate within a couple of weeks, but on 
a friendly footiiit,'. It was first reported ihey intended separating, then 
the Orpheum Circuit offered the team a route and it was thought they 
would accept it. James J. Corbett rejected the Orpheum';* return trip 
and for an odd r»'ason in the show business. Corbett says ke would feel 
tmbarrassed were he to go to the coast so shortly after Jiaving been 
there last season, Corbett and Al Jolson California claims as their 
r»>any favorite sor.s. It's doubtful if Senator Johnson could vie with the 
natives against eitJier of the two famous thespians. 

When Van and Corbett went westward over the Orpheum circuit last 
«,ea.son the country went wild as Corbett approached his liome State. The 
reception Corbett received all along the line never has been e<iualled 
by anyone anywhere. That Gentleman Jim (Corbett's pet name nearly 
now forgotten) was a California product and made good in whatever he 
undertook from tbr ring to the stag*^ h»'ld the State of California for Cor- 
bett as though he had it in his ve.st pocket. The ovations were &o tu- 
multuous and the liome folks were so cordial that James J. Js afraid 
f he again goes out there so quickly after, even though as an actor in 
the course of liis profe.ssion, the Californians might think he was taking 
.ndvantage and if they did not think it Corbett would. For that reason 
alone and a singular one for a man to advance for a t<.am that has an 
earning capacity of $l,7.j0 weekly, rf fusing 25 weeks at the figure, 
iimouniing to $4r» OOO, I'orhftt rejected the Orjdieum's offer withi-ut know- 
ing what he may do ft>];owing the dissolution. Billy B. Van proljai'ly will 
;.'o with a show. Corbett m.ny join with another comedian and continue 
on tour. 



Something of a quiet smile has passed around upon stories spreading 
the legit middle western houses of the* split week, and week stands have 
been sounded by the combined legit booking office in New York as to 
what they may think of a combination circuit next season embracing 
a variety of attrac'ionr: such as the old Stair & Havlin circuit played, 
and at pop prices. It looks to be a Shubert idea to blend the unit circuit 
into a popular price chain if the plan meets with a hearty response. So 
far no response Is reported to have been conveyed to the promoters. 
The managers approached are said to sense in the first written com- 
munication further 'etters that will lead to a weekly guarantee being 
asked of them for the shows if the circuit forms. Most of the managers 
receiving the letters recall the Stair & Havlin circuit and are not wildly 
enthusiastic over another like it. Just where the Shuberts could dig the 
producers after the unit flop Is another and somewhat important mat- 
ter, as without producers there can be no extras." 



Marion Forde, an American 
dancer, won a contest for the shape- 
liest legs in Paris last week. Con- 
testants Included Mi.'tinguetto Spi- 
nelli. Jane Marna, Peggy Vcre and 
many others. 



Harpists are rare in vaudeville, also on the whole stage. That mav be 
more easily understood in vaudeville, where it does seem the beautiful 
music from that imposing looking instrument doesn't, mean a thing. As 
a rule harp soloists are even rarer. Most harpists play merely an accom- 
paniment. The point is this — when Keith's new Palace, Cleveland, opened, 
on the bill was a harplstc in a three-act. She played "Kitten on the 
Keys" on the harp, a jazz composition admitted as the most difficult 
of execution even for pianists that has been turned out In years. And 
the Palace audience, with New Yorkers in it, didn't appear to realize what 
the harp player was doing, nor did she receive any d»>cided applause. 
When a young woman, lay harpist was Informed a girl on the stage 
played "Kitten on the Keys" as a solo she refused to believe it. 



Dan Caswell, heir to an estate 
valued at $500,000 was gianted a 
divorce Saturday from J»'ssie Reed 
Caswell, of Ziegfeld "Follies" by 
Common PJeas Judge Maurice Ber- 
non in Cleveland. Caswell's grounds 
for divorce were charges of gross 
neglert of duty. An alimony settle- 
ment is said to have been made out 
of court. The couple were married 
In Nov. 1920, following a whirlwind 
courtship. 



Ruby Thomas, wife of John 
Charles Thomas, secured a divorce 
last week in Reno. The decree was 
grantpd oo a charge of cruelty. Mrs. 
Thomas testified her husband bit 
her on one occasion until the blood 
ran from her shoulder. She also 
alleged he tore a gown she was 
wearing at the breakfast table from 
her body, leaving her almost nude 
before a male guest. 



Something of a plaint is bein^ m.ide by regular vaudeville a<ts em- 
ploying a band. These actii have the usual prooedm-e \o follow of 
break-ins, work-outs, try-outs and show-«m-all, b*'^i«les angling for 
time and arguing over salarj*. Meanwhile tlie ads, whether a .ningle or 
.louble, want to hold the band intact, for the band if not standard be- 
Jore, also perfected itself durjng the early sta^.es. A musi- I m may be 
held by a teim contract. Tiiere is oftf-n ind'»ci««ion about continuous 



Albert Lloyd Burgren has filed a 
suit for divorce In San Francisco 
against Marjorie Prevost, a sister 
of Marie Prevost, alleging his wife 
insisted upon lying in bed in the 
morning and was untidy as a house- 
keeper. 



Last week the Columbia, New York, playing Columbia burlesque shows, 
did over $10,000 with the Frank Finney show. It was the second high 
gross of the season there. The Finney show had the benefit of a holi- 
day; It was also without opposition. The Saturday previously the 
Minsky Brothers closed their season of stock burlesque at the Park on 
Columbus circle to a total reported los.s of $50,000, and the Shubert vaudc- 
viH*' unit house. Central, across Broadway from the Columbia, plaj-^d to 
less last week with the Lean-Mayfield "Blushing Bride" unit than the 
Central played to the week before with a Shubert straight vaudeville 
bill. That left the Columbia with what could be called its first clear 
week since September. While Frank Finney has an established name in 
b)irlesque, his .^how came in last week without any glowing advance re- 
ports. . t 



Customs officials who searched 
Julian Eltinge and his party of four 
arriving in Seattle Monday from 
Victoria, B, C, by steamer reported 
finding 16 quarts of liquor in their 
possession. The custoni.s officials 
forced the payment of $5 a bottle 
duty and then turned the liquor over 
to prohibition agents, who are pre- 
pared to file charges. 



With the announcement the Keith Interests intend building vaude- 
ville theatres in several cities, the sites in New York and Boston aroused 
thoM«trntion of the showmen. In New York it Is said the location 
may be around Broadway and 53rd street, the upper lino of what is 
now the Times Square theatrical district. In Boston ihey are guessing 
it will be the old Siegel building. Nothing officially is mentioned in the 
Kfith offi "<^s about any .«ite. 



Fred Stone, who Is touring In the 
west in "Tip Top," has expressed 
himself in favor of giving over the 
)-emainder of his life to the church. 
The decishm is said to have been 
reached while he was sjiowbound 
with the company in Montana, his 
first step upon arriving at Billing."? 
being to buy a Bible. T'pon reaching 
Butte he attended the services of 
the Mnuntalnview Mf ; .....list Epis- 
copal t:!huri:h. where li'/ wint into 
the pulpit nnd told hi-; life-story, 
ending with the statement. "I shall 
give one-tenth of my In^'ome to 
Cliiisllan work." He wii; not retire 
from the stage. 



Federal dry agents t.»;^f>o the 
(Continued on p.o*' '•-') 



« (. <.-*■. 






Thursday, March 1, 1923 



EDITORIALS 



(-• ,^r.V\' 



•t. ."; ■'»•"■ 



niETY 

%^d* liark R«fflat«r*d 

rmbUflh«d Weekly by VAKIKTT. liM. 

film* SlIv^nnaB. PrMldent 

114 WMt 4Ctb BtrMt New York at7 

SUBSCRIPTION: 

Aanoal ...17 I Foreign $1 

•in«ie Ooplea 10 Cent* 



YOL. LXX. 



•11W 



Thtt Brooks* Mahieu and Brooks 
Uniform Co. are organizing a cos- 
tume rental department which will 
b* under the direction of E. Stroock. 

It will contain 11,000 costumes with 
necessary accessories such as wigs, 
•hoes and hand props. The invest- 
ment reaches to the hundre>d8 of 
thousands of dollars. A consider- 
able portion of the equipment 
comes from Charles Frohman, Inc., 
through the Frohman company 
having to vacate its warehouse on 
East 43d street. All of the cos- 
tumes of the stupendous pruduc- 
tlona made by Frohman that have 
been headed b}' many of America's 
moAt famous stars are included in 
the Brooks-Mahieu purchase. Two 
extra floors have been taken by the 
firm for their business building at 
Broadway and 40th street, giving 
them the entire structure from 
May 1. In addition a storehouse 
has been secured. 



A gleaming philosophical note is 
touched in a letter received by Nel- 
lie Revell from another bed-ridden 
sufferer. The letter may have ap- 
pealed to Miss Revell as the spirit 
of mind over matter, and it's too bad 
Nellie did not receive this particu- 
lar message before Dr. Coue called 
upon her. In part it said: "I hap- 
pened to read your 'Bedside Chats' 
m Variety in the fall of 1921. I ha\ft 
read all of them ever since. We 
'Shut-Ins' should have a bond of 
sympathy. Tou have shown me how 
adversities may be endured if we 
cultivate a sense of humor instead 
of making our unfortunate lives a 
tragedy for ourselves and all about 
us, as I was doing before meeting 
you in print." 



Monday night of their engagement 
last week at the Hennepin, Minne- 
apolis, Wright andJ31etrich received 
a wire stating Rene Dietrich's father 
had died at Washington, D. C. They 
played the Tuesday matinee to per- 
mit the theatre's management to se- 
cure a substitute turn, which en- 
abled the couple to aMend the fu- 
neral services. They reopen on the 
Orpheum Circuit next week (March 
i) at Winnipeg. 



A member of the city council of 
Springfield, Mass., recently made 
the suggestion at a meeting that 
the personnel of the council be given 
official badges appropriate to the 
office which they hold. Persons al- 
leged to be "in" on the matter state 
that a principal reason for the de- 
sired apparel is so that it may Im 
used In lieu of tickets of admission 
at theatres. 



Tha B. A O. Is now carrying Sun- 
day nights on the 1 a. m. train (Mon- 
day morning) from New York, a full 
passenger car to W^ashington and 
Baltimore. It will take baggage un- 
der fourteen feet handled through 
the Pennsylvania station. The train 
formerly carried* a combined bag- 
gage car and coach. 



THETMAN WHO NEVER BROKE HIS WORD 

Marcus Heiman, affectionately known as "Markey" to his Chicago 
frlenda and associates, comes to the head of the Orpheum circuit with 
a reputation out west as "the man who never broke his word.- Eastern 
show folks do not know Mr. Helman very well. He is active but diffldent, 
quietly disposed, unostentatious, pleasant. But the men In the State- 
Lake building, Chicago, will tell you that when Markey Helman makes 
a threat or a promise he always goes through. , * 



The foundation of vaudeville Is faith. Faith not alone In contracts — 
that goes for any commercial business. But faith In mental attitudes 
that mean so much to the performer, the author and the producer. If 
Markey says to a producer "Go uho^^d— we're Interested." the rest Is 
up to the produ'^er. Heimnn mennn it and han w(»ighed what it means. 
If he says to an actor "Expand— develop — we'll sfrlng with you." he 
isn't stalling or making vacuous statements to get rid of a caller. If he 
announces a policy it Isn't specious "press agent stuff" — it is a reliable 
invitation to proceed on sUch a policy. 



That has been Ilciman's record In the past. That should be a poten- 
tial prospect fur the fuluie. The history of square shooters has been that 
they don't change their spots. Markey Heiman Is accepted as a hundred 
per cent, right guy out west, where those things are more exhaustively 
scrutinized than along Broadway, where too often the Individual Integrity 
Is winked at and men's verbal assurances aren't liquid collateral. Chl- 
cagoans boast of Markey as "the man who never broke his word.'' And 
they ought to know, for they have seen him grow and broaden and 
prosper until he has become the president of the mighty Orpheum 
circuit, where now the whole world and not only hi* Chicago circuit 
wiU watch him with Interest. 



I^ndeoce. We do not ex(^)r Variety In that category^ bocausa Variety 
we trust has many years to run to prove itself, to prove itself as muoii 
In the future as it has tried to do In the past — to be directed by others. 
as it must be sooner or later, who may have to withstand temptation 
amidst want, to draw the line and follow it. and make their way the 
only way; to back their judgment against bankruptcy. . .^,. ." 

This is not an eulogy; that perhaps was called for to explain If it 
does \»hy the legitimate producer from believing a theatrical weekly is 
the lowest thing printed has changed that opinion to the one that Impels 
him to employ Variety as an advertiwins: medium on a straightforward 
business basis, for h's own benefit and without regard to the Immediate 
return at the box ofllce. 



If Variety bn« hoen the meann of creating this new era In the present 
theatrical journalism. It was brought about through the policy the pai>er 
lived up to, of not trying to deceive the theatrical trade, of not Relieving 
It could, and giving its readers the truth as closely, as frankly, and as 
frequently as it could be secured. That policy Is not limited to any one 
department In Variety, it extends through the paper, until the theatrical 
man on the road or somewhere away each week can read Variety, know- 
ing he is reading a reflection of the hIiow bunineHS, rellevled ati IhoruUjghly 
as It has been found possible for us to do it. 



INCOME TAX MAN AT VARIETY 

Frank K. Bowers, collector of internal revenue for the second 
district, New York, has assigned Revenue Agent Charles Silber- 
stein to assist professionals in making out Federal income tax forms 
for the year ending Dec. 31, 1922. 

Mr. Siiberstein will be on duty at Variety's ofTice, 154 West 4€th 
street, starting ^ March 1 (today) and continuing daily until the 
close of business March 15, which is the final date for filing returns. 



We appreciate this ecognltlon from the legitimate— greatly. It Is 'M 
pleasure to say the legitimate producers for the first time in the history 
of theatricals anywhere In tlie world, from the first day of "The Clipper " 
to this (lay, over 80 years, have found to them a commercial product 
among theatricals weeklies. 



In mentioning no trade weekly had survived to now for permanency !( 
and independence, we purposely included the "The Clipper" by in- • 
ference. as that paper changed hands and while still publishing, appears 
to be doing so under auspices at least that place it in the list. While 
"The Blllboaid" though possibly permanently prosperous and we believe 
It to be that, can never claim Independence under the vacillating policy 
of Its present chameleon -like owner. Nor will it ever under its current 
manner of conduction erect a circulation It can trade upon, whether it 
points to the A. B. C., or as "The Billboard" really Is, F. O. B. 



NOTHING WRONG WEST r 

Judge Walter Kelly " % ^. N*w York, Feb. 28. 

Somewhere on the Orpheum Clrctllt , 

Dear Grouch. 

My attention has been called to your mention of my name in your 
biennial squawk against the west. The reason you don't pan God's 
Country oftener is that Vincent can't see you every season. How about 
Pantages next summer and a small-time bleat? 

I used to think it funny to roast the east. And I got away with It. New 
York got together and made itself attractive to me just to choke me 
off. I am a renegade; yes, but I don't ask free space in crowded 
papers to tell about it. I am going to suggest to the Chamber of Com- 
merce of Lincoln, Neb., that they give you a permanent job out there 
as the Boy Comic of the Platte, sort of throw you a fish to keep you quiot. 

I can understand your prejudice against everything beyond Phllly and 
Atlantic City, where you have folks, and New York, where you have the 
Friars Club. When a guy g^ts so A. K. his principal excitement Is 
milk and crackers, and so fat that his chief sport Is solitaire, the west has 
little to offer him. I always managed to amuse myself so well out west 
— In the western way— that I used to come to New York to rest. 

When you get to the Chicago Variety office you will find the telephone 
numbers on file. Call up. That's the least you should do, even If it's 
the most you can do. Then drink a cup of Henricl's coffee, get your 
"Snappy* Stories" and 30 to bed. If that combination don't keep you 
awake I know of nothing else that I can remember to a bored pilgrim 
with your specific temperament and sense of humor. 

Chicago is neither dry nor dreary. And the best known Greek res- 
taurant there just went Into bankruptcy. I could stand with you at 
the corner of Clark and Randolph and point out more excitement than 
Nero had while doing a Ben Bernie as Rome burned. AH you need, 
partner, is a guide. 

That's what all castem^s need when the^ get past the Wilmer A- 
Vincent territory. The west has plenty of every kind of thrills, but the 
west doesn't stick signs out on the streets to shlU In the tourists. In 
the east you get a loud ballyhoa and a gyp Inside; In the west you could 
pass a thousand times and hear only silence while a banquet to the gods 
served by the nymphs was being pulled off upstairs. 

The eaat is a Cone/ Island, lighted and set for suckers from the 
west. The west Isn't in the amusement park business, and runs Itself 
for its own, who know where the blind alleys are and who's what. Say 
— I've had a wilder evening in Peoria than Diamond Jim Brady ever aaw 
in Manhattan. 

You never lived In Waukegan. did youT Well. I've seen a New Year's 
party there started on Dec. 26 and quit Jan. 4, during which a whole 
theatrical troupe lived In the houso, a prograrA of finish fights waa 
pulled off In the billiard room, breakfast was champagne and porterhousa, 
and four bartenders and two staff physicians worked like beavers bringing 
in fresh ones and bringing back dead ones. 

Before you go west again. Judge, see me. ^ 

Meanwhile I remain yours until Shubert vaudeville l» a auccess. 

Jaclc LaU, 



That Variety forced all theatrical pupertt to a better standing is con- 
ceded by newspaper men. It has obliged papers that never heard of the 
truth to partially print It; It obliged ""the Billboard'' to revise Its ad- 
vertising columns, to condemn the bad carnivals it had for so long sup- 
ported and to attempt a semblance of respectability that is almost 
overwhelming it, while Variety forced "The Clipper" to sell out, as it did 
force out "The Mirror"; all of which weeklies previously to Variety's 
advent, had been running along In their own way. 



Variety gives returns to an advertiser and that It can be of benefit to 
a manager or producer in the legitimate is superficially a recommenda- 
tion fur the circle of readers throughout the lands Variety has been able 
to attract. ^ , 



And still nothing is actually pioveh since Variety at its best Is onlv a a 
trade weekly. . , ,. .... 



TOMMY'S TATTLES 

By THOMAS J. GRAY 

Hollywood, Feb. 2S. 
livery time some managers take lunch In some city outside of New 
York, they semi for the rei>orters ahd announce that they are going to 
tulld a theatre. Tliis will continue as long as managers eat lunch. 



^' ' :i 



Musicians want another raise in salary. It might be a good idea to 
give It to some of them if they would promise to use the extra money 
to learn how to play. 



Those orchestra leaders who ttirn to the audience and bow to their*,* 
friends while some act is oi\ the stage trying to make good, are nice boys. 
too. Managers should arrange to have them meet the audience after each 
show In the lobby. 



The engagement was announced 
this week of Ethel Rogers, daugh- 
ter of the late Gus Rogers and Mrs. 
Lizzie Raymond Roger.1, to Emanuel 
J. Weiss, son of Mr. and Mrs. Max 
Weiss, of 250 West 103d street, New 
York. Miss Rogers has never ap- 
peared professionally, but has taken 
part in amateur theatricals at 
Sherry's and other hotels. 

Sidney Fraser, an actor playing 
at Fay's, Providence, waa bitten on 
the left arm by a horse as he was 
entering the playhouse Saturday af- 
ternoon. The animal was standing 
near (he curbing • attached to a 
wagon owned by the Kimball & 
Cowell Co. Fra.ser had the injury 
treated by a physician. 



PRESENT THEATRICAL JOURNALISM 

Is thera a new era In theatrical trade journalism? It would seem »o. 
For years Variety published under what many who gave it that much 
attention said was an unconscionable theory. It may have been a theory 
but if »o, then a simple one, and in effect that since a trade paper could 
not deceive the trade It catered to — print the fact. In other words — tell 
the truth. Absurd, was the word used by those accustomed to theatrical 
weeklies of then and yore. It expressed their disgust at the thought. 



The Little Theatre Movement Is certainly gaining headway. Last je'ir 
there was only two midget troupes looking for booking, while thl» season, 
there are six. 



There Is mo reason why we should not have a .National American 
Theatre. There seems to be enough Russian actors left In Russia to come 
over and play In It. 



Will Hays has made quite a few Improvements In Hollywood since our 
last visit. Two new restaurants have opened, three streets have been 
paved and a fellow from Kansas opened up a "New York" barber shop. 



. ■ Flames d.miatred the Palace. Mo- 

\ line, 111. f'U Valentine's Day, to the 

, extent cf $'jri.OOO. TIut" \v;is no one 



in the thcuirc at the time of the fire. 

; The Cokin-.bia, r.olf.ist. Me., was 
nearly «lr.-iri yt-d l)y tiro F«l). 20, 
when fian-.os sv.i-i'* thronj^h (h«-' thf- 
ntre ;nnl an ot!i«*e a;-'! stores bloik. 



Yet there Is the present theatrical journalism as perhaps, If we may 
claim It, represented In Variety. Still pursuing the policy and plugging 
away on the Mentlotil announcement of Its first Issue; never deviating 
from the Intent cf this paper* as conveyed in its initial policy statement. 
And now, this season, to see the legitimate theatrical producer of Broad- 
way using the pages of Variety to advertise his wares for publicity or 
to prgmote his attraction. Does that constitute a new era? We hope so. 

For years the legitimate's eslimate of a tlieatrlcal weekly was that 
It didn't mean a dollar to him at the box office, either way. What good 
was It? Give It an ad at Christmas and shut It up. Along came the 
advertlsoment at Christmas, every Christmas while the paper lasted, and 
the legit let It go at that. Or maybe throughout the year it wanted the 
paper to say nothing about a certain something, and the paper said noth- 
ing. Or the legit wanted the paper to say something if he had a fight 
on with someone else In the trade, and the paper said It. That's was 
about its uses; to keep quiet or talk at dictation. 



Many stars who Intend soon, to return to the "speaking stage" are now 
wondering what they are going to talk about. • '•. 

Vaudeville managers who book "Local Follies" probably do so to give 
those two good old time headllners "Anniversary Week" and ' VnurlevlHe 
Festival" a rest. 

Popular Song Titles. ''• 

"Oh How I Cried When I Saw We Were on No. t." 
"Aggravatin' Agent, Don't You Try to Small Time Me." 
•That Old Irish Make-up of .Mine." 



Last summer someone told us those "Units" were "something dffer- 
ent — a new idea of entertainment"; they certainly wera. —^ -r^^ 



Several humorists are writing the "funniest stories they ever heard" 
far various newspaper Si>ndicales. They forget to mention the actor the/ 
heard tell them. ' :■.•" . " " --■;;..•'.■ ; ;■■'■■-;';■:,■,;•". ■:,'./<:.; 



And the trade paper publisher! He expected It and got it— the adver- 
tisement at Xmas and the insiriiotion in between. But he didn't get 
news and he didn't print new.M. I'.ut he did kite a check now and then 
Of secure a loan he neglected to pay as often as he forgot to meet ex- 
changed checks dated ahead. Those were the uses of the legit for the 
publisher. 



Report say.s masked man who was to tell audience all he knew about 
HollywooJ, did not get any more bookings after his first showing. Mayi>e 
the act was too short. .> 



Some day there is going to be a big ban^iuet held In New York at which 
Win Rogers will not be asked to speak. No telling what year this may 
happen. . . • . 



Buck dancing contest proposed for Madison Square Garden brought to 
light a lot of old time charupion.s. Now if someone would only offer a 
prfze for a bowing contest — well. 



Don't seem to be so many srhool acts around lately. Proving ihat 
vaudeville is going* back, fr^m an educational standiioint. 



Can't undrrstand why so many actrej'se.'* want to play Hamlet. Mii.<*t 
be a new male impf-rsonation craze on. 

Yo 1 (Imi t hear of matiy actor.'< saving they want to ul;«y Juliet. 



en 



With the result — the record of theatrical weekly newspapers of this 
luntry is that none has survived to the point of permanency and inde- 



Popular Irnloor sport of rlu.tintj shows Itefore the;, ojien ni.ike.<i a i>t 
of pe(»i»le stars at rehe.irsal-* if tis how. 



/ /■■■ 



What has be'^crae of tho old fa^luo^^■i^m.ln.''^er who usod to blame his 
bud bu.Hin^'fs on Lei. I'.' 



r; ■»'. r -r- 



_f • ^ fl. <»\rmr'VJ''j~. 



to 



^ 



LEGITIMATE 



■ ■>- r,_T,.',>>»f5Pt^»'^'iK-f '-»v;T,-«»_f,' .iT.-'i^v^ 



..."t'rWitjj"''^'*'' 



Thursday, March 1, 1823 



$1 TOP LEGITIMATE CIRCUIT 
IS DEFINITE FOR NEH SEASON 



Managers, Theatres and Cities Named — 35 Weeks 
, East of Kansas City — Booking Office Not to Be 
Operated for Profit — New Circuit Led by Hill 



The dollfir top rirrnit for legiti- 
mate attractions that the one night 
stand managers have been talking 
about for the last year or so and 

which Gus Hill has been the leading 
Mplrit in framing is announced an -i 
fact for next season by Its spon- 
sors. 

Negotiations have been on for the 
last two weeks with a number of 
houses throughout the country to 
form the spokes in the legitimate 
pop price wheel. A tentative list 
of stands under consideration In- 
clude 35 weeks with the following 
houses and cities: Lyceum, Pitts- 
burgh; Garrlck, St. Louis; Grand 
opera house, Kansas City; National 
and Victoria, Chicago; Prospect, 
Cleveland; Orpheum, Detroit; Crite- 
rion, Buffalo; Grand opera house. 
Toronto; Orpheum, Montreal; 
Strand, Washington; Arlington. 
Boston; Lyceum, Columbus; Or- 
pheum, Newark. 

The list also calls for houses in 
the Bronx, New York. Brooklyn. 
Providence, St. Paul, Minneapolis, 
Jersey City. Union Hill, Indianap- 
olis (with the Park probably play- 
ing the dollar top show), Philadel- 
phia, ^ Baltimore. Cincinnati and 
Richniond. 

The one night managers who will 
be interested include George GaUs, 



O. E. Wee. Arthur Alston. Robert 
Campbell, Lrffler & Bratton. Lou 
Weed, Chas. Williams (the latter 
connected with ihe Hill ofllce, but 
who will operate shows,), John T. 
Pearsall, E. J. Carpenter and Ed 
Rowland. 

The plan will be to alternate a 
farce with a dramatic show and 
musical comedy, with the musical 
shows representing about one-fourth 
of the total list of attractions. 

The circuit is to be co-operative, 
with the houses and shows splitting 
a booking fee of about $25 weekly. 
The exact amount of the booking 
fee is to be determined by the nec- 
essary Income to meet the overhead, 
but the circuit, according to its 
sponsors, is not to be operated for 
profit as far as booking fees are 
concerned. The main object is to 
supply an organization that will 
permit the one-night stand road 
manager to book his shows consec- 
utively, instead of wild-catting and 
bookin? Independently from week to 
week as the road managers have 
been doing since the Stair & Hav- 
l!n cfreuit ceased to exist. 

The Shuberts are also said to he 
planning a circuit along the same 
lines as the pop price legit wheel, 
the Shubert circuit to be built upon 
what may be left of the present 
Shubert vaudeville circuit. 



6 LITHO COMPANIES 
CONSIDERO^G MERGER 



Eliminating Price Cutting. 

Credit Regulation — Several 

Millions Represented 

A merger of the six leading the- 
atrical lithograph companies is un- 
der way, according to report. The 
concerns are the Butts Lithograph 
Co., Morgan Lltho Co., Tooker 
Printing Co., Otis Prjnting Co.. 
Ritchey Litho Corporation and 
Miner Show Printing Co. 

One of the proposed benefits 
would be to eliminate price cutting. 
Another is credit regulation. Ap- 
praKsal expert« have looked over 
the different plants to determine 
their value. 

Each of the concerns mentioned 
specialize In picture and show 
printing to a largo extent. 

JIow the merger will be handled 
has not been decided. A holding 
company may be organized to han- 
dle the project. It Is among the 
several plans under consideration. 

The combined business of the six 
litho concerns run into several mil- 
lion dollars annually. 



COPPICUS AND "LOLA'' 



Leaves Show and $36,000 Behind 
Him 



TULANE, NEW ORLEANS, 
SHOWLESS 2 WEEKS 

Combine's Booking ''System" 

Leaving South's Principal 

City Without Attraction 



New Orleans, Feb. 28. 

The v.him.sicalities of the booking 
system of the combined legitimate 
offices in New York have left New 
Orleans flat as far as any legitimate 
attractions are concerned for two 
weeks. 

This week and next the Tulane Is 
dark. If.s the only legit house in the 
city. 'The Gold Diggers' is due 
March 12. ' 

Booking- ofllce tactics that appear 
to be .slowly berefting "the road" of 
any desirable dramatic plays have 
so far depleted the touring field that 
a show on the coast worth going to 
see is a rarity, but with the south 
nearer New York, and New Orleans 
the metropolis of this section, It Is 
unexpected to see a theatre tightly 
clos*»d at this season. 

The road condition is likened to 
the tlieory of the proposers of the 
"third circuit" that all they need Is 
a house in the larger cities and they 
can afford to disregard the road for 
the return.9 coming from stoclc 
royalties. .... 



F. C. Coppicus has stepped out 
of "Lola in Love," a farce with 
music adapted from a foreign work. 
He is said to have .sunk about 
$36,000 in the piece, whit5h was on 
tour for a number of weeks, re- 
cently being brought in. A special 
showing of "Lola" was given at the 
Times Square Friday afternoon last. 
A number of showmen attended. A. 
P. Waxman expects-— to take the 
show over, seeking about $13,000 
capital. 

*'Lola'' was offered the Dresden, 
the ren^odeled house atop the New 
Amsterdam, which has been com- 
pleted several weeks. The booking 
called for $8,000 in advance, the 
money to apply on the last two 
weeks of the altraciiun'M stiiv llipre. 
In addition to the house handicap, 
conditions surrounding the mmi- 
erous rehearsals hav»} resulted in 
—the management beinf? required to 
i»8e the present cast in the event 
Ihe «how opens here. That ar- 
iingement was made with I-Jqiiity, 
"Lola" having been in<leppnd*'ntly 
produced. It is understood tl)o 
p.ece needs rccasiiiig-. 



SHOW ENGAGES TALKER 
AT MEET AND EVENTS 



Capt. Irving O'Hay Will Do 

Propaganda for ''Give 

and Take" 



The lead of Channing Pollock 
and 'William A. Brady In exploiting 
their own attractions In discourses 
at public functions, during w'hich 
the name of the show is adroitly 
interwoven in the talk, has been 
followed by Max Marcin and Aaron 
Hoffman. They have engaged a 
professional public speaker. Captain 
Irving O'Hay, to publicize "Give 
and Take*' similarly/ 

Capt. O'Hay has been regularly 
engaged by the management, that 
has Its hit now running at the 49th 
street. O'Hay's duty will be to talk 
only at any meeting or event as- 
signed In or outside of the metropo- 
lis. Capt. O'Hay is well equipped 
for the work. Besides a fund of ro- 
mantic and Interesting lore in con- 
nection with his adventures in over 
seven wars, as a soldier of fortune 
for 30 years, he has about the nim- 
blest tongue ever heard outside of a 
woman's mouth. 

"Give and Take" stars Louis Mann 
and George Sidney. It is under- 
stood Capt. O'Hay does not care 
to go into the performance. He 
prefers the missionary end. Since 
returning from the war and aband- 
oning his acting career devoting i 
most of his time to public speaking, 
O'Hay has in a very short time 
.erected a name for himself as an 
impressive impromptu speaker that 
is second to none. Hij "Give and 
Take" labors will not exclusively 
confine him to that task, he being 
enabled to arrange engagements for 
other public or private affairs at hi.^ 
convenience. 



POLLOCK'S 8S-15 FOR 
niEATRE AND 'FOOL" 



Back From Boston With Hon- 
ors and Immunity from- 
. Pinches . 



Channing Pollock returned from 
Boston this week loaded with 
honors as the result of his several 
weeks of speeches In and about the 
Hub prior to and following the 
opening there of his drama, "The 
Fool." at the Selwyn. He was made 

a Freeman of the state of Massa- 
chusetts, which makes him immune 
from arrest; was given the keys to 
the city of Boston, and a tree will 
be planted In his honor along 
"Poet's Row" on the Common. 

The playwright made 14 addresses 
In and about Boston, half being 
contracted for through the Pond 
Bureau and therefore paid appear- 
ances with approximately $500 for 
each speech. Among the gatherings 
addressed were five open forum 
meetings. 

Pollock Is to return to New Eng- 
land shortly and Dartmouth College 
is included In the Itinerary. He 
spoke twice at Harvard. His first 
appearance was* before Professor 
Baker's class In dramatic writing. 
He was invited to speak to the en- 
tire English class Wednesday of 
last week, when 807 students were 
present. The author Is barely 
mentioning his play in any of his 
addresses, if at all, going on the 
theory that those who attend his 
talks know he wrote "The Fool," 
which is enough to draw his audi- 
tors to the show. His speeche« are 
intended to aid his play about 15 
per cent, and theatricals generally 
about 85 per cent. 



OVER $400,000 IN 12 
WEEKS FOR RUSSIAN CO. 



May Visit Two or Three Oth- 
er Cities — Never Return- 
ing, Says Gest. 



The Moscow Art Theatie, now in 
^ ^. its eighth week at Jolson's 59th 

CHICAGO'S NEW PRESIDENT! St, may appear in three other 

cities after the additional four 



Reported Harry Ridings Resiging 
from the T. M. A. 



LEON ERROL BREAKS DOWN 

Removed to Hospital — Diagnosis 
Report Serious — Overwork 



Chicago, Vt-h. 28. 

Physically breaking down Leon 
Errol, eo-star of "Sally," has been 
rfinoved to St. Luke's Hospital. 

A «liaj.\n()sis report is that his con- 
ditiitn is serious, resulting from 
overwork. 

Tho prrnrral undr>rstudy for 
'Sally." I'hil Kilry, is in the Krrol 
role. 



SEPARATION AFTER 3 MONTHS 

Leonore Ma«;.«!o Townsley has 
servrd a siiin)nons in a Rei)aration 
artion oji ISaiiy T.iwnslfy. le.iding 
man of 'Tho Wasp," row breaking 
in out cf town. Mi««i^ Masso and 
Mr. TMwnslry wi-io liofh m«'inl)rrs 
of fhr»^vVHt -A. >*np** mrllT, "The 
Ilootle-g* rs" and married three 
rnonihM ago. 

Ali.KH Masso is not \\ Ith Inr hus- 
band in this new produrtion \\rit- 
ton Ity Thomas .T. Fallon, author 
of "Thn ]A}<i' Waniitig." 



Chicago, Fe-b. 28. 
Right on the heels of the political 
maneuverings which boosts John J. 
Garrity :o the general mangership 
of the promised alliance of all the- 
atre Interests in Chicago, comes 
the report that the local Theatre 
Managers' Association will have a 
new pr^rldent. 

Harry J. Ridings, manager of 
Cohan's Grand, is now president of 
the Theatre Managers* Association, 
but it Is reported he intends re- 
signlrg. The two logical candidates 
for tlie office are U. J. (Sport) 
Herrman and Garrity. Herrmann^ 
has turned down offers of the office 
in years past, and there is no rea- 
son now to expect him .o reconsider 
filling the role. 

This swings back the chances of 
the office going to Garrity with the 
thought it would be appropriate for 
the Shubert general manager to join 
the office with the alliance position. 

For the past several years the 
Theatre Managers' Association has 
been inactive, and it is believed 
there ^s a plan on foot to make it 
more of an active organization to 
combat the angles which arise 
every day and fall short of success 
from tho managers' viewpoints be- 
cause of no united strength. 

With the change of administra- 
tion at City Hall with the approach- 
ing mayoralty election, the Th'-atre 
Managers Association will prol)- 
ably be organized accordingly, and 
the right tip is that "Sport" Herr- 
mann will be the new presidrnt if 
he wants the job. if not tlie office 
will go to Garrity. 



weeks in New York. Boston, Phil- 
ad-^lphia and Montreal are men- 
tioned, but the engagements de- 
pend on permission from Kus*$ia to 
remain longer In this country. 

Morris Gest stated the Russian 
players will not again appear in 
this country. It is claimed intereets 
in their native country are too 
manifold for future touring. • The 
principal bar, however, appears to 
be that many of the players are 
reaching an age w here arduous travel 
is obnoxious. It is believed his age 
kept Lucien Guitry from coming 
here this spring, for it Is known 
he dreads an ocean voyage. 

The Moscow Art attraction will 
have grossed |350,000 by the end of 
this week. It is almost sure the 
foreigners will gross over 1400,000 
for their 12-week engagement, 
which would set a record for all 
time for dramatic presentation. 



LEWISOHN'S UPTOWN 



EMMA DUNN IN ' MARELLI" 

l-'nim.a Dunn is shortiy ifi appear 
in a new play called "Marelii." 
which will bo proiluci^d by ,\nne 
Nichols and AugUHttt^ Pitou. Mina 
Nichols is rewriting the piece from 
the original tcript of Paul Wil- 
stach. 

The new play is said to afford an 
exceptional Italian characterization 
opportunity for Miss Dunn. 



Daughters of Millionaire Interested 
in Amateur Theatricals 



Adolph Lewlsohn, New York 
millionaire, may become activ^-ly in- 
volved in Times Square show busi- 
n«'Ss through the medium of his two 
daughters who havp bfen dabbling 
ill aaiat* ui theatricals downtown 
with the Neighborhood Playhouse 
company on Henry street. 

The Lewisohn girls are tlie mov- 
ing spirits of this organization. 
They are anxious to biing ihfir 
company uptown to Broadway and 
a new tht-atre ^ite m;»y r-vfuuate. 

At intermittent periods. pla.\ers 
from the Neighborhood theatre 
have been feen on Proatlway in 
vari«»n.s )trodui:tions iiidepfiid' nt of 
tho orgaMizatifTn they wire wiih 
originally. 



FORREST HOME BENEFIT 

l'hi:adel|ih:,«. r. ii •.'S. 

"^ hpnrflt mnTlnc? )»• rfn'nianrr 
will be held Marcb 9 at the Forr«iit 
theatre for the Kdwin Forrest Home. 
Toiresdale. 

Tlje proceeds will be added to the 
fund created by the founder for the 
upkeep of the Home. 



RENT CALLED OFF WHEN 
NO TENANT IN SIGHT 



Shuberts Placed ''Sun Show- 
ers" on Sharing Basis — 
Asked $5,000 for Astor ( 



The Lew Cantdt production o< 
"Sun Showers" at the Shuberts* A8« 
tor, New York, has been lately play* 
ing on a percentage arrangement. It 
followed a reduction by the Shu^ 
berts of the guarantee demanded of 
Cantor of $5,000 weekly, to be paid 
in cash In advance by every Friday, 

With the rearrangement the Shu- 
berts placed the Astor guarantee at 
12,500, not figured by the show's 
management as other than straight 
percentage. 

The second week "Sun Showers'* 
was at the house Cantor gave the 
Shubert booking ofRce a week's no-^ 
tice of indention to leave. It Is .said 
the Shuberts tried to secure another 
attraction that would guarantee 
$5,000 eacAi week for the Astor.- Fall- 
ing, they informed Cantor to com- 
tinue under the new arrangement. 
The third week the Cantor show did 
$7,000 groK.«, and last week, with a 
$4,000 holiday bu^ness. reached a 
trifle over $10,000. 

The show is said to represent an 
Investment of about $35,000 to Can- 
tor and his associates. Among the 
latter i« reported Reuben, the deli- 
catessen vendor, with $15,000 or 
$20,000 in. 

"Sun Showers." according to re- 
port, may be handled by the Shu- 
bprt.«i ns a summer attraction or sent 
on the road at popular prices. They 
are said to see an opportunity to 
get In on the piece through the usual 
means with musical shows produced 
by new legit producers. 

When Cantor was first offered a 
.Shubert Broadway booRing the 
Ba^es roof was mentioned. Cantor 
is said to have asked Lee Shubert 
why he never played one of his own 
shows on the Roof. Lee countered; 
with the 44th Street at a $4,000 
weekly guarantt-e. In preference to 
that Cantor is reported to have re- 
plied he would rather have the As- 
tor at five and get a chance to find 
out what he had in "Sun Showers." 



NICE HOTEL PEOPLE 

Mr. and Mrs. Isaacs Personally 
Looking After III Chorus GIrJ 



Harriet FoVler, a dancer in the 
Gertrude Hoffman unit show, was 
operated on for appenclicitis at the 
Memorial h o s p i t 3. 1, Worcester, 
Mass., laet Friday. She was re- 
moved from the Bay State hotel in 
that city at the insistence of a 
physician after the freellng treat- 
ment failed. The girl Is among sev- 
eral in the show who have been 
under the guardianslup on the 
road of Mi.ss Hoffman. The* latter 
becau.se of Christian Science views 
was opposed to an operation. It 
was only after the doctor warned 
Mies Hoffman the girl would die 
that she was taken to the hospital. 

Miss Fowler was taken ill early 
last week. She was immediately 
moved to tho apartment In the hotel 
of Mr. and Mrs. I.saacs, the pro- 
prietors of the Bay State. The lat- 
ter have become most popular 
among professionals. Each Sunday 
when incoming ci^mpanles arrive, 
one chorua girl is awarded a room 
without charge. The selection is 
made by picking a number from 
a hat. ■■'■ -' - -. ,^L. ^-__ L 

Mr<. Isaacs advised Miss Hoffman 
that Mi.vs Fowler would be well 
taken care of and that after her 
recovery tho girl would be her 
guest and welcome to nmain all 
summer if she desires. 



•SECRETS" LEAVING FULTON 

"Seor.t.s- at tlie Fulton will 
leavf. in ;;ii ,ti).r two weeks. The 
pir'i c oi)ened on Christmas night 
and the contract whi.h Sam 11, 
Harris h<]d witli .Margaret I-^w- 
vrncv ff-r the rnxUuiion called for 



a fniarantfc «>f 10 weeks. 



This 



Kuar;intr.. ^vi]l bo fnljiiied by the 
nij?ht ih.it vho piece clones. 



"Tanger're" at Garrick, Chicago 

Clii.aj-'o. iM'b. 28. 

A switi-h ill urij^inal bookings is 
t«) i.la.-e "T,\nK^iin«-'' at the flar- 
rlclc. .>]»'n ! ng .Auril 1 i nmrnd of .ar* 
the .suulf iKilier as was first intend- 
♦?d. 

Tl)'' Will'nm TT«m1kc production 
"For All vf I's." row in its loth 
we*-k tlure. It is believed will run 
into tlie simimrr. . ^^ - 



•IT""'' 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



LEGITIMATE 



■." a 



fl 



EXPEQED B'WAY DECLINE HERE, 
FOLLOWING BIG HOUDAY TRADE 



J 



Business Early This Week on Main Alley Was on 
Toboggan — Comeback May Be Due Following 
V Income Tax Period 



The Indicated decline in Broad- 
wav'h businesH last week was bal- 
anced by big attendance Washing- 
ton's Birthday, both performances 
being heavy for the better part of 
the list. Kxtra prices and the ad- 
ditional matinee counted in send- 
ing grosses above thoee of Lin- 
coln's Blrthd:iy week, though that 
applied particularly for the lead- 
ing hits. 

Business this week was distinctly 
on the toboggan, with Monday 
night away c ff . One of the new 
fjhows which had been bolstered by 
the dramatic reviewers got less 
than >2U0 on that tvening. 

VVaJ^hinsTtoTi's Birthday is con- 
ceded the peak of the season, witii 
a gradual di-orease in businos'-; ex- 
pected thorciifter. The slump. lu»w- 
«.*ver, npptarii to be larger than ex- 
pected. A weak Saturday night 
•wa« the forerunner and e;irly in 
this weelc successes with empty 
rows were noted. The smashes 
stood i:i* howtver. 

A partial if Hot complete come- 
back may be in order after the mid- 
dle of the month, when the federal 
income tax period passes. There 
are about L'G attractions current 
with lusty runs to their credit and 



they will have to fall off consider- 
ably more before dropping to a level 
that would force them out. 

The business leaders last week 
were composed of the fcarae group 
that have carried the pace since 
the holidays and before. Tiie Mos- 
cow Art Theatre got |41.fOO at 
Jolson's. -The Fool" remained the 
actual <lramatic gross leader, and 
Inst week with nine performances 
got nearly $21,000. "Merton of the 
Movies." at the Cort, and "So This 
Ikj London,' at the Hudson, were 
practically even at $18,800 in the 
same number of sh »ws, while "Sev- 
enth Heaven.*' •> lyin;; 10 perform- 
ances, went to ?l7.?0'i "Kain" did 
not play an ex.ra matmee it the 
r-illiott. but estalilished a new figure 
lor the run. goin..? closo to 116.000 
with the aid of holiday scales. 
"Loyalties" beat 115.000 at th? 
Gaiety, and so did "Abie's Irish 
Ro.'?e." at the Republic. "The Fol- 
lies." again over $36,000, led the mu- 
sical.", ae usual, with "Music Box 
Revue" takin.g second place with 
$32,000. "The Dancing Girl." at the 
Garden, went into third place. 
"Little Xellie Kelly." in a class by 
itself, at the Liberty, was not far 
(Continued on page 27) 



CORTHELL TELLS TOLEDO 
TO TAKE A GOOD LOOK 



Tells Slim Audience Town Will 

Never See Him Again— 

^'Blimp" Does Poorly 

Toledo. Feb. 28. 

As John Henry Mears' "The 
Blimp" played to the smallest audi- 
ence Herbert Corthell said he had 
ever seen In one theatre, Mr. Cor- 
thell, who l3 the star of the piece, 
at the conclusion of the perform- 
ance Saturday night at the Audi- 
torium, stepped to the footlights, 
sayins: 

"Ladies and Gentlemen: Take a 
good look at me, for it's the last 
time you or Toledo will ever see 
me. I don't know if you know 
there is a saying among the show 
people that the three worst the- 
atrical weeks of the year are the 
-week before Christmas, Holy Week 
and Toledo." 

Mr. Corthell thanked those pres- 
ent for being there, mentioning that 
as Richard Bennett had started on 
his speaking way, it would not be 
amiss If he broke forth into ora- 
tory. 

"1 don't imderstand," continued 
Mr. Corthell, "how the management 
can afford to pay the musicians, 
stage hands and for the lights with 
the patronage your city gives to 
this theatre. I app<>are<l here six 
years ago with 'A Pair of Sixes* but 
not 'A Royal Flush' could get me 
here again." 

Local opinion jtietified the Cor- 
thell outburst. "The Blimp" was 
locally looked upon as a very good 
fihow. It's new and opened Sunday 
in Chicago. 

For the first half last week Frank 
Keenan played here with his new 
piece, "Peter Weston.*' and aKso suf- 
fered from lack of business. 

At Keiths last week was Bill 
Halligan. pl;l.^itlg the Kaufman 
sketch. Mr. Halligan remarked 
during his term that while in Cleve- 
land he h.'td observed a sign in a 
hotel reading 'Avoid Toledo." Had 
he not foresworn all tips through 
havitig fwllowed Charlie Pope'.i last 
summer. lif» wotild have acH'pted 
the siiggeslloM. Hallican remarked. 



FIRST "DOPE" PLAY 
SHOWN ON COAST 



Tom Wilkes Presents ''Poppy 

Kiss"— Morbid but With 

Interest 



Los Angeles. Feb. 28. 
Thomas Wilkes seems to have got- 
ten the Jump on producing managers 
in the race to be first under the wire 
with a dope play. He has produced 
"The Poppy Kiss" at the Majestic. 
It is a Catherine Chlsholm Cushing 
play in three acts with the final act 
In three scenes. 

The play Is morbid but has Inter- 
est and suspense. The story centers 
around a famous actress who be- 
comes a drug addict and is unable 
to conquer the habit. The play has 
a dream twist but the ending Is 
vague, leaving the audience in a 
quandary as to what route the 
heroine takes. The moral, however, 
Is strong dramatic material. Much 
cannot be said for the play, but it 
may get something of a run here 
because of the timeliness of the 
topic. 

Sam H. Harris may do the play in 
New York If It gets over here. 



NEW GROUP OF CO-OP'S 



The 



Green Ring and Theatre 
14th Street 



on 



<h. LN. 



WILL MARRY DIVA 

Sl)r:itgli':d. Mass . iVh 

Siinui"! T. \Villiains(»n. of Ilaver- 

\\\\\, .M;t!-s. corre«pondoiU for tlie 

>Ccvv Viul. •Timr.s," and I'l^iiU'd In 



Washingtoii. 1 ». C, will wod Cora 
Mancia <'liase. u lio mad'' hor drl>ut 
as diva (»f th.- Meu-opolaau oitera 
in Fobruary. 1921. 

Announrrment of thf engag*'- 
meat was m adn by Miss Cliase. 



"LADIES MUST LOVE" 
WINDS UP IN DAY 



VALENTINO DANCE TOUR 
VIA PRIVATE CAR 

On $7,500 Weekly Guarantee 
Plus Half of Net Profits— 
$20,000 Weekly Expense 



A new group of co-operative 
players have formed under a cor- 
porative ba?is and will shortly pre- 
sent plays In their own theatre on 
14th street. The venture will be 
called "The Green Ring." The play- 
ers have secured a building which 
they win remodel with an intimate 
stage included. Tt will be a club- 
theatre, along the lines of the 
Provincetown Players house and 
control Idea. Xo theatre license is 
required. 

"The Clroen Ring" proposes to 
present new playfl and those of es- 
tablished dramatic value wlilch 
jvould not otherwise be publicly 
produced, the general policy being 
that of exiurimont. The incor- 
porators are ^^. Idea Payno, Whit- 
ford J\ano. .Tosoph Mitrholl. liarry 
M.icollum. Eleanor Hymer, William 
IM. f'arrv and Hoswortli C'io<ker. 



Two Performances, $390 — 
Back to New York— "Im- 
moral" Play -^ 



Easton. Pa., Feb. 2«. 

'Ladies Must I..ove." the warm«'st 
titled play ever pre-sented here, 
opened Washington's Birthday at 
the'Orpheum and stopped after the 
evening performance. Several adti- 
tional dates were booked, but Ar- 
thur Fi.'^her, who produced the 
piece, suddenly left town. He de- 
posited tickets to New York at the 
railroad fitation, but is alleged to 
have paid no salaries. The gros.s 
for the two performances was said 
to be about $360. 

The local paper, In commenting 
on "Ladies Must Love," said: "Im- 
moral is too mild a term. Nothing 
so suggestive and demoralizing has 
ever been pr<:>«ented on a local 
stage.' The item also carried the 
sentiment that if a play of the kind^ 
wAs the sort aimed for Broadway, 
none of the brand was wanted here. 

The players in "Ladles Must 
Love" were all claimed to be Equity 
members, though only a couplp 
were known. In the company wero 
Li^ward Meeker. Harry Englisl), 
Edward Wad.\ Frank Harvey. 
Helen Gllmoro. Annett Tonitii. 
Florence Hartley, Muriel Oakes. 
Those concerned with the piece 
stated the cast wa« amateur and 
that that was the reason 'the show 
stopped nt TO'ston instead of play- 
ing the next stand, Allentown, 

Fisher, who was pianist in "Tlie 
Woman in Bronze." is said to have 
partly adapted "Ladles" from » 
Hungarian mu«Ical comedy. Harry 
Christy also worked on it. a«ul 
Harry McRae Webster was the di- 
rector. The latter plan to retire the 
play and try it agraln. 

Eddie Horan, a New York tailor, 
is said to have been financially in- 
terested with Fisher. The set used 
was that of "The Doormat," a piece 
that failed at the Punch and Judy. 
It was reported obtained from 
Charles Auburn of the theatre stage 
stafE In return for 10 per cent, of 
the "Ladie«" play. 



The exhibition and dancing tour 
of Rudolph Valentino and his wife, 
Winifred Hudnut Valentino, will be 
under the direction of Jack Curley, 
William Wellman and Maurice 
Revnes, starting March 15. The 
first two named are wrestling show 
impresarios and promoted a num- 
ber cf events at Madi«on Square 
(larden. Revnes. formerly a Broad- 
way theatre manager, Is concerned 
in the production of the Molnar 
comedy, "Passion.s fo«- Men," now 
on lour. ■ ; 

The new contract given the 
screen sta Is for six weeks, but 
may be extended. Report^ of a 
fabulous weekly guarantee to the 
Valentinos were exaggerated. The 
contract callH for a guarantee of 
$7,500 weekly and 60 per cent, of 
the profits. In addition, the Valen- 
tinos are to travel in a private car. 
currying a special chef and several 
others of the Valentino retinue, all 
(raveling and hotel expenses to be 
paid by the management. It is 
figured the weekly operating ex- 
pense will be 120.000 weekly, but the 
promoters figure Kross receipts can 
possibly reach »100.000 a week. The 
Valentinoe' first appearance under 
ill.- Curley, Wellman and Revnes 
direction will be at Milwaukee. 
Mississippi Valley cities will then 
be pla/ed down to Now Orleans. 
Tlic New York engagement Is due 
early in April, and the event will 
be held at the 7 1st Regiment 
Armory. Jack Curley Is now in 
^liieago arranging the bookings, 
which will take in armories as 
nnich as posnible. AdnUasion prices 
will be 12, $1.50 and |i. 



SOMEBODY GOT SLAPPED, ' 
BENNETT OR HIS FRIEND 



"Might Have Been Phone Cair' 
— But It Happened and Is 
Another Mystery Lobby Piay 






AL JOLSON PREPARING 
FOR CONCERT TOUR 



Telling Audiences He Will Make 

Single Appearances— Big 

Gross in Cleveland 



Morosco Has Hatton's Script 
Oliver Moro.-co Monday s<MMir»d 
from Charles and P'anny Hatton the 
script of tlieir new play' oi icinttly 
<iaUed "Longaere C.ieen." It has 
been renamed '.Just Off l^.r<adwa\." 
It was erroneously reported a 
couple of weeks ago Wagenhals &. 
Kemper wepe to i>rod(Ke the play. 



Last week in Cleveland Al Jolson 
with "Bombo" again registered big 
business, the gross for the week 
there being $36,000. Reports of Jol- 
son's plan of single appearances 
along concert entertainment lines 
continues to grow. The star stated 
he would enter that field when 
"Bombo" opened at the 69th Street, 
New York, and he has continuously 
mentioned It since during perform- 
ances. 

Jolson's plan of building up a fu- 
ture concert draw has been noted 
In his after-the-Bhow stunt during 
the Chicago run. Frequently after 
the fall of the curtain he would en- 
tertain the audience for nearly an 
hour. > , 



MAUDE SAILS 



With Party From England 
"Winter" Play Over Here 



for 



ryril Maude, who is to appear un- 
der the management of Charles I)ii 
lintrhani In "If Winter Comes." 
sailed from 13ngland Wedr>es(la\- 
nlioard the OI\mplc, accompanied 
by McDonald Hastings, the En^li-li 
dr.imatist who .'idapt(>d the play 
from HutehinscMi's novel. There ar<' 
also three IJiitish actresses in tlie 
party, though the balanc e of tltc 
east will be selected here. 

"If Winter Comes" will be pn - 
sented in Chic.ago before shown in 
New Vork. It is likely the play will 
remain (>ft' Broadway until next sea- 
son. 



Chicago, Feb. 23. 

Itudolph A'alentin<» and Andrew 
Karz.'is, manager ol the Trianon 
dance place, where the picture man 
ai)peared for five days last week, 
reached a heated difference of 
opinion before the engagement 
ended. Valentino said he would re- 
appear at Trianon this week; Kar- 
7,as said he i^"ould not. 

Trianon's manager stated Valen- 
tino had been engaged to hold over 
at the same salary, but at the last 
minute demanded for this week dou- 
ble what he had received last week. 

"It needed ail we could take in to 
pay Valentino last week," said Kar- 
zas, "and his impossible proposition 
is the gratitude I get ^or rescuing 
him from the hole he worked hlm- 
uelf Into in the Detroit dance place." 

A'alentino is claimed to have de- 
clared to Karzas he was drawing 
people to Trianon from all over Chi- 
cago and somebody would liave to 
pay heavy for it. 

Valentino Is now at Marigold Gar- 
den. He went to New York and 
returned in the short period that 
he had open between Chicago en- 
gagements. Valentino la at Marl- 
gold for two weeks and his guaran- 
tee is said to be 110,000 a week. 

The engagement takes on added 
importance as Valentino and his 
wife, Winifred Hudnut Valentino 
are to be remarried at Marigold 
March 5 which will mark the open- 
ing of his second week as an at- 
traction at that garden. The wed- 
ding will be solemnized by Judge 
McKinney. There will lie a wedding 
fluj.per at 8. A few selected guests 
have been Invited. 



ChicuRo. Feb. 28. 

"It ml;rht have been u telephone 
call, after all," that gave the first- 
nighters at the premiere of "Peter 
Weston" at tlie Harris Sunday night 
a chance to observe Richard Ben- 
nett publicly making frood the title 
of his play, "He Who Ciets Slappe<l ' 

Fact Is Bennett's presence in the 
audience wouldn't have l>een de- 
tected if it hadn't been fot a scene 
in the main lobby of the theatre be- 
tween the second and third acts. 

Further fact is that Bennett got 
into an alleged argument with a 
"gentleman friend" the moment the 
two reached the lobby uflrr ieavinK 
the wife of the "gentleman friend" 
In the theatre for the second inter- 
mission. 

Some reported that Bennett got 
slapped. Others claimed the "gen- 
tleman friend" was the one who got 
slapped. Take your choice. At any 
rate, there was some slapping done, 
and there would have been more If 
Col. William Uoche. manager of the 
Harris, hadn't done tlie strong-arm 
stunt, separating Bennett and the 
"gentleman friend." » 

Why the slapping was done re- 
mains a great mystery, since th« 
participants had with them the 
"gentleman friend's" wife. f|(rhc 
identity of the man and wife 
couldn't be discovered; they might 
have been the guests of Bennett. At 
any rate, it was a party of three — 
Bennett, the "gentleman friend" and 
the wife. 

Local sleuths on the Herald -Ex- 
aminer and The Tribune tried In 
vain to find out the cause for tlie 
fuss. The battalion of reporters ar- 
rived on the scene shortly after the 
critics attending the premiere tipped 
off the city desks concerning the in- 
cident. The flashlight men came 
later, but they, too, ia vain. 

(Continued on page 37) 



I 



THOS. MILLIKIN ARRESTED 



Charged in Indianapolis with Grand 
Larceny 



^cs«i 



DECEIVED EVA WILSON 

Lyceum Singer Suing Creamery 
Man for $75,000 



Mva Wilson, lyceum singer, filed 
papers here Instituting breach of 
promise proceedings against C. F. 
iJiadner. manager of the creamery 
at In(lep<-ndence, Ore. 

Miss Wilson asks damages 
amountincT to |7n,000. She claims 
IJr.'irlner on M{.y 2, 13L'l, agreed to 
marry her on the same date of the 
fallowing year i»iit later refused. 
.'<he alleges he had imiiroper rela- 
tions with her followitig his promise 
f>f marriage. 

I'.radner said nothiiit? but "blji^^h- 
ed " when pap«'rs were served (»n 
liitn. 

Mi.ss \\ il-on w.is a resMient JtT 
.^e.ittle for 10 years before coming 
to Portlund. She \* well-known in 
irMi^i) al cireles, having sung In the 
'Wayfarer*' and several other larije 
productions. 



Indianapolis. Feb. 28. 
A man giving his name as Thomas 
MilUkln, 40, is under arrest on 
grand larceny and vagrancy 
charges, as a result of accusations 
he was operating a fake scheme to 
recruit chorus glrte for a New York 
production. 

Miilikin,' according to city de- 
tectives, ran a "blind" advertise- 
ment In local papers asking glrlM 
who wanted positions in a "high 
class company" to communicate. 
Mrs. Doria Eileen Nickels. 22, and 
pretty, answered. A special deliv- 
ery letter advised her to call on 
MlUikin at a good renidencA ri4- 
dre«H, detectives charge. She 
called, and Mllllkln told her hl.« 
"instinct" told him she was the 
right height and weight, she said. 
He offered her a contract calling 
for from $22.60 to $126 a week, it 
was alleged. She objected to sign- 
ing the contract until she talked 
the matter over with her husband, 
she said. 

MiUikln called at her home, ex- 
hibiting bank references. Later the 
went to Mlllikin'a address and gave 
him a check for $26 to cover "co«t 
of costume," she alleges. On her 
way home she stopped at tlu> Pal- 
ace theatre and told Manager Herb 
Jennings and a New York theatri- 
cal man what she had done. 

Jennings and his friend' failed to 
recognize any such producing com- 
pany as the "MIUikin-FernwaU 
Co.," Miilikin claimed to represent, 
detectives stated, and so Mrs. Nicli- 
els «et out to get her money back. 
The three devised a scheme wl ere- 
by Mrs. Nickels 'phoned Milliluri 
and, representing herself to be an- 
olher girl, asked for a Job. Miilikin, 
she said, offered to take her on for 
a $15 guarantee, since she repre- 
sented .^;hc only liad that much. 

MilUkin's arrest followed. 



RETURN SUMMER DATE 

Chicago, Feb. 1%. 

"Molly Darling" will again try 
Cliieago this summer without house 
named as yet. The Moore & Megley 
attraction was h<"re last summer. 
but unsuccessfully. 

Becast for its New V<.rk showinfr. 
the piece h.a^ continued to pet b;.; 
nuMiey find is going to once mrir'» 
br.ave it in it? home tn\rn, as the 
pi»Mlueei.s are native^. 



m:. 



LEGITIMATE 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



INSIDE STUFF 



ON LEGIT 



In moving "Why Not?" from the *48th Street to the National, New York, 
Charles Miller, who Is Interested In the managtment of the company 
with a Shubert booking executive. Is figuring on a rather unusual basis. 
The arrangement under which the theatre Is housing the attraction 1j on 
a «0-40 basis with the guarantee to the house $4,000 a week. Miller is 
figuring on $2,400 a week from the cut rates and an additional $1,500 a 
week from the regular agencies selling at advance prices. This would 
give him about $3,900 or within $100 of the house guarantee. The com- 
pany Is costing between $1,600 and $1,750 in salaries, and that is to come 
over the window. It means that a gross of $7,000 will have to be played 
on the week for Miller and his associate, said to be Jules Murry, to get a 
break with advertising and other incidental extras on the show, including 
royalties. 



A couplo of theatres in the Times square district are or. the market 
for lease. With the wild scramble for theatres by producers It is sur- 
prising someone has not come to the fore and taken over at least two of 
these houses, which on a rental basis look like sure fire bargains. ' One 
in particular which has a 16-year lease to run can be had on a basis 
that will make the annual rental $42,000, is decidedly cheap all things con- 
sidered these days. Another hou.se with but a four-year lease with a 
renewal beyond that now figures $60,000 annually with a tilt of about 
$10,000 above that on the renewal for ten years. Both houses have been 
successful in the past and are located on ]|ood theatre streets. 



When the I^urette Taylor production "Ilumoresque" opened at the 
Vanderbilt this week there were at least two managers no longer in- 
terested in the production; A. L. Krlanger and Charles Dillingham, who 
stepped out of the production i; id permitted Georgre Tyler to have it all. 
The "glorified Janitor" speech of J. Hartley Manners, husband of Miss 
Taylor, la believed to have been partially the cause for their refusal to 
continue their Interest in the production. 

Weather in the northwest cost Dillingham's "Tip Top" $7,l(fo on two 
stands missed because of the terrific snow storm which swept through 
the territory. "Tip Top" was booked to play Fargo and Bismarck on the 
way out of Duluth and at Stapleton, Minn., their train was snowed in, 
«n#they were stalled for two days. In Fargo the box office had to make 
a return of $3,600 for the missed performance while in Bismarck $3,500 
had to be refunded. The company picked up its route again at Billings 
and went Into Butte, continuing on its way to the coast. . 



. While George M. Cohan was directing ^ rehearsal of "Little Nellie 
Kelly" and when the "Mother" song was being sung, it struck the stage 
manager that through the effects then in use to illustrate the number, 
he might require instructions. The effects held an illustration (since 
discontinued) for each verse and encore. Walking down to the footllKhts 
the stage manager called out: "Mr. Cohan, what would we do if there 
were no encore?" Cohan ran along the aisle and pointing with his 
finger to the stage manager, replied: 'If there is no encore for this sont;. 
there will be no show." 



"Humors of Parliament" and other entertainments. One day he happened 
to receive a royal command to dine at the government house In Ottawa. 
At that time, h« was appearing at the Ottawa opera hous». long since 
destroyed by fire. 

After luncheon Furniss was enjoying the proverbial clgaret with tne 
official members of the household, when one of the aides de camp re- 
marked to him: 

"It is a lucky thing you were not dining here tomorrow evening, for 
every Wednesday night the governor and the duchess and all of us turn 
into waiters. The butler, cook and servants sit at the table and we wan 
upon them!" ^ ,; 

Furniss some time later, while lunching with Barrle at a club, repeated 
the incident. Barrie listened with Interest and the next day .sent a note 
to Furniss asking him to meet him the following day. Again, they 
lunched together and again the Ottawa story was repeated. Not long 
afterward. Barries "The Admirable Chrichton," made Its appearance. 



PrIvatO"ltdtlces from London express Teggy O'Ntil's doubt whether 
her appearance In "Plus Fours" would not be happier had the show 
been spotted in another theatre than the Haymarket. London's "Theatre 
Royal." Miss O'Nell's personal success was undoubted when the play 
opened about four weeks ago, but there appears to have been some 
feeling of resentment that an alien star should be presented in the his- 
K.rlc Haymarket. The house has a most aristocratic draw, and It Is 
revered as the "old home of comedy." Some of the reviewers touched on 
the history and policy of the Haymarket. That Is believed to have 
stirred the sentiment, which may or may not be of Importance. Although 
the Haymarket Is known as attracting the works of the best contem- 
porary English authors and tHe be.?t of the native stars are housed 
in it, the same theatre held the American Edwin Booth and his engage- 
ment there was extremely successful. 



"BUTTERFLY" MOVING 



From 



Qlobo to Aster — Johnny 
Dooley's Billing 



There Is a critic on a New York daily who doesn't always sign his 
name to his column. He Is an old-timer, but intensely sensitive about 
"recognition." He has served notice on every press agent in town that 
any quotes ,from his reviews In ads must be credited to him by name 
and not by the nom de plume he employs. Last week a press agent asked 
him to use a story, and he answered, "Why should I give you any pub- 
licity? You don't give me an^V 



Lenore Ulrlc may go abroad sometime In May which indicates "KIkl" 
will not run through another summer at the Belasco. The Gultry comedy 
Is now on Its way for the completion of Its second season, in its 65th 
week which tops the entire cun-ent list in point of run. It Is reported 
Miss Ulrlc will tour the major stands in "Kiki" for one year and return in 
a new show for 24-25. The succteding play is said to have been selected 
and calls for the star playing a mulatto. 



Doris Keane Is leaving shortly for Europe. Her plans call for a tour 
of the continent and incidentallv to select a play for her appearance here 

in the fall. /■ ■ ■'...■■•.' ■ - .'■,.,' ' ^ i 



Following ^e visit by J. J. Shubert to Ailaniio City, recovering from 
bis illness, he went to Palm Beach. 



The Chicago 'Tost" ia reported to have started a damage suit against 
the Shuberts, or will, through the u.'^e by the Shubert theatres in Chi- 
cago of a line on their programs reading in effect: "We do not adver- 
tise in the Chicago 'Post' because it doc.s not tell the truth.* When the 
Shubcrt.s sued "The Post" for libel the Chicago paper is said to have 
spent about $40,000 in collecting data concerning the Shuberts for a 
defense. This data. It Is said, the "Post * is anxious to get on the record 
«nd also to print Itself with the damage action believed the papers plan 

The Shubert contract with producers or theatres carries a^ provision 
the Shubert show or house shall not share in newspaper advertising 
where the paper advertised in is not approved of by the Shuberts 
Through this clause the Studebaker and playhouse in Chicago last week 
Withdrew their ads from The Post," mostly through the suggestion fruni 
the Shuberts, but also beo.iuse neither house could see why it should pa.y 
the full cost of the "Post" advertising without the Shubert attraction in 
each theatre standing its share. * 

When the late A. Toxen Worm was alive and t'no general press rep- 
resentative of the Shuberts, he was muchly blanud when the Shuberts 
"pulled out" their advertising from any paper. Since Worms death Lee 
Shubert has pursued the same course, leaving it open to question as to 
whether it wasn't Lee when ^Vo^m wa.s so often blamed. 



A hotel on 44th street east of 6th avenue Is known to theatrical folk 
as the meeting place of alleged "high lights" among playwrights and 
actbrs and dubbed the "inner circle." Daily news that must be whispered 
is regaled over the tea cups. Last week the proposed revival of "The 
School for Scandal" was mentioned and a girl said: "looks as though our 
favorite hotel has been dramatized." 



"Lady Butterfly" is scheduled to 
close at the Globe. New York, March 
17 and moves to the Astor, where it 
will open the following Monday. 
Johnny Dooley entering the pieco 
this week almost disrupted the cast 
because of the billing given him on 
the theatre signs and in iiie uu\ei- 
tlsing. 

The comedian wa« given the 
feature honors. Marjorie Gateson 
and one other member of the cast 
threatened to leave the show. It is 
said, unless their contracts' In re- 
gard to advertising were observed. 
Tuesday the billing about the thea- 
tre was changed and all of the 
names taken out of the advertising 
from Wednesday on. 

"The Cherry Chair," scheduled for 
the Globe opening March 19, will 
not be in readiness by that time. 
The house may be dark for a week 
prior to the opening of the new at- 
traction, which Is being propped 
with the Idea of a summer run 
there. 



BANKROLL SHORT 

Play With Creighton Hate Did Not 
Open on Time 



The recent event In London for the benefit of the Actors Benevolent 
Fund which corresponds with the Actors Fund here. Is reported having 
been exceptionally successful. A number of jianations were tendered by 
American theatrical managers and an expression of apprecip.tlon was 
contained In a letter received this week from Gilbert Miller from C B 
Cochran, The latter when here in the fall suggested participation by 
Broadway's producers, which Idea was aided by the efforts of Miller. 
The English manager's letter told of the fine impression which was cre- 
ated when the gifts from American managers were announced and stated 
his belief that It had d">no a great deal towards helping friendly Anglo- 
American sentiment in theatrical circles. 



"Pasteur," the furthcoming play at the Empire, New* York, with Henry 
Miller starred, was written by Sacha Guitry for his fatlier, Lucien. It Is 
con.cidered by many as the elder (Jultry's greatest characterization. He 
has loured P'rance and Belgium in it. The American rights wne orginally 
secured by Crosby Gaige, partner of the Selwyns, and it was Intended for 
Lionel Barrymore. Rights were relinquished when the latter was not 
availal'le. There are 14 characters In "Pasteur," all males. No other 
drama with .a cast n.} large without a feminine role has been tried here. 

"Htavriiiy and Earthly Love," the Molr.ar play which Arthur Horl<ins 
win produce next seasin, has a heroine of unbalanced mind. At the 
cpening curtain a bier is shown. The girl has an engagement with her 
lover, but she wants him to be.ieve she has become an angel and lies 
down In the coffin. Her sweetheart on entering thinks her dead and 
kneels in pray«r. At the conclusion the girl Imagines herself In heaven, 
fche affixes wings and leaps from the window to" her death. 



Sam H. Harris will not go abroad a.s reported, but will take a winter 
vacation at Pair. Eeach, leaving next week with Crosby Gaige and 
Irving Berlin. The 'ter recently returned from the south. Mr. and 
Mrs. Art'iur Hopkins started for Cuba, but changed plans and are in 
Florida. 



One of the finest compliments given a »*ar this season fell to Jane 
Cowl for her "Juliet" at tlie Henry Miller. D'ivid Belasco witnessed the 
performaiue When the curtain dropped he went back stage and 
chatted witli Miss Cowl. He told her he always wanted to produce 
"Romeo and Juliet," but after seeing her characteriz.ition his plan was off 
for good, for it Is his belie: she is the greatest Juliet possible In the 
»pan of life yet remaining to him. 



Sam H. Harris will probably close negotiations with Arthur Ham- 
merstein where-by Frank Tinney will come under tho Harris man- 
agement. Tinney will not commence active production work until next 
fall In the third edition of the "Music Bux Review," for which pur- 
pose Harris is primarily taking over the contract This accounts for 
Hammersteii^'s abandoning his threat of enjoining Tinney from appear- 
ing for Keith's, which wou'd be in violation otherwl.^o of the produc- 
tion contract. Vaudeville work Is only allowed the comedian betweecn 
seasons. Whether 
Dill." Tinney s la 
_perIod is open to question 



or not Hammersteln's voluntary closing of "Daffy 
:t staiTijjg vehicle, made this a "between seasons" 



A producer with an attraction that moved into a Shubert house from 
another theatre In the last couple of weeks is reported as having made 
a heavy noise when It came to settling on the extra advertising bill. 
He discovered charged as his share a $40 ad in the Shubert paper, and 
!ii<ewlse a share on the advertising in two small house organs controlled 
ly the Shuberts. His squawk brought him little satisfaction, but he 
stated that as long" as the Shuberts took It upon themselves to Insist on 
his paying for advertising he never ordered, he would under his contract 
which called for his shaie of tho gross receipts. Insist that the 22 cents 
on each pass the Shuberts were collecting should be included in his gross 
receipts. In addition to that he wanted to know that why his attraction 
was only allowed a four per cent, discount on his advertising bill while 
the Shuberts were getting* five per cent. d;.soount from the Capehart- 
Carey Agency. 

There are some famous storhs of the little bird killtng the Goliath, 
the tortoise outrunning the hare, etc. Maybe that's what makes them 
famous. Here Is one for Aesop's Broadway Fables. 

Some years ago August Janssen, known as a restaurant keeper with a 
preposterous bank balance, made the rounds of Broadway managers pro- 
claiming what a gifted son he had — the son was a composer; only an 
amateur, but great. He got the laugh and the bench In the corridor. 
Finally Oliver Morosco gave him a hearing. Janssen's son p'ayed him 
Eomo songs Morosco hesitated. Father Janssen jumped up and said 
he'd finance any show In which his son's music was used. 

Well — thai was different. And the show was done and Father Janssen 
paid — and paid and paid and paid. It was a flop and Janssen took 
his loss. That should and might have been the end of It. 

But two things Interfered. Janssen, the elde , began to like the show 
business, and had more confidence than over In his son's tunes. He 
"^nt" for $300,000 and the son composed several more flops. 

This week the Oliver Morosco Holding Company, which now owns not 
onl^ Morosco's shows and theatres, but his services as well, elected 
ofiflcers. The new president is August Janssen. The Morosco Holding 
Company has one hit. "Lady Butterfly," with a weak book, generally 
credited as being kept a'.ive on Bro.ulway by its music. The composer 
is Werner Janssen. 



Los Angeles, Feb. 28. 
"Just Suppose,'* the Henry Miller 

produced flop of several years ag<\ 
was to have opened at the Mason 
Monday with Creighton HaTe in the 
lead. But the doors were unopened 
and the house management stated 
the presentation had been post- 
poned because of the non-arrival of 
the complete production from San 
Francisco. 

The venture, It is understood, is 
backed by San Francisco capital. 
On the Inside It is said they did not 
have enough to get the show into 
town in time for the opening and 
are now hustling to gather enough 
to make the grade by next wee*. 

The show was first booked for 
two weeks. It is in the hope of 
being able to play one week at least 
with a chance of getting even that 
they are hunting for a bank roll. 

Thero was no advance .''ale for 
the current week. 



LEGIT ITEMS 



Vincent Lawrence's comedy, whieh 
George M. Cohan Is producing, will 
succeed the special "So This Is 
I.,ondon" company at the Grand, 
Chicago, March 12. the western 
"London" show going on tour at 
that time. The new play, which was 
first called "Private Property, " has 
been renamed "Two Fellows and 
a Girl." Its actual debut will be at 
Rochester March 8. Harry Sloano 
has gone in advance. 



A report in one of the local dailiea 
that BuJ Murray Is the father of 
twins Is denied by the stage man- 
ager of the "Lady In Ermine, " now 
at the Century, New York. A daugh- 
ter was added to tho family two 
weeks ago, christened "Marianna" 
after the leading female role in the 
"Ermine" play, but she has no twin, 
as reported. 



"Old Bill, M. P.," the Bruce P.airnsfather pla\-^ will again take to the 
boards here. The piece was produced by Lewis and Gordon, but brought 
Jn after two weeks In Canada. Changes needed must have the consent of 
the English artist-playwright. The matter Is und r negotiation, and It 
Is understood "Old Bill" will fhort:y be placed in rehearsal in modified 
form. , , 



Ottawa, the capital city of Canada, was really responsible for Barrle's 
♦The Admirable Crichton," says Varieiys Montreal correspondent. To the 
thousands who have seen and admired Barrie's clever play, this infor- 
mation will be a revelation. Tho lnce|)tion and Inspiration of "The Ad- 
mirable Crlehton" leaked out throu^-h Harry Furniss, the famous Ptinch 
artisL FurnibS. years ago. was making a tour of Canada, giving his 



McKay Morris surprised "the talent" by appearing in "The Laughing 
Lady," submerged in a minor part In which he is on the stage only a few 
minutes In the second act while Cyril KeiKhtUy, who has not before been 
with the Ethel Barrymore companies, plays tho romantic lead. Morris 
was the principal support for Miss Barrymore In "Rose Berndt" And 
"Romeo and Juliet." It Is known he had a contract for the heason, and 
It was understood th.Tt the contract stipulated he was to be Miss B.irry- 
more's leading man. Ho Is not, however, In her current vehicle. 

Several theatrical attorneys are commenting on the stand William A. 
Brady is taking regarding the .Sunday closing' law. They a.l concur 
that legally and technically there 1» no getting about tI:o statute. AVhat 
concessions as regards the "blue laws' have been made are generoii«. in 
their opinion. Contrarily, as barristers concerned in show business and 
with the welfare of tho showman at heart, they fear that this agitation 
is liable to boomerang In nn unweieome manner. Br.ulj s dc.vion to 

(Continued oh page .37) 



Re the cast changes In "Wild- 
fiower" made last week, Charles 
Judels, Evelyn Cavanaugh and 
James Doyle state they were dis- 
satisfied with their parts and 
handed in their notices Feb. 10, 
which was several days after the 
pieco opened at the Casino. 



Billy Hawthorne has changed Hie 
title of his musical comedy from 
"Miss Daisy" to "Daisy Won't Tell.'» 
The piece will open in Springfield, 
Mas.s., at the Court S<iuare, early in 
March. There will be 15 principals 
and 18 chorus girls. 



Fred Stone will tour to the coast 
In "Tip Top." It will be his first 
appeai-ance In the territory for 11 
year.s. At that time he toured the 
west In "The Old Town," then 
teamed with tlie late Dave Mont- 
gomery. 



"Frank ^Tex ei-s. foimerlv treasurer 
of the Libert >•. N*'\v Vf)rU, and com- 
pany manager U,v sever;il attrar-- 
tions on Broadu :jy, h..-.s entered the 
inr^uram^e bu siness, lie is epccI^I 
.i;^.eiit for 'in'-State Mntu;il I'ompany 
of Massachusetts. » 



Frank Sheiid.iri le't New Vor'; 
Tuesday for tl;o eoast where he will 
work fi'.c weks i;) a 5pcei;;l i^lc- 
, ture. 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



LEGITIMATE 



"^ 



£3 



:;f. 



.».•. 



STOCKS 



GOTHAM STOCK 

Afffle Sheridan Miami Campbell 

Morgan Carr Stanley Andrews 

> Margie Patch I'Vances Ur««e 

The Stranger Rupert L.a Belle 

Jack Sheridan CUflford AW'XAnder 

Mra. Fisher Edith Bowers 

Bill Patch Dan Malloy 



There were several reasons for 
the Blaney Players at the <;otlinTn. 
Brooklyn, playing 'Why Wives CJo 
Wrong" last week. The most Im- 
portant was that the company hart 
been deprived of the seivices of 
Dagmar I-lnette. Its leading woman, 
for several wot-ks. due to illness. 
MiH.s Linette's absence has n-^cesMl- 
tttted an entire swltchinr;: of pliiyj-. 
with Miami Campbell, the ingonii?. 
and Frances (Jrestf. th»» .«?er'ond 
woman, alternating with th«* lead-« 
durititi her absence. In pl:)c.^ ol s< - 
eial plays demanding :i leadins 
woman of Mi^8 lilnetK^'s; typo, the 
management has stcured soin> 
evorv-day htock bills, among whlvMi 
was -Why Wives Go Wrong" 

The piece, by Ralph Thomas Ket- 
tering, is to a large extent a titlo 
play. Kxcepf for the title it m^-ans 
l{tti»\ and the name ser\t-.s only to 
attract curiosity seekers. Another 
reason for It being ufod at the 
Gotham was that it couhl he pr(t- 
duced ai minimum cost. Calling for 
a cast of but seven poo»»I .\ no adcV- 
tlonal recruKs to the company were 
neces.siiry for Its presentation. Tht* 
staging requires one st-t which unv 
scvnlc artist could worl; out with 
but litth' exertion. Largely on ;;:- 
count of lh»' economy svs-v)-iate' 
with it. the i)iece proved .'•airni-iently 
strong for a Lenten wetk attraction. 

"Why Wives Go Wrong" Is a 
stock »)ill without a r.roadw;(\ r- p- 
utatioii. It Is the type* 6f piece 
its authoi- can run off on short 
notice. In it la included the tdd 
triangle itleu. with an altenipt made 
to give it a llttlf twist. Tl e loca'.f 
Is a suburban town. Jad; Sheri' \ 
ia in t'.!^ salary e.irnlng commuter 
class. H<' is married and compna 
tivelv happy. The otily Oa'.U •' :>ot 
on. the couple's 1if*> «« t^"*', 'ht-ir 
child died in infancy. Sberiden 
Is inclined to be tight-fisicl and 
narrow-minded. He is hd to be- 
lieve an affair is under way 'o«*twe. ,^ 
his wife and best friend. Morgan 
Carr. He turns her from the hous- 
with Carr in the middle of the night. 
She returns the following morning 
for her clothes, having spent f ; 
night with neighbors. It i.s dis- 
closed that she has been v.orkinn; 
for Carr as secretary for ."ome time 
in order to secure sufficient funds 
to clothe herself, the a^-^'-vance 
granted by her luisband being in- 
adequate. After explanations • the 
final curtain finds the cottple in em- 
brace. 

Th*>re is much talk early of charge 
accounts; but that i>art dwindles 
awav, and as it disclost-s the reason 
-Wives Go Wrone" is that their 
husbands are tightwads an»l nar- 
row-minded. 

The regular members of the 
Gotham company handled the rob^s. 
the husband and wife a>signment 
being cared for by Clifford Alex- 
ander and Miami Campbell. Alex- 
ander is the regular Gotham lea<^- 
ing man. He is young and a fair 
actor. An eagerness to put dra- 
matic fo:-ce into his work tends to 
give the impression of overacting. 
It is a habit often acquired by stock 
plavers and usually keep." them in 
stock. Miss Campbell experienced 
little dimculty with her role. She 

f>ossesses more dramatic ability 
han is credited to the general r i 
of stock Ingenues. F».ances Gregg 
handled the second feminine role, 
giving the piece a comedy touch 
with her flippant manner. Stanley 
Andrews as the husband's f 'end 
gave a steadv performance. Dan 
Malloy, who did the directing, also 
appeared in a minor role, as did Ru- 
pert La Belle and Edith Bowers. 

"Why Wives Go Wrong" can't 1.' 
taken "s-^fiously a? a stock prod- - 
tion. Only companies with many 
faithful followers can atfor.l to ta'. e 
I chajue unless tluy e iter to a 
transient clientele. Ilaf. 



The Loew office his requested 
T^ulty to reconsider its ruling (»f 
forcir.g amateurs ai.)i>« iring with 
the Alhaml.r.i 1 'layers, llroofilxn, 
secured through a campaign con- 
ducted by the theatre and an even- 
ing newspaper, to join Kijuity when 
they are selected to appear wi*h tite 
^tock pompany. The «<t« ck comp.tny 
was installed at th<' Alh.iml'i:i pri'M- 
to Loew taking the hous- over. 



former Ingenue of the Poll Players 
in New Haven, was held could have 
been evidenced than was ehown by 
the crowds which attended the fu- 
neral services last Thur8da5^ Miss 
Hewitt died after an Illness of nine 
days, havlnff taken bichloride of 
mercury. Rev. Charles O. Scoville, 
rector of Trinity Church, read the 
services. The remains were taken 
to her late homo In Punxsutawney, 
Pa. Members of Poll's Hyperion 
theatre orchestra played "The Ros- 
ary," a favorite selection of the ac- 
tress. The girl's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. A. V. Hewitt, were at the 
services. All afternoon an<l even- 
ing \\' dnesday crowds called at the 
funeral chapel to view the body oi' 
Miss Hewitt. Traffic on Chapel 
street was blocked during the 
funeral. 



-^ A. 



Mis« Lyon accomplished most suc- 
cessfully ft mighty dlfflcult thing, 
that of foUowIngr an established 
stock leading woman in the same 

bill. ' 



BUZZELL'S SET-BACK 

Motion to Punish Schwab and 
Kus«ll Lieniod 



Frances McGrath, of stock, i.s re- 
covering from a relapse fonow;ing 
her serious illness since I'.ie holi- 
days. MisH McGrath will be con- 
fined to lyr home for about two 
more ^weeks when she will join her 
husband, Forrest Orr. leading man 
witli the Woodward Players at the 
Majestic, Detroit When Miss Mc- 
Grath suffered a relapse, the phy- 
siciatis after a consultation, deckl- 
ed a crisis was approaching "and 
wired her husband. Mr. Orr re- 
ceived the wire i«i the middle cf a 
performance. He was excu.«cd by 
th<> Woodward management after 
having played two acts of the play 
an^l missing the final two. ^ 



rejoined the 
at Harmanus 



Phyir« t]iImore 
Proctor Players 
Dleecker Hall. Albany, X. V., last 
week in 'Why Men Leave Home." 
Miss (;i!more was given an ovation 
on her first appearance on the Al- 
bany stage at the prem-ier on Mon- 
day night. She is extremely popular 
in the Capital City. After leaving 
Albany several weeks ago she w^nt 
with the Colonial Stock company 
at Pittsfield. Mass., playing leads 
in the Berkshire city until the 
etock dosed its sea.son two weeks 
ago. Mary Daniel and John Glynn 
McFarlane are the leads In the Al- 
ba i\y stock. 



(Miss) Lee Patrick, who Jumped 
into the part of Louise in "Bud- 
diee" with but one day's rehearsal, 
went over eo big she has been en- 
gaged by Smith & Duffy as a reg- 
ular member of the Pres'ident com- 
panV; Washington, to do ingentieji. 



Charles BerkcH's company, which 
is at the Grand at Davenport, Iowa, 
will move to the English Opera 
House at Indianapolis March 24. 
Jean Oliver rejoins the company 
this week and opens at Davenport 
March 4 in "The Storm." 



Montague Love has cancelled his 
engagement with the Alhambra 
Players. Brooklyn, to play the lead 
in "Bought and Paid For" next 
week on account of picture work. 



Victor Browne joins the Al Lut- 
t.'.iger stock in Salem. Mass.. Mon- 
day as leading man. He replaces 
Dwight Meaue. who has been with 
the company all season. 

.. . . ;^,v 

," . ■ ..'. ■ .»* 

S'jsanne Jackson joined the Co- 
lonial IMayers, Richmond, this week, 
openittig in "Nothing but the 
Truth," Ceclle Kerns, whom she r - 
placed, gave in her notice. 



liOUise Ktta Valentine, leading 
woman; William Balfour and Lewis 
Haines close with the Academy 
Players, Norfolk, a week from 
Saturday. 



The members of the Stanley 
James t^iock in Manchesier, N. H., 
have accepted a cut to keep the 
comi)any open during Lent. 



The Harold Hevia stock opene<l 
Monday at the Academy, Norfolk, i 
X'irglnia. 



The Auditorium Pla.vers in L.vnn, 
Mass.. this week are presenting the 
musical comedy, "Honey GIH." 
Dancing specialties are given by 
Mile. Clarice and Frances Aldrich- 
<*8pec!ally engaged. 



Kddie Buzzell's motion to punish 
Laurence Schwab and Daniel Kus- 
ell, producers of the "Gingham 
Girl," for alleged failure to live up 
to an Equity jirbitratlon ugre<qnent 
was denied last I'riday by New 
York Supr^nio Court Juotics ilcr- 
ney In a decision that covers the 

issues thoroughly. ' 

Buzzell alleged four violations of 
the arbitration; that the electric 
light bllllikg was not in keeping 
-ftith th* arbitrator**' provisions: 
that the program featuring of Buz- 
zell under the "Gingham Girl" title 
was not fulfilled; that the omission 
of the comed'an'a name from sev- 
eral tlve-llne or more newspaper 
advertlKements and the omission of 
Butzell's name from .a billboard on 
38th street and Broadway also 
violated the arbitration decision. 

Schwab & Ku.sell have made ap- 
plication to r>iuily for an arbitra- 
tion, allegii^g Buzzell violated his 
contract when he refused Jan. 18 to 
do a number with the girl who was 
understudying for Bertee Beaumont 
of the regular caPt. who was out 
through illiu'ss. Schwab & Kusell 
have appointed Walter Vincent 
(Wilmcr & Aincent) as their arbi- 
trator with Samuel Jesse Buzzell. 
the actor's lawyer-bi-other, as Buz- 
rell's arbitratcr. The appointment 
of an umpire was in abeyance pend- 
ing the outcome of this motion. 
Julius Kendler and Monroe Cold- 
stein are .counsel for Schwab & 
Kusell. •.. 

Walter Vincent has a $10,000 bond 
posted on the producers* behalf to 
ensure fulfillment of the arbitra- 
tion. He Is also reported having an 
interest in the show. 



The Garrick Players, under th 

direction of GaiTy McCJarry, openei 

this week In Washington with "M 

Lad\ Friend" and Jack Norvvorf. 

as specl.il star. McGarry was wit; 

the Garrick I'layers last season a 

an actor and later as owner of th. 

organization. Washington then took 

to him for sticking and It gave hie 

Garrick stock a friendly audience 

at the opening. The show was also 

liked and a smooth performance 

given. L. Stodriard Taylor is the 

house manager as before, and W. 

L. Fleming treasurer. McGarry is 

leasing from the Shuberts with his 

contract enforcing the 10 per cent. 

tax on all passes. 



Lansing Karnest, manager of th* 
L'nion Square Theatre Players in 
I'ittsfield. Mass., one night each 
week gives a half-hour olio of local 
Lalent, preceding the time set for 
ihe first curtain. This week local 
alent from the General KleJtric 
plant was featured. 



SILVEBS m "HASTY PUDDING" 

Lou t;iivers has grabbed this 
year's plum from the "Hasty Pud- 
ding" annual event, the Harvard 
College mu:ii^al show, which wili 
play WashlngLo.i, Boston, Baltimore 
arid New YviA m -^prll. 

Silvers Is »n » omplete ohnrg:- of 
direction. The pf .-formers v ill .ill 
'■«e students. 



HELEN LACKAYE DIVORCED 

Chicago. F'eb. 28. 

Helen Lnclraye-RldlngH was grant- 
ed a divorce here Feb. 24 from Harry 
Ridings on 1 l\e grounds of cruelty 
and desert l<»n. 

Ridings Is the manager of Cohan's 
Grand Opera House. 



COLORED SHOW DELAYED 

"Plantation Oaya" Didn't Opan at 
Lafayette and Didn't Sail 



"Plantation Days." a colored sho*,v 
booked for De CourvlMo's revue, 
"Monkey Glands," due to open at the 
Empire, London. March 15. failed to 
sail on the "Lapland" last Saturday. 
The attraction was booked by M. S. 
Bentham. It was stated yesterday 
(Wednesday) tb** d*»l«y wn« nne^n- 
sioned by tlie British labor permits 
having been held up. 

Delay in the departure of "Plan- 
tation Days " is also explained by In- 
junction proceedings Instituted 
against the show by Sol Goodman, 
attorney for "Shufffe Along." An 
order returnable Tuesday was 
signed by Justloo Goddard in the 
U. S. District Court, southern New 
York, prohibiting the use of any 
"Shuffle Along" material In London. 
It was found, however, the order 
should cover the entire company 
instead of several Individuals, and 
such an Injunction was applied for 
Tuesdw.y. 

The plan for "Plantation Da.vs" \n 
Londo. is to use the show as onr 
act of the De Courvllle revue, and 
after the performance the colored 
playera will appear in the Empire 
bar, which has been remodeled along 
the lines of an American cabaret. 

The show wat booked for the La- 
fayette. Now York, this week, but 
failed to play the date without tak- 
ing the formality of cancellation. 
The show \ft also booked for a month 
at the Arlington. Boston, startittif 
March 16. It is reported that the 
leading players in "Plantation DayiT 
will go to London and that another 
company will be formed here. The 
company expects to sail Ir^e this 
week. 



POLICE WATCH PLAY 



"God of Vengeance" Officially Re< 
viewed — No Action Taken 



The Cosmopolitan Players, Seat- 
tle, who were forced to close be- 
cause of, bad business, left their 
leading lad.v, Miss Allen, and her di- 
rector husband here with $30 cash 
and a number of checks which have 
come back through the bank marked 
N. S. F. The others of the company 
have continued on to Vancouver, 
B. C. Mayor Brown and women 
members of the City Council spon- 
sored the enterprise originally, af- 
ter th«^* leading theatrical men of. the 
city had warned them that the 
project could not succeed. 



Tl'.o New Theatre Players opened 
Mon.l.iy at the Freeport, Freeport, 
L. I., in "Adatn and Kva" The 
eompany innbr th.-» direction of 
Fred Reto includes I'lorence Bell, 
Jack IJeii^rave. Kva Ueto. Ilosc 
Dean. Helen Aubrey. Ccfil Drum- 
mor.d. Herbert W. Treitel and Wil- 
lard Kent. The stock pliy.>< the 
rrtt|.ort hou.^e the first three d.iys 
with matinee Wedr.esday. It lays 
«.fr ti'.e hist half when vaudeville is 



.... . . ,. 1 1 T r,... If ita^ed The seeond stock bill will 

\^hen «r,gmaly secured l.Lo.i".- ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^^.^ ., 

was planned to <>lose tiu- st.»'\ an<l j "^ *" . '^ .. . 

Install .«trai«lit i»;<'tur»>s. Th" linal ^ > • ' - 

date for th. .«.ock wa. .et f... I'-h. TMei:m!nar...s ^'^ ^f'^^^ T*?;,.. I-', 

to fo'.l-.vv '|-i\'« ^"e or«ai!.'.Hllon of tliC JJd l,(lv\ai»l 

F. .\lbee Stoeii Theatre, Provideneo. 




•Police were assigned to witness 
the performance of "The God of 
Vengeance" twice last week at the 
Apollo, New York. The much dis- 
cussed play, which moved up from 
Greenwich Village, Is said, to have 
caused several complaints to be filed 
with headquarters, ofllcers stating 
as much at the theatre. No action 
resulted from the complaints up to 
yesterday (Wednesday), this be- 
ing the second week of t^e piece up- 
town. 

The status of the police depart- 
ment as regards theatres is not 
clear, nor are the powers of the 
license commissioner, as the result 
of "The Deml-Vlrgin" case of last 
seaMon, when the courts ruled the 
commissioner had no authority to 
cancel a theatre license wlthotit due 
process of law. Any action of a lay 
jury which might be asked to judge 
the play by the voluntary stage 
censor committee formed Isst sum- 
mer would have questionable effect, 
as the production Is not bound to 
abide by the decision, being Inde- 
pendently produced. 

The Selwyns, who control the 
Apollo, are members of the Pro- 
ducing Managers' Association, 
which subscribed to the voluntary 
censorship plan. They might be 
held accountable In the event ad- 
verse action against the piece is 
taken. 

"Vengeance" got good business 
la«t week, $13,200 in nine perform- 
ances. 



"K. U. K." ON EOAD 

- "R. IT. R.," the Theatre Guilds 
production, at the Freeee for several 
months, will go to the road after 
next week. Louis P. Werba's pro- 
duction. "Barnum Was Right," suc- 
ceeds March 12. 

The Guild piece will be under the 
management of II. H. Frazee. It 
has been booked for six weeks only 
this sejisfm, the management intend- 
ing to play little more than the 
subway circuit. It will start next 
season at the Cort, Chicago. 

Rlichard Lambert wUKhandle "ft. 
r. ¥C^ and agent it for the neigh- 
borhobd bookings. 



4 with, pieture.s 

amateur ;dfa has creatr^d lora! in- ... . ....;, 

tercst in tin- comp.any. enabllr', it i It will bcg.na.s next season Apul 
to remain epen. Th^- re -en' i:.,uicy ,' 10. .Samuel Godfrey ha. been re- 
rulinu tl.at ail amateurs .veleet-d 1 en;;aj:e-l as slaye d. rector. Clar-nee 
nuist Join the ornanizat oti luirt the 



' Hans* n and James Ilobert.son wil! 



campaign m pmiire^'s to secure 
lie.il pe j)le. the F.jui v demandlti^; 
%\'l lie i» tjd I'tr ;i >t>;jr s il'i >.-! o;:t of 
the lir.-t we U's Kn!a;\\' (»f the ,iny\- 
tour:-, wh eli \^ S?.'». 

No' gri'.'itev indicatioT) oi" ?!i' e."- 
teem in which CJeorglanna 11 v.iit. 



.'igair. \»' cliit^ r . ' CPn lt.' a i tlst and 
peiitcr respectively. 



.Succeeding IV.lecn Wilson in At- 
il:iMtic City foi- tv/.o weel»"<, Wui.d.i 

night 



CHESTER B. BAHN 



i)i:.\MMi(.' KDi'ioii ..: 

Si/iarwtr. Y. Y., "J'.vcning Telegram" and "Ntmdn/f Atforiratt" 
Chester B. Bahn was for yearH dramatic erlitor of "The Journal" in 
lie remained on th.at pnblfrntlon itntH Ini^ fnH, when W. K. 
Hearst entepeJ the new si)aper Ibid in that city, .liahn ^wung from "The 
.Journal" to the Hearst stafT and now la lioldma (l()wn the dramatic de- 
partment on the "Kveiilng Telegram" and th«' ' Siuulay American." 

Mr. r.ahn also hiis beeti the representative In the Syraeuse territory 
for \nriety for over ten years^ He Is ro<-ognl;^ed ns a fluent and well- 



I,J (»M opeeed Sunday nigiit as j ,^fy,.p,f.,i writer, also as an authority in Centi-al New York 

"Ju'le" in 'ihiflrlies," with lii" (This i.t the fifth of titf snir:^ of brief ttlretrhcH and photorjrnph.'i of 

I're»<l<lent l':<y«r.»! In Wa.-hin^ion. //k- draviatic e<litoia oj the cf^untry anp^ariusj in Vttriely.t 



SHUBEBT HOUSES CHEAP 

The Shuberts are reported mak- 
ing overtures to stock managers to 
take over several of their theatres 
wbleh hnvn h#»#»n n1«yln«r vntulA. 
vlUe. The houses are being offered 
at terms which have attracted the 
attention of several managers, the- 
Shubcrta apparently being at a loss 
as to what policy to follow with 
the dwindling away of their vaude- 
ville. 

The Crescent, Brooklyn, Is re- 
ported as a ^tock certainly within 
the next few weeks. 






-3 



24 



LEGITIMATE 



Thursday, March l^ 1923 



"MYSTERr VS. SMAU TOWr 
OCCUPYING CHI'S STATISTICIANS 



Town Jammed With Brain St'mulalors — "Spring- 
time of Youth" at Illinois, Won't Be There 
Long — Holiday Matinee Last Week Bjg, Night 
Not So Good — Speaking of Speculators, Wait! 



(^hicago. 



Ftb 28. 
on'8 IJlit Inlay matiin'O. 
the trade of ihe hoUday 
a life-line to the sinking 
town iliut enabled thoso 
to igiirre the results of 
•'auses for another 



\\ a^llln?i 
as well as 
eve, tossed 
shows in 
concerneil 
the deadly stop 
week at least. 

From the way tlie crowds poured 
Into the loop for the extra holiday 
main tees this date can now be oon- 
sldered th»» best matinee card in 
Chicago. Tlie youthful maki-np of 
I he crowds was noticeable. As sud- 
denly as did the matinee crowds 
pop up, juj^t as rapidly did the httli- 
day spirit vanisli for tlu- night per- 
formances. Thursday nights busi- 
ness wasn't what would bf exi)e -ted 
for a holiday. It was a splendid 
(Umonst ration of how the youth of 
the town stopped dancinjj lon;^ 
enough to go to the theatre for a 
matinee. At night -the dance hall--. 
with all their added attractions 
ciTtered to over-flowing mobs. 

At the majority of the feousv.s u 
l>ijc jump in trade was checked for 
Wednesday night. On the other 
nights of the week,however. th" 
•draws" were again .surprisingly 
small for loop theatres, seveial of 
the shows playing to under $:>00. 
It was reported around town that 
there were rno<<^e j'equests for re- 
fund of ticket money for Saturday 
nights performances than for som"- 
lime, indicating illness is governing 
some portions of the existing slumi>. 
Sharp statisticians are comparing 
the present fate of the mystery 
plays in town with that of the 
Kmall tow n plot plays earlier in the 
season. At one time there was an 
over-abundant supply of plays with 
the small town atmosphere. Now 
the town's jammtd with mystery 
l)lays. When the rurals dei)arted 
as the" result of poor business, the 
loop tlieatres were hit with a prt»s- 
ptMity wave — the impetus of new- 
shows developing this wave. The 
mystery pla..vs are now floundeiing 
with indications of at least two 
making an early exit. P'^rliaps when 
they all depart th^- town will di-op 
its apparently "scarcd-to-go-to-the- 
theatre* attitiid<' and return busi- 
ness to normal. This is just as 
good a reason for the slump in town 
as any other of the numerous 0!i»^3 
given. 

Considering the manner In which 
plays of the same type have been 
jammed together in Chicago this 
season, conservative observers don't 
reckon how the alleged booking 
combine has benefited the loop the- 
atre?. For 16 out of the 24 we« ks 
already compiled for history of the 
present season, local playgoer.'* have 
not been given a variety of attrac- 
tions. First tlK-y were over-fed with 
sniall town plot j)lays. Now it's 
;nystery plays. When the bookings 
are straighter.'d out. and local pla.y- 
goers have a varied calendar from 
which to select, perhaps the folly 
of crowding plays of the same type 
into town will iielp to reach a de- 
cision why the nightly ligures go 
so small for a town of this .size. 

It is safe to piedict the bottom 
will fall out of the mystery play 
area Inrebouts before another week. 
Of course the lon.g time guest. 'Cat 
and Canary" is merely waiting to 
r<-ai'h its goal of April 1. The Prin- 
cess attraction has conij^letely (>x- 
liausted Its demand. The other 
three mystery p!ays, 'Last Warn- 
ing" ••Monster" and •'Zeno" are in 
tlie throes of much tjnceitainty. 
The days of ' Zeno" hero are niun- 
bered and likewise with 'Tlie 
.Mojister." 'Till' Last Wariiing" 
|,rnmisea to givt.- conditions a gcod 
ti;;ht, but how long the house is 
willing to fight is anotlier matter. 
AVhat will be the fate of •'The lle.ir 
«'ar' whic'ii Op< tied at llie Cort Sun- 
tia.v, tljis week must tell. There 
isn't a jiunch left in an.\ of the 
n1.^stery plays now on the boards, 
and wiiile nt other times at least 
two would be sensational hits, it's 
just a ca.se of the local public belug 
o\er-fed with the weird stories. 

Ina Claire is a lilt at the Fuwers. 
I'or the first time in many niniuhs 
the Kandolph stieet. got back its 
caniage trade. '•The Awful Truth' 
was treated nicety hy the crifir-s 
and suecess! snrrouiiil>^ th<> whole 



. nj^a^'f ni' M whicli is limited tn 
four week ■. T lir 'I ' l w^ 'r .^ Wf' l t ' n n n 's 
the g(H>d busine.^s after its I'lig 
s^ries of losii^g weeks. 

'Spiingtimr- of Vowth" (Shulieii) 
looked somewli.it strange at the 
Tjlinois. It made a liglil start, aiid 
wliile it dop-n't iiold tfie wLun-ban^r 
touch that plavgoers hereabouts 
patronize qiiieker than the-y do a 
musical i»ic.e ofl'eilng the fine voices 



contained in the ptln ip;ils list of 
•'Voulh, " the Illinois attraction will 
not be molested until March 12, 
when Wliite's "Scandals' supplants 

it. 

The local calendar promises to 
havcf a whide new face l\y Kaster. 
The sfart will lie maile March 11 
when ••.Make It Snapj)y" leaves the 
Apollo an<l "So This Is London!" 
says farewell at Cohan's C.rand. 
•■Blo.«som Time" is picked as the 
new attraction at the Apollo. "Two 
Fellows and a (Jirl" will be Cohan's 
new f»ffering. The decisions which 
will have to be made concerning 
the mystery plays are apt to give 
surprise bookings shortly, all get- 
lintr into swing here for Faster. • 

While the erratic character of ttie 
town's plays Is being checked, it 
mustn't be overlooked that 'For All 
of rs"'(iept into the lead for busi- 
ness for dramatic shows the past 
week, i-losely pursuedliy the Powers 
hit. This pulled the honor away from 
"ParMiers Again," for the first time 
since Christmas. The Hodge show 
gained the honor by giving one more 
performaiu'c than the Selwyn hit 
playe<l. The Studebaker attraction 
increased its advertisements in the 
news|>apers. carrying testimonial 
letter.s from prominent people, and 
as the week.s pile up for the Hodge 
show greater becomes the joshing a 
e.-rtain eritic in tf>wn must with- 
stand for the bitter denunciation he 
gave the play during its premiere 
w*ek at the I..a Salle. 

If the Thursday night and Satur- 
day matinee business liad held up 
"Partners Again'' would have sur- 
passed the Hodge show without be- 
ing affected for the lead in town 
that the extra matinee enabled the 
Studebaker piece to land. The Sel- 
wyn show is getting the best break 
In town for dramatic shows for 
Montlav night trade, indicating the 
theatre's campaign for Monday night 
patrons is snowing results, A new 
campaign is now under way at the 
Selwyn to hold "Partners Again" 
until May 1, and if the next three 
weeks hold un beyond the stop 
clause of $12,000 there is a chance 
for the fe-at to be accomidished. 

Frank Keenan, In "Peter Weston," 
want into the premiere at the Har- 
ris Sunday with a whcdc lot of se- 
cret angles maintained tov.-ard what 
the play was about. If "Weston" 
doesn't get over and approach the 
stop clause of $12,000 that governs 
all attractions playing the Twin 
Theatres some quick switching may 
be anticipated in the policies set 
down for the Twins. The Selwyn- 
Harris interests are striving to keep 
their own shows in the new houses 
as long as it is possible, but with 
the anxiety of several outsiders try- 
ing to book the Twins, it's possible 
in the advent of a keenan flop that 
the Twins will see their first out- 
side musical show. It is reported 
that Sam Harris is lient on book- 
in.g next season's edition t>f "The 
Music Box" for Chicago in his own 
theatre here, although the opening 
of the ni'W season will probably have 
"Rain* at the Harris and "The Fool" 
at the Selwyn. 

"Fhuffle Along'' made its farewell 
bow after a prosperous engagement 
at the Olympic. I'erhaps a trifie too 
long did the colored organization 
remain to hohl high its average, but 
tlie rush for tickets the closing week 
showed the attraction was still In 
demand, Milwaukee got the show 
first. an<l reports came from the Da- 
vidson theatre during the week that 
the attraction will hit off a record 
week there. 

Th(>se are worrisome days for the 
lo«'al speculators. The expose made 
of their tactics* has intereste«l the 
New Yt)rk managers, who are se- 
cretly searcliing further into the 
methuds employed here. Once all 
the tactics of th<? local speculators 
are we'>;he(l it's possibb- the long- 
awaited fumigation will take i)lace, 
with the m-w year finding a new 
Aldeiman at (^Jty Hall with the in- 
terests of the theatrie;il managers at 
heart, ami a revision of the- specu- 
la lion game made whereb.v the lio- 
tels will be allowed to charge 50 
cents itremiiim to nerommodate that 
portion of the i>ubli;', particularly 
the clubs, desirous of such servb'e, 
with a 2.') -cent '•k ick-l)ack" to the 
tlieatKH. This is (liricretit from the 
olden dayjc (not so b-ng ago) when 
the theatres paid the h(»tels 2^* cents 
each to s<'ll a $2.r.o seat. Because 
of this pr<»mised revision "gyp" 
plac'.'S will be driven out of busi- 
ness, aiid the high-handed methods 
of the supervising speculators will 
bo sfjuashed to the extent of the lat- 
ter not being further able to in- 
Iluence weak -minded treasurers aud 



managers that they (supervising 

speculators) h&V6 mUCu to KtO with 

whether or not the make-up of the 
executive staffs Is In accord with 
the wishes of the dominating specu- 
lators because of odd positions they 
hold here. 

A new day dawns for a complete 
reversal of theatrical management 
in Chicago, say those who are fol- 
lowing the trend of affairs. 

Last week's estimates: — 
"The Awful Truth" (Powers, 1st 
week). Returned this theatre's 
copyrighted clientele, missing for 
several months. Should draw $56,- 
000 on four weeks' engagement. 
Premiere week (Monday opening), 
tabulated $14,500. 

"Springtime of Youth" (Illinois, 
1st week). Won't stir up any great 
enthusiasm but will go along quiet- 
ly, drawing musical students be- 
cause of splendid voicee in cast. 
Critics featured it was a legless 
musical show which will keep away 
usual musical comedy hounds. Re- 
ported around $12,000. , White's 
"Scandals" March 12. 

"For All of Ua" (Studebaker. 13th 
week In -Chicago). Snatche<i lead 
for dramatic ehows last week. 
Matinee trade terrific. Grossed 
$15,000. 

^'Partners Again" (Selwyn. 9th 
week). Due to holiday falling on 
Thursday (usual matinee day for 
this theatre) attraction didn't have 
benefit of extra matinee, yet' as- 
cended on week, reaching $14,000. 
Will remain just as long. after Its 
12 weeks* contract as business re- 
mains over stop clau<;e of $12,000, 
"Make It Snappy" (ApoIJo, Ttb 
Final two weeks an- 
Cantor got $24,000 
Tihie" announced to fol 



SHOWS IN N. T. AND COHMENTi 



week), 
nounced. 
"Blossom 
low, 

"Sally" 



(Colonial, 



Figuraa aatimatad and comment point to soma attraotions baing 
auccessful, whila tha aama oi*oaa acoraditad to othara might auggaat 
mediocrity or losa. Tha variance ia explained in the difference in 
house capacities, with the varying overhead. Also the aize of caat^ 
with conaequent difference in necessary groaa for profit. Variance 
In busineaa neceaaary for muaical attraction aa againat dramatio 
piay ia also considered. 



7 th weekK 
Didn't give holiday matinee, but 
went over $38,000 once more, with 
independent scalpers given an>.^ther 
big loss. 

"Captain Applejack" (Harris. Tth 
and final week). Holiday matinee 
pulled final gross to $9, COO, Frank 
Keenan In "Peter Wston" opened 
Sunday, 

"Dice of the Gods" (Cort, 4ih 
and final week). Two surprisingly 
good matineee (Wednesday-Thurs- 
day) helped an otherwise low woek, 
giving final gross figure close to 
$8,000. Mrs, Fiske's play jumped 
back east for a handful of one- 
nighters prior to a planned Broad- 
way premiere. "The Rear Car" 
opened Sunday. 

"Shuffle Along" (Olympic. 15th 
and final week). Prosperous en- 
gagement of colored organization 
ended with a big hurrah, landing 
$14,000. -The Blimp" opened 
Sunday. 

"So This Is London:" (Cohan's 
Grand, 14th week). Couldn't reach 
$10,000, so final two weeks an- 
nounced. "Two Fellows and a 
Girl" openfl March 11. 

"The Twiat" (Playhouse, 5th 
week). Falling to respond to hard 
campaign made. Grossed around 
$7,600. 

"Zeno" (Great Northern, 7th 
week). Fallen to pieces, experi- 
encing hard struggle to reach 
$8,000. Cast changes made, with 
future of show problem. 

"The MonateK* (LaSalle, 2d 
week). Pell off from its early 
promises, only doing $7,300, mostly 
window sale. No call at the hotel 
standa. 

"The First Year" (Woods. 16th 
week). Matinee trade and that of 
the eve of Washington's Birthday 
pushed forward week's gross to 
over $13,000. Should hold average* 
of $14,000 for final two \-eeks. 
House promises to be dark week 
March 11, due to the postponement 
of "Light Wines and Beer" to 
March 18. 

"Cat and Canary" (Princefis, 2r)th 
week). Cut rates and parties util- 
ized to hold business around $8,000. 
House probably will have new at- 
traction Easter Sunday. 

"The Last Warning" (Black- 
stone, 3d week). Didn't reach 
$9,000 but win stick longer than 
present business indicates provided 
house Is satisfied. 



WYATT DROPPED 

Treasurer Appointed Manager 
Mason, Los Angeles 



of 



T/oa Angeles, Feb. "R. 

W. T. Wyatt, for 12 years man- 
ager of the Mason O. H. here, has 
been dropped. A. I.i. Krlang^r hn?* 
appointed Walter R. Hearn. treas- 
urer of the house for a number of 
years, to succeed the former man- 
ager. 

Hearn has virtually been manager 
of the house to all Intents and jmr- 
poses and In addition has been act- 
ing aa j>re8s agent. 



"Abie's Irish Rose," Republic (4l8t 
week). Wonderful money-maker, 
going along with some of very 
best on Broadway, Last week. 
with added performance (Wash- 
ington's Birthday) g^ross over 
$15,000. 

"Anything Might Happen," Comedy 

(2d week). Opened Tuesday last 
week, new Edgar Selwyn play re- 
ceiving but fair break in notices 
and indications are for moderate 
business. About $6,500 in five days 
(opened Tuesday), 
"Better Times," Hippodrome (26th 
week). May be last season for big 
house, reported definitely slated to 
be torn down and site used for 
hotel. Owners have been^ wllUn.? 
to unload for several years. Busi- 
ness between $45,000 and $50,000, 
"Caroline," Ambassador (5th week). 
Started off very well, though felt 
slump that set In two weeks. ago. 
Without pulling big grosses this 
operetta can make good profit, it 
having short cast and chorus. Nine 
performances last week for nearly 
$14,500. ' 
"Chauve-Souris," Century Roof 
(56th week). Another two months, 
though now advertised In "last 
weeks,' -\vith weekly change of 
program. Morris CJcst will likely 
keep It to profitable pace until 
May 1. 
• Dagmar," Selwyn (6th week)* Na- 
zimova in her new play two more 
weeks here. Will likely go to road 
ami ought to do smartly. House 
gets I'auline Frederick in 'The 
C.ullty One" March 19. 'Dagmar" 
made nice profit last week, get- 
t;nir over $12,000 in nine perform- 
ances. 

. oiiies," New Amr.terdam (39th 
v.eeki. Nothing in sight to re- 
place Ziegf eld's re(^or<l revue of 
series, which ought t«) stick an- 
other two months, perhaps longer. 
Average over $36,000 righf aleng. 
"Give and Take," 40lh St. (7th 
week). Aart)n Hoffman comedy 
settled down for run and getting 
strong business. Last week gross 
went upward. extra matinee 
counting in $11,400 draw. 
"God of Vengeance," Apollo (2d 
week). First week uptown indi- 
cates this "raw" product of the 
V*Hage and Europe will make 
money. Word-of-mouth discus- 
sion pro and con provides strong 
box-ofTice trade. Takings over 
$13,100, with one extra perform- 
ance. 
"Greenwich Village Follies," Shubert 
<25th week). Going out next 
week, management seeking to play 
major eastern stands before end 
of season. On form could remain 
Into spring, having averaged over 
$25,000, top money for "Village 
"Follies." "Peer Gynt" succeeds. 
"Hail and Farewell," Morosco (2d 
week). Off to fairly good start, 
initial week's gross nearly $10,000. 
considerably better than other ar- 
rivals of last week. 
"Humoresque," Vandcrbilt (Ist 
week). Opened Tuesday. Drew 
Broadway's attention because of 
difllcuity in getting booking here. 
Show on road for some weeks 
without attracting real business 
Reported guaranteeing house. 
"Icebound," Sam Harris (3d week). 
Sam H. Harris' latest production 
try here. With three matinees 
last week gross around $11,000. 
Indications are for profitable busi- 
ness, though draw in proportion to 
leaders is doubtful. 
"It Is the Law," Bayes (14th week). 
Business for this mystery play off 
lately and may take to road soon. 
• Pace last, week picked up with 
extra matinee: gross little under 
$6,500. 
"Kiki," Belasco (66tli week). Dra- 
matie wonder of last season, which 
holds to takings almost as strong 
and still counts with best money 
draws In New York. $15.00(1 and 
better. Figures to remain until 
May. 
^'Lady in Ermine," Century (22d 
week). Ojieretta since movin.g 
from .Ambassador has jilayed to 
good -business, ('ai)acity of (^en- 
tur.v and<>ut ra!es gives attraction 
excellent Saturday grosses. Tak- 
ings last wei>k in nine perform- 
ances about SJO.OOO. 
"Lady Butterfly," (llobe (6th week). 
Like most of in-betw«M-n attrac- 
tions this one got real business 
Washington s Birthday, but. fell 
off at end of wpek. Abt»ut $i'i,50'> 
last week. 
"Last Warning," Klaw (I9th wee\) 
Appears to be gong along to about 
same business as Chicago com- 
pany. Extra matinee last week 
for total of ro'.iriy $11,000. 
"Laughing Lady," Loim.ni-e <M 
week). Be.>^t try for Ethel Barry - 
more this season. Indications slie 
is set until warm weather with 
Sutro play, I^iist week first stai' 
pla.ved extra performance this 
season. Takings $1."».OUO. 
"Little Nellie Kelly," Liberty (16th 
week). Cohan's musical play has 
taken such strong hold if looks 
like cinch for summer continu- 



ance. Getting plenty of repeaters 
even now. Last week again 
played nine performances and 
again bested $26,500. 
"Liza," Daly's 63d St. (14th week). 
One more week to go; may get 
some money on road because of 
dancing strength. "Go Go," regu- 
lar musical production, due in 
March 12. 
"Loyalties," Gaiety (23d week). One 
extra performance last week, with 
house matinee record claimed lor 
Washington's Birthday afternoon. 
Takings wenf to better than $15,- 
000. 
"Mary the Third," 39th St. (4th 
week). Regarded as having strong 
chance to land among leaders, but 
to dixte going but moderately. 
I..aHt week with nine performances 
$8,500. 
"Merchant of Venice," Lyceum (11th • 
Week). Will close for season after 
one week more and will tour in 
fall. Be'asco's newest, "The Come- 
dian," succeeds March 13. 
"Merton of the Movies," Cort (16th 
week). George Tyler's smash 
comedy success, rating with the 
best In demand and getting all 
house w'll hold. Extra perform- 
ance last week and gross again 
over $18,800. 
Moscow Art Theatre, Jolson's (8th 
week). Another four weeks for 
Russian players, who have estab- 
lished dramatic business records 
which may never be equaled here. 
Time extended. Last week well 
over $41,000. 
"Mr. Malatesta," Pr ncess tlst 
week). This play was done In 
IX)ndon and one or more of orig- 
inal cast appearing here. Opened 
several weeks ago out of town 
under name of "Papa Joe." 
"Music Box Revue," Music Box 
(19th week). I'layed extra mat-' 
inee Lincoln's Birthday week, but 
takings slightlv better last week, 
total $32,000. Still $5 top, 
"Peer Gynt," Garrlck (4th week). 
Goes uptown to Shubert after an- 
other week or two and ought to 
round out season. Guild^s pro- 
duction has no trouble in getting 
$10,000 in small Garrlck. Will next ■ 
present "The Adding Machine," 
"Polly Preferred," Little (7th week). 
Some performances off last week 
for most of list,* but extra holiday 
prices made up some of slack. 
"Polly" bettered previous week 
about $1,000 and grossed $13,000. 
That means hit business in tliis 
520-seat house, 
"Rain," Maxine Elliott (17th week). 
No diminution in attendance of 
this dramatic smash. Varies only 
In amount of standing room sold, 
with the takings for last week 
over $15,900; no extra perform- 
ances. Additional prices for holl» 
day. Record for show. 
"Romeo and Juliet," Henry Miller 
(6th week). Also held to eight 
performances last week and pulled 
almost $14,000. Considered re- 
markable pace. Advance strong 
and continues evenly, with run 
sure until May. 
"Rose Briar," Empire (9th week). 
One week more, show then going 
on tour. Last week business was 
over the stop limit of $10,000. 
"Pasteur," with Henry Miller, suc- 
ceeds March 12. 
"Rita Coventry," Bijou (2d week). 
Brock I'emberton's latest produc- 
tion attracted reviewers' attention, 
though pace of first week mod- 
erate. Gross about $5,000. 
"R. U. R.," Frazec (21st week). To 
road after another week under 
management of H. H. Frazee. Haa 
yet to fall under $7,000 stop, ac- 
cording to Guild claims. "Bar- 
num Was Right," Louis F. Wer- 
ba's production, succeeding March 
'12. 
"Sally, Irene and Mary," 44th 8t, 
(26th week). Visitors in town for 
holiday last week played triple- 
titled musical, as true for other 
lioliday periods. Takings went 
upwaid, gross nearly $16,000 for 
nine performances. 
"Secrets," Fulton (10th week). May 
have i)een little otT early last 
week, as true of most other at- 
tractions, but went to nearly $14,- 
000. extra performance counting 
on lioliday. 
"Seventh Heaven," Booth (18th 
week). Gulden's di-amatlc smash. 
Comi)lete sellout for all i)erform- 
ances. e(iually volume demand of 
;n:yih:ng on n<^»n-muslcal list. 
Making new house records on a 
n'ne performance basis. Tvast 
week with 10 shows Kot $17,200. 
"So This Is London," Hud.son (27th 
we.kj. I'layt-d nine pcrfurmancos . 
l.isi ,veek, as for week previous, 
but went to better ligures becati?«« 
— ( If h o!! d : ty Bca l P.' r. tTnhnn's comedy — 

wallop better th.in $1S..')00. 

"Sporting Thing to Do," Hitz (2d 

week). Did not get break from' 

reviewcis nor did first week's 

business evidence real "life" with 

new I'^mil.v .Steveii.s attraction. 

Paisines between $7,000 and $7,500. 

"Square Peg," I'unch and Judy (5tli 

(Continued on page I'O) 



Thursday, March 1, 192S 



LEGITIMATE 



25 



^$ 



COLD WEATHER IN PHILLY 
FAILED TO DENT BUSINESS 



Attractions, Excepting ''Red Pepper," Had Good 
Week— "Green Goddess" Gets Walnut's Dra- 
matic Record With $24,000 



Philadelphia, Feb. 28. 

The unusual cold snap did not 
keep buyinesa away from theatres 
here last week. With one or two 
exceptions, the current attractions 
piled up Hurprisingly high grosses. 
Two old favorites were especially 
noticeable in the ruhningr, Arlias 
and Skinner, and one musical com- 
edy ("Molly Darling") gat the 
cream of this particular class of 
patrons. 

An unusual feature was that the 
two long-run shows ("Blossom 
Time*' in its 18th week and "The 
Cat and the Canary" In its f lurlh 
week) wore both oft noticeably, 
though not. lu an exactly ttiariniiig 
extent. 

The cre«t of a recent big wave of 
business at the Walnut was reached 
last wet'k, when George Arlis.s in 
"The Cireon (.Joddess." playing its 
second ami tinul week, reached a 
figure short of |2u,000 by only a 
few dollars, llccause of the scale 
being tilted at a higher figure, this 
groMH bt-at the best turned in by 
"The Monster" in its four- week 
stay, and is said to be the house's 
dramatic record. With the extra 
matinee plaved Thursday "The 
Green Goddess" could have grazed 
124,000 with absolute capacity. The 
weaknesses were all earlier in the 
Week. 

The only other attraction In town 
to reach $20,000 was "Molly Dar- 
ling" at the Forrest. This Megley 
& Moore musical comedy has been 
consistently gaining despite bad 
weather l>reaks, and with the aid 
of Washington's Birthday matinee 
reached a gross that fell about mid- 
way betwten $21,000 and $22,000. 
The regular Wednesday matinee 
was consiilerably off, and the usual 
number of vacant rows downstair.s 
during the early week evening per- 
formances was two or three. Ca- 
pacity ruled holidays and on Sat- 
urday. This is the final week of 
"Molly Darling." but it is not at all 
unlikely that It will play a third 
engagement here late in the spring. 
The four weeks of the present stay 
will turn in a total gross of some- 
where around $25,000 more than the 
original four weeks at the Garrlck 
In December. 

"Molly Darling" had little oppo- 
flitlon from the musical comedy 
•cross the street at the Shubert. 
••Red Pepper," playing a single 
Week's engagement, started out with 
& fine house Monday night, but 
owing perhaps to the fact that the 
news of Thomas Heath's absence 
from the cast became known in the 
reviews Tuesday morning, this show 
slumped badly and played to 
uneven business, verging on bad. all 
week. The regular W^ednesday mat- 
inee was transferred to Thursday at 
the last minute, so that this was one 
of two shows in town not playing an 
«xtra matinee for tho week. A gross 
around $10,000 Is claimed, aided 



of 



by the big opening and the holiday 
crowd. 

The usual close opposition be- 
tween the Shubert and Forrest has 
not developed this season. The lat- 
ter (Syndicate) has had tho edge In 
almost every week. Up until De- 
cember, with "Sally" and "Spice," 
the Forrest forged away ahead of 
the Shubert, which had four flops 
In a row. The Shubert came back 
with "Tangerine," which played 
"Good M^orning, Dearie," almost dol- 
lar for dollar for a couple of weeks, 
but then firopped In the rear. "The 
Passing Show" paralleled the busi- 
ness of White's "Scandals," but 
since then tho Forrest has had all 
the better of It, last week being a 
good example. 

This week "Glory" opened at the 
Shpbert, and may make a creditable 
showing ai?ainst "Molly Darling," 
though it is a foregone concluf?ipn 
won't touch Its gros.M. Next 



It 



Monday the "Music Box Revue' 
comes into the Forrest for four 
week.s and smashing business is ex- 
pected, with much interest as to 
whether it touches the high-water 
mark of "Sally." The first re.illy 
big battle, of tho year will develop 
week of March 12. when .Tolson'.i 
'Bivml.o' returns to the Shubert. 
Then for tlie first time this season 
a pair of hit; grosses, comparable to 
.several times last year, wii: be re- 
cor.led. Dim possibilitv tli.it 'The 
GreeJiwich Villauo Follies' ami 
Ziggy'.s •i.'ollies" will play brief late 
sea.sou fciiK.mt'UMMns at these nouses 
are also of intejcst. 

"lilos.sDjn Time" at the Lvrh-. the 
■ only otl TT'i 



SHUBERTS MUST LEAVE 
MAJESTIC, PROVIDENCE 

Withdraws Suit to Enforce Re- 
newal Option of Lease — 
Bookings Shifted 

Providence, Feb. 28. 
The Shuberls and Col. Felix 



the advance 
Future book- 
are not au- 



inn.^Ii'nl «M.UV Ih town, 
was deci,|..,U> off fill week. luH with 
.'* fine S.ttiuila.N matinee and goo.l 
businf.is {•••tuiday night mriMas^ed 
pnll ni> f.i within a f<-w hundred 
'ai'.s ,,f Jll.Ouu. wliirh. fii;iirr ■ was 
la.st Week. TIjc edge >eerns 



to 

dol 

passed 

dcnnite'y .,.r,- the dem..nd 

Rehubei-t oj.eretta. and Mie t\u' (.f its 

rtin Is oiily a matter of week.s n'W. 

With the probability that it wil! rloe 



for iiii.-< 



through until Holy Week. Olga 
Cook has been, out of the cast for 
several weeks, but may return 
within a few days. 

"The Cat and the Canary" con- 
tinued off last week at the Adelphi, 
though not dropping much under 
the previous week's figure. This 
mystery thriller has developed a 
habit of one or two decidedly off 
nights a week, and this was espe- 
cially true last week. Then, too, it 
must be remembered that this was 
thft only attraction besides "Red 
Pepper" not giving an extra mat- 
inee. Its gait for two weeks has 
been somewhere around $2,500 un- 
der capacity. 

Otis Skinner did creditable, but 
by no means unusual business at 
the Broad. With the aid of an extra 
matinee "Mr. Antonio" is reported 
to have passed $12,000 in gross, and 
the advance sale indicates a similar 
figure for this, the final, week. 

"Six Cylinder Love," after a 
rather uncertain start, picked up a 
.steady play at the Garrlck, and 
while undoubtedly hit as much as 
any play in town by the cold 
weather, cantered through to a 
$13,500 gro.ss. This McGuire com- 
edy is now in its la«t two weeks. 

In addition to "Glory" at the 
Shubert, this week's saw "Pasr.ions 
for Men" at tho W^alnut, the dura- 
tion of which is not generally 
known. Not since the last week of 
"Anna Christie" (which, strangely 
enough, was Chrlstmaa week) has 
this house had a losing week. "The 
Monster," "Kempy" and "The 
Green Goddess" all won large 
grosses. "Liliom" last season at 
the Adelphi opened big. but the de- 
mand fell off after a couple of 
weeks, and mtich Intereet is felt in 
the chances of this new Molnar 
play which lacks 
prestige of "Liliom." 
ings at the Walnut 
nounced. 

The booking situation here is 
chaotic, the three syndicate houses 
being especially uncertain. Ruth 
Chatterton in "William's Wife" was 
announced for the Broad beginning 
March 5, but that booking was can- 
celed, and now a return of "To the 
Ladles" for two weeks is announced 
to be followed by Nazlmova In 
"Dagmar" for a like period. This 
house has reverted evidently to its 
fortnight engagements, after start- 
ing the season with four-week runs. 
With the decision not to eend 
Warfield's "Merchant" on the road 
this season, a gap of two weeks 
had t obe llled at the Garrlck, and 
Edward Royce's new musical com- 
edy, "Cinders." was put in. This 
opens next Monday (12th) and will 
be followed March 26 by '^Captain 
Applejack," which has twice been 
underlined at syndicate houses this 
season. 

The Forrest-is set for a month 
with "The Music Box Revue" (also 
twice underlined before It finally 
arrived), but what will follow in 
April and early May Is way up in 
the air. The final decision to bring 
"Bombo" into the Shubert March 
12 fixes that house for March and 
early April, but outside of that re--^ 
vue the Shuberts haven't a eingle 
underline announced or a booking 
even mentioned despite several of 
their houses will change attractions 
within a few weeks. 
Estimates for last week: 
"Mr. Antonio" (Broad, 2d week). 
TTsual enthusiastic reception for 
Skinner, with curtain calls de- 
manded every night, but business 
not as big as with '"Blood and Sand" 
last season. Last week's gross 
around $12,000. 

"Glory" (Shubert, 1st week). 
Opened with some promise, but de- 
cided to cut rxin here down to two 
weeks. "J^ed Pepper" siumDcd 
badiv and pro«s*didnt reach $iO,000. 
"Molly Darling" (Forrest, 4th 
week). Continues to hit on all fours 
with another gain registered. 
Though^only capacity Thursday and 
Saturday, gross of nearly $21,r)00 
turned in. "Music Box Hevue" 
Monday. 

"Six Cylinder Love" (Garrick. Hd 
week). Passed panic st.ige .'iinl has 
settled to good bu.'^ine.*^, with $13.- 
r.OO Inst week. 

"Passions for Men" rW'alnut. st 
wei'k). Opened .Monda.v. "Thi" 
CJreen Goddess" turned in what i-* 
.=;.iid to be dr.wr.atit- hi;ch -water 
mark of hous*' —$20,000 in .verond 
and l.i.^t wtfU. 
— "Bloss o m- TTTrw** (T.u h . ^itrfr 



Wendelschaefer 
Majestic March 
reverts to the 
Counsel for the 
frum its lawsuit 
Amusement Co. 
trial on since 
bert company 



will vacate the 
31. The building 
Emery brothers. 
Shuberts withdrew 
against the Emery 
last Friday after a 
Monday, The Shu- 
was trying by court 



action to renew the lease it had 
held for the past five years. The 
Emerys alleged violation through a 
vaudeville unit show having been 
played at the Majestic. 

The opera house will house the 
more important Shubert attrac- 
tions. Col. Wendelscaefer owns the 
opera house. The Bonstelle Com- 
pany's occutiancy of the opera house 
ends March 31. What plans the 
Emery brothers have for the Ma- 
jestic are unknown. 



"KATINKA" IN ENGLAND 
The long pending negotiations for 
the British production rights to the 
Arthur Hammersteln operetta, 
•Katinka" have been closed with 
Robert Macdonald to sponsor the 
piece in England. Macdonald in- 
tends producing the Rudolph Frlml 
score on a pretentious scale, cabling 
Hammersteln that the 28 musical 
Ijarts are insufflcient in view of his 
intention to employ a 50-piecc 
orchestra. 

Macdonald Is reported havinR 

-paid $7,500 advance royalty. His 

)flve years' lease on the production 

provides that it must be produced 

in the provinces by April 2 and in 

West End. London, by Sept. 1. 1923. 

Hammersteln will personally go 

abroad to help stage the piece. 



BOOM IN BOSTON, LAST WEEK, 
WITH ALL PERFEa BREAKS 



'The Foor' Went to $14,000 and Is Set at Selwyn 
With $20,000 Advance Sale— ''Blossom Time*' 
Did Something at Opera House 



SHOWS IN NEW YORK 

(Continued from page 24) 
week). Quits Saturday, with 
"Jobe and the Job" mentioned 
successor. 

"Sun Showers," Astor C4th week). 
Finally got break Washington's 
Birthday, when nearly $4,000 re- 
ported on day (two performances^, 
that figure being 50 per cent, of 
receipts of entire previous week. 
Gross nearly $10,000. 

"The Clinging Vine," Knicker- 
bocker (10th week). Extra matl- 
ness last week with takings In- 
creasing over week previous, 
beating $17,000. One of beet $2.50 
musicals in seasons. 

"The Dancing Girl,". Winter Garden 
«(6th week). Getting nearly as 
much as anything on Broadway, 
but reported off for number of 
performances last week. About 
$30,000. 

"The Fool," Times Square (19th 
week). Actual grross leader of 
Broadway. Business from Christ- 
mas holidays on sensational. Last 
week with nine performances 
close to $21,000. 

"The Gingham Girl," Earl Carroll 
(27th' week). In nine performances 
last week, about $18,000, Excel- 
lent for $2.50 top musical; aided 
by holiday scales, as true else- 
where. 

"The Old Soak," Plymouth (28th 
week). Without extra perform- 
ance last week this early hit 
gros.sed $13,300. Cinch for rest of 
season. 

"The Love Child," Cohan (IGth 
week). Extra matinee last week 
sent takings upward; gross be- 
tween $11,500 and $12,000. Easily 
strongest attraction in house this 
season. 

*'The Masked Woman." Kltinge 
(Uth week) .Over $11,000 last 
wcc'k with extra matinee counted. 
"Morphia" is additional attraction 
for special matinees, t^larting to- 
day (Thursday). 

"Up She Goes," Playhouse (17th 
week). Br.idy's musical aj»|»ears 
fixed until warm weatlnr. Itrigiit 
show which operates to pruJU on 
moderate gross. Kept to eight 
perform.ance Last week but went 
to apj>roxlmately $10,000. 

"Why Not," National (l.st week*. 
Moved here Monday from 4.>>th 
St. Attraction now under man- 
agement of Cbarlea Miller, guar- 
.'itiieeing hou.se. 

"Whispering Wire*," Fioadhur.'t 
(L'!HM week). .M.vsti r.v i»iay rimted 
out bet'oi-e iinli(la\s will probal»l.v 
slick until Kiistei- 
longer. IIa« in.i<l«' 
tiuni^b recent pai .• 
iiit;.'' iiitpruv )-«( }it.-i 
n<-jrlv $10. ')()() was 



week). Will hreik reeoril run of 
"Hit." but end i.-' il-eni( d in si;.:l)* 
with fallin-.; ofi" la.-,i v.e.-k brin^m ; 
grrt.ss down to l"ss than $!4.om). 

"Tho Cat and the Canary' 
( ,\(lcll»hi. fith u.-elii. ('.int;nu<il (,fi 
l.i-l week, )nit ojMratitn; at hi;: 
prolU. and s-till bids f.iir t^) aehie- <■ 
long run rl'iii?jed for i'. (.lro:-»sf*d 
around $17. 000. 



rii'.d perhaiis 

money ami, 

idowed, talc- 

v\ t'f'iv. >\ iieii 
in. 



"Wildflower," 

— m 



r n r t.^ ' on 
should not run 
sfU'M I rnc.r.i\ , 
!,ist w»M'l<, .\ 
^^rfj'K'* over $1 
%■: '^<^ ff.p. 
•You and I," i:. 

OlMMl^-iI up 



('asinf> 
TTTTT 



(I'll wo 



k». 

Trrrrr- 



T bi.-i i mi 

tliiituuli season to 
Some ea.sf eliange.^ 
o ♦'.\tr I rnat inef; 

r. .")!•'), e.M.'ilrlU .It 



Ttnstnn, Feb. 2R 

Not since the first of the year 
when the New Year's holiday 
period gave the shows playing the 
city at that time splendid grosses 
for the week has business shown 
the boom It did last week with 
Washington's Birthday, known here 
as one of the biggest of the holidays 
for the theatres, pushed the grosses 
far up above the normal marks and 
left perfect reading on the books 
at the finish. 

There wasn't a single house in 
town that did not benefit by the 
break. Some got the Break through 
running nine performances, an extra 
matinee on Thursday', and others 
by the holiday prices but all got 
the play. It was very satisfying to 
those connected with the houses 
and the sjiows, especially as it is 
the final holiday break they will get 
in the 1922-23 8ea.son. the next 
(local) holiday, April 19. being con- 
sidered an off one for Indoor amuse- 
ment. 

Weather conditions during last 
week >vere somewhat better than 
those the week before and this also 
had a good effect. It was a week 
without a storm of any sort to fur- 
ther tangle up the railroads — some- 
thing quite unusual for this winter. 
It is figured that the weather break 
and the holiday took care of any 
adverse effect that Lent might have 
had on business and while the 
strength that prevailed la.st week 
was not noticeable at the first of it, 
good business m'as expected at the 
finish. 

Another feature of this week was 
the swing back into the legitimate 
column of the Majestic, the Shubert 
house which has been using vaude- 
ville last season and up to now this 
season. (Jertrude HofTmlin's show, 
"Hello, Everybody," opened Monday 
night playing to capacity and very 
near a turnaway with only the 
regular paper out. Whether the 
opening wa.s a criterion of what was 
to come or whether it was just a 
flash in the pan remains to be seen. 
The house is 8?aled at $1.50 top. 
It Is the first appearance of Ger- 
trude Hoffman here in several sea- 
sons. The length of her stay is 
problematical. She is figured to be 
good for four weeks and will be al- 
lowed to stay if business justifies it. 

The Boston opera house is dark 
again after two weeks of "Blossom 
Time," another surprise of the sea- 
son here. This show which could 
not get away with it last season 
planted In a splendid little down> 
town house, Wilbur, coming into an 
ark of a place like the opera house 
for a repeat did $30,000 for the two 
weeks. The first week ran to $14.- 
000 and the second, $16,000. As It 
ran along it showed signs of In- 
creasing strength. If there had 
had been a downtown house avail- 
able it is likely the Shuberts would 
hp.ve stuck the show In there for at 
least a oouple of weeks longer but 
because of special performances 
scheduled at the house uptown It 
could not remain. 

A show that is building up bu.«i- 
iness right along and Is expected 
to remain here for at least four 
weeks longer Is "Just Married^" 
which came into this town on rub- 
ber tires and was n sensation after 
it got away from the mark. Play- 
ing the Plymouth with eight per- 
formanc^'.s. but with of course holi- 
day prices for the Thursday mat- 
inee, it did b.'tter than $1.'"),000 for 
last week. This is excellent bus- 
iness for a show of the so-called 
dramatic type here and much better 
than expected. George Florida 
manai,'er of the show has been 
putting everything he has Into the 
plugging with his latest move the 
sendin(j of per.«onal letters from 
\ ivian M.irtin to everybody named 
Martin he ( otild find in the direc- 
tories of Boston and surrounding 
cities and towns. The business 
keeps buihling tjp, it being one of 
the few shows that showed excep- 
tional strength in the opening day."* 
of last week, and is now looked to 
to keep up the ]»resetit pace for a 
couple of weeks to come. 

•The I'oor* at the Selwyn looks 
safe now. In the firnt week in it 
ran c:<».'-e t,, $12.1)00. with the handi- 
c,i|» f»f Till- l>et,'inning of licnt and 
Ash \Vf<ln<r<day. La.st week with 
nine perforinances and scaled at 
$2.riO tM|» for every nifrnt. inchidmg 
llite holiilav and S.ilurda.\', it 
grr)-s<<| $I4.r.OO. The advarue sale 



inoiit ( "Jd weelc). 
n* mo;r proinisinir of 
ne-,v l>la.\•^ in la.st week. Close to 
capacity for most of wr'ek and 
>vithouJ e.Mia matinee. $",'^0'), 



tor tins show is 8Ut>.»itanti.il. it being 
tiyur-d th It there is $20,000 .sold in 
.<dvan«.' .it the present time .ind it 
look.M H'lod to sta.v several weeks 
longer. It is l»elng consistently 
plijKij.ii on tiie advertlsifig .and pub- 
licity end. 

IM Uynn is "The I'ei feet Fool" 
at the Colpnia! did -the biggest bus- 
iii"ss last week, eight iterfoirn .nce«, 
to $2?,;»00, the biggest busines.'J at 



thla house t-yr some weeks pa.st. 
On Its fourth week the show seems 
to developing signs of building up 
and every week the gross is better 
than that of the week before — and 
that is the way it should be for a 
winner. 

"Lightnin'" at the Hollls with 
nine performances for the week did 
$20,000. While the house Is not cap- 
acity at that figure that business 
has staying qualities. There isn't a 
thing in sight now to indicate that 
it won't be able to finish out the 
season at the house as was planned 
originally. 

Estimates for last week: 

''Th* Perfect Fool" (Colonial, 4th 
week). Did $22,900 for week. Start- 
ed off week bit slow with good break 
Wednesday night came strong for 
the balance. 

"Lightnin"* (Hollls, 10th week). 
Nine performances thia show 
gathered in $20,000. 

"Tho Fool" (Selwyn. 8d week). 
Now accepted as sure hit and due 
for long run. On second week did 
$14,500 with nine performances. 

"Eltio" (Shubert. 2d week). This 
show getting deserved break. 
Sought by those on Inside as worth 
seeing and did $16,000 last week. 
Not great big money maker but 
running strong enough. 

"Tho Comedian" (Tremont. 2d 
week). Started oft bit weak first 
week, doing about $10,000 for eight 
shows. Expected to run about same 
this week. 

''Listening In" (WMlbur, 2d week). 
Evidently sufTerinfy somew^hat from 
run of "The Bat" which preceded it 
at this house and did about $10,000 
for week, gtvXting away to slow start 
and not building up to any extent. 

"Just Married" (Plymouth, 6th 
week). One of surprises of season, 
running over $15,000 for week. 

THREE LOOP OPENINGS 

Chicago Has Livoly Theatrical 

Sunday Night 

_______ ^ •■ 

Chicago, Feb. 28. 

Three openings featured the Sun- 
day night card at the legit thea- 
tres in the loop.— "The Rear Car" 
at the Cort, Frank Keenan in "Peter * 
Weston" at the Harris, and "The 
Blimp" at the Olympic. Moderate 
weather prevailed. The Cort at- 
traction sold out, helped by Holme's 
local popularity. At the prices 
charged the Cort figured around 
$1,700. 

Harris' new play drew an unusual 
strong society class for a Sunday 
night opening which was checked 
in figures around $1,650. At capac- 
ity the Harris would have gone 
over $2,200. The reception that 
Frank Keenan received on his re- 
turn to the legit stage and then 
the ovation given the czist at the 
end of the play are the talk of 
those who attended. The Harris 
drew the biggest share of the 
critics. Despite commendatory no- 
tices, the right slant on the Keenan 
piece for box office value won't be 
determined for at least two weeks. 

"The Blimp" figured around $'00 
for its opening at the Olympic, be- 
ing an untried play which will re- 
ceive Its thorough test this week. 

At the Couthoul stands no tickets 
were offered for the Harris attrac* 
tion. Neither were there any tick- 
eta for "The Blimp." As per the 
usual arrangements at the Cort, 
Couthoul phone orders were accept- 
ed for "The Rear Car." but no 
tickets left at the stands. 

On the strength of the llarns 
premiere. It Is reported the Cou- 
thoul offices are attempting to 
swing a deal this week of getting 
100 seats for the Keenan piece with 
an added number for Saturday 
night. It was a case of the Couthoul 
offices waiting to see what the new 
plays were before approaching the 
ttjeatic managers. 



•^-; 



"OLD MAN SMITH" STOPS 



"Old Mru! .Sn;iih." the Geneen ST 
Mcl.'4aac dtumatic show, which wa* 
breaking In for the last couple of 
weeks, closed teinp'^raiily for reor< 
ganlzation at WilUe.. Darre, Pa., 
Saturday. 

The "Hmilh" show will lay off for 
two weeks. Changes wdl be mad« 
in the cast, with revisions In the 



28 



LEGITIMATE 



V«'t. 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



LITTLE THEATRES 



THE MUMMERS 

Thre* one-Act playa make up the Are? 
bill of this Little Thratre ri^up, opcnine 
tbelr fourth eubncrlptlon s^anon at the 
Becksrhrr Foundation Thoatre, lOith ctrcct 
and Fifth avenup, Funday evening, Feb. 
18. Tlio pieces are •'Coluniblno," by Colin 
Campbell Clenienta. played by Llllen U. 
Rosenblum «nd Mabel Merrltt. "The Ter- 
rible Meek" drama by Charles Rann Ken- 
nedy. pla>cd by Adeline Claire Ruby, 
Mitchell P. Maroun and Leo Jay l!rl8. 
••Red Feather?." operetta by A. A. Milne. 
with apeclal muslo by George Meade, 
pUyed by France* Frederics, Fritrila Kiela- 
ler Zwlm. NathanUl Grubel, Georg»' Meade 
and Sylvia Rashbo. Ralph Horace 
8praru«>. Harry Ro.senbaum. Mrs. Clara 
Oeaterrelscher and Xlttchell V. Marcu.-^. 
concerned in the direction and staging. 



The performance of these ambi- 
tious amateurs suggests the advisa- 
bility of some sort of control over 
the Little Theatre movement, some- 
what on the line of Will Hays' job. 
The light Blcetch called "Columbine" 
did very nicely as a starter for the 
program and the dainty little comic 
opera tabloid called "Red Feathers" 
served appropriately to close the 
bill, but no aspiring group of en- 
thusiasts should attempt the Ken- 
nedy drama of the Crucifixion. 

The jaunty atiHOsphere of a Little 
Theatre lark does violence to this 
aerious playlet. It requires a dig- 
nity of treatment that Is immeas- 
urably beyond the capacity of cas- 
ual amateur players. Because of 
the majesty of the subject the 
Bhortcomings of tho actors and of 
the presentation in all respects re- 
act violently upon the spirit rever- 
ence which should surround it. 
However impeccable tho purposes 
and Intents of the Mummers, and 
however sincere and Intense their 
Ideals of Art, one cannot escape the 
feeling that Little Theatre apostles 
rush in where gifted players of the 
theatre might fear to tread. 

These players are enormously 
serious and do -get a considerable 
measure of dramatic intensity Into 
their playing, but the whole sur- 
roundings of this venture make this 
particular presentation barbarously 
grotesque, and it could scarcely be 
otherwise under the cl^cumstanoes. ' 
The gem-like little theatre with Its 
mural decorations from "Mother 
Ooose" and an audience in the 
frivolous spirit of amateur theatri- 
cals is in no mood for this almost 
devotional passion play. These 
players are whole hearted and 
thorough m their production. They 
go even so far as the actual show- 
ing of the Cross at the back of the 
stage. The suggestion of the sym- 
bol would have been In infinitely 
better taste. 

It Is a pity the jarring note 
should have been tho loudest, for 
the little operetta was a mo^t en- 
joyable performance and was bel- 
ter done than either of the other 
two. It Is just an airy tritle, this 
Idyllic comedy by the iuthor of 
•*The Dover Road" and It disclosed 
the best group of playeia of the 
•venlng, five extremely likeable 
young people who seemed to enjoy 
the playing and communicate their 
enjoyment to the audience. Fran- 
ces. Frcdrics as the Daughter and 
Frieda Kreisler Zwim as the 
Mother made charming pictures. 
The score provided by George 
Meade is unpretentious but appro- 
priate and Miss I'Yederlcs and Mr. 
Meade sing several numbers de- 
lightfully. Nathaniel Grubel as the 
garrulous troubadour contributed 
a capital knack for comedy and 
Miss Rashbo's violin solos gave the 
piece a touch of musical charm. 

The story tell.s of a band of wan- 
dering musicians In romantic old 
England, say of Robin Hood's time, 
who stop at a riiral cottage and 
seek to recruit the pretty daughtor 
to join them. Instead the leader 
of tho troup falls in love with the 
mother and the tenor with the 
daughter. They turn out to be 
persons of wealth, who took to the 
road because of previous disap- 
pointnunt In love. 

Tho IJttle Theatre groups haven't 
used this work as much as they 
miglit. Perhaps it doe.<nt provide 
sufficient scope and all the groups 
appear to want to mart with "Ham- 
let" and work up from there. 

"tjolumbine" is an odd fragment. 
It might nionn .'^oni'thing if you 
could study It at leiRure, out It is 
chaotic and nx-aningh-ss at a view- 
ing of this kind. Two working 
girls discuss morals and love. 
Mlnnio is hard and sophisticated; 
Sallie, Inno'^ont. Sallie's sweet- 
heart Is Goming and .Mipi.ie warn«< 
her to dismi.ss him for all nn n are 
deceitful. Minnie dep?rt^ and llio 
curtain falls as tlie Bw.^.theart's 
voice is heard and Sallie goes rap- 
turously to greet him. 

The theatre appears to be com- 
pletely equipped, hw (he Jighls rrc 
poorly managed at limes when 
modulations are requiiel. i"or in- 
stance tho two girls are in th'-ir 
lodgings. A brilliant moon pours 
light through a squaie window, but 
the reflection on th.? wa'l la an ex- 
act circle of a well aimed spot- 
light. The flooding sutilisrht «>f tho 
"Red Feathers" piece is entirely 
satisfactory. The 8C«*iiic equipment 
consists of a golden back drape 
and a sort of cycloram.t f;ectionnl 
•oreea of blue gray to indiente in- 
tju^orir Jtuah. 



The casts for tho Uiree one-act 
tplays to be given by the Trinity 
Players shortly in Montreal have 
been chosen. They are: "Trysting 
Place"— Mrs. Curtis. Mrs. W. Stokes- 
Greene; Launcelot Briggs, Jack C. 
Prcsner; Mrs. Briggs, Mrs. W. J. 
McLaughlin; Jessie Briggs, Miss 
Brenda Spencer; Rupert Smith, C. 
S. K. Brown; Mr. Ingolsby, J. F. 
Fwing, and A My4terIous Voice, W. 
Stoke.s-Greene. 'Grlngolre. the Bal- 
lad Monger"— Louis XI.," W. A. Tre- 
maync; Simon, George Aylan; Olive 
le Dalm, S. Saunders; NIcolle. Belle 
Coughtry; Jcanette, Mrs. R. D. VI- 
bert, and Grinboire, Rupert Cap- 
Ian. "Enter the Hero" — Ruth Carey, 
Mrs. S. M. Luke; Anne Carey, Miss 
Ruth Simonds; Harold Lawson, Leo- 
nard Paul, and Mrs. Carey, Mrs. R. 
B'ord, The Weredale Dramatic Club 
of Montreal will shortly present R. 
C. Carton's original drama in four 
acts, "Liberty Hall." 



I. la th« oast were Robert D. 
Chase, Anthony Repelia, Mn. C. 
Stanley Kinney, William W. Curtis. 
Alice Crawford. John L. Hood. Wil- 
liam D. Goddard, Margaret Carpen- 
ter, Florence Bray, Ruth Harrop, 
Beatrice Pothier, Ruth Moody. The 
production was directed by Flora S. 
Curtis. 



The Community Players of Pas- 
sadena, Cal.. last week gave "Loves 
Labor's Lost," Shakespeare's first 
play. August in Daly was tho last 
to attempt It, over 20 years a^o. 
The comedy at Passadena was di- 
rected by Gilmoro Brown. March 
5-10 the Players will do "Wedding 
Bells," and March 10-25, "The Cop- 
perhead" 



Three one-act plays by English 
authors were presented by the Town 
Players pf Pittsfield. Mass., at a 
performance for the benefit of the 
poet of the American Legion. The 
plays were "A Night at Ah Inn." by 
Lord Dunsay; "The Impertinence of 
the- Creature," by Cosmos Gordon- 
Lennox and "Rocco." by Granville 
■Barker. The players recently pre- 
sented a two-part program consist- 
ing of "The Stronger" and a pan- 
tomine take-off on pictures entitled 
"Wild Nell of the Plains." Albert 
Ostrander staged the three one- 
acters. 



A general tryout for talent was 
held last week by Marcus Ford, 
director for the Kansas City the- 
atre, the local guild organization. 
Several were selected for parts in 
the next offering, "Why Marry," 
and others will be used later. One 
of the requirements to secure ac- 
ceptance as a' player Is member- 
ship in the organization, the fee of 
which iB now $3.50. 



BEQUEST SETTLEMENT 

Wiilism Winter Jefferson Namsd «s 
Solo Lsgateo by Emerson Foot*. 



The Community Players of Pasa- 
dena, Cal., lately presented "Elusive 
Cynthia," a nev/ comedy in four 
acts by Margaret Penney, with Gil- 
mor Brown directitig. Eloise Ster- 
ling assisted in the direction, also 
playing the leading role. The play- 
ers are talking of building their own 
Little theatre in Pasadena. It Is 
to cost 1200,000 and seat 800. This 
is their sixth season as an organ- 
ization. 



Presentation of an original three- 
act comedy, 'The Meddlers," was 
one of the features of Farmers* 
Week at the New York State Col- 
lege of Agriculture at Cornell Uni- 
versity, Ithaca. The play, based on 
the temporary interruption of a 
country romance by a city boarder, 
was the product of Alice Carlson of 
Danby and Philip C. Wakely of 
Jersey City. The State College 
pioneered with the Little Country 
ilioaire idea, and Ja constantly 
striving to further interest in dra- 
matics and the theatre generally. 



Washington's little theatre, the 
Ram's Head, Is doing quite nicely 
catering to the society set of Uie 
nation's capital. They give per- 
formances Wednesday, Thursday, 
Friday and Saturday nights, with a 
Saturday matinee. Clyde Fitch's 
•The Truth" Is the current attrac- 
tion. 



Emerson Foote, broker, who died 
In Paris, France, July 10, 1920, leav- 
ing a will giving his entire property 
to William Winter Jefferson, actor, 
and over which probate there was a 
contest by his sister, left a net es- 
tate of $16,322.93, according to a 
transfer tax State appraisal of his 
property, filed this week In the Sur- 
rogate's Court, New York. 

In her objections to the probate, 
which was filed Aug. 26. 1920, Alice 
Foote ^lacDougall charged fraud. 
undue influence and lack of sound 
mind and memory. She also de- 
manded trial of the Issues raised 
by her before a Jury. This was 
granted to her by the court, but as 
the case waa approaching date of 
trial the objections were withdrawn 
and the document was probated Nov. 
4. 1920. 

Although the appraisal states that 
while the case was approaching date 
of trial negotiations were under way 
which later resulted in a settlement 
out of court. It does not dl.sclose the 
terms of the compromise. 

The gross value of the estate left 
by Mr. Foote amounted to 124.096.43; 
personal chattels, $9,820.52, and in 
securities, $13,137.23. 

Mr. Jefferson, who Is a son of the 
noted late actor, was named and 
qualified as the erecutor of the es- 
tate. 



The Renilselaer Polytechnic In- 
stitute Dramatic club gave its sixth 
performance of "The Girl from No- 
where" at the Community House in 
Menands. All the roles are played 
"by male collegians. The club, one 
of the, most active and progressive 
at the Tute, has eight more per- 
formances of the play scheduled. 



The Maltland theatre, Portland, 
Me., will be closed, according to a 
decision of the board of directors. 
They feel tMt it would result In a 
financial loss to continue operation 
of the city's only little theatre. The 
house was established by Arthur 
Maitland. 



Eva Kay Flint, secretary of one of 
New York's leading little theatre 
groups, says her organization is 
about to resume activities with the 
production of the one-act play. She 
would like to hear from professional 
players who for some reason or an- 
other have abandoned the profes- 
sional stage, but would be Interested 
in devoting their spare erenings to 
rehearsals and productions; like- 
wise talented amateurs will be con- 
sidered. IMaywrlghts with playlets 
are invited to contribute their 
scripts. Miss Flint's address is 207 
East Fifth street. New York City. 



"Why Marry?" considered a 
little off color when produced sev- 
eral years ago, will be the offering 
of the Kansas City theatre March 
6-7. Several former professionals 
will b'? In the cast, which includes 
Mr.". Pliillis Carrington-IIann, Miss 
Cliiriesa Harrold, Blaine Darnold 
and Eiroy Ward. 



Syracuse University's faculty has 
caught the show craze and will make 
a vaudeville plunge, presenting a 
program March 3. It will be known 
as The Faculty Follies." and is to 
be- presented in the College of Agrl- 
oukure building. Only faculty tal- 
ent will appear, although the teach- 
ers are evidently not over-confidrnt 
as to their ability, for the vaude- 
ville outlay will b backed up by 
side shpws. 



William T. Lyons, president of the 
Kansas City Real Estate board, has 
been elected to handle playhouse 
plans for the Kansas City tlpeatre, 
the local guild organization. Many 
plans for a new theatre for the or- 
ganization have been offered, but 
nothing definite has been adopted. 



The premiere production of 'The 
Golden Apple," Lady Gregory's 
Irish fairy tale, will be given by the 
Junior Players of St. Louis In the 
Little Theatre there. There will be 
two performances, Feb. 24 and 
March 3. 



•GAY YOITNG BRIDE" OPENS 

Lawrence. Mas.s.. Feb. 28. 

'The Gay Young Bride," by Capt. 
Leslie Peacock and with Tommy 
Martelle, the female Impersonator, 
starred, opened here Monday. It's 
a new farce produced by Bernard 
Steele. 

A good audience witnessed the 
premiere. Its story is of mistaken 
Identity, with Martelle assuming 
woman's dress to complete a mar 



duly arriving. With some changes 
the show should go alo«g. 

In the cast are Kenneth Fox, 
David Baker, Bernard Pate. Frank 
Charlton, Frank Hetterick, Maud 
Blair, Irene King, Norma Brown 
and Zonia Allen. Next week the 
show will be in Bridgeport. 



Plans are under way at San 
Francisco for the permanent estab- 
lifshment of a children's theatre as 
a result of the popularity of these 
produ'tions which Mrs. John J. 
Cuddy staged at the Plaza during 
the time the San Francisco Sta&e 
tJuild controlled that house. Per- 
formances were given every .Satur- 
day morning at 10 o'clock. The 
last production was "Snow White 
and the Seven Dwarfs." 



"Quality Street" was presented 
on two nights by the Com- 
munity Players at Pawtucket, R. 



"JOBE AND JOB" BEHEARSING 

"Jobe and tho Job," a play by 
Thomas Louden, who drew atten- 
tion last season with his 'The 
Champion." was placed in rehearsal 
this week. The play Is being pro- 
duced by George Bannister, stage 
manager for "Abie's Irleh Rose." 

It wa.s proposed to do the piece 
some time ago, but Bannister re- 
fused to proceed until a house In 
New York was In sight for It. Tho 
Punch and Judy is mentioned 
berthing the new play shortly, it 
opening cold there. 



"REAR CAR" CHANCE 

Chicago, l>b. 28. 

Taylor Holmes, In Galtes' "The 
Rear Car," by Edward E. Rose. :in- 
other "mystery play." opened .;t the 
Cort this week. 

"The Rear Car" has a chance. 
There is wide Interest In theatrical 
circles in the play, not only becauje 
of the overdoing of the "mystery" 
kind of attraction, but because Rose, 
its author, was fitst known through 
Chicago connections. 



DAMAGES FROM BOND 



Rtferso Is Appointed in the Oliver 
D. Bailsy Action 



Michael E. Reiburn has been ap- 
pointed referee to decide how much 
damages Oliver D. Bailey is en- 
titled to against tho $3,000 bond 
posted by the S. R. F. Amusement 
Co., which has secured a temporary 
Injunction against th^ manager of 
the Republic, New York. The Sun- 
day night concert privilege wan the 
basis of the litigation, Bailey con- 
tending the S. R. F.. company had 
violated its covenants about book- 
ing "high class entertainment" and 
*'-at p'ctures did not constitute 
£uch. The plaintiff was awarded a 
restraining order against Biilley, 
who threatened ejection. The S. R. 
F. company posted a bond to insure 
damages. 

The restraining order was sub- 
sequently vacated and the S. R. F. 
Amusement Co. forced out of the 
Republic, where "Abie's Irish Rose" 
holds forth regularly during the 
week. Bailey is entitled to dam- 
ages, including the cost of counsel 
fees, from the 15,000 bond. O'Brien, 
Malevinsky & Driscoll acted for tho 
Republic lessee and manager. 



1 

"MOSCOW TROUPE" APPEAR 

Philadelphia, Fob. 28. 

An organization styling itself the 
Moscow Troupe announces a single 
performance on Saturday, March 3, 
at the Metropolitan opera house, of 
a Russian comedy — Gogol's "Re- 
vizor." 

Nobody knows much of anything 
about the organization, although a 
number of the dramatic critice, 
thinking possibly that this Moscow 
Troupe is a part or an offshoot of 



riage for his .sister, with the sieter''^® Moscow Art player.s, gave the 



engagement quite a lot of space. 
The only name mentioned In con- 
nection with the performance was 
that of Michael Vizarov, who, ac- 
cording to the press company, is a 
Russian actor. 

Quito a little advertising was done 
in the Saturday and Sunday papers 
with the prices announced a.s from 
$1 to 13. 



"CHRISTIE" 

The 



WITHOUT HOUSE 



opening date for "Anna 
Christie' in London has been set 
for April 9, although the theatre is 
as yet not settled upon. The at- 
traction is still on tour, but will 
end Its season here at the Riverla. 
New York. March 17. the ♦company 
then sailing. 

Tho present cast will go abroad. 
Its players are Pauline Lord, (Jeorge 
Marion. Frank Shannon and Mildred 
Beverly. The latter has been play- 
ing tho Eugenie Blair part since the 
latter's death. 

The London debut of "The Hairy 
Ape" is indefinite and the company 
will not be sent across until later. 



Egan 



Producing on Coast 

Los Angeles, Feb. 28. 
Frank Egan. who sponsored .Maud 
Fulton in "The Humming Bird" in 
New York to the extent of leacing 
a house outright to present the 
piece, I«5 back on the coast. He will 
remodel his little theatre and de- 
vote his lime to producing new 
plaj s here. 



WALCOT ESTATE 



Famous Stock Actor of Booth's Day 
Uft 138,000— Nephfvy Htir 



An accounting of the estate ot 
Charles Melton Walcot, leading man 
for £dwln Booth. Joseph Jefferson, 
Rose Coghlan and other stars, and 
who died Jan. 1. 1921, has been nied 
in the Surrogate's Court, New York. 
Although Walcot had inherited four 
fortunes he left only $38,289. most of 
which goes to a nephew. Ernest O, 
Walcot, 147 W>st 16th street. New 
York, to the exclusion of a niece 
who did not contest the probate. 

Minor bequests are directed to 
Frederick W. Peters, 300 West 44th 
street and Selma M.Engstrom, an 
employe. 

Mr. Walcot was graduated from 
St. John's coliege, Fordham where 
he established the first dramatio 
society of students. He made his 
professional debut in 1858 with the 
stock company at Charleston, S. C. 
There followed engagements In Cin- 
cinnati and Richmond and in 1861 
he appeared as leading man a{ the 
New York Winter Garden, most 
successfully as Uncle Tom in "Uncle 
Tom's Cabin." He came leading 
man of Laura Keene's stock com- 
pany and starred in Lester Wal- 
lack's "Rosedale." He was In the 
Edwin Booth production of "Ham- 
let" in 1864 which established the 
record run of 100 nights. His first 
wife was Isabel Mary Ann Walcot 
who played with him for 40 years 
and who died in 1905, leaving her 
husband $30,000. Her last engage- 
ment was with Annie Russell. The 
second wife was Beatrice Ramsey 
Walcot who died in 1918, leavlngf 
him $23,000. 



PEOPLPS SOLD 

Miner Estate Disposes of Old Bow< 
ery House . 



The People's on the Bowery, be- 
tween Rivington and Delancey 
streets,- was sold last week by the 
Miner Estate to a syndicate repre- 
sented by Morrison and Schiff, at- 
torneys. The sale of the People's 
had practically been consummated 
a year ago to P. F. Shea, the death 
of the latter just as the papers were 
to be signed calling the transaction 
off. 

The old Bowery house will con- 
tinue to be used for theatrical pur- 
poses, a deal being on to rent it by 
the new owners. The Miner family ' 
owned the People's for upwards of 
50 years. 

Another Miner property, the 
Eighth avenue, was sold last week 
to the New York Realty Co. The 
Minskys will put burlesque stock 
into the Eighth avenue house In the 
fall. 



COAST BUSINESS 



Colored Show Did $13,900 Last 
Week at the Century 



San Francisco, Feb. .28. 

The San Carlo Opera company 
opened a two weeks' engagement 
at the Carran Monday. The opening 
performance brought a gross of 
$3,700 and there is a big advance 
sale. 

Another new attraction was the 
opening of Willard Mack in "Red 
Bulldogs" at the Columbia, getting 
$1,000 on the first performance. 

"Struttin* Along" at the Century 
for its third week played to $13,900; 
terriiic in face of the fact that the 
show has been running three weeks 
and was predict^-l a flop before 
coming in. Ackerman & Harrie 
look to have a real coast winner In 
this one. 



"JEKYIX AND HYDE" OFF 

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" with 
John E. Kelkrd was the first of 
three special matinee attractions 
opening this week, at the Belmont 
Monday. It was stated at the thea- 
tre the show would be taken off 
after Thur.^sday's performance. Ad- 
vertisements were ordered out of 
the papers Tuesday, the house 
management believing the attrac- 
tion had no chance. 



"TIMBER WOLF" IS NEW 

Los Angeles. Feb. 28. 

"Timber Wolf," a new play of the 
Canr^dinn Northwo-st by Ernest F. 
Bishop, an unknown author, had its 
first production at the Egan Little 
♦heatre her o. The first p erformance 
was rather crude, but "the local 
critics give It a chance. 

Iva Shepard and George Chcsbro 
are playing the leads. 



"Scandals" at Illinois March 12 
Chicago. Feb. 28. 
The White's "Scandals" will open 
at the Illinois .March 12. 



■■fc ».< > » ^ » ^ ■»■. 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



LEGITIMATE 



ft 



BROADWAY REVIEWS 



HUMORESQUE 

'flarah Kaotor ....lAurette Tay!or 

Xbratiajn. .1... •••••••••• H&m Stdinan 

£eon Alfred I.lttle 

r.eoo (cfown up) Ttutha J. Adler 

jMM,dore Choster Hermann 

Jaador* (gTOijrn up) liou Koiln 

Esther Ada Hew Itt 

£stber («rown up). Dorothy liurton 

Mann le Sidney Carliale 

Sol CJlnaberg Frank Munning 

2loaie <.••;. ...Lillian Garrlck 

OIna Berff..... Kl«a Grey 

Bubx. . •• - • • .Charlotte Salkowltz 

Z.eon II Sidney Salkowltz 

Max Elsas Hubert Wlike 

Stage Employe Jamca H. Hell 

Reporter Wayne Wilson 

William Walter H. Brown 

Mrs. Finailirelber Vera Berliner 



sense of direction nud a foresight 
In casting that matched with the 
sclntniant and vibrant qualities of 
the star and the timbre of Fannie 
Hurst's 8tory-plcture-i)lay, which 
has as much right as anything In 
years to call itself a current classic. 

Lait. 

MR. MALATESTA 

['"cy SutKtn Sterling 

Mi^ry Ma Kitzhutfli 

W't* Rhy Uirby 

J.H) Malatesla William KIcclardI 

Charles liurdette Krippea 

\'}^^ MarlUH Kotfati 

Mike O'Reilly Thomas F. Tracy 

t'ounl d'Armund Antonio falerno 



Never In his 20 years of profo.s- 
slonal theatreKoing has this reporter 
been moved, thrilled and fascinated 
by acting as he was by the in- 
describable art and personality of 
Laurette Taylo •. 

While pert ingenues are elevating 
their untnspired no.ses at playing 
parts not Inftnltesimally suited to 
their ''type." the greatest Ingenue 
of a generation, in that bugabooed 
thing, a "mother part" (yes. a 
grandmother parti) brought a New 
York auditnce to its feet with 
cheers and unashamed and iinic- 
stralned cries of "Bravo!" Not in 
aeasons has there Y»een such a dem- 
onstration seen and heard in a New 
York playhouse as thundered for a 
full fifteen minutes through no less 
than 25 curtain calls. 

And this in a play that has no 
essential thrills; that has been seen 
In every other form that the theatre 
and print afford — magaslno, movies. 
book, vaudeville; and that for a 
woman playing a Jewish grand- 
mother who scored her most mem- 
orable triumph playing an Irish brat. 

Surely this is an epoch-making 
event in the American theatre. 
Whether the wiseacres predict box 
office potentialitie.s lor Laurette 
Taylor In "Humoresque" or not, it 
is the greatest masterpiece of com- 
edy-drama siQce "The Music Mas- 
ter." and the greatest acting since 
that, probably, too. 



Another new producer, author and 
star make their bow in a season 
which has had mo/e new names 
above and below titles than any 
other in history. R. t;. Kemmet does 
the presenting and William Rlcciar- 
dl Is the prescnti'd as the writer and 
featured player of "Mr. Malatesta.' 
Kerftmett is a local pres.s agent. 
Kicciardl is remembered by this re- 
porter only as the friondly Italian 
who played in support of Warfleld in 
'The Music Master " and enacted the 
latighable spaghetti-eating scene. 

Ricclardi, however, shows that ht» 
is not limited to comedy relief. Ho 
is a broad and human comedian, a 
character artist and an author with 
human understanding and some 
courage. His "Mr. Malatesta" has an 
excellent chance to be a success 
here, a's It has been in London. The 
Princess Is not the Ideal house for 
It, since it is principally a balcony- 
appeal play. Rut somewhere in 
America it will get more room tci 
gather the people who will like i' 
best, and it will carve Its mark. It 
may even have enough Uiialair.s 
overflow to fill the downstairs of the 
Princess for a \\ bile and not wait to 
find itself in Chicago, Philadelphia 
and Roston. 

Not since Cosmo Hamilton's 
"Blindness of Virtue" has there been 
as good and strong and fine a do- 
mestic comedy-drama shown. A man 
writes only one in a lifetime. Ric- 



If' Miss Taylor never tours In .ciardl may write greater plays, but 



"Humoresque." people from San 
Francisco should journey here to 
see her In it at the Vanderbilt. They 
can employ their time to no more 
profitable pleasure trip and can find 
no worthier pilgrimage. She is a 
miracle. 

The management has given her a 
presentation worthy of her. The 
nrst act setting and detail. In the 
home of the impoverished Kantors 
on Allen street in the Ghetto, lead- 
ir\g to the scene in which the mother 
takes the last four dollars to buy 
her son a violin, is a living credit 
to George Tyler — who, by the way, 
is not credited in the program at all. 
.T. Hartley Manners, Miss Taylor's 
liusband and her sole autjior since 
she went over the top in .his "l*eg 
o' My Heart," staged the play. 

Before opening, Mr. Manners 
scored the New \ork theatres for 
their commercialism — their demands 
of "guarantees." The Vanderbilt 
engagement is not under a guaran- 
tee, but it Is paid that the terms are 
50-50, giving a, star of Miss Taylor's 
calibre and a management like the 
Tyler firm a shade the worst of it 
•aa percentages rim these nights. 
It ill becomes theatre owners or 
anyone else with the good of the 
theatre at heart tf quibble over 
Miss Taylor, who Is worth more 
than the theatre .she plays in at any 
time, any way you want to take 
that. Her name and fame will en- 
dure longer than the solid concrete 
JOt the buildings themselves. She 
and Lenore Ulric are the only two 
stars that America has found In 
years of whom that can be said. 

And even thp financial part of It 
will take care of itself. Such a per- 
formance of such a play simply 
must not and cannot fail. 

As a pure mimic, leaving out all 

•tOther elements of art, Miss Taylor 

^. Js marvelous. Jewish dialect, the 

most abused of all comedy jargon, 

Is the most difflcult to dissimulate — 

"^Tiot for low hokum, with whiskers, 

'l)Ut for hone.^t <lramfltic rendition. 

Those who doubt it should have 

heard^ the gifted Coburns in "The 

Rronx Kxi>ress." William Norris 

did it In "Children of the Ghetto"; 

It; hasn't boon reached by a Gentile 

..tsince with the exception of Laurette 

Taylor. Slie is kosher. 

The tretnendoiis i)athos of it is 
gilded by comedy and studded with 
those minute characteri.-llca that 
make a .I<>w want to laugh and cry 
over the mere seeing and hearing 
himself in art. as a man might over 
, an uncanny painting of himself in 
honest oils or a statue in animated 
marble. Where she learned to know 
it must be as deep .a w:onder as 
where she learn»Ml to do it. On^^ 
would address her in Yiddish with- 
out a thoiij;ht aftrr her performance 
and expect a Yiddish answer. 

Sam Sidnian, as her husb.ind, 
risen from tl.e ranUs of a buffoon 
'to his i»la«-<» as ;t chaiMeter tleliiKM- 
' 'tor and diani.it :■ |i;.i\>'i-. >;■!'>•' Ik'I" 
rrfijstingni.'- IumI suin'ojt; lie was ^noro 
than gi>o«l: he was big. And a 
newronj.M-. Lutlia Adler (apparently 
of the Adler fan»il.\ of Hebrew actor.- 
Who gave us Jac(.b Adler and Frarj- 
eine Larrimor«'), s\n the son. the 
genius, patriot and soldier who over- 
joys hpf he.^rt only t6 break it. was 
8lori«>us. All the iilavliig showed a 



never a better one. Nugent wrote 
"Kempy," and then, like all others 
wlio score with Klmi)le tale.s of fire- 
side and the family relations, started 
writing about politics, boothgging 
and other "themes." Haniillon did 
it. too, with "Scandal," etc. This 
doesn't mean that authors write one 
such play and grow worse, but one 
success makes them "different," even 
if better. 

Ricciardi has here written a play 
without a villain, although his own 
son seems to be almost until the last 
curtain, and his son-in-law-to-be 
would be in almost any other script 
— a count who wooes the daughter 
of a rich old simpleton. To have 
him turn out a. squareshooting man 
in that situation makes "Mr. Mala- 
testa" worth mentioning, alone; it 
is an origirml thought in the drama. 
The play is done in one set — the 
living-room of Malatesta's home. 
He is a retired stevedore contractor 
who came up from the streets of 
Little Italy and mado his pile. He 
has married an Irish wife and has 
an Irish pal. It Is very akin to the 
psychology of "Bringing l^p Father" 
and "Abie's Irish Ro.s«." The wife 
has absurd little snobberies and so- 
cial ambitions. But she !« a great 
wife and good mother, and, like the 
rest, proves wholesome and clean 
and sympathetic. Ida Fitzhugh 
played her convincingly and well. 

The daughter shares some of her 
mother's pretensions and some of 
her father's kindly humanity. She 
loves the count, who loves her. She 
loves her parents and brother, and 
they all love her. There are little 
tempests, but they end with kisses 
and hugs. Ricciardi makes great 
use of effusive affection throughout, 
which most modern plaxwrlgiits 
haven't the courage to do. And it 
is one of the true-bluest and sweet- 
est instruments upon which to play 
to an audience as long as it doesn't 
become saccharine and soppy. 

The play is mainly a character 
disi)lay of Malatesta. and Ricciardi 
has given himself a generous enough 
helping of the spaghetti role. It is 
almost all Ricciardi. But he makes 
Malatesta very lovable and .amusing, 
and in the last net he makes him 
terrific. That, too, is a great trick — 
turning a good-natured low onie- 
dian at the last into a bang-up emo- 
tion.al hero, winning the problem of 
the play and turt\ing its climax, ther> 
letting him down on a laugh. Tiiis 
Ricciardi is Continental and he isn't 
always smooth; but he has some 
slick tricks and seems a born box- 
ofilce writer. 

The counterplot is In the relations 
of his only son and a little blonde 
orph.jn, raised iti the h<>me like 1/n 
own child, hived and loxins:. Thf 



them hate her and send her away. 
But the old man cannot; he loves 
her and pities her. and in a truly 
tremendouB scene he forces — really 
chokes — the truth out of her. Just 
then the boy comes In, fresh from 
winning his first trial and launching 
his career, a famous case of a girl 
charged with murdering her illearitl- 
njate baby because Its cowardly 
father deserted her. He has freed 
the prisoner. 

The father weeps, then comes up 
like a giant and commands tlio boy 
to marry the child he has ruinod and 
acknowledge the child he is about 
to bring Into the wo.'-ld. The boy 
feors his mother. The father throws 
him out with his own loving hands — 
hands that have alw.xya given only 
kindness 6nd tenderness. The boy 
wilts. He has truly loved t!ie girl 
all the time, but has been afraid of 
hi'? mother, the climber. When the 
mother learns tl-e truth she blesses 
the union, because beneath it all she 
is first a go.id womari. despite her 
shabby pretenses an.l feminine ilcli 
for "society." 

A^i a corn.^.lian and drani-'^.tic .-xc^or 
Ricciardi is a welcomr> innovatian. 
Rhy I>erby, the little horoi.ie, a new 
face among tfie bright lights, ha.s 
ap'>ial and yi-iithful .'harm, and Is, 
perhaps, the out.^tand'ng find of the 
cast. There is no bad o«'cing in "Mr, 
Malatesta" anywhere in truth, and 
some of it Is exeelVnt. 

What mr tsi.re of return it will get 
will hf-.ve to be discounted b.v th." 
Fni'iM theatre f.>' hn attract.* 11 which 
T.fcdft nothirit' more than capacity — 
the upstairs tyi»e of catiaoitv prin- 
cipally. But "Kempv," similarly 
confronted at tie B^'lmo.nt. was a 
orofitabie venture. And thi< shouJd 
be. too. At a hojse lii'e the «epublic 
or Hudson It would be a cinch. 



/^ 



^^ 



BROADWAY STORY 



OUT OF TOWN 



I (Continued from page 21) 

from 127.000 last week, being the 
best of the run. "Greenwich Vil- 
lage Folllea" held to its |25,000 gait 
at the Shubert. 

March 12 ia the next switching 
date. There is but one show stop- 
ping this week. "A Square Peg," at 
the Punch and Judy, and up to 
Wednesday no premieres were 
carded for the coming week. At 
the end of next week, however, the 
'TJreenwich Village Follies" will 
leave the Shubert for the road, "Peer 
Gynt" moving up from the Garrick 
an<l the latter house then offering 
"The Adding Machine"; "The Mer- 
chant of Venice" will stop at the 
Lyceum, and "The Comedian" will 
succeed; 'Rose Briar' goes on tour 
from the Kmpire, which gets "Pas- 
teur"; "R. V. R." hits the subway 
time, and the Frazee will then offer 
"P.arnum Was Right"; "Liza." the 
colored show at Daly's 63d Street, 
moves on and "Go Go," a new mus- 
ical, will enter In Its place. 

The belated special matinee sea- 
son started this week but got off 
weakly. ''The Strange Case of Dr. 
Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" was Regarded 
having no chance at the Belmont 
and figures to stop Thursday. "Mor- 
phia." due to open at the Eltlnge 
Thursday afternoon, has been set 
back until next week. "The Blonde 
Beast" is listed for Friday after- 
noon at the Plymouth, while next 
week special afternoon showings of 
"King Lear" will be tried at the 
Fail Carroll. 

"The Laughing Lady" is easily 



THE CROOKED SQUARE 

Atlantic City, Feb. 28. 
Samuel Shipman has brought 
forth another success. Pursuing a 
subject which steps into the inside 
of the "four hundred" circle and 
endeavors to show how members 
of that set are held In the grip of a 
conspiracy of spies who prey on 
their family life. Mr. Shipman has 
brought contrasting phases of liv- 
ing to single charactertj. 

In thus showing how prominent 
men and women are betrayed into 
taking .steps which j)Ut thorn 
moralljj where their business ene- 
mies can control them, he has gatrt*- 
ered a stor.v full of dramatic vitality. 
It plays with detectives, youth, the 
frailty of womanhood, the cunnitig 
of Ingenious human vultures In «Or 
ciety garb, with real people who 
live and Jove and occupy important 
places, and with the undercurrent 
of the servant group who are merely 
victims of circumstance. 

The story revolves about "The 
Crooked Square." broadly speaking, 
the. bright lighted sections of Broad- 
way from SOth downtown. With 
this heterogeneous group of people 
and these man.v phasee of life, 
Shipman ^las welded a play which 
in the revised state, which will 
come after a week at the shore, 
bids fair to be a success of long 
duration. 

The story concerns an agency for 
employment, which in reality hires 
people Into service positlone for the 
purpose of keeping an insight Into 
certain domestic situations. The 
employes so placed are all under 
"framed " obligations to the agency, 
and the Information secured is sold 
to those who can profit by It In a 
business way. In the instance of 
the play the crooks are endeavoring 
to remove a nominee from the 
Presidential Cabinet list. They are' 
fnist rated by a real detective 
agency and the assistance of a 
young, pretty, well educated south- 
ern girl who has herself been 
"framed" by the crooki of the 
agency. 

Between the girl and the brother- 
in-law of the nominee a love affair 
Is played that €ometimes removes 
itself too far from the more on- 
grossing problems of the story, 
though after all It Is a play of 
"popular" hentiments and appeal^- 
a play of the day and hour and 
more than sufficient thereto. 

The story Introduces the cool ex- 
terior surf.icing of a detective'.- 
offlce — to the coar.se indifference of 
a reformatory for girls, where 
everything is vuli^ar — to a schemer's 
otfice — and lastly to the palatial 
lireside of a we.iUhy home. The 
settings have been accomplished 
on a lavish teale. 

Constance Binney, a light, capable 
he.iuty who has been in minor in- 
genue rolets of jnomise iii past years 
and still more rec««ntly in the i)hoto- 
play, has the had — an event per 



ably important role In the hands of 
fJeiMge Renavant. with additional 
good playing by Kenneth MacKenna. 

Schcttcr. 



PETER WESTON 

Chicago. Feb. 2|. 

Isjibill.' Weston, John's wife 

M-irle NonlHtrom 
Jamrs Weston, her brother-in-in w, 

P^tiT's M>n Jay Hanna 

Jisfcio Wosion, Pcter'a dauRhfor 

Judith Anderson 

Tho >Tiiid Ilernlre V«>rt 

.T.)lin Wi'sion. liter's Bon. ..-,. I'lyde North 

Pi ti>r Wot^ton Fr«nk Koenan 

H-Miiv \'»«iinnr.1 Frp<1 Mosloy 

I'jiiil A'anniinl, Henry's S'n...rrank Ilvran 

T»i*» Poll. I- OfTiier A. n Hiihn 

Th" Hutlor , CJeo, \V. Ilarnum 

wmitim HarMn, a Ihwyer. ., .-t'aul Evorlon 



bov conies home from college, a ] hap.-^ more opportune for lu-r than 
lawyer, his mother's pride, aimed atif'T tlie i)l,iy. Her youthful i)i.iii;int 
a grand match and a career. He 
seduecs thi' girl, who has grown t'> 
.1 .\ KiuiK woman. The mtutal con- 
sequence is r<'ve:ii d. Ih' is afr.iiil 
to marrv her. because his mother 
lias «o primed hitri wilh IPI' llliMVl- 
in.^ r«'pelitions of her iiopr that h- 
marry a sot iety girl ami In- .1 stylish 
I'ather than a good and true man. 

Tlje gii ; suffers mis«M-abIy between 
hf-r coiifli.ting hnpulsos. Btit she 
d«'Cides t«» go ;jway. Sli«» ••anno! d»'- 
sert the people \\tiO have so b--- 
friendctl iier. and d<*( libs tj malvL- 



l)«'auty ofttiines cairi*'s by the fore 
of a gentle, convincing art, and 
again loses itself ia the forced de- 
mands of some biK moment. 

l'!'iuall\' important wa.<>- Rtitli Don- 
TT/^tJx In a minor rnlp. The bark* 
K^oS^nd of st.'ipe traditions that are 
wr+l. .Miss Donnelly ga\e her the 
ahiiity to play witlioiit force a very 
true i»lt. 

I'Mvvard llmery has two well -filled 
<:e»-n«'s. i^anu'lu (laythorne di.Htin- 
trtiished another part, as did fJladys 
Ilan.-on. There was another notice- 



"For tohdt dors it avail a yttan if 
he fjnincth the vholc ivorld and 
losci hit soul?" ^ .1 • 

Th.it Is the plot and tells the afory 
of "Peter Weston." 

In VNhat looks like a sure-fire 
show, Frank Keenan bowed back 
before the public from a successful 
screen retirement. It was a bril- 
liant opcnhig In the Harris for any 
star, and Frank Keenan's worship- 
ers were there In legion. • . 

Someth/r.j» new to Chicago was 
enacted at the drop of the curtain, 
when the audience Is usually fight- 
ing its w;iy to the outdoor air. This 
audience seemed to sit entranced 
until they woke with thunderous 
applause. They forced each Indi- 
vidual artist to take two or three 
bows. Also one of the authors, 
Frank Dazey, and three words of 
thanks from the star. 

The play, whieb bad Its birth and 
tryout In Columbus and Dayton, ran 
liko well-oiled machinery, it was 
written by Mr. Dazey and Leighton 
Osmun, staged by Sam Forrest. 
One setting is used, the Interior of a 
mlllion.'i Ire's library. The stage set- 
ting was in keeping and In harmony 
with the acting and general work of 
producer and artist. In this town, 
where strong language on the stage 
is at ill a foreign element, two lines 
creat<Ml a stir. If they remain, us 
they should remain, It will mean 
much more to llie success of the 
piece. 

Peter Wertvon (Frank Keenan") Is 
ji manufacturer of pumps in a rural 
town, which lie l.uil^ and named 
after himself. He is an lr<m-willed 
father, who has forced his ideas and 
Ills i)Ower upon his entire family, 
li\ing to see his well-laid plans go 
amiss; bis youngest non drinking 
himself to death, bis oldest son a 
nuirderer of his tlauKhter'H lover 
and father of an exi)ected child born 
our of wedlock. 

Kc<'nan c-anic back with force 
an<l r<d-blooded action that swept 
tlu' audience off its feet. 

Judith Anderson ns the d.'iughter 
was one of thr>se phenomenons that 
I .all for starring overnight. She has 
«'V<ry»liin>,' — youth, beauty, ^r.ice 
and .ability. Marie Nordslrotn as 
Isab«'lle Weston and tlu» wife of 
.lohn Weston, the muid'-rer, was 
sijpeib. The t'Htire cast was wfll 
n!«1i pfffect. 

Xm- frrrgrtllng th?? workmanlilcp 
tnanrw-r in whicli tlje .authors lian- 
<ll« (I :i situation of calamitie.q and 
ni;i(b' it interesting and tlieatrlcal 
«•: ouKh to spell "jlasH" and "money." 

It not only turned out an artistic 
h!l. but should prove a linancia! 
* success for Sam If. Il.ariis. the au- 
ihors .and the actors. 



the strongest of the newer produc- 
tions. It is Kthel Barrymore's third 
appearance at the Longucre this 
season and her best. Last week she 
played an extra matinee for the 
first time, and in the nine perform- 
ances the attraction got $15,600. Of 
last week's quintet of new plays 
"You and I," at the 'Beimont, stands 
out as having the best chance. It 
drew virtual capacity most of the 
evenings of the first week for near- 
ly I7.U00 grossed In the small house. 
'"Hall and Farewell" went to nearly 
110.000 at the Morosco. but must 
pick up If it is to rate a success. 
"The Sporting Thing to Do" was a 
bit under |7,500 at tne Rltz. which 
means the piece Is a week draw. 
"Anything Might Happen" was un- 
der $6,r)06 In six days at the Cora* . 
edy, and "Rita Coventrj-" wfi« 
quoted at |5,000 at the BlJou. 

"The God of Vengeance" pulled 
real business at the Apollo in the 
strength of Its downtown rep of be- 
ing dirty. In nine performances it 
grossed $13,200 for tho first week 
on Broadway, which ia probably ^ 
more money that It could have got- 
ten In a month down town. "~"^ 

Bertha Kalich la a disappoint- 
ment on tho subway time. At the 
Montauk, Brooklyn, lust week her 
"JItta's Atonement" drew less than 
$5,000. It was expect v;d the former 
Yiddish btar would start fomothing 
in the Bronx thia week, but Mon- 
day's takings at the opera houee 
there totaled $250. "Pa.sslons -for 
Men" at the same house last week 
just beat $5,000. "The Passing 
Show- got $14,300 at the Broad St., 
Newark, with an extra performance 
In. "Blossom Time" led the list in 
the neighborhood housea, gctttOK & 
little under $19,000 f6r it« second 
week at the Majestic, Brooklyn. 

3uys and Cuta About Even 
The list of buys, it la surprising 
to say, is increasing even though , 
the Lenten season is upoor ua. By ~ 
tho same token, however, the cut 
rate market Is running true to form 
and the list of attractions that are 
being offered at bargain rates are 
al«o on the increase. Thia week 
there were 27 attractions for which 
the agencies heW outright buys, 
while there were 24 attractions on 
the bargain counter on Wednesday 
afternoon. 

In Hie advance agencies there was 
some complaint as to business the 
first three days of this week, but In 
the cut rates there waa a llouriabing 
demand for seata. ' V '. .^v -', 

The attractions that came In this 
and last week were not Included ^ 
amojig the buys, those being hold 
by the brokers Including "Caroline" 
(Ambas.sador), "The God of Ven- 
geance" (Apollo); "Klkl" (Bela.sco); 
"Seventh Heaven' (Booth); "Wild- 
flower" (Casino); "The I*ady in 
Krmlne" (Century) ; "Anything 
Might- TTappen" (Comedy); "M«»r-. 
ton of the Movies" (Cort): "Rain" 
(Elliott); 'Rose Briar" (Empire); 
"Give and Take" (49th Street); "Se- 
crets" (Fulton); "Loyalties" (Gai- 
ety); "Lady Butterfly" (Globe); 
"Ice-bound" (Harris); "So Thia Is 
Lohdon!" (Hudson); "Cllnglng^^lne" 
(Knickerbocker): "Little Nellie Kel- 
ly" (Liberty); "Polly Preferred'-' 
(Little); "Laughing Lady" (Long- 
acre); ''Music Box Revue" (Music 
Box); "Why Not" (National); "The 
Old Soak" (Plymouth); "Mary the 
3d" (39th Street): "The Fool" 
(Times Square), and "The Dancing 
Girl" (Winter Garden). 

Two of tho attractions that were 
added to the list that had been re- 
fused buys were "The Laughing 
Lady" at the Longacre, which got 
its buy after being in town two 
weeks, and the buy for "Why Not," 
on its moving to the National, ae a 
favor to Charles Miller. V V 

In the cut rates the 24 attraction.*! 
offered doubled to a certain extent 
some of those held by the outright 
buy boys. The shows at bargain 
prices were "Caroline" (Ambassa- 
dor), "The (;od of Vengeance" 
(Apollo), "Sun .Showers" (Astor), 
•It Is the Law" (Bayes), "You and I" 
(Belmont). "Rita Coventry" (liljou), 
"Whispering Wires" (Broadhurst), 
"Wildflower" (Casino), Shubert 
vaudeville (Central), "The Lady in 
Ermine" (Century), "The Love 
Child' (Cohan). "Lixa" (Daly's), 
"Rose Briar" ( Empire). "Sally, Irene 
and Mnry" (44th Street), "R. l'. R.** 
(!• razee), 'Icebound' (Harris), "Hail 
and h'arcwell" (Morosco*), "W hy • 
.Not" (National), "Up She Go**»^ - 
(Playhouse), "A Square Peg'* - 
(Punch and Judy). "The Sporting 
Thing to IK/' (IJitzt. "J>agmar'" 
(Selwyn). "(Jreenwich N'illage Fol- 
lies" (Shubert) and 'Mary ttoe 
Third' (3ath Street). ;;^*^ ^* 



28 



MOTION PICTURE DEPARTMENT— Pa«:es 28 to 33 

PICTURES 



ThvffiddYf March 1, 1923 



MINISTER ADVOCATING 
'^EHER MOVIE WEEK" 



Dr. Aked, of Kansas City, Has 

Own Censoring Rule— Wants 

to Emulate Atlanta 



Kancas City, Feb. 28. 
Dr. C. F. Aked, pastor of the First 
Congregational Church, a strong 
advocate for federal censorship of 
fllnrifl, is agitating a "Better Movie 
Week," and suggests that a plan 
originated in Atlanta be tried, stat- 
ing It had been proven satisfactory 
and that only high class produc- 
tions were now shown in the 57 
theatrcfl of that city. The plan as 
suggested by Dr. Aked follows: 

"The Atlanta churches, civic or- 
ganizations and clubs, made a deal 
with the exhibitors who agreed to 
show during a given week no pic- 
ture that had not been approved 
by a committee of the organization. 
The event was to be advertised and 
sponsored in consideration of the 
agreement of the exhibitors. Eight 
weeks were devoted to viewing pic- 
tures. When the final selections 
were made and these productions 
shown on the screen the motion 
picture houses did a greater vol- 
ume of business than ever before In 
a similar length of time and the 
high standard has been maintained. 
I will guarantee that if such a move 
were inaugurated in Kansa.s City 
the exhibitors would make more 
money than they ever made before 
In any week they have been in 
business." 

In support of his views on na- 
tional censorship the minister called 
attention to the reports that cer- 
tain producers were filming thes, in- 
decent that could not be shown in 
this country and exporting them to 
foreign countries, and said: "These 
pictures .create overseas a .wi'ong 
Impre.ssion of American Ideals and 
morals. I ask that an Intelligent 
censorship be fslaVjlished so that 
American art may not be prosti- 
tuted at home and abroad." 

Dr. Aked dcolarrd the following 
things should be barred from pic- 
tures: ' 

"Reflection on any race or re- 
ligion under the American flag." 

"Scenes that educate in, or are 
likely to induce, crlmi'," * 

"Over-empha«i8 of sex and srx- 
wal relations." 

"Disclosure of the human form 
In such a manner as to wound deli- 
cate susceptibilities." 

"Scenes antagoni.stic to patriot- 
ism and re.si)ect for law." 



FEDERAL TRADE HEARING 

The IVd- ral Trade Conimi-siDn, 
^hich last week entritMl an 
ftmendfd complaint against the Fa- 
mo'.is I'lnyrrs-La.^ky Corp., will be- 
KJn uie taking of testimony within 
the next three weeks. The Com- 
niN.sion has been investigating the 
a(:ivitics of the corporation for more 
than a yoar, and with the i-lacin^ 
of the jim»'n<le«l complaint it was 
Kiated that they felt certain that 
ihry could produce a case against 
the^ corporation under investigation. 

The » (.mni.ssion will probably 
r.iake its nr>-t stop in New York to 
take testimony, with a possibility 
that ii will Kiy as far West as Chi- 
cago j.Pitl as far Sttuth as Now Or- 
)»»ans in their qu^'st for infoi-niation. 
"ihn K»^nnnl belief is that they will 
liave thf mat tor in such shap^ by 
April that ihoy^will be able to move 
in the Fedrrai courts in their a< tion. 



CONSTANCE TAIMADGE QJJ: RY 

The ad\anre. sheets for the 1 irs 
National show there is to be no (on- 
H'ance Talniadire starring pro* uo- 
tion issued within the next ' m: 
months. It is leading to specula lor 
l«y exhibitors. Mi.ss Talmadge 1; 
known to be under contract to Firs; 
National, roujdod with lier sis'er 
Norma, in the <b'al that the distrib- 
uting organization has with Josipl 
Sohf-nck whereby a certain numbr 
of iirodix'tjons are to be delivered I 
them annually. 



REISSUING DADDY LONG LE : 

"Daddy I'Oiv,' Lops" is to )•♦• r« ' 
su»d by First National within ' i 
next few weehs. It has Mary I'ii ; 



EXHIBITORS BALK AT HIGH RENTALS 
HOLDING BACK FROM PARAMOUNfS '39' 



/, 



Many Other Plaints Expressed by Picture Buyers — 
Boosting "Covered Wagon" Looked Upon Pecu- 
liarly — ''Brand Advertising" Losing Value? 



"Without preconcerted movement 

on anyone's part there seemingly 

has sprung Into being within the 

last three or four weeks an apathy 

on the part of the exhibitors in the 
New York territory against the 
product which Famous Pli\ycrs-L. 
is marketing. The 'Super 39," 
which the Paramount organization 
is selling for release covering the 
period of from Feb. 1 to Aug. 1 of 
this year has apparently brought 
the exhibitors to a frame of mind 
where they want to be sbow.n. 

In the local exchange of Para- 
mount the sales staff to a great ex- 
tent is complaining they are not 
getting the reactltn from the ex- 
hibitor on their sales plan for thi« 
series of pictures they did for the 
series released in the six months 
previous to Feb. 1. The reason for 
this condition, according to them, 
is unfathomable. . 

On the exhibitor side the reasons 
How easily enough. "Prices too 
high" is one of the many plaints. 

Out of their present "Super 39" 
Famous has taken one production, 
"The Covered Wagon," and concen- 
trated an advertising campaign on 
it second to none Paramount has 
t'v^ put over. This picture is being 
pl»igg«^l in New York through the 
medium of expensive electric sign 
locations, specially painted boards, 
program advertising in all the 
Paramount controlled houses, and 
the local exchange is making a spe- 
cial display of a miniature scene 
from the feature. 

The^concentration of all effort on 
the sales of this picture through the 
medium of advertising has led the 
exhibitor mind to hold this j evi- 



dently the sole production of the 
•Super 39" Paramount thought well 
enough of to boost. 

The fact that the Paramount sales 
organization Is going out to secure 
"Wallace Reid prices," as they are 
termed, for the Walter Heirs star- 
ring pictures is another one of the 
exhibitor kicks and the boosting of 
the pi'ice on the Thomas Meighan 
features anywhere from' 40 to 303 
per cent. Is also one of the real 
complaints, although the exhibitors 
grant that Meighan has come along 
stronger as a box office attraction 
within the last year than any other 
of the Famous Players stars with 
the possible exception of the brief 
flash that Valentino made. 

The matter of thi lo.sa of "brand" 
value in advertising Is the most In- 
teresting angle of the complaint the 
exhibitor can make. The advance 
in price on the product that the 
selling force is offering also has 
considerable to do with ihe reluc- 
tance on the part of the exhibitor 
to buy. The exhibitor contends 
that Paramount should no: expect 
to receive higher prices for the fea- 
ture, which it Is to release during 
tl • Hummer, the annual period of 
business depression in the p.'cture 
houses, than it did for the pictures 
released during the six months 
prior when the best business of the 
season was expected. 

Meantime the Famous sales force 
is battling and the exhibitor is hold- 
ing out. The advent in the market 
of a better grade of Independent 
.'eaturee within the past few 
months and the promise of better 
ones to come may also be calcu- 
lated on as having its eff^^ct on the 
exhibitor-buyer at this time. ;- 



GORMAN DISAGREEMENT 



Former Exchange Manager Indicted 
for Larceny 



Portland. Me., Feb. 28. 
The jury* reported a disagreement 
in the case of Leon Gorman, indicted 
for larceny by embezzlement of pic- 
ture films of an apKregnte value of 
$1,265. Gorman furniKhed bail of 

$5,000 on a continuance to the May 
term of Superior Court in Portland. 

Tiie trial of <"«< rinan rt-vealed how 
l;e, Avheji manager of the Portland 
exchange of Metro, made a deal to 
>*^U nearly 1.000 reels of film to be 
sl'.own in South America, Mexico 
and Japan to AVilnn^t C. Hawkins, 
representative for -Metro. At the 
time of the dc.il G.trman did not 
Icnow the identity of Hawkins, who 
posed as a prospecii\e purchaser of 
lilnis. 

Hawkins said the price agreed 
upon w«.s $.'( a reel for feattnes and 
serials and $2 a reel for scenic and 
comedy films. lie said he was to 
pay $.'iOO down to Gorman and thp 
rest when the films were shipped. 
•The Metro representative began his 
investigations that led to the arrest 
il CJorman when he discovered a 
q ;antity of Metro films in New York 
Cltf, shipped there from Maln<». 
Tney were addressed to man named 
Ginsberg. Hawkins accosted Gins- 
bf •?; when the latter came to claim 
;h • films. After learning something 
: b ut the shipment he went to Port- 
'ar.d, where he posed as a buyer of 
fill IS and said he made th j der 1 
wT i Gorman. 



METHODIST MINISTER 
FOR TROY FILM HOUSES 



Rev. Ellenwood Says Local 

Theatres Are All Right — 

Tells Conqreqation 



ford^!'> the .•■tar and Wesley r„ii i\ 
the cast. 

It was first rimifucd that tlie ) 
turo would bo reissued by the <l 
tribu'ors in time fnr thel.oew limi 
to play it in oppo itlon to the Alt 
booking;- of the remade "Trss." Tl 
waji fiot done. 



•*; Winter Comes" for Week Only 
Springfield. .Mass. Feb. 28. 
? xt week, at Fox's Theatre hen 
Ihf Fox film organization will ex- 
h;i i "If AVintcr Comes* for tb« 
\\r .i o)ily. Fi^llowlnp, it Is stj.ted, 
th' jiicture will not 1» agaiti socn 
\xn 'A September, and then in a 1:0- 
ati on lJroa<hvav. 



M ouri Manager Purchases Kin " 

St. I.ouls, Feb. 2S. 
• T\!n?TS lia.s liC^-n purchased 1 
\\ . .iiii Guldnian, furnuTly mana^ 
ing (llrector of th? Missouri theatr 
King^. i-loscd for alterations, wil 
rcv.j>en ^'avter .*<unday. 



Troy. N. T., Feb. 28. 

"What Is believed to have been the 
fii"; t time a minister came to the 
dcfen.«<Q of the theatre in the his- 
tory of the Collar City took place 
on Sunday evening when the Rev. 
.lames Lee Ellenwood, pasto.' of the 
Str.te Street Methodist Church, de- 
feiHlcd licture hou."^«'s in Trjy from 
the pulpit of his church. 

The Rev. Mr. Ellenwood, who 
made a name as a crusad t at Sche- 
nectady befiMe a.ssuming the pas- 
torate of the local church, toll his 
congregation at the regular Sundny 
evening service that he does not be- 
lieve Troy film theatres are inde- 
cent and declared that he had spent 
many pleasant hours of recreation 
in them. The Rev. Mr, Ellenwood 
belongs to the Metht»dist faith. 

— — — _. ^ 

ANOTHER PANIC AVERTED 

Boston, Feb. 28. 
Two per.-ons were injured in a fire 
that started in a bowling alley in the 
basement of Gordons CHympia the- 
atre building in Massachusetts ave- 
nue, Cambridge, Sunday night. One 
n^an was Injured when .a hydrant 
burst and the other was injured by 
being struek by a piece of iippara- 
tus on the way to the blaze. 

At the time the fire started thn 
theatre was occupied. A girl usher 
was notified and the police officer 
on duty in the place ordered the fire 
exits opened. The audience fi!e<l 
out of the place to music by the 
<.rcheHtra. There w.i'-- iim- mi ■ s!l-!)f- 
""•st sugge.'?tIon of a i..i;ij. .Muung the 
' 'aprons. 

The fire itself never got above the 
•asement, and the damige to thn 
•uilding and thf firms o* oupying the 
')asoment and first floor was esti- 
mated at $10,000. The theatre re 
, sunied business oh Monday. 



MEMBERSHIP OF.A. B. C. 
UNDERGOES CHANGES 



Insurgents Retired — Group 

Bookers Seek Finances — 

Elections Soon 



Election of new ofUcers of the 
Associated Booking Corp. was de- 
ferred last week, but balloting will 
take place to-morrow (Friday). It 
is reported numerous changes have 
taken place in the membership of 
the group bookers and that certain 
"insurgents" have been "permitted 
to withdraw," 

With the election of new oflflcers 
the booking, alliance will take a sec- 
ond start toward its objective of 
buying pictures on a co-operative 
b.*8is. It is hoped that with the 
corrected membership and a. new 
board, representing a substantial 
element in the independent exhibitor 
field, efforts to attract financial 
backing will be successful and the 
concern will have command of suf- 
ficient capital available to bid for 
material on a prompt cash basis. 

One of tlie things that haj ham- 
pered the organization has been in- 
side arguments by certain members 
which have embarrassed the execu- 
tive board. It is stated that this 
clement has been eliminated. 



ZUKOR-GRAUMAN SPLIT; 
SID GOING TO RIVALS 



AMERICAN LEADERS 



None but Native Born to Make and 
Distribute Films Advocated 



Washington, Feb. 26. 

Duj'ing the sessions here last week 
of the Institute of the Government, 
Mrs. Ilaviland .11. Lund, president 
of the associ.ition, declared that 
".Vmerican born American."? should 
.aiake and distribute the picaires 
upon which the youth of the land 
daily gaze.'' 

Mrs. Lund stated in her address 
that American producers .should get 
a square deal, which they are not 
now receiving. "The thing that is 
most wrong in the motion* picture 
industry today is that a certain 
group of men control the key cities 
and their theatres, and the good pic- 
tures caij not be shown In them," 
stated the president 6f the institute. 

That PresidLUit Harding was In 
favor of the Federal trade commis- 
.sion's investigation In spite of the 
"whisper campaign," was another 
statement made by Mrs, Lund, who 
added that Will H. TT.ays represents 
about twelve of the motion picture 
organizations only and that "many 
are restive." 

"Mr. Hay.'?," she continued, "no 
matter how well intentioned he is, 
can not have his position run other 
than from the counting house. The 
key to the motion picture situation 
is not disti-ibution, but production," 



Jointly Interested In Theatres 
— Too Much Eastern Op- 
. eration Reported 

Los Angeles, Feb. 28. 

Just what is the cause of the dis- 
satisfaction leading to Sid Grau« 
man parting with Adolph Zukor as 
representing Famous Players is not 
known here. It Is said Grauman la 
going with Jos. Schenck and Sol 
Lesser with the trio Intending to 
build a picture house in Hollywood, 

This leads to the conjecture that 
as Lesser is with the Gore Bros, 
and the Ramiah combination hold- 
ing the First National franchise, 
also controlling the West Coast the- 
atres, Famous does not look with 
favor upon the Grauman connec- 
tion, since he Is linking up with 
Famou.s' bitter rivals out hece. 

Report also says that Grauman 
isn't alto.'?ether pleased over the 
manner Famous is handling its In- 
tere^Jt in the Grauman theatres, par- 
ticularly the new Metropolitan. 
Famous is supposed to hold 50 per 
cent, of the new house, but through 
Investments made during its con- 
struction Famous appears to be 
exercising more authority than 
merely a half partner should have. 
It's said here that while Irving 
Ackcrman, of Ackerman & Harris, 
vns lately in New York he dealt 
directly with Harold Franklin in the 
Famous' New York office for A. & 
H. to take over the Grauman Mil- 
lion lioll.'r house at IJrondway and 
Third, which Famous is likewise in- 
terested in. While Sam Harris, of 
the same firm came here from San 
FrancHco to see Grauman about it 
as w^'ll, the New York end appears 
to be or>erating. 

The indications are the Grauman- 
Zukor break is final; also that 
Ackerm.in & Harris will get the 
Million D(»llar theatre, and another 
local hou! e. Los Angeles is just at 
present the only important coast 
city where A. & 11. are not repre- 
sented with their vaudeville policy 
progr.".ms. ^ 



.Salt Lake City. Feb. 28. 
Ackerman & Harris, of San Fran- 
ci.«co. expect to secure the Orpheum 
theatre, now held under lease from 
the Orpheum Circuit by natives. 
Ackerman &. Harris will play vaude- 
ville in j[t if sectared. The Orpheum 
Circuit recently ended Its big time 
vaudeville season at the house. 



• WOMAN CENSOR CHAIRMAN 

Kansas City, Feb. 28. 

Governor Jonathan Davis, of 
Kansas, haa announced the ap- 
pointment of Mrs. Gertrude Saw- 
telle, of Kansas City, as chairman 
of the state board of film censors, 
to succeed Dwight Thatcher Har- 
ris, who has resigned, effective 
March 31. 

It is understood the governor will 
appoint two other women as mem- 
bers of the board, which heretofore 
ha« been composed of one man and 
two women. 



EMMETT FLYNN LEAVES FOX 

> Los Angele«, Feb. 28, 
Emmett J. Flynn. recognized a* 
■ the foi-emost of tlie Fox directors on 
the West Coast lot, has resigned 
after a row with Winfield R. Shee- 
han, general manager of the cor- 
poration, who is at present here. 

The contract between the cor- 
poration and the director, which 
had but a short time to run, was 
cancelled by mutual consent. 

Flynn, ac(;ordlng to report, has 
been signed by Cosmopolitan and 
^'ill work on the Goldwyn lot for 
them. 



GAMBLING ON MARRIAGE 

I-^s Angeles. Feb. 28. 

During the olT baseball season the 
sports are betting on marriages, 
whether they will, how long they 
will last and if they are. 

The latest market quotation is 3 
to 2 th'-re will be no Charlie Chajt- 
lin-Pola Negri wedding. 



"Unknown Purple" as Independent 

A. Carlos, formerly with I'ox us 

Kastfrn manager f)f j.>ro<1u<'ti<'n at 

the .studios, has entered into a. part*. 



iier.ship with Holah<l West, under 
which the two arc to make a sercf ti 
version of the latter'«i play, '•Th* 
Iiiknown Purjile." Carlos and West 
ru-e to start for I^s .Atigeles in about 
ten days to start r.n the picture, it 
is Intcjided for the independent mar- 
ket. , . ' 



CLOSE EDUCATIONAL CORP. 

The Pictured Records of the Past, 
Inc.. is a $500,000 clo.se corporation 
organized for the purpose of pub- 
lishing historical textbooks and 
screening their contents for educa- 
tional purposes for use in high 
•schools and coTeges. 

Several professor*: . of anthropol- 
ogy of our universities. are among 
the incorporators. 

In.lndfd is Prof. Ralph Van de 
Magoffin of John« Hopkins Uni- 
versity, Prof. David N. Robinson, 
Ravmord Well.s, who staged the 
Biblical play.s laft year: Charles 
Walton, picture director; E. Josepll 
KgRintnn. and others. 



HOLD-UP TIP 



l^)ston. Feb. 28.' 

Ofn V r<* 'n 1)1 i!n clothes were de- 

•:ii].l i<i the box offices of several 

"f \M*^ 1 ical hou.sns last wej-k on a 

ti}), r.-t!-. 1 by the n-jljc^ that A 



"aiur '' ! 1 hit" the ehy from New 
V «'!: u:l) a ijl.in to ho'd-.up the box 
■■fi7 -ey. ' . :- _ 

Ni.'lilnT ^levclopsd from the tip. 
.ind f • en i:i^ police were bn-Hned to 
re-jird it iishtly. but slated the 
yr\»Trd ■«*%* '^HitablSshed lo b« on tlie 
safe •Ida. 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



PICTURES 



■"1 



DRUG PICTURES" MAY BE BANNED 
BY EXHIBITORS' ASSOOATION 



Talking It Over at Meeting— Trying to Hitch Onto 
Hearst Campaign — Theatre on Broadway, the 
Salvation 



At today's (Thursday's) meeting of It (i P f NAMINATIANQ 
the Theatre Owners Chamber of *• V, U I/. IWlTIUlAHUnO 

AT CURRENT MEETING 



Commerce the question of playing 

feature productions deaHns with 
the traftic In narcotics or the expose 
of the dope rings of the country Is 
to come up for discussion. 

There is a possibility one of the 
pictures that has been made will be 
discriminated in favor of. This is 
the picture entitled "The Drug Traf- 
fic," written by Harvey Gates and 
made on the coast by Irving Cum- 
mings. Those handling the business 
end of this production, which is 
being sold on stated right.s, are try- 
ing at this time to lint their picture 
with the drive that the Hearst pub- 
lications are making against the 
drug evil. If It la declared the of- 
ficial picture of the campaign it ^ 
ijtiTle possible that the T. O. C. C. 
■will exempt this one production 
from the ban It contemplates against 
dru«r pictures in general. 

The majority of the producers 
and distributors of the various drufe 
pictures did not have in mind any 
chance of getting their productions 
accepted for runs In any of the big- 
ger theatres for pre-release or even 
first run dates, but were contenting 
themselves with the fact that the 
second run houses and the majority 
of smaller theatres would prove the 
scene of their ^oan-up. Dut seem- 
ingly the second run houses as well 
as the first runs are off of the drug 
films. 

It lookp, however, as though a le- 
gitimate theatre run for one of the 
bigger drug pictures is going to be 
the only solution. Whichever of 
the producers manage to hitch thelf 
'picture to the Hearst campaign can 
easily get over for a qui'.k flash In 
a legitimate Bouse, providing they 
can get one on Broadway. 

That ought to start the wave go- 
ing, and the chances would be that 
the small exhibitors, whether or not 
they are members of any organiza- 
tion, would jump at the chance to 
book any one of the dope pictures to 
>af!h in on the publicity that the one 
big one was getting, regardless o! 
any "resolution" that mitjht be 
. passed by any organization. 



EXCESSIVE INTEREST 
CHARGE BY MINN. MAN 



Sobleman Files Suit— Finkel- 
< stein & Ruben Among 
Defendants 



MANEUVERING OF EHIBITORS 
SHIFTS FILM GROUP LINEUP 



JERSEY BOOKINGS 



H. & B. Houses Move Agents and 
Otherwise Change 



The Harring & BTumenthal vaude- 
ville theatres in New Jersey re- 
turned to the books of the Fally 
Markus office this week, after having 
secured their bills during the past 
month from the Loew ollice. Mar- 
kus formerly booked the H. & B. 
houses with a switck made while a 
deal was pending for Loew's to take 
over the houses. The negotiations 
fell through. 

Markus v.audeviUe opened at the 
Lincoln, Union Hill and Roosevelt, 
West lloboken, N. J., Monday, and 
will be InUhe Central, Jersey City, 
next week. The Central this week 
is playing a vaudeville bill booked 
In the Keith office, originally In- 
tended to play Frank Hall's RItz, 
which has been taken over by Har- 
ring & Blumenthal, who started a 
straight picture policy there this 
week. H. & B.'s National, directly 
acro.ss the .street from the Ritz, 
playing straight licturrs, Is dark 
this week and will remain so with 
its former policy, moving to the 
newly acquired house, which has a 
larger seating capacity. Playing 
the Keith bill jit the Central this 
Week vas necessitated by contracts 
having been issued to acts prior to 
Hall disposing of the Ritz to Har- 
ring & HhimfMithnl. 

With Harring gc "niumenthal ac- 
quiring til/' Ritz, a pool has be«'n 
entered fnto with Frank Hall fur 
picture h\iying for all of lh''r 
houses in Hudson Coimty. 



William Landau Loath to Run 

for Office— Brandt, Ochs 

and O'Reilly Mentioned 

Tl^ weekly meeting of the The- 
atre Owners' Chamber of Commerce 
scheduled for Tuesday was post- 
poned till today (Thursday) at the 
Hotel Astor. The reason for the 
postponement, was that a delega- 
tion from the Chamber- was ex- 
pected to be in Albany Tuesday to 
speak for the aboli43hment of pic- 
ture censorship In New York State. 
The hearing was also postponed 
until next week and the delegation 

did not mak the trip. 

At today's meeting the regular 
nominations for the new oJflcers to 
lead the T. O. C. C. during the com- 
hig yoar will be made. William 
Landau, the president, has no de- 
sire for another term of olTloe. In 
the fleld during the early part of 
the week the possibilities wer? Wil- 
liam Brandt, one of the founders 
and the first president of the or- 
ganization; Charles O'Reilly, at 
present president of the New York 
State organization oX exhibiior.s, and 
Lee Ochs. 

The latter it was stated would 
withdraw from having his name 
placed before the organization as a 
nominee and it was intimated that 
Brandt would do likewise, provid- 
ing O'Reilly was nominated for the 
presidency. It would make the 
nomination of O'Reilly unanimous 
and would obviate the necessity of 
an election. 

The O'Reilly movement wa« 
started in the interests of harmony 
within the organization. There have 
been two factions in the T. O. C. C. 
since the defeat of Brandt by Lan- 
dau a year ago. Although there 
have been no open clashes there 
has been an undercurrent of feeling 
in the organization. With neither 
of the factions having a candidate^ 
in the field and O'Reilly In the po-' 
sition of being really a compromise 
candidate, there Is a certainty the 
factional feeling will be wiped out. 

Both Brandt and O'Reilly were 
loath to head and ticket. Brandt 
on hearing Ochs and John Man- 
heimer proposed running on a Joint 
ticket stated that he would make a 
fight against it. O'Reilly was 
broached by a conservative element 
and asked to accept the nomina- 
tion. Early this week he was not 
sure he would run, but there was a 
general feeling among members of 
both of the factions O'Reilly would 
accept. 

Next Tuesday about 30 members 
of the T. O. C. C, Including Lan- 
dau, Brandt, Berirard Edlehertz, 
O'Reilly, Sam Moross, Charles 
Steiner, Lou Blumenthal and Leo 
Brecher, will leave for Albany to be 
present at the hearing on the re- 
peal of censorehip, which la to be 
before the Ways and Means Com- 
mittee. They will return the same 
evening, leaving Albany at 7 p. ra. 



"- MinncapoIlB, Feb. 28. 

Charging he has been compelled 
to pay piore than 10 per cent. In- 
terest on notes held by the Twin 
City Amusement Trust estate. Wil- 
liam A. Sobleman, a director of the 
Rivoli Theatre Company, this week 
filed suit in Hennepin county dis- 
trict court against the Twin City 
Amusement Co. and William Hamm, 
St., Moses I. Finkelstein, Isaac H. 
R^ben, E. C. Nippold, WHlIam 
Hamm, Jr., Harold D. Finkelstein 
and H. J. Charles, directors. 

The suit, said to be the outgrowth 
of efforts of Finkelstein & Ruben to 
take over the Blue Mouse theatre, 
picture house, promises to furnish 
the local rialto with plenty of gos- 
sip for several weeks. Mr. Hamm, 
former St. Paul brewer, and every- 
one connected with the Twin City 
Amusement Co. are known In the 
theatrical world .as exhibitors. They 
operate practically all of the the- 
atres in Minneapolis and St. Paul. 

Mr. Sobleman in his complaint 
alleges the rate of Interest charged, 
because- of a bonus demanded by 
the elder Hamm, Is greater than the 
law allows, and that the notes are, 
therefore, null and void. He asks 
that the court order cancellation of 
the notes and the mortgage given as 
security, and repayment of the 115.- 
000 interest already paid. He aH!;« 
that the defendants have no right 
and title to leases owned by the 
Rivoli theatre company. 

The complaint sets forth that V7il- 
liam Hamm, Sr.; Finkelatt-ln & Ru- 
ben, together with Oliver Roe, A. B. 
Alprin and William A. Sobleman are 
directors of the Rivoli Theatre Co.. 
which owns and operates the Blue 
Mouse here and another theatre hi 
St. Paul. Sobleman states he owns 



Harring & Blumenthal Forced to Take Crescent in 
Bronx by Loew*8 Entrance into Elsmere — Clare- 
mont Changes Hands and Jams Heights Zone 



SELZNtCK AFFAIRS ARE 
VERY MUCH IN COURT 



Creditors' Committee Unable 

to Have Motion Approved — 

Wener Invested $175,000 



Despite the reorganization of the 
Selznick Corporation of Delaware 
and its nfilliated and subsidiary 
corporations, Lewis J. Selznick is 
sdtlll prolilically involved in the 
courts. 

The creditors' committee, consist- 
ing of Hyman Winnlk, Ralph B. It- 
tleson. W. C. J. Doolittle, M. C. 
Levee and Charles E. Pain, have 
been unsuccessful in their motion 
for an order restraining Charlea 
Gold or any other rreditor from en- 
tering cl.nims against Selznick or 
afniiated companies. Gold last 
week recovered judgment for 
15.502. 58 against the Select Pictures 
Corp., Lewis J. and Florence A. 
Selznick, on two notes for money 
loaned. 

Judge Learned Hand in the U. S. 
District Court has decided the mo- 
t'on cannot be entertained, since 
the alleged bankrupt has not been 
•«o adjudicated and its counsel has 
not the right to move for such pro- 
tection. 

The Selznick interests consist of 
the following subsidiaries: — Selz- 



, nick Corp. of Delaware, Select Pic- 
625 shares out of 5.000 shares an I ^,„.^g ^.^^^ Selznick Pictures Corp.. 



that the par value is $100 per share; 
that the senior Hamm, Finke!ste n 
& Ruben own 2,500 shares and thai 
the rest belong to Alprin and Roe. 

Hamm loaned $173,500 to the 
Rivoli company, to be repaid in 10 
annual . Installments, commencln*? 
Sept. 1, 1922, with interest at the 
rate of 7 per cent, per annum, pay- 
able semi-annually, according to the 
complaint. 

Hamm demanded a note for $200,- 
000 and a mortgage on all the prop- 
erties owned by the Rivoli company 
Oct. 6, 1922, made out to the Twin 
City Co., Soblemnn declared, and 
then demanded a bonus of 2,500 
shares of stock in the Rivoli com- 
pany of a par value of $100 eacn 
The actual value of the 2,500 shares 
the complaint states, Is about 
$100,000. 

Since that time, according to So- 
bleman. the Rivoli company has paid 
to the Twin City Amusement Estate 
Co.. as holders of the mortgage, 
$40,000 on principal and $15,000 on 
Interest. 

The defendants have not filed r -. 
answer yet. 



Change In ownership In two im- 
portant picture housfs In New York 
recently have disturbed the status 
of the independents and the cir- 
cuits. 

Loew takes over the operation of 
the Klsmeie in the upper Bronx 
after alterations, forcing Harring & 
Blumenthal to take up the Crescent 
a few blockfl away at Boston road 
and 168th street in order to pro- 
tect their other interests in that 
territoiy. 

The transfer of the Claremont at 
143d street and Broadway, the lower 
part of the Washington Heights 
section, was reported early this 
week. The principals In the deal 
were hidden, but the belief was ex- 
pressed that the new lessee was 
either B. S. Moea or the Loew in- 
terests. 

The significance of these moves 
lies In the fact that exhibitor groups 
and the big circuits have become 
so organized in the various metro- 
politan territories that a change In 
the line-up disturbs the entire sit- 
uation. If Moss has the Claremont 
he will be in . a poeltlon to work 
considerable damage upon the in- 
dependents in the same section. 
These include the Gotham, the 
Bunny, the Blue Bird and the 
Washington. The last named is 
operated by Fox, while the other 
thr<»e are booked Individually, all 
thiVe exhibitors being members of 
the A. ti. C. Moss has the Hamil- 
ton at 146ih street and Broadway 
and the independents would be 
practically between that house and 
the Claremont. The Fox ^ouse k 
somewhat out of the zone of con- 
flict. The nearest Loew house Is 
tho Rio at 158th street and Broad- 
way. The nearest house south Of 
the Claremont Is the West End. 
run by Himberg and booked by Fox. 

The career of the Claremont aj< 
an independent h.is been a losing 
proposition. It was operated under 
sevtral manngemente and last wai? 
sponsored by a corporation with 
real estate barking. The Elsmere 



SOL LESSER SIGNE^G 

— So! I.fw-...,. ])^^ sl'CJUtl T'l;iii.' K' 
Svvoft ;rtul Ilryant \v*;if<l.iiUiMi . )/ 
the production of 'The Mean .:. 
Miin in ihe World," to l.«" donr" ".y 
I'riM'Mpal r;ctnr«'s. The pirtui-f i 
<o be .stTrtcd under the dirf»«"'iioii » ' 
Kddip ('line as .soon a.s H«'rt I.,yt« '.! 
finiviiif.s ii.s f !ij^'.'»tr<'nM'nts in \-.iu<l*'- 
^ille In .San l-"rancisco and I 



DOUBLE EXTRA ATTRACTION 



.o^ I M 



:::il Morrlsey Will Give Hour Act 
and Take Local Pictures 

A double attraction has been pro- 
vided for i):<:ture theatres by Bill 
Morrisoy, the I^ambs Club .star en- 
tertainer and uni versa' comedian. 

It's Morriseys intention to take 
out a group of weli ;-n6vvn urtLsts- 
who will Kive an hours porform- 
.Tnoe, more or 1»'S.-*, as required, upf>n 
the .s^nj;*' :i(ul i:i»Mrporate th»r lur.il 
p lrt n r r ^tunr: — >*:rrnrrs nf n-itrves 
will b** takf'ii in the way of a^piriiiR 
'ilni ).l.iye:-«. 

In .\l(»rr:s*'y's traveling pictui* 
fhow ;n-.' .Mari;ui>;i!e M;«vsh. Billy 
\\>sr (the 1)1. "turf* comic). Klh»>l 
Cibson and « "..tl.rif '!'> Hinaldn, r.illcd 
"Tlje Sf.nTid V.iN'Mt imi." )i"siil< ;: 



orrisfj* himself. 



USE KNICKERBOCKER'S WALLS 

Wa.shlngton, Feb. 28. 
The remaining walls of the oM 
Knickerbocker theatre, which col- 
lapsed here over a year ago with a 
terrific toll of killed and Injured, are 
to be used In the construction of tYu- 
new theatre being erected by the 
Crandall Interests on the former 
site. This came to ligh^ when the 
building department of the district 
government Issued a permit for the 
erection of the Ambassador, which 
Is to be the name of the new house 



building department owing to cer- 
tain construction detaTls and wa* 
«"losed for months while necessary 

> hanges were made. /"■ *, 



gono to Oaumonts In place of Wll 
ICellino, wl)o Isas Joined the Stol 
outfit. 



LONDON niM NEWS 



London, Feb. 10. 
Among the most Important even; 
now pending is the Ideal Co.'s ''x- 
periinent In showing three , ne 
ninis. Instead of giving difT«r«'n' 
trade .«hows iip and down \hf r-oun- 
trj'. they will give central ones i;' 
London, to wi)ich the provinr*:.. ' 
exhibitore will be bro\ight a? tI.^^ 
firm's expen.'^e. Several hundn 1 
will arrive, and they will bo lodK' 1 
at two big hotels in the West En.! 
Tl'f' three pirtnre.s chosen for th\f 
extton.nive expf-rimfnt are "Throuph 
Fire and Water.' featuring Flora If 
Ilr* ton and pro<lnred by Tliomri."^ 
Lentley. "Tho Harbor Lit'hrs.' 
produ ed by Tom T' rri.sr. and ffii- 
turlng Tom Moore and Ifobel'L'l 



oni. niul ■Tli*' fJriirw Widow," \rt- 
ducid l)y Frank 11. Crane. Of fi <. 
tlu'eo prodficers Cr.ine h.is y-v 
nonipJ* f'd a new ni'lodrmua (<>:• 
Jlie ' oinT»any < milled "Th*- Ilfiwh ' 
•Aiiicji fearurrs Chnrle« lInf»-lunKO -. 
the Am'^iifnn ««'r'al Ptunt s'ar. T';i 
pi''*ur».' has boon prin.-'ipally m uii^ 
!n Torquay r^id FOmou'h and >m>{ 
TITo le.TM^ of iiis aniai'tlone Is vi^ 
".<«tunt" in whif'h th«» glldf-r whi-ii 
ve"'Mif!y voti flii' Hri'if»h trials ]>■• 
:is» d in n fl.Kht froni a higii cliff 
into .'< )o-!)l;1i «••.'». It is tiulikfly 
Crfin" will inalce nnofh*r picture fm- 
:.h*> fiSTn. at any rato Ju.-^t a* t)ie 
J 1 »:n< nt, .Tud ))♦» i^' in town n.aUmt' 
'.rrar^f nutits for anothf-r prod.i'-- 
:if)n 'fi a li'ge sra]r. T'l'.'lnn ha« 



th' 



o«ard of 



V. i-h the completion of "The 
llnv.lf." Frank H. Crane has come 
to th«' « nd of his pr*^Krnt contract 
ujtii I.Val. IliH last production for 
ih.K .onipany. -Tin r.r.ifX!, Orphan," 
v\.is .tn *>xcell' nt on»» nod M'*«11 In 

r'hanr^. of T h.■:na^^ ISentley'' 

I : "on?;;;! | ji f .i„d W aT»l« ' and Tom 



i' !!;!<• • Tiif lfar»)our Lights." 

.A|ti,o.!irh tiling!* i;ie st'll Aery 
• i'!i»'t and WardoiBj- street is wrar- 
iiJg a long fM<v>, Tl^rre are sipns th.T 
bnsi-.. ^n i^ in.i.rg^jnf:. \r.rious bif.- 
|ii'iid.» -inf' <om)/inl>« ar" f»p«ning 

I'P hU'\ .t]:y,v:i\Jn- \\i,. piO-^IMPt for 

th*^ l>!a\«'r nft.rit, ;.*.»'«.« 



'^ 



Republic Distributing Corp., C. K. 
Y. Film Corp.. Robblns Film Co., 
Inc.. Fmpire Enterprises, Inc., T. & 
T. I'llni:*. Inc., S.'lect Pictures Corp., 
Ltd. (Canada). Owen .Moore Film 
Coip.. National Picture Theatres. 
Inc.. Weber Productions, Inc., and 
Eva Tanguay Film Corp.V :i . 

In the New York Supreme Court 
Lewis J. Selzniok lost out in a point 
against Jacob Wener and the T. & 

T. Films, Inc.. of which Wener i^ in the Bronx had trouble with th#s 
treasurer. Wener invested $170,000 
cn.sh in Selznick's film enterprises 
to reis.«jue 12 of Selznick's Con- 
stance and Norma Talmadge fea- 
tMi'os. Selznick charged t)ie $175.- 
(00 was in the nature of a loan and 
that the T. & T. Film«, In-*, wa.« 
I'oi'nje.d for the purpose of side- 
.stepping the usury laws. Wener 
countered otherwi.se and w.i« up- 
held with the re.stilt a preliminary 
injunction to show cause why 
Wener should not bo restrained 
f om di.'po.^lng of the lilms, which 
he holds as coilateral, h;is been \'a- 
cated. Wener's aflldavit In opposi- 
tion contains a number of state- 
ments to the effect in.surance pre- 
miums on the nims were charged 
to him. although not actually in- 
sur.ed; Hin)ilarly, film print costs on 
Alms tliat w»ie made when the pi<*- 
tures were originally released to 
exhibitors. 

The cr^'ditors' committee Is cur- 
rently circularizing the hundretl- 
odd creditors to secure iheir con- 
sent for putting into effect a reor- 
ganization plan whfreby the gen- 
eral overhead may be redu«.'eU and 
new revenue derived from current 
JS«'li,nick prod u<"t ions. 

Already creditors to Ihf extent 
of over tlTiOCOOO ha\e approved «.f 
the plan. 



^l 



A.iho.iKh things In the Britlsl, 
fllm world l.ave been remarkably 
quiet of late, there is a perfect epi- 
demic of big trade sliows and pub- 
lic screening of super-pictures 
"The Prisoner of Zenda'* has fol- 
lowed "The Four Horsemen" at the 
Palace, the run of "Robin Hood" 
lias boon extended at the Pavilion, 
and the First National'e "The Eter- 
nal Flame," with Norma Talmadge 
has gone into tho Empire, where 
the .Stuart Plackton feature, "The 
Virgin Queen." was by no meanr 
.1 Kensational sticcess. Other rent- 
• t.h' are digging into their cellar* 
for "Kuper.M." and the succesn of * 
few is likely to create a boom Ir 
West End runs, the owners of the 
features wisely realizing immense 
values of such an advertisement 
wh^'n the films reach the province* 
to say nothing of the way they will 
be abi** to put the hire prices up 
for the e.xhibitors. 



The Huge kinema which Is td take 
the place of the TIvoll. ie rapid!) 
nearlng completion but the great 
tnjildUig in Oxford street which wa« 
going to leave any other movie show 
in* thf world, does not seem to have 
got beyond Its foundations yet, 
uhilo of the very super place near 
liihkiuuhitm Palace where prices 
wrre t'ning u, be ftu*h as to keep 
\ .jlgar b#^vd out has not been 

lHl#>. 



?^ 



PICTURES 



-y-'- 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



mMi 



NEW CHAPLIN FILM BIG HRST 
TWO DAYS. THEN FALLS OFF 



Last Week's Crop on Broadway Held Two New 
Ones — "Hottentot" Disappointed Strand Thea- 
tre— "Adam and Eva" a Surprise 



I^iist work marked the advrnt of 
but two new pictlin's aloiiK Ifrnad- 
way. Thf Strnnt] ]tr»>Mcnl«>il "Th«' 
Hottentot." while at the Hivoli "Ilac- 
Ing Hearts" Jicld forth. The Capitol 
held over "The Christiaji" and at 
the Rialto "Adam and lOva" moved 
down from the Uivoli. The Camoo 
had "Down to the Sea in Ships." 
Kiving the ])Icture an unu.sually 
heavy adverti.«<inK caoipalpin. At the 
Criterion the II. production, "Driv- 
en," wan a holdover, while at the 
Lyric "Hunting Big Came" contin- 
ued on its way. 

Of the new pictures "The Hotten- 
tot" held up the strongest, although 
It proved somewhat of a disappoint- 
ment to the Strand management 
thai believed the production would 
come near breaking records, no 
strong was the advance dope on the 
feature as a comedy hit. Business 
was slightly better than the aver- 
age at the house. "Racing Hearts" 
at the Rivoli. with three names. 
iV^rnes Ay res, Theodore Roberts and 
Richard Dix, featured In outside 
billing, failed to pull a.s expected, 
with just a little better than $19,000 
on the week. 

The surprise was the unexpected 
strength shown by the Marlon Da- 
vfea picture, "Adam and Kvn. ' for 
Its second week on Broadway. At 
the Rivoli the week previously the 
picture played to |26,7C0. It was 
figured lucky if the showing at the 
Rialto would be |18.000, but instead 
the statemr.nt at the finish .shovve<l 
124.200. 

. Ii) "The Christian" run of ,two 
•weeTts at the Capitol the second 
week showed a falling off of only 
^3.000 under the previous week, 
i The fair return all along the street 
Thust in a certain degree be cred- 
ited to the holiday in the middle of 
the week, when pra- tically all of 
the houses did capacity at holiday 
prices. 

>'or the current week the street 
has four rn \v jtirtures with three 
active opposition to the others. Thf- 
Capitol has "Minnie," while the Do- 
>fllle picture, "Adam's Rih," Is at 
the Rivoli and tlie Strand i.s pre- 
senting the latest Chaplin. Chaplin 
Opened strong Sunday, beating tho 
record of '-The Kid" by about $600, 
Mold about even on Monday and 
dropped Tuesday and AVedne.sday. 
: "Othello," a foreign picture, came 
Into the Criterion for a two weeks* 
run, presented by Ben r.lumenthal, 
and received corking notices in the 
dailies. It is a question if picture 
house audiences want Shakespeare. 
If they ^o, then this picture is going 
to mop up. but Broadway did not 
express any particular desire for it 
during the first three days of this 
week. "Down to the Sea" held over 
at the Cameo for tl)is week. 

An estimate of last week's busi- 
ness Is: 

Cameo— "Down to the S«a in 
Ships" (Hodkinson. Seats 500; 
Scale 5o-7r>). Was given a terrific 
wallop by local advertising in the 
dailies. IloiIJiinson staff claiming 
all sorts of records for the picture 

fit this house', some so absurd that 
t wouldn't have been possible had 
the house played to absolute capac- 
ity 15 hours a day for the entire 
\veek. The opening Sunday was 
lighter as far as the aftet noon busi- 
ness was COUP riKHl than it is on 
the regular Sundays at the house. 
The real gross was $8,100. 

Criterion — "Driven" (I'niversal 
Seats 60K; scale, mats.. $1 top; eves.. 
11.50). For the second week this 
ilTniversj\I, whieh got corking notice? 
Irom the dailies, had a fairly good 
week, with the holiday crowd and 
holiday prices tal<en into consider- 
ation. The groi-s. $0,300. 

Lyric — "Hunting Big dame in 
Africa" (.1. .T. MeCarthy-Kui^'en. 
Roth. Seats 1.400; scale, mats.. $1 
top; eves., $).r.O). The holiday 
crowd held this one arotmd $11,000 
last week, although the i>iet4ire has 
been here for a couple of moi\jhs 
Heavy circus advertising started 
this week, which looks as though 
It was going to hold the picture 
above $10,000 until after i:asler. 

Rialto— "Adam and VWa" (Cosmo- 
politan-Paramount. S<'atH 1,960; 
scale, 5.^-S5-J)9). Marion .Davies 
star. This was []\n .second week on 
Broadway for this pictiu-e, which 
played the Rivoli the week before. 
where it got almost $27,000 on fh«> 
week. At the Rialto, to the surprise 
of .the Paramount people i)arti(- 
iilarly, the feature managed to top 
$24,000 by a few dollars, which was 
. almost $1,000 better t han w hat 
"Java Head " did at the ln)Use undfi 
the Fam« circumstances the week 
previously. This showing speak.'^ 
clearly of the sirength that ''Knij;ht- 
hood • has added to the Marion Da- 
vies name abov« a picture. 

Rivoli-^'RacinA Hearts' (Famon*. 
Players -J4'''ky. Seats 2,200; scale. 
15-85 -9'J), With tJirec names fea- 



4 CHICAGO THEATRES 
USING "COUE MESSAGE" 

Baiaban & Katz departure 
From Custom — Chicago Did 
$36,000 Last Week : 



LOS ANGELES HOUSES 
IN SUPREMACY BATTLE 



.at 
in 



Chicago. Feb. 28. 
The Message of Kmile Coue" is 
the four Baiaban & Katz theatres 
Chicago this week. It is a de- 
parture inasmuch as the Chicago 
theatres generally lead the outlying 
Baiaban ^ Katz houses. 

The Chicago's current attraction 
is Marshall Xeilan's "The Strangers' 
Banquet," while the Riviera and 
Tivoli have "Quincy Adams Saw- 
yer," looked upon as only ap ordi- 
nary photoplay. The Central Park 
has 'The \'olce from the Minaret." 
McVicker's has Jack Holt in "No- 
body's Money," with U'anda Hawley 
in the leading feminine role, and 
the stage presentations ineUide a 
double Russian Quartet, wrth Serge 
llorowsk'y as soloist. 

The RandOM'h has "Women Men 
Marry." Barbee's has "The Inno- 
cent Cheat." The Roosevelt adver- 



in Cfiruiection 

The Orpheum 

Saturday and 

saw a record - 

The Stratford, 



tises 'last chance' 

with 'Roldn Hood.' 

started "Dr. Jack." 

the first two days 

breaking business. 

an Important outlying house, has 

"The World's Applause" and Sweet's 

Band as an extra feature. This act 

secured the most applause Sunday 

that an a<Med ;»ttra<-tion has ever 

been accftriled at that house. The 

Senate has the same 

and Art K.ahn's orehestra continues 

to prove a big draw for that theatre. 

I^ast week's estimate.*--: 

Chicago — "What ;i Wife Learned" 
(First National). $36,000. 

Roosevelt — Douglas Fairbanks in 
"Robin Hood" (United Artists), lifih 
week, $17,000. 

McVicker's — l*etty Compson in 
'The \\ hiie Fiowei ' (Paramount), 
$L'S.OOO. 

Randolph— Priscllla Dean in "The 
Flame of Life" (I'niversal), second 
week, $5,000. 



Loew's State and Grauman's 
Met. in Advertising and 
r.v- Publicity Fight 

■ ' Los Angeles, Feb. 2S. 

Qrauman's noir Metropolitan and 
Loew's State appear to be in a heck- 
and-neck fight for receipts suprem- 
acy. Both theatres are the heaviest 
users of advertising' space In the 
papers, and their respective press 
agents are working day and night 
to keep the name of their theatres 
in the limelight. Grauman's, with 
its greater capacity, seems to be 
leading by a slight margin. From 

the film patronage viewpoint the 
theatres did well this week, several 
of the "leadehs reaping big rewards 
for unusually good attractions. 

The estimates: 

California— "The Beautiful and 
Damned" (Warner Bros.). Seats 
2.000; prices, nights, 35-75; mats.. 
25-55. 'Marie Prevost and Kenneth 
Harlan. Drew $11,275. 

KInema— "Oliver Twist (2d week) 
(A. F. N.). Seat* 1.800; prices, 
nights, 35-75; mats., 25-55. Jackie 
Coogan starred. Musical features 
played heavily. Took $16,500. 

Grauman's — "The Ninety and 
Nine" (Vitagraph). Seats 2.200; 
prices, nights, 40-55; mats., 25-35. 
Critics treated film mildly, some 
notices containing roasts, which did 
not help box office. Christie comedy, 
with Neal Burns featured. Got 
$10,112 on week. 

Grauman's Metropolitan — 'Racing 
Hearts" (Paramount). Seats 3,800; 
prices, nights, 60-65; 'mats., 30. 
Agnes Ayres In type, with Theo. 
Roberts and Hichard T>ix also men- 
tioned. Waring's band. Grossed 
$32,025. 

Grauman's Rialto— "Adam's Rih" 
(Paramount). Seats 800; prices, 
nights. 55-85; mats., 33-55. Cecil B. 
De Mille aa director given the ad- 
vertising space. Settling down for 
a run, with patronage big. Took 
$9,000. 

Grauman's Hollywood — "Robin 

Hood" (Fairbanks): Seats 1.800; 

prices, nights, 75-150; naats., 50-$l. 

photoplav, ] Knd of long run not yet in sight. 

Got $11,000. 

Loew's State— "All the Brothers 
Wore Valiant" (Metro)* Seats 2.400; 
prices, nights. 40-55; mats., 25-35. 
Kxtra advertising helped put film 
over Max Fisher'^ orchestra. Took 
$14,750. 

Mission— "One FJxcltlng Night" 
(Griffith). Seats 1.000; prices, nights. 
50-$l; -mats., 25-50. Fact this Is a 
(Iriinth thriller acts an impetus at 
cash window. Doing nicely latter 
part of week, with early part weak. 
Grossed $11,070. 



DETROIT NORMAL 



Lent 



Not Yet Affecting 
Cold and Snow 



Business. 



Detroit, Feb. 28. 

The cold spell and tlie snow con- 
tinued last week, and still every- 
body liad prolitable business. The 
Lenten season doesn't seem to af- 
fect the theatres if they have the 
attractions the public want to see. 
Estimates for last week: 

Adams — "Java Head." Business 
satisfaetory, although picture dis- 
appointi!ig. lirags too much. 

Madison — "Knighthood." Normal 
business, all Kiuisky expected. Pic- 
ture previously at Kunsky's Adams 
for five weeks. 

Capitol — "Racing Hearts." Busi- 
ness b:g. due to interest in Coue 
picture. 

Broadway — Strand — Last week of 
"One Kxciting Night." Business 
much better than expected. En- 
^'ag<»ment made good protU €or the 
house. 

Fox — Washington — "Face on Bar- 
room Floor." I'roli table. 



HOLIDAY SAVED WEEK 
IN BOSTON HOUSES 



tured this picture failed to pull 'em 
ai the upper Broadway Paramount 
house last week. The trio coupled 
in the billing were Agnes Ayros 
starred with Theodore Roberts, and 
Kiehard Dix featured. All three 
have been favorites, hut the crowd 
simply wouldn't come, the result 
w;is that the week .showed just bot- 
tir tlian $19,000. 

Strand— 'The Hottentot" (First 
National. Seats 2,900; scale. 30-50- 
sr».) Douglas Mcr.,ean star. Picture 
ii.iiled in advance as a comedy wal- 
lop did not pr(jve an unusual busi- 
ness-g»'tter at the Strand. This was 
due to the fact that public did not 
expect McLean to deliver a real com- 
edy .veieatn. The consensus of opin- 
ion is tliat the next (>uf> that he does, 
if it is as good as this, will ])Ull 100 
l)er cent stronger. I..ast week the 
1,'r.iss showed $.n,200. 

Capitol— "The Christian' (C.old- 
wvn. Scuts 5.300: scale. f.r.-S.';-$J.10). 
I'l.iyd fir two vvoe'cs, getting $14.- 
(MMl ijw liist week and ilroppiiii; only 
$:{.U0O behind that figure for the sec- 
ond week. Of course, both weeks 
Ii.id tlie advantage of a holiday — 
riineoln's and AVasliington's birth- 
days^^^hieh helped 8wel the gross. 
All things coM.sIdoied the second 
week's slutwing with $41,000 showed 
unusual streiigtli for the pit.-iure. 



NAZMOVA'S mOHrSTARIlES 
ALDINE, PHILLY, BY BIG GROSS 



■f'».'i:' »-'A'.. ■ 



Held Over— Expected to Do $5,000, Did $12,000--; 
Stanley's Off Week With "Quincy Adami Saw- 
yer" — Stanton Has Loil Its Jinx ^ 



-4- 



FHJnS' FOREIGN LOCALES 
BEATEN BY AMERICAN 



"Third Alarm" In Lead Last 

m K. C— '^Nero" and 

**0mar" Against It 



Lent Having Effect on Box 

Offices— "Christian" Did 

$10,000 at $1.50 Top 

Boston, Feb. 2S. 

The holiday saved the aifiatlon 
for the picture houses In thla city 
last week. Their grosses were 
about on a par with those that 
would be the normal run during the 
s( ason and shows that I^ent has 
had an affect on them. None did 
the big business noticeable at the 
Xmas holiday season and if they 
plug along as they go now, every- 
thing will be even. 

"The Christian" which opened at 
the I'ark last week did about $10,000 
for the first week. It does not look 
very strong and will not be held In 
the house for an extended period 
under the existing conditions. Those 
connected with the film were of the 
opinion that everything had been 
done In the advertising and pub- 
licity line to put the picture across 
and did not have any complaint 
along those lines. 

Loew's State (capacity. 2.400; 
scale, 25-50). With "Drums of Fate" 
and "Adam and Eva." did $16,000 
last week. "Java Head" and Chap- 
lin this week. 

Park (cai>acity, 1,100; scale, 50- 
$1.50). "The Christian," the second 
and final week. Credited with $10.- 
000 for first week. 

Modern (capacity, 800; scale, 28- 
40). $7,000 last week with "The I^it- 
tle Church Around the Corner." 
Chaplin's "Pilgrim," and "Wildcat 
Jordan" this week. 

Beacon (capacity, scale, attraction 
and gross same as Modern.) 



Kansa.s City, Feb. 28. 

With each of the big four down- 
town picture theatres offering pro- 
ductions with foreign settings, 
oriental costuming and thrilling in- 
cidents, it remained for the Pan- 
tages to run away from everything 
with an American picture "The 
Third Alarm." The feature had 
been strongly clrcused and it was 
put over for a record, beating any 
week at the. house in over two years, 
with the exception of the Jack 
Dempsey week. 

"Nero." the big Fox special, failed 
to develop anything ufTQsual and 
"Omar, the Tentmaker" trailed 
along. 

In the residental district houses 
the Apollo at 32d and Troost, broke 
into tlie week stand class with the 
first run of "The Headless Hor.se- 
man." Good business was reported 
for all night performances. Th^ 
Regent, one of tlie popular priced 
hou.ses on 12th street, also offered 
a first run. 'The Wolfs Fangsi" 

Last week's estimates: • 

Liberty — "Nero" , (Fox special), 
("seats 1.000, scale .15 -.'>0). 'Lavish 
In stage settings, and produced 
with foreign cast, unknown to local 
fans, spectacle, will please. Violet 
Mersereau's only well known fare 
on the screen. Failed to develop 
any appeal and business only of 
regular program offerings, about 
$6,400. *;-.. ,' .,_■,. - . V; A » . .. 

Newman — "My American Wife" 
(Paramount), seats 1980, ecale 
nights 50-75. Gloria Swanson. Two 
orchestras, three picture reels and 
two vaudeville acts completed 
regular "eight event" bill. Antonio 
Moreno given second billing as 
"Her New Leading Man." Around 
$12,000. 

Royal — "Omar the Tentmaker," 
(First National), (seats 890— scale 
35-50.) Guy Dates Post In leading 
role. According to local critics real 
star Is Virginia Falre as Shlreen. 
Elaborate settings' and gorgeous 
Oriental costumes. Story seems lit- 
tle far fetched at times. Receipts 
cl«»se to $6,200. 

Twelfth Street— "Drums of Fate" 
(Par.amount), (seats 1,100 — scale 30) 
Mary ^lilese Minter. Much of the 
story in Africa giving some Inter- 
esting "shots." Business about regu- 
lar, $2,000. 

Opposition films at the vaude- 
ville houses "Third Alarm," Pan- 
tages, "Breaking Home Ties," 
Globe, "Gimme," Main street. 



FRISCO BETTER 



Fine Business Downtown Last Week 
For Good Pictures 



Joel A. Levy Leaves Path* 

Philadelphia. Feb. 28. 
Joel A. Levy, after six and one- 
half years with the Pathe Ex- 
change, Inc., Philadelphia branch, 
as director of publicity and sales- 
man, has resigned to aflllllate with 
Ihe Famous Players-Lasky ex- 
change here In their sales depart- 
ment. 



San Francisco, Feb. 28. 
With good features downtown last 
week business climbed to a peak 
much higher than normal. 

The holdover did not fare so well. 
"One Exciting Night," at the New 
Portola. was booked in with the ex- 
pectation of a long run. In Its third 
week it fell off and another was 
underlined. "The" Strangers Ban- 
quet," at the Imperial, flopped in its 
second week. 

California — "My American Wife' 
(Paramount). (Seats 2,700; scale, 
ri5-90.) Band extra attraction. 
Gross $19,000. 

Granada — -"Adam's Rib" <Para- 
mount). (Seats 2,840; scale, 55-90.) 
(Sot top money of the town, with 
$24,000 to its credit. 

Imperial — "The Stranger's Ban- 
quet" (Goldwyn). (Seats 1,425; 
seale, 35-75.) Second week way off, 
falling to $6,000. 

Portola— "One Exciting Night' 
(t'nited Artists). (Scats 1.100; scale. 
50-75). Big'slump; off after threj 
weeks. Final week $0,600. 

Loew's Warfield— "The Woman of 
Bronze" (Metro). (Seats 2.800: 
scale, 55-75.) Clara Kimball Young 
Ciccolini's second and final week. 
Played to $12,000. 

Tivoli — "The Dangerous Age'" 
(First National). (Seats l.HOO; sc.ile, 
40-75.) Lewis SloJie and Ruth Clif- 
ford. Got $11,000. . 

Strand— "liights of New York" 
(Fox). (Seats 1.700; scale, 50-75.) 
Played to only $3,500. 

Frolic — "The CJenllem<»n from 
America" (Univer.sal). (Seats 1.000; 
scale, 10-30.) Hoot Gibson. l>id its 
usual $3,100.' 



Philadelphia, Feb. 28. 
The surprise feature last week in 
films here was the good business 
turned in by Nazimova's "Salome" 
at the Aldlne. Here was a feature 
touted by nearly everybody here as 
too highbrow to draw, especially In 
the Aldlne, which has not been 
doing especially well since Us open- 
ing over a year ago. It was boolied 
for a week, and generally figured to 
gross around $5,000 in this medium 
capacity house, where the last 
Nazlmova film ("Doll's House") 
flopped last spring. Instead after a 
weak opening "Salome" commenced 
to drag them In. The dallies 
were enthusiastic, and one drastic 
critic devoted most of his Sunday 
column to it. None of the reviews 
were of the usual cut-and-dried na- 
ture, and all commented on the fact 
that "Salome" was a little bit dif- 
ferent from any other feature ever 
made. 

The crowds began to come. By 
the middle of the week it was de- 
cided to hold "Salome" over for. an- 
other six days, the first time tMs 
has happened at the Aldlne since 
the Metro occupation early last fall. 
The crowds were curious, though It 
is not likely that any were expect- 
ing risque stuff, as the reviews es- 
pecially noted the absence of sensa- 
tionalism. It was felt by many that 
the demand would slump after the 
flrst brigade of curious had passed, 
but despite some very cold weather 
business continued big all week, and 
with the warmer spell this week the 
gross expected to hold up. 

"liobln Hood'' had another good 
week at the Stanton, although the 
gross began to slide considerably 
when the cold spell struck the city. 
This week will tell the tale here, al- 
though the feature is definitely set 
for at least one more (a fifth) week, 
and the probability Is that it will 
stay around for a sixth, thus set- 
ting the season's long run film rec- 
ord. The Stanton, hy the way, has 
again developed into a big money- 
maker for the Stanley Company af- 
ter being way off last season, due, it 
is figured, to the opening of th« 
new Stajiley and the attention paid 
to that house. Last spring the 
Stanton closed early after a number 
of utter flops, but this year, with 
perhaps one exception, it has had 
outstanding hits, four weeks of good 
business being the r^ular thing. 
"Adam's Rib' will probably be the 
next. 

The Stanley had an off week 
again -with "Quincy Adams Saw- 
yer." the matinee trade being espe- 
cially hard hit. The weakness con- 
tinued right up to the end of th« 
week, with the first showings Fri- 
day being especially hard hit. The 
cold weather hit business here as 
much as anywhere in the city. The 
Stanley has not done so very well 
with several features lacking big 
name stars of late after several 
months of fine business with names. 
It Is said the present pollc> Is In 
the nature of a test. This week's 
feature Is "Java Head," much In the 
same category, but next week "The 
Christian" is expected to see a re- 
turn of big grosses. Surprise Is ex- 
pressed at the booking of this 
Maurice Tourneur picture In a one- 
week house Instead of at the Stan- 
ton, where runs are common. 

The Karlton had "Hearts Aflame** 
last week and did fairly well, al- 
though it never did as well as "The 
Storm," a fl'm similar in character, 
which played to two weeks of big 
business last fall. Jack Holt In 
"Nobody's Money" Is this week's 
feature. T!iis star 
house here, his 
I)layed all over. 

Business in the drop-In houses on 
East Maiket street (Palace, Vic- 
toria and Cai)ltol) was hit by the 
cold weather last week, especially 
in the evenings. "My American 
Wife'' and "Broken Chains' were 
the attractions at the Palace anil 
X'ictoria respectively. 
Estimates for last week: 
Stanley — "Quincy Adams Sawyer" 
(Metro). No added features used, 
though later in week ads called 
attention to pictures of Tut's torn'*. 
(Jross of around $21,000, under nor- 
mal, with niiitinee trade especially 
hard hit. Some dallies roasted pic- 
ure unmercifully. Capacity, 4,000; 
scale. 50-75. evenings. 

Stanton— -Rol. in Hood" (United 
.\rtists). Third week. IMrst droji 
noticeable, but it grossed around 
$1<?.000 and looks good for three 
more weeks, (^apac lty, 1^700; scale. 
50-7.'. fvejilngs. 

Aldine — "Salome" (Fnited Ar- 
tists), Surprise hit of week and 
held over. (Jross of about $12,000, 
best at house for some time. Ca- 
pacit\, ! 500; scale, 50 top. 

Karf^ •— FTrarta Aflame." Fair. 
Aroun I 3\000. Capacity. 1.100; 60 
top. 



has no regular 
features being 



*t«.3*A< 



■••»»^i»<r-«»—«»'V«* ••-•■. ■•••••»•■«*» 



-,-••■•-•—•- V". 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



PICTURES 



SI 



TWO BUFFALO HOUSES 
BREAK GROSS RECORDS 



Loew's and Hip Top Within $6 
of One Another— Remark- 
,: able Business Last Week 



Buffalo, Feb. 28. 

Last week's business at Buffalo 
picture houses reached heightii un- 
precedented m local theatredom. In 
the «ame week and at a season 
usually marked by declining grosses, 
Loew'a and Shea's Hippodrome 
broke all previous records. At the 
same time both houses, with dif- 
ferent scales and capacities, reached 
Almost the eame exact figure fop 
the week's busines.^i. 

The Hippodrome's achievement 
for a straight picture house Is little 
short of remarkable. The previous 
record for the house was held by 
rrhe Kid" with $18,006, long thought 
to be unapproachable. Loew's has 
been flirting around tho peak« for 
several weeks, shooting at Doral- 
dina's record of over 117,500 a year 

ago. 

With four downtown picture 
houses taking an estimated gross of 
$60,000 in one week, local picture 
men found little to complain about. 

Last week's estimates: 

Loew's State — "Heroes of the 
Street" and vaudeville. (Capacity, 
3.400. Scale, nights 30-50.) Barry 
fllm caught on early and dragged 
them to the box office In droves. 
Business jumped so strongly before 
end of week house was unable to 
take care of crowds. Bubbled over 
into this week with Monday's mati- 
nee stopping ticket eale at 3 o'clock. 
$18,300 for week. 

Hipp — "Tess of the Storm Coun- 
try" and "Day Dreams." (Capacity. 
2,400. Nights. 35-50.) PIckford 
feature panned pure gold here. 
Started with one of the biggest 
Sundays on house's books and 
flowed along irresistibly all week. 
Keaton film rounded off bill neatly. 
$18,306 on week. 

Lafayette Square — 'Xlghts of 
New York" and vaudeville. Slipped 
again last week. Business has been 
skidding for several weeks, with 
various rea.sons assigned. Estimated 
under $11,000. 

Olympic— "The Flame of Life." 
(Capacity, 1.500. Nights, 20-25.) 
Picked up perceptibly In numbers 
but low scale Is keei>4ng gro«s from 
higher levels. Picture proved popu- 
lar. The house is nearing the first 
lA) of its lease and decision will 
Indicate whether U'« first run 
scheme here has been euccessful. 
Around $2,500. 



INSIDE STUFF 



ONPICTUBES 



''f 



•/• 



UNEXPECTED HAPPENED 



Upward Last Week in Wash 
ington 



"Washington, Feb. 28. 

It is sometimes the unexpected 
that happens. With the local pic- 
ture house managers all set for a 
skid downward in the receipts dur- 
ing Lent, much to their surprise, 
they held up remarkably well, al- 
though not quite equalling the 
splendid business done the previous 
week, when all houses noted an up- 
ward trend. 

From the previous week, during 
which practically all four of the 
downtown houses were presenting 
films with comedy as their chief 
feature, found the past week given 
over to plots of a more serious na- 
ture and brought one big release. 
*The Christian," for its first show- 
ing here. The contract seemingly 
was what was wanted, and although 
the usual running order of the 
bouses was upset none apparently 
luid room for complaint, 

Kstimatcs for last week: 

Mocpe's Rialto — (Capacity. 1,900; 
scale, 50c. evenings). "The Chris- 
tian" (Maurice Tourneur). For the 
first time in many moons this the- 
atre held an attraction that topped 
the other houses. This picturiza- 
tlon of Hall Caine's story was well 
done and got at least $12,000 or. the 
week. New record for this house. 

Loew's Columbia — (Capacity. 1.- 
100; .scale. 35-50. evenings.) Gloria 
Swanson in I'My American Wife" 
(Paramount). "With Antonio Morino 
featured, although held only for ou( 
Week, did very fair. Picture did not 
create any unu.«=ual intere-t and 
reached about $10,000. 

Loew's Palace— ( Capacity, 2.500. 
ecale, 35-50, evenings.) "Java 
Head' (George Melford). House 
had exceptional play with picture 
that created gr<'at deal of inter'st 
and forcing receipts up onto par 
with Columbia, close to $10,000. 

Crandall's Metropolitan — (Capa<"- 
Ity, 1,700; scale. 35-50, cvnniMj?"") 
Katherin*^ MacDonaTd in 'Woman 
Conqueis,' and Iluster Keaton in 
"Day Djoams' (First National). 
Mi.'^S M;n'Don;t]d won id .st?e!ii to be 
losing some of h<v drawing po\v«'r, 
film or star, har<i to judge. A<ld»Ml 
Keaton comedy aided vdrr.y^ and 
"lOuse did about $8,000. 



The Hearst-GoldVyn combination Is expected In the trade to give 
battle sooner or later to Famous Players or any other distributor of slee. 
It's understood ■William R. Hearst, in making the connection for his 
International and Cosmopolitan, secured an equal voice In all of the 
combination's moves or operations. The alliance has, no doubt, Invigo- 
rated the Independent feeling among the Independents. Just how the 
Hearst-Goldwyn combine will work out for them remains to be seen. 
It's a strong combination, taken as a whole, as distributor and pro- 
ducer. With its money backing extending to Hearst. Godsol and the 
DuPonts there is no doubt about Its financial resources. 

Just what Hearst's inclination may be toward Famous Players is not 

of record. But that he left that organization Is one Indicator, while It Is 

known there have been many a wordy altercation between Famous and 

International. Those controversies ran the gamut, from the handling of 

the Cosmopolitan on the Famous' playing list and In actual handling, and 

to the correctness of the Famous' returns for Cosmopolitan picture dis- 
tribution. 

Hearst, taking the Park on the Circle, New York, and renaming It 
Cosmopolitan for that producer's first run on runs, gives the combine two 
Broadway houses. It has the Capitol with a weekly change. The Hearst- 
Goldwyn expects to turn out 80 releases for the year. Accepting the 
Park (or Cosmopolitan) wlll.use at least 12 (even with the runs) and the 
Capitol 52, this gives it an immediate Broadway showing for 64 out of a 
possible 80. If the 12 at the Park figured in the Capitol's 52, which Is 
quite likely. It will leave the Goldwyn-Hearst distribution with an addi- 
tional 40 pictures with the chances the combine would then be oblged to 
secure another first run hous:; to take up the remainder of the output. 
In that event It would still be short 12 for the third house's 62 weeks, 
perhaps forftng It Into the open market to supply the defl<"iency. 

Against the Hearst-Goldwyn's 80 for the year are the 90 of the Famous, 
not a great margin of difl!erence. The Independent may see In the forth- 
coming struggle a call for him from within both sides of the opposition, 
but the call will be mainly for completed Independent films, not Inde- 
pendent .producers. 

Metro and First National, besides the others, while not arrayed against 
these two combinations, are nevertheless on the outside of them. More 
speculation comes along for Metro's position than the others. Metro*^ pro- 
fesses to claim it Is well satisfied with the present; that It will have 
36 releases, perhaps more for next season, and as it Is making money 
will trail along. The natural thought of a possible Loew-Zukor con- 
nection through their family and friendly relations comes to the fore, but 
close friends of both men present as a reason, good enough to cover every- 
thing, they say, that neither Marcus Loew nor Adolph Zukor could ever 
agree upon who would be boss If they combined, with each insisting upon 
being the boss If a merger were contemplated. Another and stronger 
reason, though, to many is that Marcus Loew after his terrific, but suc- 
cessful struggle with Metro, will be loathe to submerge it with anybody or 
anything excepting Metro and Loew. Loew always may be depended 
upon to consider the two points before him when any deal for Metro Is 
proposed; that Is the Loew Circuit and all of Its theatres that must be 
protected at all hazards for pictures, and Metro Itself. And Marcus 
Loew has two sons, good able boys who have proven themselves aftd now 
occupy positions of responsibility In their father's companies. 

It seems improbable Famous allowed Hearst to leave without an effort 
to hold him, so It's plausible to think Hearst insisted upon the severance 
of his relations with Famous. The odds on axe that the alliance with 
Goldwyn was deliberately planned and executed and by. Hearst, for It Is 
understood the Hearst people approached Godaol, outlining the pro- 
cedure for the Juncture with that procedure followed to the culmination 
of the deal. 

There Is some expectancy about that when C?haplln's 'Tllgrlm* Is 
generally released it may stir up the ministers in sections. For an escaped 
convict, as Chaplin is supposed to be, made very vivid In the picture at 
the opening and thereafter, to don clerical dress and even proceed to 
do a mock sermon In the pulpit of a small town church, clowning it also 
while there, may get to the clergymen in some manner. Besides the 
"crook" thing Is apt to figure. Chaplin may be wise for First National 
and himself in having made "The Pilgrim" a four-reeler to get the extra 
money from the exhibitors, but he hardly has done himself much good 
through it. Nor will the exhibitors grow enthusiastic over him when 
plainly seeing he padded a *two-reeler into a four. 

Film comics who want to express their art in long films had better 
consider the accidental laugh punchers that come out now and then, like 
"The Hottentot." "The Hottentot." In five reels, was at the Strand. 
New York, last week, It^held plenty of laughs, legitimate ones without 
slapstick, and several more hearty than an.vthing Chaplin stuck into "The 
Pilgrim." Yet "The Pilgrim." a widely heralded Chaplin, and therefore a 
laugh-maker, had to follow '"The Hottentot" film Into the Strand this 
week. Accepting that the house draws a fairly steady clientele, the 
Chaplin will get all the worst of the comparison. In two re^s there 
could have been no comparison, • • ' 



houses tho "Hunt" film could easily be divided with five reels run each 
half, cinching the business for both end.s. 



Mary Miles Minter, wtiose contract was recently unrenewed by Famou* 
Players-Lasky, suddenly has come to the conclusion that she doesn't 
want publicity and It's worth a reporter's life to get an Interview with 
her. Mary goes on the assumption Maude Adams didn't need a p»re8S 
agent and, therefore, why should Mary Miles Minter cast herself In the 
public eye. However^ thero arc some who say that the star's abrupt 
dislike for Interviewers, etc., was precipitated by her connection with 
the Taj- lor murder scandal and. of later date, her reported engagement 
to Louis Shervvin, former New York critic. ' • ' - ' 



It has percolated through const film circles that Charlies Chaplin ap- 
pears to have lined up with Douglas Fairbanks on the lattcr's attitude 
toward Will Hoys as the mentor of pictures. Hays lately sent a New 
Yorker to the coast as the representative of the Hays organization, to 
which neither Fairbanks nor Chaplin belongs. The Hays man called at 
the Chaplin studios sending in his name and business to the comedian. 
Chaplin refused to see him and left mstructlons he was not to come into 
the studio. 



"Othello," the Ben Blumenthal special feature picture at the Criterion, 
New York, is paying $2,500 weekly for the rent of the theatre. In ad- 
dition It is costing the picture $1,000 for the use of the mammoth sign on 
the front of the building, first used for "Knighthood." 



FILM ITEMS 



The Warner Bros, have moved 
again. This is the third time within 
a year and on each occasion It has 
been for the purpose of enlarging 
their quarters. Despite the three 
moves however thjy are still In the 
Mecca building with their new quar- 
ters taking up the entice ninth 
floor. /:■■' : 



A house eeating 1,000, to split the 
week between pictures and vaude- 
ville, is to be erected by Jos. Modi 
at Barnesville .Ohio. 



Max Weiss recently secured 
judgment against Hy Gainsborough 
for $800.22 on a claim resulting 
from a transaction In moving pic- 
tures. When the judgment was un- 



satisfied Weiss, through hir. attor- 
ney, Harry O. Kosch, secured an 
order In supplementary prcceedincs 
against Gainsborough, the proceed- 
ing being dated for Feb. 28. 



The distributing system of th« 
Second National Pictures Corpora- 
tion is being reorganized with Dale 
Hanshaw in active charge as field 
representative. 



The home otRcea of Associated 
First National after May 1 will b« 
located at 46th street and Madison 
avenue, opposite the Rltx Carlton 
Hotel. The present ofllces at 6 West 
48th street, although located on five 
floors of the building, are much 
cramped, and In the new quarter* 
the entire staff of the organixatoln 
will be located on one floor. 



U 




No great demand for the "dope" pictures has asserted itself. Neither 
do the big distributors apparently want to handle "dope" films before 
knowing what the censors will do to them. It Is said some of the 
"dopes" In celluloid now around are content to wait until the film 
censoring bill in New York has been repealed before going ahead with 
their pictures for exhibition. They believe laxity In New York State 
might carry them through elsewhere, although if New York does repeal 
the censoring law thero are several Important States with olTlcial censor- 
ing boards. It's difficult to Imagine a 'dope' picture without "a jab 
in the arm' at least in it. The casual censor will hardly see anythins 
educational in that. Some years ago when the "dopes' came out on this 
side and from EUroi)e they were merely looked upon as sensational; 
now with the agitation no one can tell how they may be viewed. Of 
course, th^y all are in the line of the cau.se. meaning the urug publicity 



'8 BESI" 



That's What the New York 
Critics Think of It 



«f 



«' 



<i 



Francis X, Bushman an<J Bev^rl'y 
Bayne have started on the first of 
the series of feature.** they are to 
make under contract to Whitman 
Bennett, It is an adaptation from 
the English novel, "Lady Varley." 
I.Aurence Wir.dom Is dlrectirg. 



There is a wild scratMile on the part of s^verul distributing organiza- 
tions to se.-uro the right to Ijnndle •'Hunting Big Game in Africa" after it 
has completed its run in the ]eKitimate hou-^es. The Fox organization Im 
said to havo made a bid for a^outriglit purcha.se of the picture. With 
the ohase of the film now at its heigl)t. stories of how ii was turned down 
by all of the bigger prouucers and distributors are again cropping uj). 
Carl L'-amm'e turned the picture dov.n. ai -ordlng to report, becauHo his 
lO-yoar-oId son didnt like it. Jfs.sc Lasl<y walked out of the projection 
!oom on the pi.-ture before it was half run, according to report, not even 
giving the film the courtesy of a thorough view. The First Natiohal re- 
viewers gave the pifture wliat Is known a.s 'Projection Room Form 34." 
'the big yawn). In the United Artists pmjrctJon rooms the picture was 
screened five times and it i.s doubtful if anyone saw it at all. 

No dooi.^ion has be'^n r'^ach'-d on tho distribution of thp "Big Hunt' 
picture at the Lyrir-, Xr-w Yo rk It will pro habl/'easlly remain at the 
I.yrio with its |1.C3 top for ynolher month at least. The j.i tare Is i.ow 
dnIniT between $10 000 and Ill.OCO weekly. .Several offers have be*^ n 
made for it by distribuiors. but it seems tliat McCarthy & Mitchell, 
lepiesenting Roth ^uho bought it from the Snows), are dellbefating just 
how to pro-'f^d to circulate it. Offers MrCanhy & Mitchell have received 
to date indi.'ate big return ccnld be se^nred in a qui<^k time by Statc- 
:igh»ing it. The pi< fur*-, through its tremendous drawing power and 
of 30 re«^s, has uniriue por «ibilitiei, for !»ome houses like tho pop 
\nu'levii:r ri-.eatre^ playt-'if a fnlit wrr]. ard using a feature. In tbosr- 



As enjoyable an example of his pantomimic art as 
anything he has done before. Keeps the audience 
rocking with laughter." — ^A^eu> York Journal, 

The funniest film Chaplin has made." — New York Sun. 

Chaplin again proves himself the master pantominH- 
i,t."— iVeu; York Mail. 

"Even the most iudicrous inventions of the imagination 
are exceeded. Most incomparable."— *Neui York Even* 
ing Telegram. 

"Irresistibly funny. As vitally laughable as anything 
ever written or said." — New York Herald. 

"We liked it better than almost any of his other pic- 
tures* One of the funniest things we have ever seen." 
— ^A^eu; York Tribune. * 

"Everyone in the theatre let himself go until the steel 
girders began to buckle." — New York American. 

"It is screamingly funny. We howled, we roared."-— 
New York Daily News. 

Charles Chaplin 



"THE PILGRIM" 



4 



Big Reels 

Written and directed by 
Charles Chaplin 



4 



Foreign rights controlled by 

., WUHam M. Vogel 

13 West 46th Street_ 
New York City 




AUrjbt national "Picture 



1 



I 



-M 



■ .,* 



1 



> ■ <•■ -a 



•V 



.'33 






PICTURES 



Thursday, March 1, 1823 



THE PILGRIM 

Char'i" Ch.'iplin's four roe' comply, r«»- 
1»a»ed tliroutcli First National. At th<» 
Htran<l, N<nv York, week Feb. 2.'. I'r'>- 
crram<><i as havinir boon written and di- 
rected by Cljarles ('hu|t|iii. 

Th» rCKrim Charies Chuplin 

The (ilrl ...Ktln.i I'urviancc 

Her Mothf-r Kitty Hralbury 

The r>»*aron. .. ., M;Mk Kwain 

The Killer L lyul l.'n<l«^rw(j.Jii 

kaj^e Hoy Dinky IVan 

■■3tt|H^O<>'^'' ^fH<^ Wt'tl!! 

«er liusbnnd. Syiln«'v Chaplin 

The (nxik "Chuck" U.-isn.«r 

The Sheriff Tom Murniy 



"ThP PilRTim" is not sonsationally 
funnj', not as much so uh expected 
from Chaplin In four reels. There 
are laughs; a number of them and 
brought together in two reels, they 
would have based a corking comic 
film. 

In the Rtorj' Chaplin is an es- 
caped convict. It brings him later 
into contact with another crook. 
While Chaplin is made to appear 
heroic, although this is a picture 
comedy, somehow the groundwork 
brings about a mental clash. 

After escaping with a reward of 
11,000 offered for his capture, he 
secures a clerical dress and picking 
at random a amall Texan town, 
goes there to be secure in his lib- 
erty. The town's church Is exi)ect- 
ing a new minister. Chaplin is mis- 
taken for him when met at the 
train by a delegation, rushed to the 
pulpit for his first service and later 
Installed in one of the parishioner's 
homes, presided over by a widow 
and her daughter. 

A small boy called Dinky Dean on 
the program but said to be the son 
of Chuck Reisner (who api>ears as 
the other crook) Is responsible for . 
considerable of the fun. He in a 
little kid, looking about live and has 



been taught some rough tactics for 
laughs. They are out and slapstick 
Dinky .Mlaps tf»e minister in the face, 
slaps his father's and mothers 
faces and alstJ i-hoves a sheet of 
stirky fly paper over his fatlier's 
map. That *'fly-pai)er" and "slap- 
stick" still seem to be standards. 

The best hit the boy started was 
the placing of his father's derby 
over a plum pudding as it stood 
ujion a plate in the kitchen. Ch:n>- 
lin decorated it with white frosting 
and attempted to cut it in the par- 
lor as the father commenced look- 
ing for his hat. 

The nearest approach to genuine 
humor is when Chaplin with a paid 
fcir ticket to Texas but in fear of 
detection, tries to ride on the bump- 
ers of the passenger coach. Or- 
dered out by an observing conductor 
he displays his ticket and is taken 
inside the train, next se<^ sitting 
there as liis neighbor flashes a 
paper toward him with its outside 
page carrying an advertisement of 
his picture and the reward. 

Later in church there is some 
rough fun, illogically done in very 
broad if not unc^outh style and the 
remainder runs spasmodically. 

The picture will draw on the 
Chaplin name according to its start 
at the i>trand Sunday, when it was 
filling up the Ijouse before 2:30. 
Kan payers may be satislied with 
the number of laughs it provides 
in 45 minutes. 

Sydney Chaplin as the father of 
the boy did well enough in his small 
chance, as no one but Chaplin him- 
self gets mueh of un Opportunity 
in any of his pictures unless he 
points them for it as with the kid 
here. Loyal l^nderwood held a 
laugh in his make-up as the Elder. 

This is Chaplin's final First Na- 
tional release under hit* contract 
with it. ; Simc. 



MINNIE 



ifarsh-iH N'ellan prcaentlny and &o- 
dlrectlnj with Frank Urson. Released 
through First National, fcnturinff Leatrice 
Jov. At the CapKol, New York, week of 
IVh. 1'5. 

Minnie ^ I.eatrlce Joy 

Newspaper Man......... Matt Muore 

Minnie's Feather Qeorire narnum 

.'Stepmother .Joaephine Crowell 

St-'p.ilater Helen I^ynoh 

Chewing Gum Salesman. .Raymond Griffith 



Rather a conventional feature 
contains two or three good laughs, 
but in no way approaches the pre- 
tentiousness or actual entertaining 
qualities that Neilan and Urson 
turned out in their previous effort, 
"The Stranger's Banquet." Carry- 
ing a Cinderella-like theme the 
story is dead open and shut as to 
its conclusion. The varlouw^comedy 
incidents scattered through' the con- 
tinuity sufTice to hold up the in- 
terest. 

The picture seems to reach Its 
zenith with the trio of Instances 
wherein "Minnie," the ugly duckling 
of the town, falls for the auto ride 
gag. walks back twice and the third 
time takes bar walking shoes along. 
It's a sure-flre piece of business 
exceptionally well handled and 
secured heavy returns in each 
instance before a Sunday night 
audience at the Capitol. 

Other than that Neilan has gone 
in for brief philosophy that with the 
pictured examples and reading 
matter murt come close to 500 feet 
of film before the story to be re- 
lated is given Its sendoff. 

The script tails of Minnie, very 
much neglected and spurned be- 
cause of her unbeauteous qualities 
finally spreading the impression of 
a heavy lover through sending her- 
self impassioned missives along 
with flowers and candy. Discovered 
and threatened with exposure by her 
step-sister, a newspaper item of an 



"ADAM'S RIB 



jy 



breaks record of 

"MANSLAUGHTERS' 




^^^IK 



IN NEW YORK 



IN LOS ANGELES 



"Adam's Rib" opened at the Rivoli Tlicatre, 
Sunday, February 25. 

The total paid admissions for the day were 
8,992. 

The total paid admissions for the openino^ dav 
of "Manslaughter" were 8,<^39. 

Watch for further reports on the New York 
showing. 



"Adam's Rib" is now in its fourth week at 
Grauman's Rialto. 

In the first three weeks it broke the "Man- 
slaughter" record for the same period bv 
$2,300. 

The crowds were so big that special Saturday 
morning matinees were necessary. 

All indications point to a long-run record. 



Like every other DeMille picture, **Adam's 
Rib'' will break records evTrvwhere. * 

.-■"■. i- .■ , . * 

— DeMille can't make anything but record-break-— 
ers. He doesn't know how. ^ y..-:;^ : -.•■-';'," :•'■ '-' ' ■.- ■ 

JESSE L. LASKY presents 

CECIL B. DeMILLE'S 

production 

'^ADAM^S RIB^V 

with Milton Sills, Elliott Dexter, 

Theodore Kosloff, Anna Q. Nilsson 

and Pauline Garon 

By Jeanie Macpherson 

CH Q^amnrount QiduiS 




F^^IQ!US PIAYERS-LASKY CORPORATION 

'-*■ ■ AOOLPM ZUMOA. »»t*44mm « » 



'^Li.^h 




unclaimed l>odr In th* morgue 
prompts the "out" only to lead to 
complications when a reporter trails 
the item to play up as a story. The 
scribe, no raving beauty himself, 
falls for Minnie. It's all over when 
her father finally succeeds In per- 
fecting his electrical invention sold 
to a company of which the re- 
porter's uncle Is president. The 
linish has a surgeon changing the 
facial expressions of the couple for 
a return to the home town in 
triumph. 

Leatrice Joy clicks regularly and 
sincerely as Minnie. A continua- 
tion of ^uch performances as this 
girl hag. recently been t^urning in 
should very soon see her established 
beyond a doubt. Matt Moore, op- 
posite, in as the absent minded re- 
porter, lends capable support and 
George Barnum was worthy of at^ 
tention as the father. Neilan has 
Inserted a dance fioar flash, a la 
"Fools First." with Raymond Grif- 
fith as the principal flgure. As a 
traveling salesman and one of the 
auto ride instigators he protruded 
at every opportunity afforded. 

Neilan Is credited with being the 
author of the story, which, accord- 
ing to a title, is based on facts in 
its early episodes. The camera work 
is above the water- line although 
there are no extravagant light effects 
employed due to tlie action which 
supposedly takes place in a small 
town hotel. The settings are ap- 
propriate to the atmosphere. 

A First National attraction in the 
Capitol, a Goldwyn liouse. may 
cause some comment amongst pic- 
ture p^ple. No matter the dis- 
tributor it would seem as if all the 
Broadway picture houses are start- 
ing their features too late at the 
last shows. Running 10 minutes 
over the hour "Minnie" went on at 
10.21. It Is getting to be nothing 
unusual for the final evening pro- 
jections to terminate anywhere 
between 11.30 and midnight. The 
cause is easily attributed to the 
length of the vocal and tab portions 
of the programs. Good or other- 
wise the lilm houses are just letting 
out when most of the legit theatres 
ha\c already become dark. Skig- 



ADAM'S RIB 

Sorifty plrfy of about eight reels prp- 
fifnted by JoBse I.. I.a.sky (Famous IMayora- 
Faramount), deaitrintUtl an a C*e<.U U. 
DcMille production. .Story by Jeanie Mac- 
pherson. Five names featured In the order 
Riven In the attached cast. At the mvoll, 
New York, week Feb. 'Jb. 

.Michael Ramaay Milton Sills 

Prof. Nathan Reade Elliott Dexter 

M. Jaromlr, Klnc of Morania 

Theodore Kosloft 

Mrs. Michael Ramsay Anna Q. Nilsson 

Mathilda Rantsay Pauline Garon 

"The Mischievous One" Julia Faye 

James Kilkenna Clar«T»ce Geldart 

Minister to Morania Oeorge Field 

Hugo Kermaler Robert Brower 

Kramar Forrest R(>blnsnn 

lileut. Braschek Oeno Corradf) 

Secretary to Minister. . .Wedgewood Nowell 
Cave Man Clarence Burton 



^ J 



A silly, piffling screen play, deal- 
ing with husband and wife sex sub- 
ject in a peculiarly crude and ob- 
vious style, but a picture that prob- 
ably is destined to make a lot of 
money. As early as the evening of 
Ita first day on Broadway the title 
and cast appeared to have attracted 
attention, for the Rivoli was filled 
before 7 o'clock and jammed half 
an hour later with the lobby filled 
and an overflow spilling out over 
the sidewalk. It looks like another 
case of "The Sheik." Only this 
story is even more foolish. 

There are half a dozen places 
whore the complications would stop 
cold if any one of half a dozen 
characters had common sense. It 
is only possible to keep the story 
moving by making its people do 
unreasonable things. A woman of 
40 keeps a rendezvous with a 
nobleman at his house, deliberately 
planning to elope with him. Hor 
daughter follows, determined to 
prevent a .scandal, and ie discov- 
ered in compromising circum- 
stances by both her father and her 
nance. The fiance agrees to marry 
the girl forthwith in order to save 
her good name, and the girl ac- 
cepts him. Ten words to the bride- 
groom would have explained the 
whole affair, but the girl allows him 
to depart on a foreign mission, 
heart-broken and disillusioned. Just 
crude theatrical device. 

But that's the least of the crudi- 
ties. What can be said for a mod- 
era play which seeks to engage 
.sympathy for a 40-ycar-old flapper- 
matron, with a marriageable 
daughter, who "yearns for romance 
and life" to the extent of bilking 
her loyal husband In favor of a 
con^ opera king from one of those 
tricK Balkan states? Of course, 
she's just a plain fool, but she 
hasn't a thing on her husband. The 
fact that they picture him n^ an 
able wheat pit manipulator doesn't 
save \\\h fact". He knows all about 
his wife's affair with the comedy 
king, but he spends $7,000,000 in 
gold (honest, they #«how you some 
oL4jie gold> to put the king back 
on irTir^ronc and so get him out 
of the waj-. j 

T'iir Mi.' \An\\ hilsoan'ie.-t aiul i"it 
iiiidtlli'-;iKi il l;iLt<.'ii irf about to bu.; 
with his nmjesiy. when the hun- ! 
band interferes and prevents the 
elop«'mrnt. Although it is made to I 
apjje.n* tliat the king has romjM'o- 
mised his (laii«htcr. what ilnr« this 
N:JT>oleon of the wheat pit do? Kill 
the miscreant in a film ron;rh- 

hoiisr? N'ii|)c. II(» n^ii.9S(.; up Ill's 
kinKleCs hair and tie and tears his 
collar, then goes mournfully away , 



from there. It was woefully Inads* 
quate. but more Is to come. 

Presently frivolous mamma comes 
home and confesses all, handing the 
outraged husband .. revolver to kill 
her with. But the husband couldn't 
see a good idea when It,jyas forced 
on him. You were left to suppose 
he seized her in his strong arms 
and loved her to death. Anyhow, 
we presently find the family dead 
broke, with 17,000,000 worth of 
Balkan wheat and nowhere to put 
it. Under the circumstances you'd 
think the situation called for tact 
and discretion on the wife's part. 
She might at least have kept out 
of the way. But, no, here she is in 
the center of the picture, and of all 
things, she is playfully urging on 
her indulgent better half that they 
"leave all this and go off on a sec-/ 
ond honeymoon." The old girl was 
going to have her romance if hell 
froze over. But it didn't. The 
northwest wheat belt froze over in- 
stead and European spot No. 2 red 
wheat jumped to $1.20 a bushel 
f. o. b. Black Sea ports. So the 
picture ends with husband peddling 
wheat to clamorous "shorts" on the 
Chicago Board of Trade while 
romantic mamma makes eyes at 
him from the visitors' balcony and 
he simpers back. Milton SlUa. best 
of movie leading men, eaved his 
reputation at this point by looking 
sheepish as though he was ashamed 
of the exhibition. 

The production Is % extremely 
elaborate and must have cost a lot 
of money. Hush. 



FLAMING HEARTS 

I'resented by Franklyn E. Bnrker. Dis- 
tributed for State Rights hy Kant Coast 
niHirihutors. James H. Warner starred. 
Story by Frank Howard Olark. Shown at 
Loew's Circle. NeA- Yo:U. double feature 
WU Feb. 27. 1923. 



Combination society and western 
that has a never ending li.st of 
characters in it. The picture is 
presented by Franklyn E. Bax-.ker, 
who must think that he has a log- 
ical successor to Wallace Held in 
James- B. Warner, whom he is st.ar- 
rinpr in it. Warner is a fairly snap- 
py looking young fellow, who seems 
all out of place in afternoon attire 
and equally ill at ease in rough-and- 
ready cowboy costume later. 

Outside of that he is likable 
enough and if properly coached in 
the matter of dress may gf» along 
in pictuies and make a spot for him- 
self. 

This offering, however, looks like 
it was "just one of thot?e things." 
There isn't much to the story, al- 
though it looked for a time as 
though there must have been a real 
Idea behind it, and the shooting (St 
it was so arranged every po.ssible 
little thing that could be caught out 
of doors without any production cost 
was in the footage. It's just a 
picture Intended for the little low 
admission priced houses. 

Warner plays a society tame cat 
in the early part of the picture who 
has His spirit roused by a girl, the 
social secretary of one of the mid* 
die-aged flappers he dances atten« 
tion on. He determines to take her 
advice and "go west, where men 
are men," etc. He mixes with a 
couple of hoboes in a box car, and 
all three are kicked off the train, 
steal a handcar, and while the 
"dude" does all the work the other 
two argue over the division of the 
spoils of a recent robbery, with the 
result the dude pumps them back 
to the scene of their crime and they 
are grabbed, while he is made a 
hero of and given a job. 

Right there it looked like the story 
was cold and any one could guess 
what the answer was going to he, 
for the wealthy ranchman, his 
daughter and the glowering fore- 
man of the hands were all on the 
job. But the author slipped a sur- 
prise under the belt of those in 
front. He had the hero of the tale 
rescue the girl and then put her In 
the arms of the ranch foreman and 
take a run out. Girls were too much 
for him. Right after that at a car- 
nival he wins the lottery, the grand 
prize of which is a kiss from the 
pretty daughter of the sheriff, and 
he runs out on that, but she gets 
him at the finish. 

It's just hoak of the old kind 
dished up a little differently. That 
is what is going to make the low- 
brow audience hate it. for it Is away 
from the reKular furniula, and It 
isn't good enough for the middle- 
class houses, Vrrd. 



All Exhibitors 
in Michigan 

Head our magazine published every 

Tuesday 

If you want to roach this clientele 

there is no better medium. 

Rates very low 

MICHIGAN FILM REVIEW 

JACOB SMITH, Publisher 
415 Free Press Bfdg. DETROIT 



msmm 



ft^UGKER RlM M/G.Q)Mli\N^;^ 



* J J^ • »l 01VCW5CY ^<UtllW»V - ^MTASO . U $ * 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



PICTURES 



33 



ENVIRONMENT 

y^fnelpal Pictures proilacilon, diatrlbuted 

S^ atlU*'* tightM baala. Bawd on a alory 
IlArv«7 OaAea. Produced ftnd directed 
^ Irvinv Cummlnrfl. Six reels. Shown at 
I^w'a Circle, double-feature bill, Foib. 27, 



S«v« UacLiaren MDton SilU 

S»lly Dolan Alire Lake 

. •^UMe Boy" Toval Ben Hewlett 

Ormndma MacLaren Gertrude <::iaire 

••Jlmmle" Mact*r»»n Richard Iledrick 

••Diamond-Jim" l-^vre Ralph Lewis 

Here Is a real blood-and-thunder 
Ihrlller. done in corking style, that 
baa crooked Chicago and the 
straight and narrow of the farm as 
its plot. It has a couple of real 
thrills In a fire and rescue, a couple 
of fights, a murder and a love story 
In which the honest lad from the 
farm wins and reforms the beautiful 
confidence queen < f 'the Chicago 
«lums. What more could any ex- 



hibitor ask for than to have a plot 
like this dished up to him in sets 
that include a Chicago dance caba- 
ret, a fire scene, with the smoke and 
flames pouring forth, «jid the en- 
gines dajshing, and as an extra touch 
a chance to^ee the heroine of the 
cast In an old tin bath tub down on 
the farm, with an undraped shoulder 
and a dimpled knee showing. Th«' 
majority are going to say here's the 
picture for us, and In the average 
first and second run neighborhood 
houses It Is just going to be the 
thing, for they will have a couple of 
names that they can feature In .\lico 
Lake and Milton Sills, and there are 
going to be enough punches in the 
feature to plea.se their audiences. 

Alice Lake ]>lays "('Chicago Sal" 
Dolan. formerly a cabaret dancer, 
but more lately turned confldenoo 
queen, working with a band of wire 



ac3= 



tappers. On the way south from 
Chioago In a machine with "Willie 
Boy." the head of the mob, he de- 
cides to stop oflf and turn a trick at 
a lonely farmhouse, with the result 
that she Is nabbed while ho makes 
a getaway. Her case comes up in 
the local court, and Milton SlUs, who 
is the big-hearted and honest farm- 
er, doesn't want her sent to Jail, but 
is willif^g: to take her home to "help 
ma with the cooking,'* so that the 
$300 that was stolen is to be repaid 
with work, and the court thinks that 

.10 <i {ir«-iiv Sk>»j<1 iue*t. 

But Willie Boy' get» back to Chi 
and tells his tale, and "Diamond 
Jim" makes him tak* a return trip 
to ase«'rtain if Wim»''.s story is on 
the square and to give "Sal* a 
chance to make a getaway. Sal, 
after a month on the farm. Is far 
from loath lo get back to her old 



haunts, but she Insists the |300 be 
made good. Before going she makes 
it a point that the farmer gets her 
Chicago address. 

Back In the big town she Is the 
lure In a wire racket, and the cops 
are on her trail. The farmer, who 
has -fallen like a ton of coal, walks 
in Just before the cops show, and 
while he manages to let her mako a 
clean break, he is grabbed. He get.^ 
three months for refusing to squeal, 
and in the meantime the girl look.s 
up th« grandma and youngpter that 
hf bruught iv CiiicaKO wtih him and 
takes care of them. His release 
from Jail finds him at the door of 
"Diamond Jim's" place. He make.** 
a bid for her to take to the straight 
road, although in his mind he has u 
doubt of the relationship between 
the girl and Jim. Jim is knocked 
off a few minutes later by "Willie 



Boy." who ham a grudge, aild then 
Sills, sfier hearing the «tory from 
Jim of the true htate of Sal s affec- 
tions, dashes after her. to arrive on 
the scene just as the apartment in 
which she has placed his mother avul 
little youngster is In flames, so he 
difls the big herolo an<l rescues them 
both, and the quartet go back to the 
farm. 'Tl.s a pretty thing. 

But It is well done in true melo- 
dramatic form, with Irving Cum;^ 
mings handling the directlqii^'lTr 
great shape and slipping up in only 
one or two minor details. For state 
right picture In the popular-priced 
houses this one is there. Prcd. 



William Salkin has opened a new 
1.500-8eat house, the 79th Street 
theatre at 79th Street and Second 
avenue. 









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r'OthclIo" is a fuH-blooded motion picture. It has vitality, it is direct and 
Itrue, it is a thing of action. It rises by many (degrees of acelknce abote the | 
lusual offering on the screen.— iV«4> Y<Al^ Times. 

\" Othello" is aded uith surpassing, sbtriglh. The great Girman eharatUr §dor, 

\BJnil Jannings, and thai other distinguished German, Kraus, comhine tvoo iuperb 

iperfornKinces and bring to Broadway what ix beyond question the fintd ading [ 

Uhatisimtl'w here ai Oils tirm,—Quinn Martin— N. K World. 

"Othello" excels in film form. A powerful, efficient work. EmU Janninfi u 

the Moor and Kraus as lago shine in a brilliantly balanced cast Technically 

and artistically pleasing to the mind arxi eye. A prestige that is given few | 

motion pictures.— LoueZ/a Parson* — Morning Telegraph. 

"Othello" is oresentod with all oj the splendor and with all oj the e/torrrtous gdAtr* I 

ings which distinguish the foreign productions. Superbly aded with Emit Jan* 

nings in the title role. A wonderful production. 

HarridU VnderhiU—N. Y. Tribune, 

I Ejnil Janningt is impressive as OtheDo. He makes the Moor of Venice more 
I human than %ve have ever seen him before. , A motion picture one should not { 
Superbly acted.— £i>en/!ni Sun. 






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Shakespeare-in-the-mocies gains new and powerful impetus from this produdkn 1 
of "Othello.** Jannings looks and ads the pari in a manner thai is sure add to \ 
his fame. The tratic pathos of his interprdation haunts one. Here is an Othello 
\thai seems to live ike role.— Eoening Telegraph. 

"OthcUo"*.' magnificent — Ece. Qobo. 









Aitiel'ic'a.Tt itrtd Can^di-an^n^htS toatrollcd fay 

DXV I D P. H OW ELL S 'and ♦ 
EXPORT aixd IMPORT FILM CO., INC * 

720' S e\re rvtVi Ave ., Se\^ York C ity 






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presented • * ' btj 
Ben BlumentK-al 



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Thursday, March 1, 1923 



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VALE8KA 8URATT and CO. (4) 
"Siikfl, Satin*, Calico and Rags" 

(Dramatic). 
40 Mint.; Four (Special) 
Orphoum 

Edgar Allan Woolf ha** f«iii>plio<1 
Valeska Surati's nevr vehiM^, "Silk-s, 
Satins, Calico and rugs." Jt is an 
episodic framework tliat permits for 
the recounting of a melodramatic 
atory cycle, never coiiviming and 
probably not intended to l>e. unreal- 
istic, ofttimcs fragiie and insipid. 
With mushy and maudlin platitudes 
that should be deleted, and yet good 
vaudeville, if properly kneaded, sea- 
soned and t)aked. But that 40 min- 
utes' running time is impossible. 
Its length should and can be dimin- 
ished. 

The title .*;ngge.sts the plot Idea. 
\ Miss Suratt i.s a vain matron wlio 
insists her boy at school is only 
eleven. He returns suddenl.v, grown 
up ^nd 18. She introduces him to 
her friend, Mr. Fenton, as her 
the old gent has pre- 
informed of their re- 



(3) 



PORTER J. WHITE and Co. 
Dramatic SkatcH 
15 Mins.; Full Stag* (Spacial Set) 
23rd Street 

An excellently conceived and 
brightly and masterfully executed 
sketch written by Oliver White, 
that grips the audience from 
curtain to curtain. The atory is 
about a French comedienne and a 



MARIE CAVANAQH and CO. (2) 

Dancing 

17 Mins.; Two 

5th Ave. 

Marie Cavanagh has two boya In 
support; Bobby Dale, an acrobatic 
dancer/ and Bud L. Cooper at the 
piano. Miss Cavanagh Is a young 
and pretty brunet, of a nice, refined 
personality and a graceful dancer, 
but in dancing lacks experience or 



(2) 



nephew, but 
viously been 
latlonship. 

The story commences there, the 
boy being in love with a society 
girl whoi^e parents don't thihk the 
"silks" oflrsi>ring is worthy of the 
"satins" heiress. Hence the mother's 
determination to elevate still higher. 
Old Fenton suggests a 1 100,000 in- 
vestment that will net millions in 
a few months. The second scent 
finds them ritzltig it with a ven- 
geance. The butler, James, has 
been instructed to acquire "han hac- 
cent" and also remember that htre- 
after hla name is "Jeemea." The 
latter is now in satin breeches and 
struts like a peacock, although not 
so gracefully. A funny character, 
that James. The matron is advi.'^ed 
that her holdings in the North Pole 
Pie Co. have earned her tainted 
profits because of the inferior ingre- 
dients of the pies. So she sells out 
her interests and gives up he;- mil- 
lions to achieve the "calico" jieriod. 
(What authorii will do for the sake 
of the plot!) 

The butler is still buttling in the 
third episode, as he has not been 
paid off and i.s living "on the house." 
He is insolent and disdainful. The 
son steals some money from the 
bank. Kviction for non-payment of 
rent Is threatened. Hence, Scene 
No. 4, wMth the troupe in "rags," 
even the rich old codger, Fenton, 
now pr?senting an appearance of 
frayed respectability. Miss Suratt 
Is in nondescript shoes, hose and 
perfect head-dress, scrubbing the 
floor with Ivory soap. And for the 
curtain, with the iag(^nue entering 
in bridal costume, having jilted her 
millionaire betrothed at the very al- 
tar to return to the poor son -lover. 
Miss Suratt says romething about 
"being good on the inside," and 
presto: change: once again enter the 
satin butler with an cxpeiisive cloak 
for madame, who lias been in rags 
for a long time. Her pover'y was 
only sham. 

The playlet's incongruity is the 
more surpri.^ing in view oC its 
plausible playing. The ci»mi'iny is 
responsible for that. In the curtain 
speech Miss Suratt acknowledged 
the butler's (Billy Ploward) able 
comedy support. The ingenue is 
weak, although suftlcing. The ju- 
venile is adequate. One set is em- 
ployed, with the walls merely 
changed from silks to satins, to cal- 
ico, to rags, as required, with extra 
pieces, and the prop, couch atid ta- 
ble and chairs similarly draped. 

Miss Suratt announced this as one 
of Mr. Woolf's best sketches and 
one of the best vaudeville has ever 



dramatic critic. The critic has re- 

.served a table at a boulevard cafe.: coaching She ia unlikely to be 

The curtain rises to disclose the/ ^<^"^"^''^^ 
scene with music in the cafe proper 



and the garcon waiting for his 
guest. 

A shabbily dressed artist appears. 
After flippantly refusing to be re- 
buffed by the waiter he seats him- 
self at the reserved table. The 
waiter attempts to dissuade him. 
but is silenced w^hpn informed by 
innuendo the shabby one is none 
other than the great comedian} 
whom the dramatic critic has libeled 
by saying that he was incapable of 
sustaining the Illusion of a char- 
acter, but alw^^a played himself in 
every role. 

The critic arrives. After ordering 
the stranger to depart, he is be- 
guiled into drink and cameraderie 
the lattor's introduction of himself 
as the comedian's worst enemy. The 
critic confesses love for the come- 
dian's wife. The shabby artist of- 
fers to arx*ange an introduction hint- 
ing at an intimacy. The critic, an- 
gered, tears off mustache and beard, 
revealing himself as the comedian. 

The pseudo actor is a detective. 
The critic has been murdered that 
afternoon. The detective found the 
actor's watch case beside the body 
and suspected. The actor murderer 
confesses his crime and the motive 
for his disguise, which was to try 
and win his wife's love by assum- 
ins; the role oC her critic lover. 

The detective (Porter J. White) 
returns the damaging evidence to its 
owner and leaves him to keep his 
appointment, remarking as he exit-: 
"After all, he only killed a critic." 

The sketch is a dramatic gem and 
is In capable hands. The supporting 
cast are excellent. The French 
waiter is responsible for a few dia- 
lect lapses but from the nioment 
Mr. White enters as the detective, 
he dominates. The double "sur- 
prise" finish is logical and convinc- 
ing. 

The act is big time and will hold 
a spot on any bill. Con. 



seen. That's her opinion. 



Abel. 



SAM and JACK GOOLD 
"Musical Cartoons" 
15 Mint.; One ' 

American, Chicago 

' Chicago, I'Vb. 26. 

Sam and Jack Goold arc the cabi- 
ret style of entertaitiprs, combining 
planolog with songs, as olher-s of 
such acts have done, and employing 
novelties to give songs punch. They 
have the advantage of pleasing ap- 
pearance and the singing and com- 
edy ability necea.^ary. Their rou- 
tine Is timely as to .«-ongs and ef- 
fective as to results, though in the 
framing of a new act it is rurpris- 
ing that tliey would elect a couple 
of number already done to dcjUh. 



DOROTHY BYTON and CO. (4) 
Ballet and Solo Dancers 
•16 Mins.; One and Full Stage 
Special Set and Drapes 
Oroadway 

Five girls, with Miss Byton mostly 
doing solos between the ensemble 
dances. The latter are of the Eng- 
lish ballet type so prevalent this 
season and, while well done, show 
a distinct similarity all through. 

The one digression was an Egyp- 
tian dance before a special drt)p de- 
pleting the Sphinx. A pony high 
fichool ballet has been done by sev- 
eral other turns of this class. 

The solo dancing of Miss Byton 
was well and gracefully executed, 
but lacked variety. Her toe work 
was smooth but not difflcult. The 
absence of. a jazz number was 
noticeable, although the girls tried 
to sell a ballet number done to jazz 
tempo as the latter. 

The turn is adequately produced, 
the cofitumcs being new and the 
changes commensurate with the 
numbers. Miss Byton looked well 
in her costUmes, a pantaletle white 
suit being the flash. 

The act did nicely here, spotted 
perfectly, and should pass in this 
grade of vaudeville. It lacke the 
punch for the two-a-day hoyse?. 

Con. 



VALDO, NEERS and VALDO 
Wira Act 

8 Mins.; Full Stage (Special) 
125th St. 

Mixed duo doing the actual wai'c 
_ivith a male comedian u.'^ing vat lous 
props on the special buck drop to 
gain laughs. The fotmer pair offer 
an average sequence of wire events, 
although there is nothing spectacu- 
lar contained therein. 

The figures on the canvas furnish 
sufllcicnt action to amuse, and the 
act sunns np as being about right 
Tor a niiddle tla^4 opciic.-. Hhii/. 



ROLLINSON and MAXEY 
Colored Song and Dance 
11 Mins.; One s • 

23d St. (Feb. 26) 

Rollinson was lately partnered 
with Williams. The present turn 
which was one of the try outs at 
this house retains much of the for- 
mer material. The opening with 
straisht man pushing comic on in 
a baby cainiage to pop number Is 
the same. 

Followintf this the pair return 
for crossfire of ancient and un- 
funny material. The comedian 
MOlos a pop song next with straight 
ditto on a ballad. A bit of cross- 
fire follows with the closing a duet 
of an old fashioned song idea, "I'm 
(Joing Home" with the comic cairy- 
ing a grip. 

The straight man has an excellent 
voice which is about all of the 
merit the turn pos.^csses. The pair 
need material and lots of it. The 
present turn is hopeless for any- 
Itind of vaudeville. 

At this house the act was a most 
qaict Ucincr. t'on. 



throush Mr. Dale aa a 
dancing partner.. Mr. Cooper as a 
pianist wiis troubled Monday eve- 
ning through a heavy cold that In- 
terfered with an Introductory con- 
tinued lyric of old-time melodies 
he played and should have sung. 
It introduces Mis« Cavanagh for 
the different numbers that take in 
a variety. ^ 

Miss Cavanagh is a sister of Lu- 
cille Cavjmagh, a dancer, who left 
name and fame in vaudeville to 
retire for marriage and mother- 
hood. Lucille Cavanagh, If mem- 
ory i.s correct, left vaudeville about 
six years ago, after having ap- 
peared in a dance act production 
and (memory serving again) pro- 
duced by Harry Singer, then chief 
of the Orpheum circuit's " pl^oduc- 
tion department. Nothing In the 
dance line as a production turn has 
since excelled that Singer-produced 
Cavanagh turn. Where is Harry 
Singer now? On the Coaat for 
the Orpheum circuit. His place is 
New York. There are too few ex- 
pert vaud?ville men like him to 
hide away out there. Mr. Singer 
could have done for Marie what he 
did for Lucille, for Marie seems to 
have everything, even to an at- 
tractive form, that her sister has. 

As the present act proceeds the 
fawnlike grace of Miss Marie im- 
presses, but it is not strongly 
enough brought out. She includes 
an imitafon of one of Lucille's 
dances, not badly done, and It dis- 
plays Marie's possibilities. Mr. 
Dale secures an individual score in 
his eolo acrobatic number that also 
displays he is an acrobatic dancer 
only. 

The Marie Cavanagh turn has 
played the Keith southern fm.c. 
This seems to be its initial metro- 
politan aj)pearance for review. Its 
big time through its principal: just 
how big will depend upon he:* and 
her direction. Simc. 



JOHNNY JASON 

Comedy Acrobat 

7 Mins,; Three * 

23d St. (Feb. 26) 

Jason is palpably an amateur. 
Opening on stilts ia clown attire he 
goes after laughs with comedy 
dramatic gesturing that mi* a wide- 
ly. Shedding the stilts and cos- 
tume he does hand stands and body 
balancing on the stage and on a 
chair aiming for comedy the while 
with mugging and pantomine and 
drawing a blank. ' 

Several falls got a few snickers 
the best a dive over a chair mis- 
sing a hand stand for a dangerous 
looking fall. The balance of the 
act consists of old business of get- 
ting atop a table done by innumer- 
able acts. 

For a finish Jason drves over a 
two-high table and chair arrange- 
ment. The act Is amateurishly of- 
fered and needs much direction be- 
fore qualifying, for the smallest of 
small time. It w^as a try out here 
opening the show. Con. 



GEORGE RANDALL and Co. (2). 

Comedy sketch 

15 Mins.; Full Stage (Parlor). 

American. 

Just another small time sketch. 
Played indifferently and not es- 
pecially amusing. Brkle and bride- 
groom aro living in a hotel. tTjc 
honeymoon is just over. Wife Is 
peeved to learn that her husband 
never had a lurid past. ,She wants 
a ga:' devil for a husband, and Is 
disappointed that hubby never was 
in love until he met her. 

Uncle of husband calls in the 
midst of the quarrel and by way of 
fixing things invents a lot of wild 
adventures in husband's career. 
Tills leads to a quarrel, the wife 
turning jealous. Wife invents n 
past of hf-r ( wn and the squabble 
makes the action. Just a nonde- 
script vehicle done by only passable- 
players. I'ttsh. 



MONTANA 

Banjoist 

15 Min.; One 

Clad in whito wes^.t* rn lifiiif tlii- 
tall well proportioned cl:;ip prr • i.t., 
a straight routine of banjo playing 
An attachment to his body holds the 
Instrument with his expert fingering 
going far in a musical way. The 
playing is fast and the selections of 
varied styles. No. 2 at the Fifth 
Avenue the rt turns were large with 
the show given a boost in the right 
direction. Hart. 



BILLY DUNN and Co. 
Song and Danca ^ ' 

10 Mina. On« and Full Stag* 
(Special Set) 

23rd St. i:'- .■.■•.■•..• ..> ■ ■ 

Billy Dunn Is an Interpretative 
dancer, but why ho should be billed 
over h'.s girl dancing partner will 
remain an unsolved mystery. The 
turn is a novelty in its way. but it 
will require the best type of book- 
ings to secure serious consideration 
of the dance. "Original Sin." which 
shows Adam and Eve in the Garden 
of Eden. 

A third member, a woman In 
vamplsh make-up, s-ymbolizes the 
snake. The set is elaborate, show- 
ing the apple tree. Adam and Eve 
arc lying beneath the tree when 
tempted by the serpent. An "adagio" 
follows, in which the girl cast as 
Eve does high -class work. After 
tasting of the forbidden fruit an 
"effect" of the anger of the elements 
concludes a mofet artistic dancing 
conceit. 

The act opens in "one" before a 
special drop. The girl dancer and 
Dunn do a conventional song and 
danco. interruptedly the appear- 
ance of the third meTh^er back of a 
scrim Insert. ft\ rh\ntte she de- 
cries the modern dance hnd Invites 
the audience to witness the dance 
of "Original Sin" as done in "The 
Garden of Eden." The act then goes 
to full stage. \ 

Th^turn is elaborately produced 
and classes with anything of i»9 
kind seen around for novelty and 
production. The Isck of a "name" 
In the cast may hamper It for the 
best of the bookings. Con. 



FENNER and ROBERTS 

Comedy Talk and Acrobatics 

10 Mins.; One 

58th St. I '- 

Tv.o men acrobatic team with the 
usual attempt to disguise the ath- 
letics uniil the la?t few moments, 
when some exc<>lleiit ground tum- 
bling is unveilt^tl. 

The opening consist*? of a mono- 
log about the dlthcuUy of perform- 
ing a trick wii.h a cane and a re- 
volving dislipan. This is inter- 
rupted by the entrance of the other 
man in "bcob" aitire and carrying 
a violin case, 

A cigar which he is smoking is 
parked in the violin case where- 
upon he exe-.'utes a well handled 
acrobatic buck dance. The other 
gets a laugh by extracting a deck 
of caiJs from the violin ca^e and 
after asking the audience to name 
two cards remarking "Thanke. 1 
just wanted to see if you were pay- 
ing attention." Jim Thornton's 
"Hieroglyphics on a Babylonian 
tombstone' 'is liorrowed for tne oc- 
casion in the talk. 

The groimd tumbling follows, 
topped off by some excellent aerial 
stuff with tlie flyer propelled into 
the air by his partner jumping onto 
the springboard from a tower. 

It ii« a tmall time turn as ie, but 
should work into a big time opener 
or closer with the injection of real 
comedy novelties for the eaily por- 
tion. Con, 



THE DUPONTS 
Comedy Jugglers 
12 Mins.; Full Stage 
American 

Man and woman with a simple 
dumb act that catches attention. 
The man gets a lot of excellent quiet 
comedy out of his tricks without 
seeming to .«>tri\e for laughs. There 
isn't a word of talk, but odd kinks 
'n handling objects somewhat in the 
manner of W. C. Fields are amusing. 

For the (»pcning the man dances 
on and goes through a miscellaneous 
routine with hat, cane, cigar, etc., 
keeping up the stepping all the time. 
The woman, a tall girl dressed In a 
weird costume of cloth oi silver In 
a sort of h.irem design, just breezes 
in and out and contributes little un- 
til the juRgling of axes at the finish, 
one c<f the least interesting Items in 
the act. Placed No. 3 in the bill 
nnd scored substantially. Act needs 
dre.'^slng. /i'us'7i. 



LIME TRIO 
Comedy Knockabout 
7 Min.; Full Stage 

Three men In a knockabout com- 
edy turn with one featured in a 
grotesque costume and head cover- 
ing programed as "The Gollywop." 
The bulk of the work rests upon 
this member. Contortionistlcally in- 
clined he is thrown about by his 
partners as if a dummy. 

Tlie comedy \alue of tlte act is 
developed In this method with the 



work sufflciently fa.^t to prove en- 
tertaining. Tiie other two appear as 
comedy express men bringing their 
co-worker U[»on the stage in a pack- 
ing case ond carrying him off in 
the same manner. At the Iliverside 
th.e turn opened the .•<how holding 
the attentn«n of those already 
seated. Hart. 



RUPERT INGALESE (4) 
Juggling, Balancing, Piano 
IS Mins.; Thrsa (Parlor Sat) 

Rupert Ingalese la a European 
act and a novelty opener for any 
American vaudeville bill. It's Just 
that little different from the con- 
ventional juggling-balancing frame* 
ups to insure Its demand locally. It 
is flashy and elaborate, but not a 
fraction as Impressing as Mr. 
Ingalese's Individual efforts. Tlia 
program reads, "Rupert Ipc<«1e9e 
and his flunkeys in a refined draw- 
ing-room entertainment, supported 
by Angela Grey, the eminent pian- 
ist from the Queens Hall, London." 

The "flunkeys" are two In num- 
ber and elaborately costumed for 
effect. Miss (;rey is a pianist who 
assists but mildly and falls below 
billing expectations, not even es- 
saying a .solo, which may have been 
Included, but amputated for sake of 
running time. Ingalese lilmself 
does considerable work, easing In 
a modicum of comedy in conjunc- 
tion with his technical exhibition. 
He 'enters In opera cape, topper and 
cane, juggling all three, with the 
flunkey grasping the air to retrieve 
them. 

At the piano, playing a fair bass 
accompaniment with one hand. In- 
galese juggles with the right hand, 
among other things catching a mon- 
ocle In his eye and adjusting it 
without the use of his hand. He 
later balances one of his assistants 
aloft on one hand and balances 
various tlzed lampshades on one 
foot, forehead and the other hand, 
while the man aloft does a little 
juggling on his own initiative, mak- 
ing a rather blriking picture. Sev- 
eral of these "pictures" effects are 
e^8/^yed and all to good i>ur]iose. 

Another striking bit was throw*!* 
ing first two, then three; f oiu . tive 
an.d six tmull objects, on th»» size 
of coins. Into the air and catching 
each in turn with individual twirls 
of the hand. It looked difflcult and 
eert.'iJnl.v calls fo|- rnr«irIprf»bV d»T- 
terity. The closer, of jugjlinf; flam- 
ing torches in various pretty rota- 
tions, was a flashy getaway and a 
corking corclusioji to a top notch 
15 minutes' entei cuitiment. 



*r 



of a 

fake 

vocal 

some 



McNALLY and DE WOLF 
Talk, Dance, Songs 
16 Mins.; One 
City 

Man and woman, formerly 
three-act. Opening witli a 
flirtation bit she bunks a 
number and he enters f..r 
acrobatic steppinjr and tumbling. 
The latter is real flashy looking and 
could be played up a trifle. He 
introduces himself a«» a sale-^man 
of "love lozenges" and that is de- 
veloped as to be expected. He does 
a couple more of his comt-dy somer- 
saults prior to a "choo choo" song 
and dance. The song means little 
and is probably retained because 
of the tempo familiarity to fit the 
stepping. The dance number by 
the man has considerable meat to 
it, but It is detracted from by the 
woman's standing to one side and 
clapping time with her hands and 
broadly marveling at hi.=' pedal pro- 
ficiency. Even the Cityit?s didn't 
warm up to that veteran stunt and 
perfunctorily acknowledged ai^pre- 
ciation. She should stay off for the 
dance, although that Is the act fin- 
ish, and merely come back with him 
for the bends. It would be better 
than now. 

The girl's sartorla! get-up Qpuld 
be Improved. The black color 
scheme Is too neutral and lustre- 
less. More color contrast would be 
advisable. No. 2 at the City. Fair. 

Abel 



SHAW'S LEAPING HOUNDS 
Trained Dogs 

13 Mins.; Full Stags (Special Drop) 
23rd St. 

The leaping grey IiounJ^ in this 
turn are probably from a turn for- 
merly known as 'Shaw's Comedy 
Circus."* If this IS the same act 
the unrldcable donliey has been 
eliminated. 

Shaw iti western regalia barked 
by a special back drop of an (tut- 
dour scene opens with an intelUjrent 
monolog Introducing various bre*^d» 
of dogs. It consumes .about five 
minute-s and tells intorcstin^; lireed- 
inj? and habit doi)"-* on tlie Racing 
Whippet. Russian Wolf Hound, 
Coyote Hounds (a t«';im of wl»ic1i 
.ire shown) and list, tiie I'Mping 
grey hounds. 

The grey hounds leap ov« r ob- 



stacles built up by an :itt»'ndant, 
getting their takp off Horn an in- 
clined springboard. The jirize 
jumper is a year old pup entered 
in the Interirttional ruiurit\ at 
Toronto. 

It'.«4 a most Ititpre.'^.ting turn due 
to tie dogs and Sh.tW?* showman- 
ship. Con. 



Tl""- 



Thursday, March 1. 1923^ 



NEW SHOWS THIS WEEK 



98 



TOCK and TOY 
Tal>( •^^ Songs 
12 Mini.; On« (8p«ci«l Drop) 

'23d St. (Feb. 26) 

Chinese couple, Amoriranlzed 
Orientals who talk English without 
tji accent. Tho turn opens in "one" 
before a special drop of oriental 
design. The male, a personable 
Chinese In native attire sings "My 
Little San Toy." 

The drop is sectional and intro- 
duces the girl likewise in native 
gttiu Stated :it a tabic drinking tea. 
She Joins him before the drop for 
iome crossfire draped upon the 
Idea he is Americaniaed while she 

• Is a real Sun Daughter who will be 
unable to converse with one who 
has forgotten his native language. 

To his surprise the girl after 
listening to hi.s pidgeon advises him 
to say It In English. She further 
amazes him by resorting to slang. 

' A duet is followed by a solo of a 
pop ballad by her with a bit of 
dancing while ho changes to Tuxedo 
for a ballad. For a finish she dons 

^ bridal attire to Join him in a wed- 
ding number, the lyrics of which are 
sung in English then repeated by 
him in Chinese. 

The act. in Ita present shape will 
do as a small time novelty. The 
couple have appenrance and per- 
sonality and fair singing voices. 
The turn is light in comedy. This 
portion can be strengthened by 
building up the crossfire portion, 
alloting the girl more Amprioan 
alang etc. 

It held the trey spot as a profes- 
pional tr>' out and held it well at 
this house. Con. 



. BOB ANDERSON and POLO PONY 
11 Mini.; Three (Special) 

Bob Anderson is a veteran animal 
trainer although Variety has no new 
act record of him. Mr. Anderson 
has a cleverly trained polo pony to 
do comedy to his "straight." The 
usual questions of liow many days', 
people in the audience, counting 
numbers, "reading" a number off a 
blackboard and tapping It out, add- 
ing four four-digited numbers and 
a general Intelligence display, com- 
prises the routine. Its worth and 
Its entertainment value la best at- 
tested by the fact It held 90 per 
cent of the house in the closing po- 
sition, remarkable for an act that 
: is by no means ripsnortingly flashy, 
)t but contnarily, rather quiet and sub- 
dued. Abel 



FLO MAYO and Co. (1) 

Trapeze and Musical 

12 Min. One (Special Drop) 

Flo Mayo formerly did a straight 
trapeze act with a male partner. 
Her present offering includes a 
young woqjan^ pianist and some 
trapeze work over the audieuoe. 

The trapeze Is suspended out over 
the footlights by a special device. 
While Miss Mayo changes after her 
initial work with a saxaphone the 
pianist offers a vocal number, the 
trj-pezc work following and con- 
cluding the turn. Flaccd No. 4, the 
act appeared at a disadvnntnge. It 
Jfollowed a sketch and suffored ac- 
'cordingly. 

If properly placed It will do for 
three-a-day bills. Hart. 



HARRY GARLAND 
Songs and Talk 
17 Mins.; One 
Rialto, Chicago 

Chicago, Feb. 28. 

Harry Garland, drtsscd in white 
•uit with straw hat and white 
gloves, corka the very blackest and 
In this guise offers songs with a 
few remarks here and there rather 
f^ than essaying monolog at any time 
to any great length. He has a good 
tinging voice, an Ingratiating man- 
ner and every number presented at 
the Rialto won applause. 

The girl In the audience is no 
great value to the act, but enables 
It to come to an end with a break 
In the establiehed routine. 



AKI KUMA and CO. (3) 

Magician 

12 Mins.; Full Stage (Special Set) 

Broadway 

Aki Kunia is a clean-cut Jap who 
works fast and smoothly. Ho has 
an interesting assortment of cabinet 
Illusions, producing a girl apsistant 
and two male attnndanta from 
cabinet.". 

A "Ic\itatio!i" of tho girl and her 

! tub.eequent di.sappearanoe was we!l 

masked and handled. Telescope 

cube.s were switched and manipu- 

. latPd to show empty, then prodnoc 

a kettle of water. whi<.h was later 

l fHA » ..-.1 ' I ' • ' 



"dlSftOlved." 

For a (flowing trick Knma pi''^- 
duoes .1 fun -sized ei!k drop from 
a trunk full of colore nuikes an 
InstaiiTaiuouH strip change brhin-l 
It and steps into "one" in a ^rhite 
t-ven'r.- out}'.-. I:'s a fn^, i--»Mv-si- 
iJiS opej)tr fcr anywlitrc. Lon. 



JOHN and MABEL DOVE 
Blackface, Songs and Dancaa 
15 Mins.; 0ns 
58th St. 

A team that can develop Into big 
time material, providing the com- 
edy section ie built up. It is going 
to be up to the man of the team 
to procure the line of laugh pro- 
ducing material that is going to put 
the team over on. the big time. Th? 
girl is there. 

John Dove !s doing A heavy 
blackface smoko. th»» o^lri a high 
brown. A little talk "following a 
double opening, which doesn't mean 
anything, plants that she is a fe- 
male detective looking for an as- 
sistant while he is an alimony 
dodger. This is folloxwd by the 
girl offerliig a pop published num- 
ber, after which the comedian is 
back again for a few laughs with 
a Scotch costume showing his 
calves and knees, establishing that 
this is a white combination. Prl: r 
to that there was some d >ubt in 
the minds of those in front. A fol- 
low-up of a medley of Lauder num- 
bers gets over fairly well and then 
a ballad by the girl at the finish 
goes over In great chape. From 
time to time during the act Dove 
does some stepping of the soft shoo 
variety with taps that are a delight 
to hear. 

It's a ne.'tt combination that is 
right for the better small time 
houses at present, but with Mabel 
Dove's personality and the right 
kind of comedy material for John 
there should be no question of big 
time in the future for them. 

Fred. 



COLINtS DANCERS (3) 

Dancing 

16 Mins.; One and Full Stags 

Two girls and a man. Girls start 
act with introductory song. Man 
who looks like Russian dancing act 
graduate on for solo, mcstly 
pirouettes. Girls back with cos- 
tume change for double dance, in- 
troducing some excellent kicking. 
More pirouettes by man. Dance with 
two girls and man In Chinese cos- 
tume for finish. Man does too much 
whirling, pivoting around almost 
every second he occupies stage. 
Too much of one thing takes edge 
off. Man also should drop black 
shirt or blouse. His make-up is 
too foreign. Tux or dress suit would 
be better. 

Small time dancing turn just like 
numerous others of type. Bell. 



CAMPBELL and COOGAN 
Comedy and Acrobatic 
10 Mins.; One 
58th St. * 

Two men, skilled as athletes, but, 
making thoir routine stand out 
through comedy. It Is cf the "nut " 
kind. 

Near the opening there Is a hand- 
to-hand travesty bit, with tho pair 
switching to bunk musical brasses. 
A ladder stunt with one member 
climbing up the proscenium side 
was worked for a big laugh. That 
came after a fall that looked risky 
and brought feminine shrieks. At 
the close one member's sommer- 
eaulting and the other's tumbling 
took the team off strong. 

They were on early, but can stand 
a late spot in this class of shows. 

Jbcc. 



DE WILFRED *- 

Xylcphonist ' 

10 Mins.; 0ns 
American 

De AVilfred has a rornino xylo- 
phone turn cf the type staple In 
vaudeville for year.s. He starts with 
a medley Introducing parts of stand- 
ard operatic overtures, with "Old 
Kentucky Home" following, the lat- 
ter played with four hammers, har- 
monized, and with ihe .soft luuiimba 
effect u.oed. 

Pop medley next, with brief op- 
eratic interlude, A good xylophon 
1st playing correctly, with the usual 
faking out. The second number is 
without orchestral accompaniment. 
Standard opening or Xo. 2 turn for 
the pop. houses. lit II. 



FIVE ARTS (5) 
Singing, Dancing, Dramatic 
10 Mins.; Full (Special Cyc) 
Twenty-third Street (Feb. 21) 

Three women and two ni»Mi are 
the principals in this act that is in- 
tended as a small time flash. Two 
of the girls and the two men ar». 
simply a chorus background. The 
ono principal woman, rather a strik- 
ing blonde in appearance manng«^s 
to handle a court r<jom scene ppee>h 



very Well Indeed. .She has, a fair 

dramatic voice and r* ad.-5 very well. 

]Ur contriliution was r*"ally th*^ only 

part of the act that qualified. Tl;e 

^ singing and dancing by the support - 

' inp qij.'irtf't sfpnifd latlur i"Ou>;h al- 

, TluMigh 'Jtpable of b'-ing ijuprov..! 

by work. I'ltd. 



PALACE 

George Gottlelb's final weekly 
fling at ths Palacs bill Is a cork- 
ing effort, although there seemed 
to be an edge In favor of the first 
half of the program. Even the 
"Topics" narrations highly amused. 

Abundant with feminine names, 
the show impressed as reaching Its 
highest point with Fanny Brice and 
the Blltmore Orchestra, Nos. 4 and 

., . w.^^L.,t.I * C<j . 1 nejr i;iun<?U out Mil 

initial portion that In Itself testified 

it would tal;e plenty of following to 
gain additional momentum. To hold 
the pace set by the opening stanza 
looked to the about impossible. It 
was, and while entertaining values 
were affluent during the later stages. 
It was a grade below the velocity 
preceding the interim. 

Mi.ss Brlce, Grette Ardine, DeLyle 
.Mda, Juo Quon Tai and Robbie Gor- 
done comprised the fair sex con- 
tingent of the nine-act bill. They 
performed in pairs, the initial duo 
placed ahead of the stretch period, 
the, next two following the cessa- 
tion of activities, with Miss Gordone 
closing. Other than the musicians, 
the Three Londons. Combe and Nev- 
ins, and Van and Corbett rounded 
out the evening. 

The former "Follies" comedienne 
ran away with the performance, do- 
ing nine songs and a recitation for 
3G minutes, with still a demand. 
-Miss Hrice literally went for "the 
works," even unto a Cockney lyric 
that listened as being an emergency 
ditty from former days, and made 
it i)roblematical as to how the men 
in the pit played the orchestration. 
Their rendering wafted suspiciously 
of a more or less degree of faking, 
but so was Miss Brice's Cockney - 
Yiddish accent. A return entrance 
for an encore finale with the hotel 
dance music combination brought 
another outburst as a reception for 
the singer. It reached the clamor- 
ous classification at the conclusion. 
ThJ.-? last bit had Miss Brlce in male 
evening attire stepping to a "hot" 
.•selection. 

Some one with a sense of propor- 
tion evidently has reframed the rou- 
tine of the Biltmore orchestra. Be- 
sides an opening medley rendered 
behind a gauze screen upon which 
flowers float downward, there Is but 
another "pop." conglomeration of 
melodies and a violin solo. The fol- 
lov. -up was the encore, with Miss 
P.rice in front, and finish. It makes 
for a compact offering that has not 
the fault of running on Indefinitely, 
a)id is neither too much nor too lit- 
tle. Additioitally. there is the ma- 
neuvering of Willie Creeger at the 
drums, who is practically putting 
the band over by his comedy m.in- 
rerisms while working around the 
traps. Not that the orchestra Is 
nithoi't merit, Albeit there Is many 
a musical combination that can play 
right along with this one; many can 
top it; but Creeger poKse.«(ses a sense 
of showmanship and humor and 
.sells both to the end the band is 
not only a "band," but an act. 

The Three Londons pushed off at 
close to eight, succeeded by Coombe 
and Nevins, who carried It along 
nicely with their songs. Miss Hr- 
dine, assisted by John Tyrell and 
Tom Mack, flashed a speed dance 
episode that for 17 minutes provided 
as much action as could normally 
be containei^ In such a length of 
time, Tho costumes of the girl, 
backed by the special setting, illu- 
sioned prettily, while tho stepping 
was 'way above par and of suf- 
ficient merit to overcome the some- 
what weak vocalizing and minor 
dialog. Singly, doubling or In en- 
.«:emble the trio seem equally at 
home, while an early swing of the 
girl (by the two boys) is bound to 
be "copped" right and left. The end 
was a tie-up, although the necessity 
of a speech was sensibly passed. 

Van and Corbett, next to closing, 
froliced through tp continuous re- 
turns and went to the head of the 
class as far as the latter half of 
the schedule was concerned. Tho 
team tacked on a bit, for a fini.sh, 
that had a reappearance of the Chi- 
neso girl as an excuse. It framed 
as a neat comedy situation and suf- 
li'M-d as to its purpose. 

Miss Alda was on seventh with 
hrr elaborate satire on the musical 
i»git pi-oductlons. The act clicked 
regularly and was .accorded a sub- 
stai'tial outburst at the finale. The 
cost is capable in their support of 
tlie leading member, whose high 
notes were not all they fhould have 
be^n and developed an Inclination 
to r gister a little off key every so 
.ftdi. The pantalette costume of 
.Miss Buckley, worn In the second 
sc^^ne. was decidedly unplcturesque 
and out of place. 

Santos and Hayes, although pro- 
grammed, did not appear, and Jue 
gjon Tai blazed the trail for the 
scond heat. The miss from the 
Orient seemed to find it difficult to 
fr^t started. That may In some i)art 
have be<?n due to the morale of tho 
previous succession of events she 
w.Ts forced to follow. The briuKinK 
<in of the .lister provided the im- 
prti;«. with the song and dance of 
rh" protet re putting the turn on the 



COLONIAL 



ripht side. It looks now as if th« 
viiiinrer member rf)uld go out and 
U,wo hvr ••lose relative plenty of op- 
ji'^fjjtion. 

Mi's 'lordone's series of poses ter- 
nifTMiTd for the night to a house 
♦h.'it whH qtri'e willing ♦o rlt and 
1-oT v.\],o iuy « lj;i!;'"<.*i >A m^^^iiig a 
trick. hkiff. 



Monday night's house was not up 
to the business standard the Co- 
lonial set during the winter. The 
rear half of the lower floor was 
spotty, with the sides rather bare. 
The balcony was off also, with no 
particular reason. 

The bill was framed for cotnedy 
strength and It proved a laugh get- 
ting entertainment. However, tho 
running time was exceeded, several 
turns playing beyond tho allottetl 
period, and that took thA Rnnn out 
of the show, ' 

Juliet, peeress of Impereonators, 
and Mabel Ford rhared the even- 
ing's applause honors, the former 
closing Intermission and the latter 
furnishing a smashing number six. 
The impressionist is at the height 
of her powers and without doubt 
is playing the most brightly rou- 
tined act of her career. It is pos- 
sible her brother, Harry Delf, who 
is credited with writing her ma- 
terial, had a hand in the present 
staging, and If eo he has been of 
fine service. The hat-buying bit 
for the opening is excellently done 
and it paves the way for the bal- 
ance of the act, a marked improve- 
ment over the rather cold beginning 
Mies Juliet formerly had. After 27 
minutes Miss Juliet won such In- 
sistent returns phe could not escape 
half a dozen more bite. 

Miss Ford's dance revue climaxed 
the show again, with solid returns 
rewarding the company and band. 
The speed work of Golden and 
West, with one of the boy's "leg" 
steps looking dangerous, drew a 
separate score, while the stepping 
of the Doll Sisters counted for a 
good deal. Mis.s Fcrd's own dancing 
is always pretty. Her presentation 
is again one of the season's fore- 
most dancing acts. 

Ben Welch, th« veteran onmic, 
was given the honor spot next to 
closing with hie pal, Frank P. 
Murphy. He won a remarkable 
dcmonbtration after serving laughs 
for half an hour or more. Afflicted 
with blindness as he Is, Welch Is 
so much the artist he makes his 
audience forget It. Some little 
change of pace lightens the routine, 
such ae the "wop" dialect bit with 
tl\e orchestra leader, 

Charles Ahearn was the first of 
Tlio comedy wallops and he uupplled 
it on third. The way the turn Is 
now running the cycling bits are 
secondary, in fact nearly forgotten. 
It's a sort of bathing suit revu**. 
Ahearn can think up the nuttiest 
stunts of their kind In vaude- 
ville. Nothing more Ingenious 
has been noticed than the use of a 
lawn mower to gather up the grass 
skirt of the Hawaiian dancer — a 
slim and Rood looking girl. Fly- 
paper on the hands has been done 
before but it remained for Ahearn 
to have it stick to bare feet. The 
slow motion ba.seball bit won Its 
quota of laughs and so did the 
band, Ahearn's turn is aboyt the 
only one the.<?e days where the com- 
pany doubles in brass at iliat. 

Harry Jolson with a mite cf aid 
from a "gltl rcporfr" on the stage 
and a good doal from the singing 
plant on the aisle went over for a 
big No. 4, One of the duets with 
the audienc<» songster which rang 
in a dash of "The Rosary" counted 
perhaps the strongest. For encor- 
ing it was a case of duetting, the 
man on the als'.e distinctly winning 
attention. 

Emmgtt Gilfoyle and Klsle Lange 
ojiened Intermission and, too. an- 
nexed a he.ivy score. But the act 
was on far too long. According to 
the time-table out^^ide the Colonial. 
Gilfoyle r<'main''d twico tho num- 
ber of minutes allotted him. Miss 
T-ange is a hand.'^ome woman, knows 
how to we.ir clothes and certainly 
sports a lot of them; in fact, the 
profusion of rich wardrobe gives 
the turn a class standing. 

Paul Murray and Gladys Gerrleh 
were No, 2, The imitation of Broad- 
way stars went for little, particu- 
larly with Juliet on the bill. TTse of 
numbers from musical comedies is 
really the act. The Vanderbilts 
opened. The billing stafes the turn 
as beitig "written and conceived by 
Alleen Stanley" and is titled "re- 
hearsing for the millionaire's hall." 
The routine 1« along the lines of 
the Rath Brothers, quite similar in 
certain ways. It's very w*ll done, 
but the billing wa** not understood, 
Tho Norvdles rlo.'-«'d. with the clork 
nearly touching ll'l."; and the 
house emptying rapidly, Hnrdly 50 
per cent, of tho audience remained. 

Ibre. 



RIVERSIDE 

The Riverside d^d busir.''«'<? Mon- 
day night. The upper part was 
practically filled, and the lower 
fl<or did very well, not capacity or 
near It. but excellent biisine.ss for 
the middle of Lent and a di.sagree- 
able Febr\iary night. 

It was a wf'll arranged bill, eight 
instead of the re^ijl-'ition nine acts-, 
and running to comedy Kener.ally. 

Iloonry ami Bent's "Rings of 
.*sniok^,' 'steenth tim^ ber«'> re^rister- 
ed ns usual. Following his own 
turn r;ir Hooiu y wrl|.;<(l on in th«' 
l);i\iM and I'«llc l).'iinl bal in< ing act 
and clowned, Pat was in grnat 
foitn Monday night. Kv<'rythirig he 
did was in for a lauKh before he 
started. The fir.^t half ran until 
!0.1,''>. the "kings of .«moke" tab go- 
intr for n n hour. 

Gibson and Price started the 



show with comedy Juggling by Gib- 
son and drawing by MIsa Price. 
Gibson has a likeable flow of patter 
with a style suggesting he has seen 
many a .show In his day, TOost of 
*em having comedy jugglers who 
talked. The line "Ye gods, is their 
no limit to tills man's cleverness" 
belongs to Griff. Griff Is In Eng- 
land. Gibson has the delivery and 
aome excellent material. The stuff 
that belongs to show business In . 
general only ser^'cs to pull down hia 
average. tJood Juggler. He went 
over very well opcnlncr. 

Dixie Hamilton. second with 
songs. Miss Hamilton fits the No. 
2 spot nicely for big time, with 
undeveloped talent that shows 
promise. 

Emil Boreo third and a young ' 
riot. Boreo works in an explosive 
foreign stylo that makes a good 
contrast for the domestic brand of 
vocalizing and talking. The "Pag- 
llacci ' number is the weakest of hla 
repertoire. Boreo has a remarkable 
facility for expressing emotions 
with his face. Mugging— but mug- 
King of the highest degree. The 
•Runaway Four started the second 
half off at a mile a minute clip 
with a varied routine of stuff. 

Edna I^eedom and Dave Stamper 
were next to closing with a smart 
line of repartee, written by Paul 
Gerard Smith. The comedy of the 
conuersatlonal clicked unfailingly. ~ 
Miss Leedom'a clowning kept the 
house giggling and yelling by 
turns. The act finished a bit light, 
not through any fault of the team 
or material, but possibly because of 
the house being show weary. 

Closing were Ona Munson and six 
male singers and dancers; Impos* 
Bible spot for the production turn, 
but It held 'em well. _, Bell. 



ORPHEUM, BROOKLYN 

The show on paper looked in- 
auspicious and, contrary to the 
happy manner such lay-outs have 
of developing Into smooth playing 
bills, thiti frame-up did not disap- 
point In proving Itself slow, draggy, 
tedious sort of entertainment. 
Valeska Surntt In "Silks, Satins, 
Calico and Rags," was the sole 
"name" on the bill. Scheduled for 
second after intermission she waa 
moved down to close the first half 
and consumed some 40 minutes to 
deliver her episodio playlet. Thia 
brought the Intermission period at 
10.15. about three-quarters of an 
hour later than the usual siesta 
stretch. It Is a wonder the remain- 
ing four acts got through at 11. SO In 
view of the first halTs tardiness. 
Still, the late hour did not seem to 
bother the Brooklynltes. They were 
Just as content to sit through the 
closing act. Bob Anderson and Polo 
I'ony, a;< If It were the opener, which 
ooncededly reflects some credit on 
hia ofl'erlng. 

Camilla's Birds opened, the dozen 
cockatoos being put through a 
showmanly routine by the woman. 
Rul'^ and O'Brien twlced with & 
piano a«'t routine that possesses a 
modicum of distinction although 
«iot much different generally from 
the rn.'tny other piano frame-ups. 
Charlie M.iddock's '"60 Miles from 
Jiroadway" was brouKht down to 
No. .1 from closing the first half. 
It's a <unnplete little production w^ith 
a good c.aHt. a corking comedian 
(Hany B. -^Vatson) and a cracker- 
jack vis-a-vis, Reg. B. Mervllle. 
Tho hayseed comedy is funny and 
carries the tight little plot forward 
with each line. The bombardic baas 
diuni finish is a punchy conclusion 
to a rube v.audeville classic. 

Sybil Vane. No. 4, was programed 
to reoiien after Intermifislon. The 
little prima has an operatic routine 
that has been lauded and applauded 
time and again before. She also has 
a pianist. Leon Domque who can do 
an act all by himself. Here Is an 
Ivory manipulator who Is blessed 
with that veneer that stands many 
a vaudcvillian In good stead, namely, 
personality of a sort that in- 
gratiates, captivates and makes the 
audience capitulate. The applause 
barrage at the conclusion of hia 
piano Sftlo left little doubt as to 
that. His verve and flippancy at 
walloping that keyboard was pretty 
to watch as the music was to hear. 
Miss Suratt (New Acts) preceded 
intermission. 

Art Henry and Leah Moore, billed 
for No, 4, inaugurated the second 
half with ,1 variety song-'alk-dance- 
musital frame-up. After winning a 
fair share of laughs the team called 
It an evening at 10,50. 

Florrie Mlllershlp and Alfred 
Gerrard with their standard dance 
revue frame-up wore a claasy In- 
terlude, Miss Millcrship seems to 
have invested considerable sar- 
toriallv and to advantage. She 
sported a number of stunning 
changes; likewise a new vocal num- 
b.»r. an impr'-ssion of Edith Day 
with a solo from "Orange Blos- 
soms." Some of the other vocal 
m;itter could be changed because 
of its familiarity, "Outside" has 
one l.'iugh at the finish and has been 
used around by Miss Millership and 
others. 

Lydr-ll and Afacy paralleled the 
"IQ Miles from Broadway ' Idea oL. 



tlHtv.o central characters continu- 
ously quarreling. Otherwise both 
have created two legitimate char- 
acteri.itions that stand out like 
cameos amidst the contributing '. 
ga;?ging. falling and hokelng. , 

Anderson's routine is delivered 
pmrtothly and the cueing is almost * 
Imperceptible. : «» Abel, 



fv ••••.I." 



3« 



NEW SHOWS THIS WEEK 



vjf,'- 



fv-Kl^**'"?',''**'*,'? '■■I'f^'i *• '«^'?'-'^»r^""^«".«*-''t»"*;*»^"*-»-'-' 



Thursday, March 1, 1922 



81 ST ST. 



Nlco running vaudeville fir.st half 
-^r«ce<lii»tf th* ♦icreen feature loiiped 
by two i>Di)dueiion turns and pliy- 
ing to a well liUed hou.^o despite 
dreary weather. Wood and Wyde 
and Mabel McCntie held the ma- 
jority ot the space in the outside 
hilhng. The length of the latter 
offering ])rol)ably was the eauso of 
the bill being held down to live 
acts. The McCano interlude took 
away a »ubotantial quota, although 
a conclM<lii:K speech was not abso- 
lutely necessary. The clothe.s of 
the feniitiine lead caused more 
favorable conmient than her emo- 
tional interpretations. Her male 
support, of which there are four, 
registered nothing unusual but suf- 
liced in getting the main idea of 
the theme across. 

Wood and Wyde, No. S, have 
played thi« house at various inter- 
vals since presenting the current 
vehicle, but repeated for their usu.il 
complimentary returns. The act is 
practically ideittlcal as with its 
Initial showing around this locality. 
with the "All right, Eddie." satire 
continuing to flounce across as a 
corking comedy bit- 
Alice liamilton wa.s spaced be- 
tween the two scenic incidents j.nd 
so far as actually concerns api)lause 
left off on an equal basis with her 
contemporaries. An amount of iJi- 
serted material listened as being 
new and was of additional value. 
I'receding were Russell and Mar- 
coni, violinist and accordionist re- 
spectively, who have done away 
.with the entrance of the latter frorii 
th« front of the house besides also 
eliminating their formerly used 
conversation. Rather backward in 
getting started, the routine built up. 
due to the pop melodicft, for an 
amount of appreciation that seems 
capable of keeping this team busy 
deucing around the smaller houses. 
In presenting the fllm attra-'iori 
this house has Installed the idea of 
a prolog instead of flashing and 
going right into the picture "cold." 
A aeries of three inserts, represent- 
ing youth, marriage and after, 
served as the prelude to First Na- 
tional's "The Dangerous Age." 
Lighting effects might help the idea 
along, if it is to be continuetl. At 
present the trio of tableau.x: needs 
embellishment generally. 

The Kios opened. Sk'iff. 

BROADWAY 

The Hroadway has achieved an 
individuality in the presentation of 
its Phows that is being discou'ited 
at the box oflice, the house dJing 
consistently good business. 

Its bill this week is just an aver- 
age vaudeville bill taking the acts 
individually, but they have be:^n se- 
lected with an eye to varietv and 
topped <.ff by the clowning at the 
llnish of the Krnie Golden and Band 
act that has come to be a trade- 
mark with the Broadway .shows. 
The audience eat the ad lib up. veil- 
ing with gleo at such old stul^f as 
"burlesque ventriloquism," done by 
Ray Conlin, with fat Abe I.eavitt 
on his kiiff. Felix Adler ha?^ been 
identified with this bit, but at these 
ad lib affairs it seems evervthing 
goes. Lcavitt was master of cere- 
monies, clowning with band, lead-' 
ing a quartet composed of his 
pianist and two stage hands, and 
introducing the other specialtits of 
two girl dancers, Sammy Smith 
and another song plugger, an. I tlio 
dingo dancer from Bob Albri;;hfs 
act, who was vociferously d(>nianded. 
The clowning ended at 11 p. m.. 
when all stood at retiuest to sin'4 the 
national anthem, which ptoxed to 
bo, "flow Dry I Am." 

The bill itself op»»nod with Aki 
Kuma and Co. (Xew Acts), a List 
magic turn. Kay Conlin was sec- 
ond with his v«'ntrHoquial specialtv. 
working to solid favor after a slow 
start. The enunciation of ih > 
"dummy* is e.xceltent and the ma- 
terial ttkay. 

Klklns, Fay and Elkins. nnxt, got 
'cm with i1h» sure fire finish. The 
three m.n do a minstrel litiish one 



tiiple 



handling a tambourine for 
time l.'tp.s by acrobatic worlr. The 
other pair stick to bones and piano. 
The singing ahead was passabl--. the 
turn, despite the mod.-rn .all ire of 
the priiM^ipals and a flossy looking' 
spevial drop, smacking oi" the old 
sehool and cork. They likcl it for 
an encore and several bends here. 
Leavitt and Lockwood followed. 
Leavitfs vehicle has be(v>int> most 
familiar through constant i)la\iiig 
locally, hut it was evidenilv now to 
this bunch. The "before .-ind after 
marriage" bit and Leavitt's comedy 
aimed at his weight were sure lire. 
Miss I.^)ckwood has picked u|i con- 
siderable poundage since first seen 
with the ex-burlesque comic and 
author. The I.eavitt-I^ockwood turn, 
while all right for the int»-rrnedi;it^ 
Imuses-, is about played out for the 
two-a-day. 

Dorothy P.yton and Co. (.\c\v 
Acta) followed. The act was spottril 
just right and. due to the scireity 
of women ahead or behhid. got ri 
real break. It proved an oidinaty 
ballet en.'-emblc, evidently of I'n^- 
llsh exira( lion and truining. 

^ QklahniH.I Boh Albrlpht novt 

With s'M-.gs .and stories, tlu* lattii- 
the cream of those b< inu heard 
around, llo.wever, when Monfacju*- 
Crlass anfl lr\in Cobb c.an .veil them 
as original and recent they are any- 
body's propi- ty. Albright san;; and 
talked Itis w.«y to Sinety. then 
trotted (Mil t1^ o c dored I»m\ s. tun; 



of whom proved to be a "hot" 
dancer. 1'he other went to the box. 
The dancing one hopxied a Jazz buck 
fidl of faked 'wings/' and the other 
fake hoofing that makes the real 
dancers throw their shoes awa.v ,but 
which is sure t\ve for the uninitiated 
out front. At his .sl.sle he ia there. 
A waltz dog "reeiuested* from the 
gallery while tho trio were stalling 
in "one" was gracefully ducked by 
Albright, and th<* kid did a repeti- 
tion of his one dance. In the clown 
hnl.sh he repeated th«» same routine 
of steps but they liked it better the 
third time than the hrst. "Shades 
of Milt Wood!" 

Krnle (Jolden and Band closed the 
show and furnished background for 
the clowning. CSohlen is going in 
for "effects," having three in his 
arrangements. "The Thief." which 
i.s a published, continues to be his 
best number. Cou. 



STATE 

Klein Brothers, jiexf to closing 
the hrst half kIiow at the State. 
c.-ime as near to overcoming the 
State's odds agaiiKit a talking turn 
incidentally as it seems possible to 
do. They did it Tueiiday night with- 
out shouting or talking beyond a 
natural intonation. They could be 
heard clearly tnough to make th»» 
whole house laugh. .an<l that's .some 
achievement for talk at the Stale. 
The straight man wasn't up to his 
usual laughing form Tuesday even- 
ing, lie onI.\ laughed at the come- 
dian's gags and null isms SO times 
during th.e act. Ordinarily the 
straifiht man on past performances 
should av<rage 20i» taughs on his 
own, so if the taller of the Klein 
Biothers doesni watch himself Mrs. 
.Iimmie Barry will edge him out of 
the laughing - ai - your - partner's- 
comi'dy chatnpior.ship. yet. 

The Hii»podrome rn.ght possibly 
he wttr^e for a sketch than the 
State, but n«)t much. Notwithstand- 
ing "In Wrong." a comedy playlet, 
did very well in llie llrst half show. 
Plenty of lively action — good old- 
fashioned farce .unfolded the plot us 
plain as if it had been a moving 
picture, and the sketch held atten- 
tion and got all the laughs in sight. 
A cast of thoroughly competent 
players give '"Ifi Wrong" a toJie and 
finish in playing and presentation 
miles abo\e the small-time average 
of acts of its type. 

Fraricis aa<i ^Vilson were the 
upenei.-i. An acrobatic turn, man 
and woman, with the woman a g(;od 
tumbler and the man showing a line 
of tricks that rate with the best. 
A standing jump, half soaiersault, 
with the man lockigg his feet in a 
foot hold with the woman's feet, 
the latter suspended from rings, 
made a Hash feature stunt that 
clicked neatly. 

Dorothy Wahl, second, with songs, 
pianologing and dancing. Usual in- 
troductorj numbe • with orchestra, 
with repertoire including ballad 
nicely done, .some average piano 
playing, brief bit of comedy verse, 
and a short session of simple step- 
ping, maih^ liUoaole No. 2 turn. A 
cold seemed to hamper Miss Wahl's 
vocalizing Tuesd.ay night, but. she 
waded through courageously with- 
out alibiing. 

Renard and West, third, with "I'll 
Tell the King," a novelty comedy 
turn for a mixed team that should 
have graduated long ago to the big 
time, wluie it would lit perfectly 
in the early se<'tion. The man is a 
Hebraic comic of the modern sfhool 
and the woman carries abbre-viated 
costumes like .a Ziegfeld "Foilie.s" 
entry. They made the grade surely 
at the State, the spaciousness hold- 
ing down the laughs a bit naturally. 

The Skclly and Melt Revue closed 
with Hugh Skelly's nut comedy and 
dancing. Mi.'^s Hclt*.^ vocalixing. 
Mildre(l I..ivirmston's excellent leg- 
mania dancirg. and some jlngly 
jazzing by anotr.or of the gitis com- 
bining for a like.iblf mixture. About 
three-quarters of a house Tuesday 
night. "Jav.i Head" was the fea- 
ture picture. UrU. 



FIFTH AVE, 

An "aft'M pic'«" for good measure 
at the Otli .Ave. the lirst half put the 
periorl to a very entertaining hill — 
for the r-th Ave. The bill-end's 
travesty was contrived by Larry 
(Joidie. v\ iio boaks the house, and 
r.ill Qua id. who manages it. Us new 
to the lith Ave. as it is new to the 
metropolitai: section, although the 
Colonial had a week of the mix-iti 
mmibcr for a llnish. Most of these 
bits this season have been strictly 
mix-ins — artists going into other 
acts on the program for additional 
clowning. 

The .iiih ,\ve. .afterpiece, Hioui,'h. 
was cohesive- it was an adapted 
burlesque bit, with a "wild woman" 
lo(.>king for her 'iong-lost lover." The 
same bell was rung, once for a kiss, 
twice for a hug, ";n.d it never ha^^ 
been ktiftwn to ring three times.'" 
Florric Bi-nni-tt was the "wild wom- 
an," making it pretty wild in the 
way fho swung tlv^ men about be- 
fore h^aditig th«m behind the hack 
diop for the bell stuff. I'tiul Cun- 
nitif^hain did the straight and ox- 
planatjons. with llariv ila>den, Mr 
.Ma(k and Mi. Miller (Milk-r aiil 
M:iek) the come-oim. Millef ni hI.' 



the finale by- starting the hill on 
riotous, rinuiriij streak. The audi- 
ence ate it up, liking the r^uigli 
ctunctly and the people in it as they 
had previously while the various 
niembers were doing their regular 
turns. 
Opening the afteri»'M'e werflfc, bits, 



songs by Frances Arms and Mr. 
Carroll (Carroll and Sedley>. These 
were preceded by an announcement 
by Mr. Cunningham for the after- 
piece, he fii'st Introducing the Cun- 
ningham-Bennett orchestra (Broad- 
way Entertainers) for the opening 
number. A previous mention of the 
extra numhtt- to conclude the even- 
ing was made by Mr. Cunningham 
when acknowledging the applause 
for his own act, and it served to hold 
nearly the entire house Intact for the 
finish. 

The bill came in Monday without 
having before played together. 
Messrs, Goldie and Quaid framed it 
on the paper billing, informing the 
turns aii^ booking but eight acts for 
the first half. The bill proper ended 
with Marie Cavanagh and Co. (New 
Acts) in a dance turn that did well, 
leaving a neat opening for the Im- 
promptu bit that followed with 
hardly a wait. Some of the people 
in it appeared in the costume of 
their turns. 

Headlining were th.e latest Cun- 



the dialog. The man carries the 
greater part of the comedy and the 
off ei- ing looks like an Ideal one for 
the better pop houses. 
■ Jess I.,ibonatI seemed to get hot 
feet from hi« own playing on the 
xylophone, but he got over with a 
wallop at the flnlsh with his popu- 
lar rag and Jazz tunes. 

Next to closing Sully and Thomas 
held forth. Here is an act that 
hasn't overlooked a bet in "old 
hoke." It's all there and for great 
laughs with pop audiences, but 
there are one or two little touches 
that go just a little beyond the line 
for "reflned vaudeville," The comic 
of the team has everything in the 
way of prope that suggest things. 
A pair of red suspenders for a fieck- 
tie. a pair of drawers for a muffler 
and a pair of women's corsets for 
another prof) laugh. All of this 
goes, but the back bone naming 
stulT should stop where the cross 
Is made; beyond that It gets rough. 
Closing Mme. Doree's ottering. 
'Here, There and Everywhere," a 



. 



ningham and Bennett act, with an ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^^ .^^^j^ flash'act 

orchestra of six. besides two colored 
dancers, boy and girl. The colored 
couple jazzed it up in their stepping 
and made the act's llnish a big one 



seems to have poseibilitles. What 
it needs is a little touch of comedy. 
Also a bit of snap to the Chinese 



scene, which is a little too much 

r.ilhcr 

by with the regular vaudeville audi 



in song. In the afterpiece her con- 
tribution was "Far Roekaway." an- 
nounced as by request, but no longer 
in her repertoire. Miss Arms should 
restore it. Outside of Jimmy Hus- 
sey, who hasn't been on the big time 
while laying off on the Shubert cir- 
cuit, and Fanny Brlce. who may 
have used it but slightly, "Far Rock- 
away" is new to the east and west, 
although Miss Arms employed it last 
season. This girl can take booking 
as a big-time single without every- 
body asking how much she Is get- 
ting. 

Another laughmaker was the 
Harry Hayden sketch, with Its nice- 
ly balanced company of three sur- 
rounding Mr. Hayden's comedy. It 
drew good laughs and they quickly 
remembered Hayden when he en- 
tered In the closing skit. No. 5 held 
Hampton and Blake, with a couple 
of quite good songs, the songs stand- 
ing out beyond the talk, as the gag- 
ging .cross- fire, through an o' er- 
supply. commenced to lose its grip 
along about the center of it. An- 
other song, placed earlier, might 
benefit, for there is enough in the 
talk to have it shaved down with 
the dross out. 

Opening were Valdo, Meers and 
Valdo in a comedy wire act, and No. 
2 held Carroll and Seeley, a couple 
of singing boys with a piano, re- 
cruited from one of the recent "Am- 
ateur Follies." 

Business capacity, but no standing 
overflow. Himr. 



58TH ST. 



The 5Sth St. had the lightest 
Monday night in many mootis. The 
slackness In trade affected prin- 
cipally the reserved f?ection and the 
boxes, while the b.ilcony had a line 
of standees and there were also a 
scattered few standing on the lower 
floor. The show in Itself was pleas- 
ing entertainment for this type of 
house .so far as the vaudeville wa-t 
concerned, but seemingly there is a 
now era being arrived at In the 
pop vaudeville houses, which in ef- 
fect is that even a great vaudeville 
show with a poor picture will not 
draw, while a nnvliocre vaudeville 
bill with a good pi<ture is sure of 
business. The feature pieture offer- 
ing of the 58th St.s bill the fiitit 
half was "The Hero." 

Th.e vaudeville seciit>n was opened 
with Pali Dassi .and Co.. a mixe 1 
comedy acrobatic animal act that 
has as its strong piincli the boxinu 
pony. There arc seveial \ery good 
bits in the offering ami lh<Me were 
.any number of l.iughs from lh< 
ludietice. which setMiied to enjo\' 
the act f horouKhl.\-. Jtdm aixl 
.Mabel Dove ( \. w Act«s>. a blac k 
face team, m.in and wom:ui. scoi i d 
heavily with- what looks like ii 
nii£;:ht be developed into ;i big time 
ofTering of class with a little atten- 
tion to the comed.v. 

RoTland and R.iy with their .Xuto 
mat talking skit proved entertain- 
ing, getting laughs right along with 



explain itself. Dunn and Day were 
the favored act. 

Show had abundant light comedy, 
but was short on stepping. The 
bill was unusual in this respect, 
there being only one real dancing 
act in the running. Fairly strong 
on singing. 

The Braminoa, musical clowns, 
opened. They are using all the 
time honored Instrumental eccen- 
tricities, opening with whistles con- 
cealed in walking sticks and finish- 
ing with the wrist and ankle bells 
for Cavallerla Rusticana," and in 
between do a pantomime of a card 
game, ringing electric bells as they 
play the pasteboards, and other 
similar devices. The rotating ma- 
chine with music resembling a xylo- 
phone was perhaps the best. Act 
of ten years ago in material and 
dressing. 

Dunn and Day are just boy and 
girl with an exceedingly light rou- 
tine of talk and numbers, several 
of which probably are their own. 
But the gags are common property 
and there is little point to the talk. 
They have a cold opening and then 
go into kid costume, with school 
children quarrels and repartee. Just 
a couple of youngsters with their 
career all before them. 

The Duponts (New Acts) really 
began the rpal show, and although 
thing but a dumb rou- 
omedy juggling, they 
crowd. It was easier 
ilson, and he got away 
ng start with topical talk 
the guaranteed husband 




they have 
title ot 
tha wed 
for Ai 4 
t 
m 



ife theme. Ills num.bers are 
nicely delivered and brink in style 
and the dialect talk and travesty 
songs at the finish got him away 
and back for a real encore. The 
finale is immense, illustrating the 
atmosphere and the sound effects 
of an old-fashioned German saloon 
after the sixth round of pinochle. 
It's a gem of a bit and the .ipplause 
was genuine enough, but that 
doesn't, justify a single man taking 
up 21 minutes. Including the en- 
core, Wilson can tighten up his 
routine to ground l."> minutes and 
make it all meat. 

I'rank A. Burt. assisted by 
Myrtle Rosedale, took up the run- 
ning from there. Burt's offering ie< 
a capital quarter hour of fooling. 
lie iloes the bungling "Dutch " char- 
acter and gets over a lot of first - 
rate low comedy of the kind they 
fatten on at 42d and Eighth. Miss 
Rosedale Is a great little helper, 
doing her feeding neatly .and ener- 
!::etically and appearing to h.ave a 
uodd time at It. Burt ha;; .a dancing 
st.vie all his own, with semi-acro- 
h.itic and semi-eccentric stej»« that 
-;i.nid out. The .<^ample ;it tiie tiiiish 
(tut a clincher on 11. » turn. 

\\'arman .and Mack are a coui>le 
of likable young men. one ojjerating 
on the ivories and both singing 
popular songs. Clean-cut looking 
p'iir In trim tuxedos, working 
l>riskly and getting away in just 12 
minutes. The last three, devoted to 



liberally aided bv the band itself, i p^Y''';. „„. c...iii.,o„ .„ o»,.t^ ^ ..» 

no mean one for its size, and the * ^•*'*'^'* °"^ Sullivan In style to get 
principals, of course, being largely. . , , .». .. » . 1 1 tfu 

nstrumental. Mr. Cunningham and - f"^^^- In singing the act holda with 
Miss Bennett have their episodical t ^«' exception of the rather baritone 
bit in lyrical form and characterize! ba.;S. who flats everything he tries 
that makes a healthy number for ! ^"^^ has no stage appearance or 
them. The houing or applause l'*^''«""'»''^>;- Another touch causes 
thing is carried out quite far at the j the act to lose the effect of the final 
finale, but, through it Cunningham -''.-''^"t' ^ Pa^^'^t leather one. It i.^ 
.secures a direct line oi what and ! the bringing up the lights to full 
who pleased the audience from for the flnal few minutes of the act. 
among those in his turn, as he That patent leather stuff is meant 
names each in a'soeech of aeknowl- , to be u.sed for reflection purposes 
edgment. : and gains its effectiveness from the 

For laughter .Miller and Mack, No. ! us»> of iight« properly. With the 
7 and following the production turn, [ lights full on It is cheap in appear- 
Bot the ribbon. Those boys wowed ! anoe. Keep 'em dim and use varied 
'em good. This Miller is quite a I colored ones, going to the liRhter 
twisting, singing, dancing come- ■ hues if necessary, but don't come up 
dian. Its no late discoveiy for alliKclher on the v\hltes. 
vaudeville. For a low-comedy two- A news weekly and the feature 
act that dances without any bur- ; wcte the. film offerings of the bill, 
lesque stuff carrying them along in i ,. Fred. 

the comedy way this pair just about [ ; 

look to stand all alone in their cliss. j • . mjimi/^ a Xl 

As a single Miss Arms stood up. i AMlliKlL'AIN 

There's manv a worse woman single ^. . .,, .... .. . .. i 

in vaudeville who has made people '""> ^« ^"> ^° ^^«'^^^»' ^^^^" "^"'^' 
wonder how she got booked on the , business Monday evening. Fr.*me- 
big time. Miss Arms, a gortd-look- up rather uneven with strong pointa 

ing blonde, who u.ses too much i po^ipensating for weak ones and 
rouge, mixes her routine of songs., , . , , .,. # „ 

She sings straight and character. \ t'"'^' ^^ hole averaging up satisfac- 
one number a medley of aitnosi dia- j toiil.v. Small time billlr.g is ever a 
lect bits, in which her Yiddish is the ' mystery. Why they selected a No. 2 
best. It isn't often in vaudeville j turn and new at that foT* third dis- 
you see a blonde doing Yiddish stuff i play over sure-fire turns doesn't 



a «olo dance, could be eliminated. 
They can both deliver a number in 
the breezy style once called "rath- 
skeller' atts, but the dancer can't 
step. 

George Randall and Co. wer» 
there for their periodical sketch 
called "I'ast, Present and Future" 
this time, (New Acts.) Harrington 
and CJreen, man and woman, are 
genuine darky entertainers. Com- 
edy colored i>eople don't fall down 
once in a dozen times. It is only 
when they essay polite that they 
mitis. These two, in their line of 
scrappy give and take, are a scream 
all the way. The man of the pair 
does an amusing bit of card game 
pantomime in the Bert Williams 
style for an opening, and from that 
minute they are over. A bit of 
stepping at the finish would im- 
prove the act, for 16 minutes of 
talk and song needs relief. 

Foria u,nd West have a good deal 
of individuality for simple comed.v 
acrobatH. They both wear dinner 
jackets and work without haste or 
parade and make no aggressive 
effort for comedy, but they get 
laughing results just the same by 
the simple trick of maneuvering: 
for the posseifiion of a cigar as they 
do the tricks. The top-mounter i.s 
slightly intoxicated, and from this 
circumstance they get a number, of 
odd catches and holds in ground 
tumbling and hand-to-hand forma- 
tions. 

"The World's Applause* for the 
screen feature. I'lti^h. 



BUSHWICK 



Little complaint could be regis- 
tered against business at the Bush- 
wick Monda.\ night when the nine- 
act bill headed by the I/apez Band 
drew (lose to capacity with weather 
conditions not in favor of the house. 
The buslrifss ut this neighborhood 
house has been holding up strongl.v 
since the start of Lent. In a scc- 
fon where the effects of Lent are 
felt In many lines the Bushwick ap- 
pears to have established a pnlic.v 
which ^•erves it throughout the year. 

The Lime Trio, a knockout novel- 
ty turn, opened the show, securing a 
number of laughs on the efforts o? 
the contortionist. The turn, novel 
and fast, got the bill under way with 
speed. Jack Little, with a straight, 
piano act. appeared No. 2. Little 
is a neat appearing chap and a 
corking pianist. His impressions of 
mechanical pianos are typically 
worth while and display an expert - 
ness in fingering that stands him in 
good stead. In addition to the trick 
playing Little registered easily with 
his straight efforts. 

Programed for second after In- 
termission Mollie Fuller in her 
Blanche Afenill vehicle,. "Twilight." 
appeared No. 3. Miss Fuller played 
with all of the feeling which has 
characterized her stage work for 
years and was one of the evening's 
brightest spots. In support she has 
Harriet Marlotte in a comedy board- 
ing house mistress role, and Edward 
"Mecca" Graham doing a Bert 
Savoy impersonation. Miss Mar- 
lotte has been Identified with this 
type of part for some time and plays 
it easily. Graham played for two 
seasons with the "Greenwich Vil- 
lage Follies" and was given ample 
opportunities to study the style of 
Bert Savoy which he has gotten 
down to a nicety, proving an able 
aide to Miss Fuller. 

Demarest and Collette were given 
an opportunity for a comedy punch 
No. 4 and delivered. The couple 
gave the show speed, making way 
for the Lopez band which closed 
the first half. The musical organ- 
ization was the outstanding hit of 
the evening with a straight routine 
of published numbers. The special 
effects used with some aided in 
giving a novel aspect to the straight 
musical work. The musical ability 
of the Lojiez musicians stands out. 
The combination has been together 
for some time and displays it in 
the playing which is of the smooth- 
est kind. As a vaudeville feature 
the turn hit the mark easily Mon- 
day night. 

The second half secured a good 
comedy start with George Watts 
and Belle Hawlej', Watts, a broad 
beamed comedian from the middle 
west, whanged over his comedy 
numbers v 1th telling effect. Miss 
Hawley remains at the piano ex- 
clusively, given opportunities vocal- 
ly which she handles In good style 
notwithstanding the fact one num- 
ber is a trifle long. Watts makes 
his comed.v numbers surefire. There 
is little talk but what there is proves 
produ tive. This type of comedian 
is an everlasting joy to Bushwick 
audiences and the Monday night 
crowd dis])layed their approval from 
start to finish. 

Marga Waldron the dainty dan- 
seusc with an artistic routine iis- 
sisied by (Jeorne Halprin at the 
piano appeared second after infcr- 
rnissioti. The trur- artistry of this 
youthful dancer m.ade .» direct ap- 
peal and the heavy spot was easily 
carried. < 

Clayton and Kd wards drew the 
next tf> closing assinnineni. The 
t\\" laii l earn experien ceil no uilll- 
(uli\ u i;!i the conieuy work. Th?^ 
laughs «:nne easily and continued 
until rhe finish. The routin"^ is 
identical to that visrd prior to their 
splittin.g. Kd an<l Jennie Rormey 
on the double trapeze closed the 
show, providing an acrobatic flash. 

.//arf. 



1IL91V «..^«zju ^ '"JV^: 



..TT' ^VV'Tf^''* 



1 ftursday. March 1, iW«l 






fr'*'*r^ 



V A K 1 K T Y 



^' 



37 






. WOMEN AND aOTHES 



"^ . «• .'#, > -1 1, 



IT Madge Bellamy as Peggy FaJrfax In "The Hottentot" wears a be- 

'coming informal riding habit of black with white shirt waist open 

;»t the throat and a becoming three cornered hat. In an aftertioon 

["icene she appears In a white ruffled Ingenue frock with blue bow and 

streamers at the waist. She also wears a spangled evening dress with 

A great deal of tulle draped fibout her shoulders and a high Spanish 

comb In her hair. At the races she has a black and white sport dress 

with a long cape and small black and white sport hat. Lila Leslie as 

Mrs. Carol Chadwick, the hostess, wears a particularly smart formal 

riding habit of black and white check with whiter slock, guahtlets and a 

•tiff black sailor hat. 

^— ^-^— • 

In the very dramatic and appealing picture *Tury'' there are few at- 
tractive clothes through the story. However, Dorothy Gish succeeded 
\n being completely captivating even with her hair in curl papers — 
which is going some. Miss Gish Is pretty in her outlandish cockn^^y 
wedding costume with its tight knee length striped skirt, redlculous 
coat with its waist ruffle and the absurd flowing feather boa which she 
wears so pridefully. 

The ever lovely Billle (surely no surname Is necessary!) with her 
wajward titian hair, tremulous voice and sweetly pouting ways in the 
nrst act ot "Rose Briar' -at the pjmplre has a neatly becoming pongee 
' silk afternoon dress made on Btralght lines with cream color lace at neck 
, and sleeves and a velvet streamer bow of 'Binie Burke blue" (a certain 
French blvje is so extremely becoming to Miss Burke she should claim 
It as her own). Miss Burke's |)ompadour costume is a work of art. Heavy 
pink silk panlers are draped over a silver lace petticoat. The pink silk 
bodice is tight fitting with tiny little bluebows down the front and silver 
lace falling from the elbow sleeves. The sweeping skirt with its long 
train Miss Burke manages with Inimitable grace. The costume Is finished 
with a white wig dressed after the manner of the. Louis XV court ladies. 
In the second act as the baby vamp who steals the stunning and 
pampered Mis: Valentine's (Mrs. Lydig Hoyt) husband and -beau-lover 
<not to mention the lady's own stock in trade of mannerisms). Ml?s 
Burke as "Rose Briar" appears in a dainty summer afternoon frock. It 
Js of white net made over a pale pink slip, and much be-ruffled and 
rose budded after Miss Burke's usual feminine fashion. 

In the last act Mrs. Hoyt was stunning wearing a soft yellow silk 
dinner gown made on 'long flowing CJrecian lines with gold ear ring>«, 
girdle and slippers v.ith the high tongue that is now so much In vogue. 
Ethel Rcmey as the conscientious newspaper girl chose her costumes in 
very good taste. 

The Louis XV tableau in the first act designed by Ben AH Hagan (he 
also designed Miss Burke's costume for that scene) is a color and rhythm 
perfection. The cc^tumes of the "Grande Monarchqut" and his beautiful 
ladles are created in rich shades of pink, yellow and blue,* arranged In 
perfect harmony. . • f. ..'.-v . a '-■■■. .-.■■ 



The first gift of Balieflfs in the present production of his "Chauve 
Sour is ' at the Century Roof l.s a somber, reverent group or novices 
gathered at the door of a Russian Church listening to an old Pilgrim 
chant the l*-g*'nd of the Miracle of the Holy Virgin. In the dim light the 
young women have shawls over their heads In pea.sant fashion, their 
skirts and kerchitfji <.f dull red, purple and brown or gayly embroid- 
ered. The quiet, subdued setting, the chant-like singing, the chiming 
of church bells all conspire to create the atmosphere of simple, reveren- 
tial peasants at their devotions. The marionettes in the burlesque on 
Italian opera are giddily attired in brilliant rods, yellows and blues in a 
very roccoco frame. 

Thr, Louis XV silhouette was another charming, delicate bit. the blue 
background being especially effective for the dark llgures. For the 
Tartar dance by Mr. Kotchetovsky there I.-j a cubist background of 
tumbly down houses, the general effect being blue and green.- He wears 
a rose and white stripped coat with ankle bloomers of a deeper shade of 
rose. After oi^r eager applause Mr. Balieff explained that if the Tartar 
answered the encore ho might become too excited and blood thirsty. 
There was such tremendous vitality, abandon and savage beauty in Mr. 
Kotchetovfiky's performance. The Katinka episode is done in bright 
pinks and greens — an impression of color riot. 



For the existence of the fearfully bdresome picture. "Adam's Rib." at 
the Rivoli this week there is no excuse except that it gives two pretty 
women an opportunity for pretty clothes. Anna Q. Nilsson, as the 
romantic mother, had a black lace afternoon dress with wide sleeves 
edged with black fox. She was particularly attractive when donning a 
dark velvet negligee draped up in fi'ont and trimmed at neck and sleeves 
with bands of chinchilla. She wox-e one or two evening gowns. Miss 
Nilsson also wears some luxurious evening wraps. Her street coat 
vras of sealskin with fox collar and. cuffs. She wore a. bouquet o^ violets 
on her cuff, coquettish and unique. 



"When Chaplin wrote his entertaining film comedy, 'The pilgrim." he 
thought more of creating a comedy rolo for himself than of giving the 
ladies of his cast a chance to wear clothes. So the costumes of the 
wonten of the country congregation were quite as they should be — in 
comedy. 

MID-WEST ACTS 



(Continued from page 11) 



Around ilie Map 

Allen Cheyenne Min- 
strels 

Andrus & George 

Artist's Dream 

Rroderick. Wynn & Co. 
mock & Dimlap 
Bravo. Michplini & 

Trujillo 
Jean Barrios 
Lucy Bruch 
Chadwick & T.xy'.or 
Cook ^- Cohan 
Cross & .Santoia 
Five Ci-anf.s 
Clark & Manninjr 
Cornell Ac Fav Sisters 
Dollys 1 tolls' 
l>r!f'Uo *L- Karl 
•Julia Fd\vard« 
Karl Rial Reviif» 
Km«M>on & IJaidwin 
Harry «;iit»ert 
'lene & .Mignon 
Gibson Sistns i\ Gradv 
Frank \- Kth-l Halls 
Kddio Tiiii 

Harry Haw g: Soy Sin 
••^ix Harlff|nln« 
Hagrr Ai f.oo.lv^ in- 
Coy Hrn.don 
Natalip H;.rr;son 



Lane & Harper 
.Speaker Lewis 
Mills & Duncan 
Vlaeta Maslova 
Nil»^s Marsh & Co. 
Bob Mills 
.les.se Miller 
Nad & Kd wards 
O'Neil Sisters & Benson 
Renard & West 
Harry Rose 
.Sylvester & Vance 

Twins 
Virginia Bolles A. Beau 
Waiman & 1 Jerry 
Gilbert W*-lls 
liilly \Val6h 
Alexandria 
Arthur & Pffrjry 
"Act Beautiful" 
Antoinett*; &. .Monica 
Anthony 

V'aiorie Berpnr.> & Co. 
Bertram fc Andos 
pHgpy Brt-men A: Bro. 
Bcrnjvici Bros. 
Beckwith'H Lions 
Bird & K»ma 
Brownin;^ & Davis 
Bro.kman, .Slatrr K- Co. 
Bartram * .Saxon 
••SmilinK" Billy Mason 
loiinnv ('oulon 



Bobby Jackson Ai Co. 

Boh .Toii^s 

Lioyd ^t •;oo'le -^— ^ 

KUa Li Vail • 

Kd Lowrv 

Jack Lfvy ^ Ciowell 

Sis*.•l■^ 



Jane Garnett * 

Elaine & Marshall 
Julia Edwartls 
Michael Kmmett & Co. 
Fulton & Bobbins 
Ford & Price -^— 

"Junior Frolice" 
Florlan Trio 
Four Girton Glr's 
Cecil ily< y 
CJrew & Paltes 
(ithan & Garretson 
Jim & Gladys Guilfoyle 
Rita Could 
Chas. Girard & Co. 
Musical llvnitcrs 
"The Honeymoon Ship" 
Hyams &. Kvans 
.Mnye Hunt 
Harry HoUlrn .t Co. 
I^arini*'!' \' Hud.>jun 
Fr*'il I^Mndbi'ij; 
Fnd Lindsay & Cn. 
Ml to;*' ^ Arnold 
Alunav it Lajxi 
MM!vin"'« & Paile 
Maxlb'ld & < '.Olson 
Musical Lund.^ 
.VIiQiiav i*t Haz'lton 
Harry \V. Fields & Co. 
Gcravo 

.Milton Pollock & Co. 
pjrl-ard'rt S^als 



Benny Huimmwoh jt C o . Cantor R«md fihow — PHtHv- K h «' l)y St Barvl 



'Tbo M;ini<'ur«i .Sboji' 
Jamrs Cullen 
.Mik<^ Donlin & Co. 
Dresslnr & Wilson 
He Onzo.s & Co. 
UidinK l)a\ f'n|>orts 
Kddi.* l)«-.\'nvfr A Co. 



Sigworth At Snow 
.Si»Tnad'>4 MitlRerx 
S«-h»'itj»'s « *om»fdy Cin us 
.Savi.y & Capps 
'Tango Shoes' ' 

Th«^;ma 
\ <rn'»n 



, INSDE STUFF ON LEGIT 

(Continued from page 21) 
flght his own case Is subjecting him to a target from the Lord's Day 
Alliance and similar clerical organizations which seems intent on feecuring 
Sunday closing enforcement. "While moro or less of a dead letter in the 
metropolis, the law still stands and It la feared something drastic as 
regards Sunday observance may result. 



"William Xlein has acquired a new female ofllce assistant. He Is 
In danger of losing her through some of his theatrical clients being Im- 
pressed by her personality and advising the barrister they are tempted 
to give her a small bit In a picture or play to see her possibilities. Klein 
himself thinks she's "there" and is planning something along similar 
lines for the pretty gal. 



The Chicago "Tribune" completely'' overhauled Its policy last .Sunday 
of handling photographs for .'ittractlons playing loop theatres. For the 
past three weeks "The Tribune" has been slowly creeping away from 
the *thumb-cut" idea for Sheppard Cutler's Sunday articles. Last Sun- 
day came the full blast of an apparently new policy of this newspaper. 
The change showed two tremendous sized photographs of feminine 
celebrities in loop shows, panel width, side by side, fully one-half page in 
length. It was the biggest dramatic photo "tfhsh" carried by "The 
Tribune" in years, and developed that both of tWe photographs were for 
shows that Walter Duggan is press agenting. It Is unknown whether or 
not "The Tribune" intends continuing the policy. It may be a move on 
the part of 'The Tribune" to match the extra dramatic "smash" that 
"The Herald-Examiner" has been gK'lng of -^lute to its Sunday readers. 



One of the most incongurous situations exists on 42nd street. The 
Selwyns' Apollo and Times Square theatres adjoin and so only a brick 
wall separates "The Fool," the cleanest play of the season, and "The 
God of Vengeance," considered the dirtiest. Next door in the Selwyn 
"Dagmar," with Xazlmova, is the present attraction. It leans to the 
"Vengeance" side of the fence, having a heroine of loose morals. 



i\ 



Cleverly worded cards h^ve been gotten up for the advertising of 
"Light Wines and' Beer" for the Chicago engagement at the Woods. The 
wording is based on the fact that Chicago voted wet at the last election. 
They read: "Last November you voted for light wines and beer. You'll 
tet them in March." "You won't need your bootlegger after March 12." 
'Tou'll soon enjoy light wines and beer at a well known place on Ran- 
dolph street." No mention of the theatre Im made on any of the cards. 



DISC REVIEWS 

POPULAR 

JOKES (Laughing Fox Trot)— 
Regs Dance Orchestra (two 
sicles)--Okeh No. 473L 
This l.s a follow-up on the Okch 
laughing record which enjoyed and 
still is enjoying great popularity. 
For a novelty dance record this 
cant bo beat. Everything and 
everybody laughs; if it Isn't th« 
saxoe, or trombones, or cornets, ths 
musicians them.s«>lv»s slulek forth 
in undeniable mirth. All the whil« 
a perfect dance rhythm Is main- 
tained. 

The tune Itself has a moderation 
of original composition around 
which is built up a conglomeration 
of familiar airs whirh are ragged 
in dancQ rh^Uunv raugUig from the. 
"funeral march" to the hoochy- 
coochy "Streets of Cairo." "Jokes," 
part one and two, is compoced by 
Hlng-IIager, and the latter's or- 
chestra has made it. ..Fred Hager is 
recording director of the Okeh 
laboratories. 






>"^ 



4 



The gallery at the Republic, New York, where "Abie's , Irish Rose" Is 
running, has sold out virtually every night since the holidays. That is 
proven by the performance gros.s of $1,840, really $20 over capacity 
and rReans standees also. It Is the first time for the Republic to sell out 
the gallery since "The Darling of the Gods" played the house nearly 20 
years ago, when it was then called the Belasco. The same stage doorman 
is at the Republic as when under Belascos management and vouches 
for the history of the gallery business. There are other current attrac- 
tions going clean In the gallery, which puts to rout, the aimless discus- 
sions on the topic last fall. "Rain" never has an empty seat in that sec- 
tion at the Elliott, nor does "Romeo and Juliet" at the Henry Miller. 
There are rarely any vacancies at the Liberty for "Little Nellie Kelly" 
nor for "Merton of the Movios" at the Cort. 



SOMEBODT SLAPPED 

(Continued from page 21) 

Bennett wasn't to be found. It 
was reported he had "skipped" to 
the LaSalle street station to caU:h 
the 11 o'clock train for Cleveland. 
The man and wife were lost in the 
audience. • 

The flashlight men departed with- 
out "copy." 

The reporters went into confpr- 
ence. They had the facts of the 
scene of the Incident, with all won- 
dering why Bennett was advertising 
his vehicle, "He Who Gets Slapped," 
since the piece departed from thete 
parts several weeks ago. But the 
reporters couldn't find out what they 
sought — the cause. 

Nobody stopped to realize that it 
might have been a telephone call 
that upset the possibilities of a "per- 
fect premiere night'* for the party 
of three. A mystery Is a mystery 
until solved. 

The town!s right now filled with 
mystery plrfys, but It has the Ben- 
nett episode to add to the list. 

The reporters attempted to have 
Ashton Stevens and Shepi)ard But- 
ler determine the dramatic touch of 
the incident, for both critics elbowed 
with the Inquiring flrst-nlghters 
over the affair. The curtain was 
lowered altogether too soon by Man- 
ager Roche for even the critics to 
draw their own conclusions other 
than for Stevens to remind the re- 
porters that Bennett's play title was 
"He Who Get* Slapped." 

The demon news .sleuth who re- 
mained long after the theatrg doors 
were closed with hopes of getting 
the real clue remarked, "It might 
have been caused by a iclrphonr 
call, after all." 

Some mystery! 

The "Superior" exchange on t1)P 
Chicago telephone card has liroUmht 
trouble to more than one actt»r. 

Monday's nfwspapfrs "played up" 
the story on the front V'.tK*', but all 
overlooked the "Superior' angle. 



JUDGMENT RECORD 



petr-.it. Feb. 28. 

Ulrhard B'Min'^tt in "Ho who Got 
Slapped" got a real slat) last week 
;it the box office of the New Detroit 

Bennett started to m;ike rurtiiln 
^^pceches after he re:»d ih" pannings 
following the opening perffmanc- 
Hennett didn't like Al \Ve»>ks' no- 
ti'-e in the 'News." He said f i <>ni 
the >tage Weeks didn't h(fcf>vv ail 
and also reproatht d the other lof-al 
critif^s as well as tli«^ iH'tioit pub- 
lic for their evident Inek of inler»«t 
In "He." 

If Bennett's object were, the box 
offifo. the town divai.jxdiiled bin), 
.something terrible. 



. :-\ 



Lighting Film Corp.; Craftsman 
Film Labs.; $75.33. 

Town & Country' Films, Inc.; R. 

Suratt; $2. 1.06. 45. 

Nat. Exchanges, Inc.; Jam^ B. 
J^c.ong Prods., Inc.; |1, 334.05. 

Educational Films Corp.; Globe 
Indemnity Co.; costs, $102.60. 

Sitas K. Everett; Tyson & Bro. 
T'nited Theatre Ticket Offices, Inc.; 
$173.72. 

Arenkay Amus. Co., Inc.; City of 
New York; $44.57. 

Eaco Films Co., Inc.; same; same. 

George E. Price; R. C. P. Smith 
Syndicate; costs, $80.60. ' 

I. H. Herk; Strand Securities 
Corp.; $6,045.88. 

Owen Murphy; M. M. Knoller; 
$5,996.43. 

Judgments Cancelled 

John Cort; Hudson Trust Co.; 
$7,325.70; April 3, 1916. 

Same; M. Tempest; $292.01; April 
19, 1916. 

Same; J. W^anamaker; $163,31; 
May 12, 1916. 

Same; M. M. Horowitz; $3,752.50; 
December 15, 1915. 

Same; M. J. Freund; $3,184.29; 
December 24, 1915. 

Same; A. Held; $4,017.63; Decem- 
ber 28, 1915. 

Same; F. E. Lindemann; $467.95; 
February 21, 1918. 

Same; C. K. Starr; $119.47, Feb- 
ruary 28, 1916. 

Same; Nat. Security Co.; $5,046; 
.September 27, 1916. 

Same; M. Brill; $150.46; Octo- 
ber 25, 1916. 

Same; H. B. Marinelll; $146.51; 
November 22, 1916. 

Same: P. Fletcher; $509.19; De- 
cember «, 1916. 

Same; N. Y. Edison Co.; $184.-56; 
December 15, 1916. 

Same; I>oty Demos Co., Inc.; 
$29.51; January 11, 1917. 

Same; Manhattan .Slide & Film 
Co.: $L'L'0.L'2; June 24, 1916. 

Same; J. M. Sullivan; $803.98; 
.iiuy zi, J 91 6. 

Same; Stern Ihos.; $3:iS5: July 
L'S, 1fM6. 

Same; 1'. S. Fidelity A Guaranty 
Co.; $1,519.99: Augu.st 18, i;n6. 

Same; J. J. Sullivan; $10,320.73; 
Anmi.st 20. 1916. 

Same; .N. Y. Tt.1. Co.; $48.94; 
S -idf mber 6. 1916. 

Same; Gimbel B»oh., N. V.; 
$St;.L'3; .M.irrh 19, Kri7. 

Same; Hirkjjii, In.-.; $099.07; 
.\j.iil 28. 1M7. 

8s.me; Sfnitliejn Sni-ety Co.; 
;::»;. ',] ; M.-n-rh 18. lf>17. 

Same; Am. .\e\vHp;ij>er Pub. 
.\-;s'n. Ine.; $XM91.T: Angnst «. I'.tlT. 
_ Same; L'nivtr.sai FiUu Alfg. Co..;. 
*i:',J.Sl; August 21. 1917. 

Same; Caperhartz-MaiUnown 
.M«rljod.s, Ine.; $L':M.L'5; <.)ftober 1',. 
li»17. 

Same; K. Taliaferro B.own; 
S.S37.2't; perenilKT 5, 1917. 

Sarr.c: .\o)'len Kle-, i^.-^n Co. 
III.-.; $!*ril; l).'(eml>»r 14. 1916. 



WILL SHE COME FROM THE 

EA8T?~-Jehn Steel (Vocal). 
LADY OF THE EVENING— 8«m« 
— Victor No. 18990. 
John Steel has been absent from 
the Victor ranks for some time. His 
return this month is effected ria 
the medium of two "Music Box Re- 
vue" selection*. 8teel Is a member 
of the company proper and Is there- 
fore excellently quallfled through 
daily practice to exact the most 
possible from this popular couplet 
of Irving Berlin's compositions. 



LOST A WONDERFUL QIRL— > 

Ernest Hare (Vocal). 
NELLIE KELLY, I LOVE YOU— < 

William Reess — Brunswick.^. 

Record. '^5 

Ernest Hare does "Lost" In » 
elow, sincere style. Injecting senti«r 
ment into this popular ballad. Un-r 
like Al Jolson, he eschews aggres- ' 
Hive syncopation and Jazz inter- 
ludes, which should recommend the 
number to lovers of light ballads. 
•Nellie Kelly, I Love You." from 
the George M. Cohan "Nellie Kelly" 
show, is fetchlngly rendered by 
William Reeses tenor, accompanied 
by the White W'ay Quartet. 



MR. GALLAGHER AND MR. 

SHEAN (One-Step) — Pm^O" 

Biete's Orchestra. 
HELLOl HELLOI HELLOI-* 

Lewis snd Dcdy (VocJii)— €•• 

lumbis No. 3783. 
Bitse does the "Gallagher and 
.Shean" number as a snappy one- 
step with the bass saxo doing th# - 
flpst name and the cornet as Shean.;. 
The conversational Idea is devel« 
oped novelly with considerable in- 
terpolation of other "nut" ditties 
for good measure. 

Gn the reverse Lewis and Dody, 
the v-audevilie team, make their disk 
de^but with their "chera boocha" nut 
classic. 



V. 



THE OLD HOMESTEAD— Walter 

Scanlan (Vocal). 
STAR OF FAITH—Walter Scanlan 

and Helen Clark — Edison No. 

61101. 
It 1« anite well known that every 
song that is recorded on the Edison 
labels must ilrst be approved by 
Thomas A. Edison himself. It is 
erjually well known that at times he 
has refused to have songs of the 
"enper-popular" variety "canned," 
although they really might net him 
some real revenue beeause of their 
general familiarity. But because 
they do not strike his fancy they 
remain off the Edison disks. It Is 
therefore a stamp of approval for 
all numbers that do receive the Edi- 
son imprint. "The Old Homestead," 
by Milt Hagen, is one of the few 
truly meritorious oompoeltiona of 
the flock of "picture songs" pub- 
lished. Mr. Hagen seems to be a 
specialist in this type of number, 
Judging from his past p'^rformances 
with "The Flirt." "Human Hearts' 
and others, written around soms 
picture feature. 

Scanlan'e ingratiating tenor car- 
ries the theme with a mixed chorus 
accompanying the pretty waltz song 
with interludes of "Home, Sweet 
Home," "Old Oaken Bucket" and 
other "home" classies, A harp and 
violin orchestra aerompaniment 
standi^ out. The reveine is a more 
staid composition, al.^o pleading. 



(Med- 
Dance 



JOURNEY'S END— TY UP 
lay Fox Trot) — Majestic 
Orchestra. 
WHEN HEARTS ARE YOUNG— 
Max Terr's Orchestra — Paths 
. No. 20884. 

iWtli niusi^-al eo;nedy excerpts. 
The "Joorney's Knd ' medley is 
from "V]} .She Goes' (Harry Tier- 
ne> ) and nnrippSty sold by the Ma- 
jestic y.r/.zTm. M'«x Terr's orches- 
tra in "When Jlear.'H Ar#» Voung" 
has somehow overlt)oked the oppor- 
tunity for A "Kweet" recording In- 
Kt« ad of J.igging it unmercifully. 

LOVIN' SAM (Pox Trot)— Reser 

Trio. 
PLANTATION HOME — Same — 

Gennctt No. 4978. 

It's a pleasant lonibo, Harry 
fteser'jf Tio of banjo (Heser's 
favoi ;:e). nax ard ,))ano. In "Lovln* 
.Sam" Billy JoTies gftn in an Incl- 
4lin;a) chorus for good measure. 
The instrumentalists satisfy them- 
sel\»«« with but brief forte playing 
(«;ontinued on page 46B) 



VARIETY 



Thursday, March 1» 1823 



BILLS NEXT WEEK (MARCH 5) 

IN VAUDB3VrL.LB THBATRB8 

(All hoa«M op*o for tb« w««k wltb Mondar inatlf««. wb*a not otharwiM 
IMloatad > 

Th« bllli btlow ar* vroupad In dlvliloiu^ aecordlnv t* booklnv ofllCM saypltod 
Crom. 

Tb* niann«r In wbich thcM bill* ar« prlntad do** not d*not* tb* ralntlT* 
Importanc* of ait* nor tbalr p-ogram poaltiona 

• b*fop* nam* denot** act I* dotnc n*w tarn, ar r*app*arlnt aft*r ab*«na* 
fr*m ▼aad*vlll*. or app**rlnv In cUr wb*r* Il*i*d for tb* Orat tima 



C* 



KEITH CIRCUIT 



KEW YORK CITY 

Keith'* ralar« 

Duncan Sia 
California R'mblers 
Bernard & Uarry 
Jack Wllaon 
Lonr Tark Sam 
Claude & Marlon 
Barb«tt* 
(Two to nil) 
Keith'* Blveraid* 
Ben Bernie Band 
IWInore ft WHliama 
Rich Haye* 
*Allyn Mann Co 
Th* Show Off 
Watt* A Hawler 
MUlerahip ft Oer'rd 
Millar ft Marlla 
(On* to All) 

Keith'* Boyal 

Vincent Lopes Co 
Bantoa ft Hayea 
Ona Munson Co 
Mollle Fuller 
Billy Stanton 
*Rialto ft I^aMont 
Zuha ft Drle* 
(Two to nil) 

Keith'* Colonial 
Haclcett ft Dehiiar 
Clayton ft Edw'rdi 
Jo* Laurie Jr 
liMtlr ft Croa* 
lC*lTine ft Rul* 
Kaah ft O'Donnell 
Maureen Knglla 
Ella Bradna Co 
Pauline 
r J Sydney C* 

Keith'* Alhambra 

Victor Moore C* 
Becal ft Carroll 



St. 

Co 



Mr ft Mra J Barry 
•Dorothy Uyt«»n Lo 
*l''«t>er ft King 
Winlon Broa 
iMivcr & i)pp 
Prortor'a 125th 

2d half (1-4) 
Arthur Howard 
lieitaer ft Irwin 
•Hilly I)unn Co 
McKiasick ft Hllday 
Fericudon ft S'd'rl'd 
Margot ft Francola 

lat half (5-7) 
Cha* Keating Co 
Allen ft Canfleld 
Weston's Modcia 
Minstrels 
(Othera to All) 

2ci half (8-11) 
Bob Willis 
White Black ft IT 
Norman ft J'netl*>« 
Allman ft liuward 
Minstrels 
(Two to nil) 

I'rprtor'* 58th St. 

'ZA half (1-4) 
('has Keating (a 
I.idpll ft aibson 
Mdvif Masque 
Jansen 

Arnoroa ft OBoy 
(One to nil) 

lat half (6-7) 
Jimmy Lucaa Co 
Shrlner A F'za'm'ii.j 
Neville & Paulaon 
(ilbpon ft Price 
(Two to fill) 

2d half (R-in 
Tleraa ft Wllla 
Phil Davia 
(Othrrs to nil) 



t 



CECRLE nARRT 

D'ANDREA and WALTERS 

Featured I^ancera 
ALIVAYg 
Personal direction of 
J08. M. GAITE8 



Emma Malg 
Meehan ft Newman 
Kuebco ft H&ll 
Laura Pierpont Co 
Freda ft Anthony 
Robbie Gordon* 
(On* to nil) 

Moaa* Broad waj 

Mabel Burke Co 
Ernie Oolden Co 
Thoinj>son ft Covan 
Beeaer ft Irwla 
Johnny Burke 
(Others to nil) 

Mo*** Colisenni 

•Fairbanks Twins 
Melino Bros 
Creations 
Stanley ft Burn* 
(Two to till) 
2d half 
Wella V« ft Weet 
,-E Taliaferro Co 
Higgins & Bate* 
Potter ft (Iambi* 
(Two to fill) 

Keith'a Fordhom 

Joan Adair Co 
Craig Campbell 
Movie Masque 
Wilson Aubrey I 
(Two to nil) 
2d half 
•Fairbanks Twin* 
Creations 
Norwood ft Hall 
Stanley ft Burn* 
(Two to nil) 

Mo**' Franklin 

Son Dodger 
Man Off Wagon 
•Petora ft I-cHuff 
(Others to ntl) 

2d half 
Demarest ft CoH'te 
Miss Juliet 
Will M ah oner 
Melino Bios 
(Two to nil) 

Keith'* Hamlllon 

Lillian Shaw 

Toto 

Gilbert We!t* 



Proetor'M Sth Are. 

2d half (1-4) 
Tempest ft D'kins'n 
•Tom Howard Co 
•The Collegians 
Howard ft Clark 
Arthur West 
Ktta Gould 
•RIalto ft LaMont 
(One lo fiii; 

1st half (5-7) 
Harry Stoddard Co 
The Diamonds 
C ft M Dunbar 
Paull ft Goas 
(Others to nil) 

2d half 
Sophie Tucker Tp 
Frank Wilcox Co 
Jimmy Lucas Co 
Princfss Winona 
(Othrrs to nit) 

Proctor's 33d Rt. 

2d half (1-4) 
May iHler Co 
•llagfinan's Oroh 
Espt'e ft Dutton 
•Ash ft Hall 
Tiller Sis 
Hob F.t rns 

Isl half (3-7) 
AUman ft Howard 
•On Roof Garden 
Bob WilUs 
White Black ft U 
Stevens ft Burnc'.ie 
La Foil Co 

2d half (S-ll) 
Rita (joulii Co 
Allen ft Canfield 
•Liza ft Shuffling 6 
Weston's Mod»»ii 
Mack ft Reading 
(One to nil) 

FAB BOCK AWAY 

Columbia 
A Fncdland Co 
Lillian rihaw 
Coombe & Nev'.ns 
Movie Masque 
Pinto ft Boyl* 
(One to fill* 



B. F. KEITH CIRCIIT 

POHER and GAMBLE 

March 1-4— Hamilton, New Ywk 
Munli j-« — .lefTi-rsun, New York 

Direction: THOS. ,1. FITZPATKICK 



(Others to rtli) 

2d half 
B1 Ba Bo 
Kellam ft O Dare 
O'Meara ft I<and;a 
•Carroll ft .'^edl'-y 
Frank Wll.-on 
(One to nil) 

Keith'* Jeffcrtion 

Tom Howard Co 
K Taliafcrm Co 
Potter ft (inmhio 
Edwarilx ft Hdw.!* 
Dennis' Th,l» t ft C 
(Others to fiH 

2d half 
Son DodK'T 
•Peters ft LeBiifT 
Wilson Aubrey Co 
(Others to nil) 

Momn' Regent 

DonovHn ft Lee 
Will Mahoney 



Teinis Four 
Ray Snow ft N 
Cordon ft Germaine 
(One to nil) 

Jst half (6-7) 
Frank Wllcoi Co 
Jo Jo ft Dooley 
•The Collegians 
Bozo 



t Blu* Demons 
(Two to nil) 

2d half 

The Randails 
•Cheater ft Dovere 
Haynea ft Beck 
Right or Wrong 
(Two to nil) 



IIROOKI.YS 

Keith's BuMhwivk 

I'.inny Brice 
Walsh ft Kills 
McLaughlin ft E 
Marino ft Martin 
Anders«on ft Pony 
Mc<"art ft M.tron-' 
Rule ft O'Brien 
flrcy ft Old Rose 
(One to fill I 

Kellh'H Orplienni 

K\.» Slurley Co 
DeLyle Alda Co 
Trixle Frijjanza 
Runa\va\- Four 
l>ixie Hamilt(>?» 
H SluTwood .'I- r.ru 
•P ft W LaVair 
•'•Isen ft .Tohnson 
(One to nil » 

Momh' I'lutbanh 

Fr.nnk Dixon Co 



HAVE YOU READ MY AD IN 
THIS WEEK'S ISSUE? 
Don't Miss It — See Page 75 

MAX RICHARD 
AGENCY 



w. 



Booking Exclusively With 
V. M. A.-B. F. Keith (West) 



Capitol BIdg. (Masonic Temple) 
CHICAGO 

PHONE CENTBAI. 024« 



(Two to nil) 

X<1 half (8-11) 
•Frances Noskay 
(Others to nil) 

Keith's Prospect 

2d half (1-4) 
Frank Wilcor Co 
Joe Browning 
Max Ford Rev 
FoUis ft LeHoy 
Louis Hart 
(One to nil) 

lat half (j-7) 
Sophie Tucker Co 
Harrington ft Gr'n 
B ft P Valentine 
(Others to nil» 

2d half (8-11) 
Donovan ft Lee 
Collegians Band 
The Diamonds 
Paull ft (loss 
Cerard's Monkeys 
(One to nil) 

Mo**' Rit-rra 

A Friedland Co 
Keiiam & i» Dare 
Frank Wilaon 
Carroll ft Sedley 
Ltine ft Harper 
(One to fill) 
2d half 
Harry Stoddard Co 
<-' ft M Dunbar • 
Cilbert Wells 
(Others to nil) 

A Ml ANY 

Proctor's 

nrent Hayes 
Kenny ft Ilollis 



BATON ROl'tiE 

Columbia 

(Shrev»?pori split) 

1st half 
I Betty Washington 
W ft O Ahearn 
Master Gabriel Co 
Three Renards 

BIBMIN(iUA3f 

I.yrie 

(Atlanta split) 

1st half 
Kennedy ft Kramer 
Kl Cleve 

Harry J Conley Co 
Ned Norworth Co 
Wheeler Trio 

BOSTON 

B. F. Keith'* 

Stella Mayhew 
Mrs Valentino 
Leedum ft Stamper 
•Restelll 

Hn <v iliut tie ft Cuu\ 
Bezazlan ft White 
Carter ft I'ornisli 
(One to nil) 

Bl'ITAIX) 

Shea's 

The Lime Trio 

Dotson 

Owen McGiveney 

Patrlcola 

Marmoin Sis 

B ft B Wheeler 

W ft J Mandell 

The Wager 



Merle's Cockatoo* 
(One to All) 

E.\STON, PA. 

Able O. H. 

O'Brien ft J's'phln* 
Moran ft Macli 
Virginia Bntwr 
(Two to nil) 
2d half 
Follls Girls 
•Jones ft Rar 
Jack Kennedy 
Al Wohlman 
(One to nil) 

ELIZARKTIf. N. J. 

Proctor's 

2d half (1-4) 
Fred LaRoln* Co 
Coley ft Jaxoa 
Neilson yts 
M ft J Dov* 
Creations 
Gerard's Monkeys 

1st half (5-7) 
Yip Yip Y'phankera 
•lidna Deal 
, Fiaher ft Ilurat 
Hampton ft Blake 
•Kervin ft Krayona 
(One to nil) 

2d half (8-11) 
Cha> Keating Co 
Welch Mealy ft M 
Gertrude Harne* 
(Others to nil) 

CRIE. P.A. 

C'olonUI 

E! ft I Tlndale 
Crafts ft Haley 
Flaherty ft Ston'g 
Lee ft Cranston 

Elsie White 

GERM'NT'WN, PA. 

O^yheuna 

Mang ft Snyder 
Jean LaCross 
Shone ft Snuirea 
China Bine Plate 
Cahlll ft Romaine 
Howard's Ponies 

GRAND BAPIDS 
Rm press 

Mac Sovereign Co 
Moody ft Duncan 
Bryant ft Stewart 
Anderson ft Burt 
Ryan Weber ft R 
(One to nil) 

CiRECNVILUB 
Grand O. H. 

(Augusta spill) 
1st half 
Lynn ft Thompson 
Gene 2(organ 
Fulton ft Burt 
Plaano ft Llndauer 



MONTBRAL 

Imperial 

(Runday opening) 
Holland A Odeon 
Herbert Denton Co 
1 bach's Band 
Jennier Bros 
Margi* Coate* 
Rogers ft Donnelly 
Prince** 

(Sunday opening) 
Danolse Sisters 
•Block ft Dunlop 
Harriet Rempel Co 
Swor ft Conroy 
Alea ft Elmore 
•Ben Meroff Co 
Traps 
Ernie Ball 
Mme Herman 

MT. VERNON, X.T. 
Proctor's 

2d half (1-4) 
Hampton ft Blake 
Billy Sharp Rev 
Barrett * Farnum 
Craig Campbell Co 
Caating Campbells 
(One to niD 

lat half (5-7) 
Rooney-Bent Rev 
Davis ft Peile 
(Others to nil) 

2d half (8-11) 
Van ft Vernon 
For Pity's Sake 
Texaa Four 
Frances Arms 
Toto 
(One to nil) 

NEWARK, N. 4. 
Proctor'a 

Kerr ft Weston 
Cecilia Weston Co 
Bob Pender Tr 
Arnaut Three 
Harry Breen 
Newark Minstrels 
Ben Smith 
(One to niD 

N. BRl NSW'K.X.J. 

RivoU 

Alanson 

I Clifford ft Morton 
Vandyke ft Vlney 
•Oxford Revue 
(Two to nil) 
2d half 
Davis ft Chadwlck 
•Wall Flower 
•Holer ft Ayloff 
•Weigand Troupe 
(Two to nil) 

State 

Miss loteen 
Williams ft Taylor 
Cook ft Oatciun 
Norwood ft Hall 



VALDO, MEERS and VALDO 

"HOKUMKDLAM8 OF TUB WOUT* 

Ifazt Week (Mareh 6), FlAtkaak. 

Brooklyn 

Dfareetloa: PArL. DURANB 



i 



Xd half 

Great Johnsoa 
Van Dyke ft Vlney 
Johnny Murphy 
I^rralne Co 
(Two to nil) 

PORTLAND, me. 

B. F. Keith's 

Moor* A Freed 
James Thornton 
Mallnda A Dad* 
Brook* ft Morgan 
Ruby Norton Co 
Willie Schenclc Co 



Lorray 

TAD War« 
Lee A Lawr*n*o 
The Randalls 
Sd half 
Wilbur A Lrk* 
FIske A Fallon 
Uddle Whit* 
Lorray 

B A J Crelghton 
8 Blu* Demon* 

TAjIkPA, FLA. 

Victoria 

(6-C> 
(Sam* bill plays St. 



TO.MMY— 



—SABA 



VAN and VERNON 



THE BRAMINOS 

With their wonderful musical Instrument 

PLAYING I.OEW CIRCIIT 

l>irectlon: J. H. MBIN 



SiniCT's MIdit'>ts 
(Three to nil) 

:d half 
Kthe! Hopkins 
Fen ton ft- Fields 
Singer's Midgets 
(Three to nil) 

ALLENTOWV. PA. 

Orphcum 

Follls Girls 
•Jones ft Ray 
Jack Kennedy Co 
Al Wohlman 
(One to nil) 
2d half 
O'Brien ft Josi-phnf 
Moran ft Mack 
Virginia FJnter 
(Two to nil) 

AMs^TKRDAM. N.Y. 

Rialto 

Williams ft Daisy 
•Ttalack ft Dean' 
Allman ft Harvey 
Willie Solar 
•Ma'jiiy Juniny B'd 
(One to fill) 
I'd half 
.T S Bl.indy 
Mark ft Stanton 
N»»nhi>rr ft Phelps 
B.'n W.'Ich 
F'ridkin & Rhoda 
(One to nil) 

ASTtl RY P'K, N.J. 

Main St. • 

W ft H Brown 



CHESTER. PA. 

Adgenient 

•Pollard 
•Ijine ft Cross 
•Chas Morattl Co 
Henry's Melody % 
\\'ilson Bros 
A ft G Falls 

2d half 
Holden ft Graham 
Corinne Arbuckle 
Mahoney ft Cecil 
K Keller Co 
Williams ft Taylor 
Clown Seal 

CINCINNATI 

B. F. Keith's 

Three Whirlwinds 
Vincent O'Donnell 
Grace Huff Co 
Four Tellerons 
Tom Smith Co 

CLEVELAND 

Palace 

Gautler ft Pony 
Lytell ft Faut 
Bryan ft BroderKk 
Joe Cook 
Alexs ft Smith 
(One to nil) 

105th St. 
•Paul SydoU 
Wayne M'shall ft C 
Herbert Clifton 
.Murray ft- Oakland 
Wilton Sis 
(One to nil) 



Princess Wahletka 
HAMILTON. CAN. 

Lyric 

D.ily ft B'>rlew 
Lane ft Freeman 
•R Pagan's Band 
Dorothy Watera 
(Two to nil) 

IIARRISRURO 

lllttjcstie 

Corinne Arbuckte 
Itond Wilson Co 
Marks ft Wilson 
Sternad'a Midgets 
(One to flll> 
L'd half 
Lehr ft ICennedy 
AnUfcr ft Packer 
Sternad's Midgets 
(Two to nil) 

INDIANAPOLIS 
B. F. Keith's 

R ft W Roberts 
Shaw ft Lee 
Artistic Treat 
Al Herman 
Chief CapoIIcan 
Janet of France 

JACKSONVILLE 

Arcade 

(?avannah split) 



B Sharp's Rev 
(One to nil) 

2d half 
Downey A Claridgc 
Annette 

Jos Stanley Co 
Dooley ft Storey 
Brown's Dogs 
(One to nil) 

NEW ORLEANS 

Palace 

(Mobile split) 

1st half 
•Glencoe Sifters 
B ft H SUatelle 
Newell ft Most 
Polly Moran 
Pedestriatiism 

NORFOLK 

Academy 

(Richmond spill) 
1st half 
Beege ft Quepee 
W ft M Rogers 

Magic Tablet 
Elizabeth Brics 
Vera Burt ft Sasl 
HoUsworth ft B'nd 

PATERSON. N. J. 

Majestie 
2d half (1-4) 
RoUand ft Rae 



"IT IS TO LAUGH" 

NEIL 
McKINLEY 

' '.-y '■:■' i; .:■■.•■'■ ::: ■,. -" 
AND TIIS PLAYMATE 

AL DOWNS 

Arc Playing Their Thirty-third 
Week This Season for the 

Keith Vaudeville Exchange 

DIRECTION: 

ALF T. WILTON 



Bloom A Bhm 
*Monro* Bros 
(On* to fill) 

W. PAf Jf BMACU 

Blalto 
(lliaral *pllt) 
1st half 
•ChHsty ft Will* 
•Buchanan ft C 
Rawl* ft Von K 
Loner Hasicell 
Bd Janl* R*Ta* 

WHITK PLAINS 
Lyna 

Sd half (1-4) 
Sully ft Thoma* 
Porter J White Co 
Al|e«n Htanlay 
I M Chadwlck ft D 
Toung ft Wheeler 
LAB Dreyer 

1st half (5-7) 
'Geo Alexander Co 
Bison City Four 
Cartmell & Harris 
Foster ft Ball Co 
Rita Gould 
Amoros ft Obey 

2d half (8-11) 
Franklyn Ardell Co 
I^vdia Barry 
•Irving ft Seahury 
Hampton ft Blake 
Ruby Royce 
Kdwards &• Edw'ds 

WILMINGTON 

Aldine 
Holden ft CJraham 
Ruby Royce 
.Mahoney ft Cecil 



LoiTAlno Co 
*Johnny llurph|{ 
Clomi Seal 

Xdhalf I 
•Pollard \ 

•Lan* A Ro« 
Cha* Morattl 0§ 
Henry ICelodr 
Meredith ft Ba' 
A ft O Pall* 

TONKBBS, M, 1^ 
Proctor's 

Sd half (l-4> 
Hera* ft Will* 
Prince** Winona 
Shrlner ft K'u'm'M 
Th* Headllnera 
Donoran ft L*o 
Itofi* Zlsvu* 

1st half (S-T) 
For Pity's 8ak* 
Texaa Four 
(Other* to All) 

2d half 
B ft P Valentin* 
Harrington ft Qr'A 
(Othera to All) 

YORK, PA. 

Opor* Hooao 

Torke ft Maybello 
Van Hoven 
Adams ft Gritnth 
•Alba DeRoss Co 
(One to fill) 
2d half 
Jahrl ft Oeorgo ' 
Mark* ft Wilson 
Barrett ft Cun'ee* 
t Arabian Knight* 
(One to All) 



POU CIRCUIT 



PROVIUKNCK 
K. F. Aihee 

*\a Minlca'a Orch 
Seed ft Auatin 
Venita Gould 
Jln\ McWIlliams 
•Danny Duggan Co 
Van Cleve ft Pete 
(Two to nil) 

RKADINC. PA. 

Majestic 

•Jahrl ft George 
Barrett ft Cun'ecn 
I.ang ft Itlakeney 
7 Arabian Knights 
(Olie lu (ii!) 

:d half 
Torke ft Maytielle 
\'an Hoven 
Adams ft OriOlth 
•Alba DeRnss Co 
(One to nil) 

UICIIMOND 

Lyric 

(Norfolk split) 

1st half 

Bernard ft Merritt 

Gllfoyle ft Lange 

Four Caating Stara 



Patera 7-8; Or- 

land 9-10) 
R ft B Brill . 

Rozellas 

•Mile Vanity Co 
Rome ft Gaut 
•Three Kltaros 

TOLEDO 
U. F. Keith's 

CliHord ft O'Connor 
The Uriants 
Schicbtl's Manikins 
Bdna Aug Co 
(Two to All) 

TORONTO 

Rhea'* 

Osborne Trio 
Stone ft Franels 
Ray Ball ft Bro 
Wellington Cross 
Brown ft Whltaker 
Margt Severn Co 
Harry Burns Co 
The Duttons 

TRENTOTN, N. J. 

Capitol 
Downey ft Claridge 
Annette 



DRIDC.EPORT 

Poli'M 

Les Splendlds 
•(Jeo Pollano Co 
Princess Nai Tal T 
Dress Rehearsal 
(Ono to All) 
2d half 
Nora Jane ft Karl 
Hail ft O'Brien 
H ft K Sharrook 
•P Whiteside Band 
(One to Ail) • 

Palac* 

Boy ft Hoyer 
Lorraine How'd Co 
Ring Tangle 
Burke Burton ft B 
Dance Rev of 1923 
(One^lo All) 
Sd hhlf 

S Odd Chaps 
Geo heMalre Co 
Sharkey Roth ft II 



PA, 



SCRANTOV. 
Poii'»_ 

(Wilkes-Barr* 
split) 

^ 1st half ^ 

Arthur Huston Co 
Haxel Crosby Co 
Russell ft Haye* 
Baal Bek 
DeLange ft Anger 
Leach l^Quinlan I 

SPRINGFIELD 

FtUaco 

R ft J FIfer 
•Reynolds ft Whit* 
Lillian Steele I , 
Tom Kelly 
Fink'a Mules 

2d half 
•Tyler ft St. Clair 
•I ft K Claire A D 
Fritxl Scheff 
Smythe ft James 



4 DANCING MADCAPS 

This Week (Feb. 2C). Alhambra. N. 
Produced by CISST MADCAP, 
Direction: JIMMY Dl"NFJ>IN 



VARDON and PERRY 

HEADLINING 

PANTAGE8 CIRCUIT * 

NEXT WEEK (MAK< II 4) 
PANTA<iE8. PORTI.AM). ORE. 



TOM CALLOWAY 



WITH 



JOHN B. HYMER 

Orpheum Circuit 



Offlrlal noDtlal t« th* N V ft 

DR. JULIAN SIEGEL 

4».'t D'svay (Patnaoi DIds. ) N. 1 



Hcnsational ifend-TtnlttnrlMi; FfjiiMIUrUU 
THE ORK.INAI. 

FOUR PHILLIPS 

Next Week (>Iar. 5), lieitli'-*, ( olniiiltus 
Manngement: M.V\ Plili.I.IP 



Kuma Co 

•J Clark ft I>av;s 
(Two to nil) 
2d half 
Tip Tap Yaph".;r' 
Dennis' Thlb't ft « 
(Others to nil* 

KHtfa's Slit M. 
Tyeite Rug''l 



Van ft Corl.ptt 
Vt'inpesi ft D'lk'.n.s'ii 
J.ick I.itfle 
V;i;do Me- rs ft V 
(<jnf to tii:> 

Krilli's Lrcciipoiii'. 

id half n-t^ 
•••:uit\v.Mi ft W i.-r 
•Aster llill .<■ I'..tu.i 



Irin'-is ft- Hume 
I'<-.;Ky Brooks 
M I.Uaniond CtJ 
vlwo to till I 
2d half 
*J ft- F. Jam-s 
Th'trn'o'i ft .»<c,r.-« 
M^iHon ft Shnw 
K'iin»7.a»'a .laps 

-t vwH to nil* 

ATLANTA 

l.jrir 

' lt.riniiir;l>:> >i< >*\'" '■ > 

Isl h:Of 
nouilini A H 111.1 rd 

ntigns ft T tv i m 

M»'l,fM;in A Carson 
I.i'W r')Oi)<'r 
I'l-jtiia t;r:i n:i(los 

Al IK KN. N. Y. 

ileflTiTHon 

i'ni.il ,!» ft nil >.l I 
-K.H> While 
; »( J I'roig^ron 



COI.lMniA. s. c. 

Columltia 

2d half 
.Tohn R»*gay Co 
McCormick ft W 
•t Terrace (;ir:s 
.'^anipBon ft I>o'8'a* 
Cordon ft Day 

coriMnrs 

U. F. Krith's 

' 'ano\ a 
K ft r. Dran 
I'our Phillips 
J 'i'.! If on X- Mick 
Al K 11.1 11 r.» 

joBtM'n T' iBka y 

DKTROIT 

Temple 

I-C.'iy I Ian 'i, n ft IC a» 

\ t.n firay 

II trriHoM ft- !»a't\in 

II., mack 

Until Roy* 

i;u-> IM .' .ir Ih Co 



1st half 
Van Arman's Mlns 

KNOXVILLK 

Uijoa 

(Chattanooga spilt"* 

1st half 
•Gray Sisters 
Kd Morton 
Mola May Co 
Clifford ft Gray 
Lyons ft Yosco 

I/<i BRANCH. N;.L 

Ilroadway 

T ft E James 
Thornton ft S<i'iri»fl 
Mason ft Shaw 
Kar.azawa Japs 
(Two to lill) 

2d half 
W ft H Brown 
PcKBy Brooks 
Francis ft Hume 
M Diamond Co 
(Two to All) 

LOWELL. MASS, 
11. F. Keith* 

r.ydcll ft Mary 
K Raymond ("o 
Maxine ft Hobby 
Hob AlhrlKht 
•Hrown Sis 
Florence Brady 
Sam[.»e: ft I^onh'J 
(One to fill) 



CS. 



MOBILE 

Lyrie 



Orl>»ans split) 
ist half 
Frank Work Co 
•itog'-r \^ illiame 
Golden Gate Trio 
Stanley ft McNnbi* 
Oddities of 19:S 



•Dancing a la C'rte 
The Randalls 
(Others to All) 

Ist half (5-7) 
LIdell ft Gibson 
Su^iy ft Thomas 
H.'ras ft Wills 
(tethers to fill) 

2d half 
Neville ft Paulson 
Bison City Four 
(Others to fll!) 

PlIILADKLPIfIA 

Ke> stone 

The FayncB 
Ergot tl ft Tier man 
Wm IMmund.s Co 
Marie Sparrow 
•Doily Davis Rev 
(One to Jill) 

Wm. Pcnn 

•North A South 
•S<-haef.T W * C 
Klashf-s Sont'land 
(Three to All) 

2<l halt 
Miss lol.'f n 
♦l.anfi: ft Hlakolt 
Cook ft- Oat man 
Thornton ft King 
Southlands Enter 
(t»ne to nil) 

PITTMBI RC.n 
Du%l8 

Millar ft Wi.idfoid 

Dixie Four 
Mernt ft- J'arrner 
> raw ford ft Brod'k 



PLAIN! ri.D. N. 

PIninfleld 
Cornell l.eoi.a ft 

•Wall Fl.wer 
Ray ConMn 
Jas statite\ C« 
( I'Wd t3 !i.l> 



J. 



(Two to All) 

ROANOKJC 

Rounoice 

(.Same 1st half bill 
plays Winston- 
Salem 2d half) 
H LaMarr Co 
Janis ft Chaplow 
fJllian Herletn Co 
Vluntlng ft Francia 
•Art Impressions 

2d half 
•Vee ft Tully 
Hallen A Day 
•Southern Revu* 
Howard ft Ijewi* 
llanako Jap* 

ROCHE9TEB 

Tempi* 

The Hartwell* 
Wyeth A Wyna 
Weak Spot 
•H ft H Scholder 
A ft F Stcdmao 
Stars of Future 
Bobby Randall 
Van Horn A Ines 

SAVANNAH 

Bljoa 

(Jacksonville spilt) 

lat half 
Van ft Tysoa 
Dorothy Ramer 
Princeton Five 
nniott ft Latour 
•Holinan Bros 



When Love'a Toung 
Dooley ft Story 
•Southland'a Enter 
(One to All) 

2d half 
•Oxford Revue 
•North ft South 
•Flashes Songland 
•Schaefer W A C 
B Sharp's Rev 
(One to All) 

TROT, N. T. 

Proctor** 

Wilbur A Lyk* 
Ethel Hopklna 
Sager Midgley Co 
Pent on ft Fields 
Sh'ldon B'nt'e A H 
(One to All) 
2d half 
Wllllami* A Daisy 
Brent Haye* 
O Valentine Co 
Kenny ft Hollls 
Follies of 192S 
(One to All) 

I'TICA. N. T. 

Colonial 

Boyd ft King 
Syncopated Seven 
Bloom ft Sher 
•Monroe Bro* 
(Two to All) 
2d half 
Garcennetl Bros 
Fern ft Maree 




S< IIENECTADY 

Proctor'* 

J S Blondy Co 
Mack ff' Stanton 
G Xalentine Co 
Newh'-ff ft I'helps 
Hen Welch 
i'oliiea of 1923 

2d half 
Sh'ldon B Tnt'e ft H 
Tcniack ft Dean 
Allman ft Harvey 
Hobby Jarvls Co 
Willie Solar 
•Ma'my Jimmy Bd 

SYRACCSE 

IL F. Keith's 

Valentine ft B'-l!." 
Uedinan ft Weils 
Goo Moore Co 
Leavltt ft Leckw'd 
Aiidrrson ft Gr'cPK 
Walters ft Walters 

Proctor'* 

O ft M Perry 
•Chester & Devere 



Paul HIM Co 
Wm lObbs 
Hrown C/ilner ft I! 
ti»ne to till) 

WA.milNCiTON 
n. F. Keith's 

Tlie Roont ys 
Five Avalotis 
Frank Tinney 
Itiossom Seeley 
Clark ft Berpman 
Holmes ft Lave re 
Vaughn Comfort 
AJice Hamilton 
(One to All) 

W T'RTWN. N. Y. 

Olympic 

Garrintictti Bros 
Hayn»>s ft Heck 
Paul Hill Co 
Win Ebbs 
Brown G'dne- ,t ij 

2(1 half 
Boyd ft King 
Syncopated Seven 



•Krlc Phillips Co 
(Two to All) 

HARTFORD 

Capitol 

T ft K OMeara 
Artie Leeming 
Heath ft Sperling 
•P Whiteside Band 
(Two to All) 

2d half 
LaToys Models 
Joseph Rankin 
Lillian .crteele S 
Stop Thief — 
Tom Kelly 
•Land of Tango 

Palace 

Nora Jane ft Karl 
•Pauline Carroll Co 
Hall ft O'Brien 
H ft E Sharrock 
Home Town Follies 
(One to All) 
2d half 
Stevers ft Lovejoy 
LeMaire ft Hayes 
Home Town Follies 
(Others to All) 

NEW HAVEN 
Palace 

•Johnny Reynolds 
S Odd Chaps 
Eadle ft Ramsden 
Geo LeMaire Co 
Sharkey Roth A H 
•Eric Phillips Co 

2d half 
Splendlt ft Partner 
Princess Nal Tal T 
A Ring Tangle 
Carl A Ines 
Burke Barton A B 
Dance Rev of 1923 



Nathane ft Sully 

WATERBURT 

Palaco 

r.a Toys Model* 
Joseph Rankin 
Ste\-er8 ft Love Jo/ 
Carl ft IneK 
Stop Thief 
Smythe ft James 

2d halt 

T ft K O'Mear* 
•Pauline Carroll C.0 
Radle A Rnmsdea 
Artie I^eeming 
Dress Rehearsal 
Ifeath ft Sperliny 

WILK'S-BAB'K PA 

PoU'* 

(Scranton spilt) 
1st half 
Summers 2 
Innls ft Ryaa 
Stilwell ft Fraeer 
•Fairytale Follloa 
Nell McKlnley 
Rulofl A Elton 

WORCESTKB 

Poll'* 
Nathane A Sallr 
•Tyler A St Clair 
•I A K Clair* * 
Fritzl Scheff 
LeMalr* A Har*« 
I^nd of Tango 

Sd half 
RAJ Flfer * 
•Reynolds A Whlto 
•Lor'lne How'd Co 
Thos J Ryan Co 
Calvin A O'Conaor 
Fink's >Mules 



BOSTON KEITH CIKCUIT 



B08T0N 
BootoB 

Ross ft Foss 
Four Miners 
Jdel Klee 
W Manthey Co 
(One to All) 

Clordon'* Olympin 

(Scollay Sq ) 
Miacahua Co 
•Pesco Duo 
Zeck ft Randolph 
McGrath ft- DeedH 
•Phenomenal Co 

tinrdon's Olympin 

( WashinRton St.) 
Leon ft Dawn 
•Barry ft Wolf.rds 
Frozen! • 
.\nderMon ft Yvel 
(One to till I 

BANGOR. ME. 

Hijou 

Wheeler ft l>elay 
Fid Gordon 
H BrocUman Rev 
.fohnny Burns 
•Stanley ft A tree 
(une to fll!) 



O'Nell ft Plunkett 
A Francis ft John* 

2d half 
Fred Gray Co 
Innls Bro* 
nob Hall 
Rose ft Moon 

CMBRFGE, MAM. 

Central Hq. 
Harry Mayo 
Tracey ft McHrld* 
Mayley ft Porter 
Rose ft Moon 
(One to All) 
2d half 
Aif Grant 
Robert H Hodg* 
.Snlle ft Roblea 
*J Marshall Rer 

FALL RIVER 

Empiro 

Fr^d (Jray Co 
Hank Brown Co 
M'Devitt Kelly ft Q 
Lew Seymour 
Rob Hall 
Zcno Moll ft- C 

2d half 
Stanley ft Durman 



E. HEMMENDINGER, Inc. 

.1 E W E 1. E R R 

S3 West IRth .Street New York 

Tc^phone Bryant l.'iLt 



2d half 
•Ruir^ ft Roiw — 
Klsic Huber 
Knapp ft Cornelia 
Loral Act 
(Two to All) . 

HK'CKTON. MASS 

Strand 

LaKleur ft- P..rtla 
DeLacey ft Willi'ms 



Gilbert ft K»»nnr 
Harry Hnrden-t?*- 
.lini Culli n 
Lynn A Howland 
Dancing Shoois 



FITf HIH t:0 

Ciimmlngs 

Aif C.rtini _^ . 
l'ran<MS Day 
lnn:M Bros 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



VARIETY 



Johnny Clark Co 
(One to nil) 
2d half 
lUrry Wntkin» 
VIa« AVynn* 
Butler ti Parker 

Booth it Nina 
ii.WERHILL 

Colonial 

roop^T & Lacey 
• H- r"l«l Kenne<!y 
Clayton I>rew Co 
l.'urmon tt Bvana 
Booih & Nina 
2«1 half 
' •p«rnnr(1 itr Ttnt ta 
ranthcon Sinffcr.s 
C>"N<il & PluiWiott 
I.aFltur & Portia 

I.AWRKNCE 

Kniplre 

Bernnnl & Potts 
JainPs Cullen 
Jloiu'town Follies 
(One to fill) 
2(1 half 
■W K^rhB tc Sis 
Kill Gordon 
Traroy & McDrulo 
Hoinrtown Follies 

LKWISTOV. ME. 

Mnaio Hall 



l.YNN. UAMI. 

OiymplA 

RuBSfll & l'lerc« 
Forn St. Marie 
Walmsley St K'tlng 
Louiso Lovely Co 

2d half 
Johnny Clark Co 
Furnian it Evana 
liaxlcy A Porter 
Liouise Lovely Co 

MANCHESTER 

Pttlaco 

\V Karbe & Sis 
Stanipy gt. HtivenH 
Robt H }Iodge Co 
r.ynn & lluwland 
I'aiithi.on dinger 

2d half 
FrantlH & Day 
Dolaciy & "Willi uhh 
MDevltt Ki'lly & Q 
Hodc & Lowell 
Zt-no Moll & C 

NEW BEDFORD 

Olympia 

Harry Walklns 
Gilbert & Kenny 
Thomas J Ryan Co 
Hnlle & Robles 
•Justa Mar'l C Rev 

2d half 
Russell Plerco 
Lew Seymour Co 
Harry Mayo 



MARGUERITE DeVON 

with "Th4> Shrlk'ff FaTorite" 

EX<n,t:STVE DIHETTION QV 

WEBER A FRICOLANOER 



•RuRP & Rose 
KIsie iluber 
Knapp & Cornelia 
(Two to nil) 

2d half 
Wheeler & Delay 
H n rock man Rev 
Johnny Burns 
Stanley & Attreo 
(On«^ to nil) 



^'I^vo to nil) 

NEWPORT R. I. 

Colonial 

•Ma<» Wynne 
Itutler &, Parker 
Johnson & llayi s 
(Two to nil) 
2a half 
NValnisley & Keat'K 
(Others to nil) 



CHICAGO KEITH CIECUIT 



CINCINNATI 

PiUam 

•Miller & Frear 
•Bobby Jaxim Co 
•Sid I^ndneld 
Pive Ballots 
(Two to nil) 

CLEVELAND 

Rf«d«'a Hipp 

Bartram & Saxton 
AndriefT Trio 
Flirtation 

Newport Stlrk * P 
Happy Harrison Co 
•Creedon & Davis 

DAYTON 
B. F. Koltli'a 

Renle Roberts 
Birdland Follies 
WeCormack & W 
•Sam A J Oold 
(One to nil) 
2d half 
•romebnoks 
•Hazel Oreen Co 
•Turner Bros 
(Three to All) 

DETROIT 

lASalle Garden 

A Powell Co 
Hilly Beard 
Fred Lindsay Co 
•Stanley Doyle & R 
Ankar Three 

2d half 
Geo Thompson 
•Railer * Brown 
(Thr-'e to nil) 

EVNSVILLE, IND. 

Victory 

Rinns &■ Grill 
Davis A BradJier 
I>ave Feriruson Co 

Chrliili*» & Betinf^tt 

2d half 
DtAVltt Burns * T 



•Bernlvlcl Bros 
Ned Nestor. Co 
Taylor &. Bgbbe 
Olrl from Toy land 
Al Fields 

KOKOMO. IND. 

Lawton 

Harry & Whitlcd^e 
Murray KIssen Co 
(One to nil) 
2d half 
Davis A Bradner 
Lll«>tta Co 
Bob Murphy 
The Arleys 

LEXINGTON, KV. 
B«n All 

Dallas Walker 
Kddy A Wynn 
Hnzel Green Co 
Turner Bros 
(One to nil) 

2d half 
Favorites of Past 
HibbM-t A Malle 
(Three to All) 

UMA, O. 

Faurot O. If. 

Lilctta Co 
Doroe's Celebrities 
Waiman A Berry 
llibb'rt A Malle 
(One to nil) 

2d half 
Ruharr & Muffs 
Hilly Beard 
Around the Map 
Jarvls A ITarrison 
Fred Lind.say Co 

PADLTAH. K¥. 

Oritlirom 

Hill A Ouinelle 
Bender A Armstr'p 
Jean Bydell 



INCOME TAX RETURNS 

If. ELY GOLDSMITH 

Cf rtlfled Public AccownUut Tax Expert 

105 WMt 40tli St.. N. Y. Plisaa Pisa. C887 

1 can prepare and file jour returni sfen when jou 
•re not In New York. Writs ms about jour clr- 
riinistances aud I will ask rou for sucb d«tall» 
• si need. 



.T^an Bydell 
Mccormick A W 
I^ancB Dreams 
Col Battle Co 

FLINT, Midi. 

Palace 

•Don Quixano 
•Harry Cooper Co 
l>un!ay A Merrill 
•Dance o Lltog 

2d half 
Maxon & Brown 
Snow A SIgworih 
Olive A Mack 
Stranded 

^r. WAYNE. IND. 

Paloee 

Rosher A Muffs 
J Thompson Co 
Around the Map 
Roller A Brown 

2d half 
Roatine Ac Barrfit 
Larry Comer 
>;iube 



Favorites of Past 

2d half 
Ada Weber 
•Williams A Clark 
Honeymooners 
(One to nil) 

RICILMOND. IND. 

Murray 

Bob Murphy 
Th*- Arleys 
(Two to fill) - 

2d half 
Binnn A Grllt 
Christy A Benn-tt 
Davo Ferjfuson Co 
(One to nil) 

SAGINAW. MICH. 

.IrfTera Htrantl 

Driscoll Loiiff A II 
Snow A .SIgworih 
Bddle Hill 
NIobe 

2d half 
Elliott A Wert 
Dan Quixano t'o 



DENTIST 

Prices within reason to the profaaslon. 

Dr. M. Q. GARY 

N. W. Cor. Rtata and Randolph Sta 

Second floor over Drug Store 

Bntrance 6 W Handolpb St.. «:mCAGO 



RAJ Gold 

liNTiN(;T'N. IND. 

Huntinirton 

•Qulrn & <ab. r:v 
Wnlinan A B>-rrv 
INDIANAPOLIH 
l'alae« 

Bender A Armslrjr 



Luvai ft Symona 



Harry Cooper Co 
Dunlny A Merrill 
Danco O'Lltes 

TKRRE IIAl TK 

Liberty 

Kobati Japa 

< )cta vo 

Frazer A Bun^ e 



Creole F^ashlon I'l 
Little Coltage 
Doc Baker Co 
Pear'n New'rt A P 
Henatur Ford 
Beaumont Sisters 
Roxy I^aRocra 

DENVER 

Orphrnm 

(Sunday opening) 



rOKTL.*ND. OKE. 

Orpheam 

Julian Eltinga 
«'oogan A Casey 
Rudel it Dunlgan 
Charlie Wilson 
Richard Kean 
I<loyd Nevado 
Mignonette KoUln 



ARTHUR SILBER 

BOOKING EXCLUSIVELY WITH 

PANTAGES CIRCUIT 

000 FITZGERALD ni.DG.. NKW YORK 
Phone* Kit V A NT 707(1 — 1820 



Wilfred Clarke 
M A P Miller 
Vlsser Vo 

B FiUglbbon A IJ 
Jack l,uVier 
Hurst A Vogt 
Hal Skelly Co 

DEM MOINES 

Orpheum 

(Sunday opening) 
Florenis 
Quixy 4 
Proflteerlnir 
Hallen A Rus.soM 
12ddie Leonard 
TuHcano Bros 
Alan Shaw 

KANSAS CITY SIO 

Main Street 

(SUndajik opening) 
Tints A Tones 
Daniels A XValters 
Scanl'n Deno B A S 
John B liymer «'o 
Spencer A Williams 
(One to nil) 

Orphenm 

(Sunday opening) 
Aunt Jemina Co 
Waiter c Kelly 
<'ummln3 A White 
Circum'tlal Evid'ce 

I Magleys 
Margaret Padula 

I PressI.T A Klais.s 
(One to fill) 

LOS ANGELES 
Hill Street 

Slan Stanley 
Babbs Carroll A S 
Fries A Wilson 
Hughes A DeBrow 
Harry Holmaa 
(One to nil) 

Orphenm 

Harry Longc^in Co 
Seattle Har'y Kin's 
Johnson A Baker 
Milt Collins 
Farrell A Florence 
Bert Lytell Co 
Francis Wms A V 

MEMPHIS 

Orphenm 
Parlor. Bed'm A B 
Pilcer A Douglas 

MILWAUKEE 

Palfkee 

(Sunday opening) 
Mitty A Tillio 



SACKA.MENTO 

Orpheum 

(3-7) 
(Same bill plays 

Fresno 8-10) 
Marry Me 
Davl.s A Darnell 
Carl Francis A C 
Lucas A Inez 
Crystal Bennett 
Carlisle A Lamal 
(One to nil) 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Golden Gata 

(.Sunday opening) 
Jack Ostcrman 
Berzac's Circus 
liove .Sisters 
Fri.sco 

Veland Gamble 
(One to nil) 

Orphenm 

(.Sund.iy opening) 
Jessie Bufdey 
Four Fords 
Steppe A onm: 
Jo.sephine Aiiioros 
Edwin (Jcorgo 
•Dougal A Leary 
Cautier's Br'klayers 
Alan Rogers A A 



^ 



39 



Sam Howard 
Lillian Norwood 
Will Phil brick 
Alexander Dagmar 
John Quinlan 
Wm H Pringia 

PHILADELPHIA 

( heatnnt St. O. H. 
Midnight Rounders 

Smith A Dale 
Green A Blyer 
Regal & .Moore 
Jack St rouse 
Ix'la (hulfonto 

ST. LOUS 
Empress « 



Co 



(Suml.iy opening) 

LOEW CIRCUIT 

NF.W 



Whirl of New York 

Ann Toddings Cu 

Florence .Schubert 

Keno A Green 

Cummings A Shaw 

Kyra 

Purcella Brothers 

WASHINtiTON 

Itelaaco 

Spire of \%Vi 

Brendil A IK it 
Arman Kaliz 
.Sam Hearn 
Ha.soutra 
Johnny Berlre^ 
Florc!u:e Browne 



VORK ( ITY 

State 

LnToy Uros 
•Roy l>orn A D 
Casey & Warren 
Dallon (v <^'r»lg 
MoHs & Frye 
Futuristic Revue 

:d half 
•Pihianni Troupe 



Brooks A Grace 
Will A Blondy 
Follies 

Avenue H 

Hoffnian A Jessie 
'";r«^en A 'Myra 
Louise Carter Co 
Itarton A .Sparling 
•Harry Abrams Co 
2d half 



CHAS. J. FREEMAN 

booking WITH ALL 

INDEPENDENT CIRCUITS 

SUITE 307 ROM AX BLDO. 

243 West 47(h St. 

NEW YORK 

Phone KRYANT 8917 



Merritt A Cough'n 
A A L Barlow 
Moss «•; Frye 
L A J Archer 

.American 

Mi-Coniifll A Ausfn 
Nat Burns 
Wyoming Duo 



Flynn A Arnold 
Howard A Ross 
Harry Cooper 
•p:iko A Keyo 
(One to nil) 

BROOKLYN 

Metropolitan 

T>ing A Long 



Sd half 
Bell A Eva 
Norton A Wilson 
Nancy Boyer «'o 
Thos Potter Dunne 
Kdw Stanlsloft Co 

BOSTON 

Orpheum 

\'aUla Co 



Greenwich Villager 

2d half 
r.aVere A tolllns 
Blair A Pennington 
Mr A Mrs D Clark 
Art Smith 
•Brgn Mc'K'a A O 

MILWAI KEE 

Miller 



CHESTER FREDERICKS 

The Featured .luvenile Dancer and 

(lever Miniic 

Third SeiiHoii with 

(■UN Kdwardw Hevue 



Irving Edwards 
The McNauKlitons 
•Stolen Sw>.«'ts 
Ktlifl Davis <'o 
LaFranco Bros 

HI FFALO 

State 

.Australian D<'lsos 
L«onard A Wallace 
Kcklioff A tJordon 
.Adrian 
Aloxand«r Co 

CHirAGO 
Rinlto 

Nestor A Vincent 
Herman Berrent 
Dobbs Clark A D 
Marsion A Manii-> 
Snap-shots 

DAYTON 

Hub* rt Dyer <^'o 
B<nfy Banks A C, 
Ki!nb<>rl»y A I'ago 
HuKh< s A r:\\n 
•LaSova A Gll're C 

HOHOKKN. N. .L 

Lyrlo 

Mankin 

Driscoll A Perry 
I .rook. ^ A (;rnv"6 
W.-b.'r A Elliott 



ELEGANCE IN COSTUMES 



=^ 



FASHION CLOTHES, MUSICAL COMEDY, FANTASTIC AND 
PERIOD COSTUMES FOR BOTH MEN AND WOMEN 

BAYER-SCHUMACHER CO., Inc. 

67-69 West 46th St., New York. Tel. Bryant 1834 



SRATTLE 

Orphenm 

^Sunday opening) 
HoudinI 

Gibson A Connclli 
Four of Us 
Bravo Mich'ino A B 
Jack Denny 
Howd Wlng'd A B 
Frances Kennedy 

- SIOUX CITY 

Orphenm 

Nral Abel 
Speeders 

McKay A Ardlr.e 
Juggling Nelsons 
2d half 



HUGH HERBERT 

22S LFFFKRTS AVENUE, 
KEW OARDKNS. L. I. 

Phone Riehmond Hill 968S 



Dooley A Sales 
Leo Donnelly 
Billy Arlington 
Mallia Bart 

MINNEAPOIJS 

Hennepin 

(Sunday opening) 
PAS Kelton 
Fr.ink Ward 
V< r.i Gordon Co 
Burke A Durktn 
Dance Creations 
Springtime Follies 
Billy Dale Co 

NEW ORLEANS 

Orpheum 
Williams A Wolfu.s 
Weaver A Weaver 
Bronsun A Baldwin 
Sneli A Vernon 
Ernest A HIatt 
Meehan's Dogs 
Miller A Capnian 

OAKI.-'VND. C.IL. 
Orplievm 

Max A Morltz 
Wbiteneld A Irel'd 
l^'rt Howard 
A A M Havel 
Aerial Valentines 
Mme /)oree Co 

OMAIf.4>, NEU. 

Orphenm 

(Sunday opening) 
Gordon A Rica 
Perone A Oliver 
Dugan A Raymond 
Flanagan A Mor'on 
Ro.H<oe Alia 
Pietro 
Ad'>laido Bell Co 



Don Valerip 
Glanville A Sand'rs 
Mlddlfn A SpelTer 
G'-ni; Green 

ST LOUIS 

Orpheum 

(Sunday opening) 
Bespio Barrlscale 
Van A Schen( k 
Gollis 

May Wirth 
I>. D. H? 
Hector 

.ST. PAUL 

Orpheum 

(Sunday opening) 
Lea Kellora 
Eric Zardo 
Conlln A Glass 
I.ou Tellegen Co 
Wayne A Warr«n 
<^*lara Howard 
(One to fill) 

VANCO'ER,. R. C. 

Orpheum 

(7-10) 
Rath Bros 
Fred Hughes 
Wylie A Harlni.Tn 
Farr.l A Taylor 
I>itMont 3 
Yarmark 
Rainbow s End 

WINNIPEG 

Orpheum 

Land of Fanta^te 
Wright A Dietrich 
Mfiore A KenJall 
Koyal Sidneys 
F A T Sabinl 
Whito Bros 
J A E Connelly 
Smith A Barker 



SHUBEET CIRCUIT 



Rosa Wyae Trio 



ORIHEUM CIRCUIT 



(IlKAf.O 

Palace 

<Sunday open '.g) 
•Thfo l(oVrt<i »'o 
P<>w<rH A WhhH.. 
Bt\au 4- IMnt 



(Week of Feb. S6) 

NEW YORW tITY 
Central 

Troubles of 1933 

♦Jeorge Jessel 
Courtney .Sisters 
J«'d Dooley Co 
O'Brien Hayes A B 
O'Hrien A Warren 

Harlem O. H. 

Ulushing Hride 

Lean A MayrtoUl 
J A K Do Ma CO 
Herman A Briscoe 
Georgie I'rice 
Harry C Clarke Co 
H A G Ellsworth 

BROOKLYN 
< Ye *m 



'"I'nrge DuFrai)?)'- 
11.1 li Errniii" A l< 
' 'a n Minos 
.\ I M<rtnan 

>tate-l4ike 
(Fundry <>\r n!ii;4 ) 



Snapshots 

I,«'iV l'i<lds 
Wynne Gibson 
Glad.vs Jam''s 
l"r.inr«s Vernon 
AI H.irdy 
.Imiifs '"agn^y 
l.riKhlon I'll itt .«• J 
>:<!! Wood 



BOSTON 

.Mnjestir 
Hello KvrrylMdy 

<;»rtrude Hoffman 
HAW Lander 

(HH'A(;0 

(«arrick 

(Sunday opening;) 
Rose (iirl 
Mbby A Sparrow 
Hattio Aithoff A Sis 
.\rco Bros , 

.Sht|) Camp 
Lou'.s Simon 

CINdNNATI 

Hhuhrri 

i Sunday openinj:) 
K a:^ n Wjtitrrs 
G-'orge Deacon 

,r-4^ U UJM — 



Merritt A Cough'n 
J Elliott A Girls 
•M Follet A Moth'r 
O'Brien A Buckley 
George Morton 
Victoria A Dupre 

2d half 
Nelaon A Nelson 
Conroy A Howard 
*Stutz A Bingham 
Louise Carter Co 
Howard A Brown 
Columbia A Victor 
Barnes A Stremci 
Kara 
(One to All) 

VIrtoria 

Obala A Adrienne 
Evelyn Cunnlngh'm 
A A L Barlow 
Eddie Nelson 
D Harris A Band 

:'d half 
Sanku.s A Silvers 
Nad<a Norralne 
•Kirk A Harris 
Georgf> Morton 
Dave Harris Band 

Linroln Rq. 

•Birdie Kraemer 
Wilton A Leio 
•Little Liar 
llillr McDermott 
Diaz Monkeys 
I'd half 
•T..aToy Bros 
Dayton A Palmer 
Reed A Selman 
Wor.sloy A Illllyer 
J Powell Sextet 
Greeley .Sq. 
Eddie A Grace 
Murray Senna A D 
Burt A Rosedale 
Al H Wilson 
Francis A Wilson 

2d half 
Raymond A Pike 
c:ilbert .Sis A A'ng 
Marshall Montg'ry 
Wilson A Jerome 
Graz<'r A Lawlor 

Delanrer Kt 

Perez A La Flor 
('has Glbbs 
Mooro A Goodwin 
K<lly A Wise 
Black A O'Donnell 
Gits Dance Hits 

2d half 
Fran''i<« A Wilson 
•Ma Follett A M 



Freeman A West 
4 Queens A Joker 
(irand Gardner 
Rubs LeVan A P 

2d half 
Obala A Adrienne 
Carey Bannon A M 
Percival Noel Co 
Eddie Nelson 
Bits Dance Hits 

Fulton 
John LcClalr 
Mabel Drew 
Columbfa A Victor 
Gilb't Sis A Arng 
J Powell Sextette 

2d half 
Perez A LaFlor 
Murphy A lUadley 
Burt A Rosedale 
Al H Wilson 
Dalton A Craig 

<i»tefl 

Grace A Lawlor 
Lazar A iiale 
Royal Midgets 

2d half 
Ling A Long 
Caledonia 4 
Royal Midgets 

Palace 

Canton 3 
Flynn A Arnold 
Howard A Ross 
Harry Cooper 
Making Movies 

2d half 
Green A Myra 
Roy A Arthur 
Making Movies 
(Two to nil) 

Warwick 

•Eiko A Keyo 
Ross Bros 
Sully A Kennedy 
•Hub't KIney A 'o 
(One to nil) 

2d half 
Arch! A Vedl 
Violet Carleson 
(Three to nil) 

ASTORIA. L. I. 

Astoria 

Duponts 
Violet Carleson 
Caledonia Four 
Percival Noel Co 
Lew Wilson 
Skelly A H'.lt Rev 
2d half 



Dancing Shoes 

2d half 
Watbon's Dogs 
Ellnorc A Love 
Fisher A Sheppard 
(Two to nil) 

LONDON, CAN. 

I>oew'a 

Dreon Sisters 
Goetz A Duffy 
Morning Glories 

2d half 
3 Bohemians 
Jones A I..loyd 
(tJne to flli) 

MEMPHIS 

State 

Prevoat A Goel»>t 



Maurice A Girlie 
-May .McKay A Sla 
Harr Mayo .'_ U 
Adjir A^ I Minbar 
itarab.m Grohs t.'o 

MONTREAL 

l.oeu-'H 

:i Walters 
.slmnis A Wynn" 
•Wh( n We Gr'w Cp 
V\ ilson A McAvoy 
Will Stanton Co 

Htate 
Maude Ellet Co 
4 liyron Girls 
Jewel Faulkner Co 
Jinnuy Savo Co 
Sparks of Broady 

NEW ORLEANS 

Creaeent 

•Helen Miller 
Fox A Aliyn 
Louis Love Co 
Lawrence A Bur'n 
Snyder's Animals 

2d half 
Prevost A Goelef 
St< vi-ns A Laurel 
Overholt A Young 
Jarrow 
Greenwich Villager 

OTTAWA. CAN. 

Loew 

Leo Zarrell 2 
•Irving A El wood 
Ti.ni Martin Co 
P»rmHino A Shelly 
I'rimrose Minstrels 

I'ROVIDENCE 

Emery 

Ponzlni's Monkeys 
Martin A Courtn^^y 
Marion Clare 
CAT Harvey 
Roy A Arthur 
(One to nil) 
2d half 
Mankin ' 

Old TImera 
DeVine A Williams 
Dancing Roots 
(Two to nii)> 

TORONTO 

Yonce Kt. 

•Ed GIngras Co 
t'ortr« A Ryan 
Helene Davis Co 
Wheeler A Potter 
«'has F Seamon 
Boys of I.«ng Ago 

W.ASHINGTOII 

Strand 

Zara Carmen 3 
1! A L Walton 



.....J" 



••SIR" JAMES 



DWYER 



Stevens A T>aur»l 
Overholt A Young 
Jarrow 



Hanson A Burton S 
Harrison Moss 
Tartan 



&U? SUN CIRCUir 



KETCH and WILMA 

"VOCAL VARIETY" 

Featuring Fred Ketch, whose douMe- 
k/c'mI duet wa** siwcensfully broadcasted 
My radio from Wentinghousc Sta., KDK.\. 

Playing Keith Circuit 



Whitrt X, B< ck 
James Watts Co 
I'arjsh A P»ru 
l»e Wolf Girls <••> 
Frank Fay 
li.iyutaKa Japs 



\LW\RK. N. 

Miuhe rt 
Liiilies of I9.'3 



Sully A Kennedy 

Duponts 

(On- I ) nil) 

National 

ri.iymond I'ike 
•Hidden Voices 
H<ed A Selman 
Wilson A Jerome ■ 
<Jld Timers 

Id half 
nur^ L.Van A P 
•.Mur'y Senna A D 
.I'iin Gr.inese 
.M A <:..1<1 Dust 2 

Orpheum 
♦I'ichinntil Troupe 
Conway A Howard 
M A C.old Dust 2 
.?f.i!i Granese 
L A J Archer 
2d half 
Wilton A Leio 



Cunt.lng'm 
O'Donnf-ll 



Bla.k 7k 

Hilly M'Dermotf 

Sk« liy A Heit Rf v 

Itoulevard 

K'l.r.i 

Karl .<: Mat(li<-v. s 

KI.ISS A Brilliant 

I .ni:- H 

I'd half 
Pird «. Kr;>em<.r 



Victoria A Dupre 
Eddie A < J race 
Little ]>iar 
MallfiU A .M<C,,b.. 

ATLANTA 

< irand 

B.n A Eva 

Norton A Wilson 
Nancy Boyr-r Co 
Thos Potter Dunne 
fc:dw Stanl.sloU in 

2d half 
<;f»r'.lfin Duo 
•l-'rank Shannon 
riul Statz< r Co 
Hill A Sw.< t 
(t »ne to fill) 

HALTl.MURK 

Hippodrome 

r.( kard's S< ain 
K<'r)nedy A lJ«\ m 

• ym nk Ford tii 

A'l.n K Ali'n 
1.1 1 1 'raid H»'\ u.e 

IHRMINfillAH 

Bijou 

r<<V'-r.i A «"oliiris 
•Miair A Peniiing'n 
Mr A Mrx D CufK 

♦ .A r T S I n i t h 

lITg n .\l K«'a A O 



III I'FALO 

I.«fuyette 

G A- T, iJardner 
I'arnmount 4 
.lack Conway Co 
•Betty Blytho 
♦10 English Dai.Hl^B 

CORTLAND, N. Y. 

Cortland 

ArmHtrong A Tyson 
♦I'erry (,'orwey 
•Peck A Harris 

Fl'LTON, N. Y. 

4|uirk 

Lee A Lawrence 
2 It'lnjonts 
(Two to nil) 

.L%Mi:sTO'N N Y 
Palace 

•Harry Fisher Co 
•Joseiyn A Turner 
.\ Ashley Co 
H'-rbert A Baggott 
L, Hawkins A Boyii 

2d half 
Eld'ge Barlow A K 
Sid Gold A Bro 
Badalle Natalie I'o 
Hurnham 
Bolhl Browne Co 

NIAGARA FALLS 

Ciltaract 

Eld'ge Barlow & K 
.\\ Jerome 
S.d (;old A Bro 
Fiud«'iie Nttiaiie '~«> 

2d half 
•Harry Fixh^r Co 
•JoR»'l>n A Turii-r 



♦H'rbert A Baggott 
.Ashley Co 

RO< HESTER N Y 

Victoria ^ 

•War.l A Gory 
Mme Du Harry Co 

2d half 
F A T Hayden 
Holmrs A Wells 

Sr*NGFlEIJ», O, 

Regent 

Willie Lang 
Hanley A Howard 
Taylor Macey A H 
Around the Corner 

2d half 
•Conn A Hart 
Stuart A Lawrerpc 
Fred WebT Co 
♦Torley's Circus 

WARREN, I' A. 

Liberty 

iHt half 

•Ciirmen Ercclle 
• Hum ham 
Bud Snyder Co 

WATKRT'N, N. Y. 

Havon 

•4 I'antinos 
Ariiivirong A Tyson 

JfoilrU'S A W'lls 

F A r Hayden 
•r< rry <'orwey 

2d half 
N'fit Burns 

iVri I il A (f«»l y 

Mine l»uBarry Co 
•K'ating A Ross 
VMarli Hart Co 



WESTERN VAUDEVILLE 



(IIICAGO 

Kedzie 
•G:ird'-ll A Pr.or 
.Ma. U A V'-lniar 
(l'i)ur to nil) 

2d half 
Kingston A Ebii' r 
(;••»<• A Mignon 
Billy Miller <■,, 
Fit.hs Mlnsirrli 
(Two to nil) 
Majestic 
H'dtllilKl'Ji) A Gi't 
\'<'rno»i 

•.Morgan Wo l'> «'<> 
I hree While Kuiins 
liillla (it fjUkTiidtK 



.hi< k G< oBK<' 
s i\<'r i)u\.il 
I'our Err«-»<s 

\BF.RDEKN. • 

(Irphruin 

mi M > 
G ,C .M Mot.if 
I'SKg K Wh'i»- 

ihrf .A." a 



Di><> 
A l< 



l>. 



IIL'MIN<>TON, ILL. 

Majestir 

Ward A Van 
La Pllarica Trio 
(One to nil) 
2d half 
S»>yniour A H'-aley 
<':^udia •'olPinMii 
.Spirit Murdi IJias 

BOONE, I A. 
L>rle 

•Wheat on A B<'>d 
Walter Baiter Co 

< F.DAR RAPIIIM 

.Majestic 

TT.-.r„:!n A Marl. 

I ) \« 1 Sis A H- il^■.^ 
It!.; Uf'binson 
• Two to HI) 
;'d half 
•t>aisv A Mt' in-i 
\ a''itl;iie \ i>i 
•H'd»ri<k W>nM I*,, 
< "'i^' a A Wf »ii 
»••-.« t'l fill/ 



CENTRA UA, WLI.. 

Grand 

•Berri A Bonnl 
Uantell'a Maniklna 

DUnUQUB. lA. 

Majestle 

Valentine Vox 
•Daisy A Htelna 
•Hderick Wynn Co 
CoHcia A Verdi 

FARGO, N. D. 

<>riind 

lH( half 
G A M Mooro 
lagg A White 
rhiee Alex 

FT. 5IAI>!?<ON 

Columhlik 

i'oniu'lly i'v- Uad< if.- 
•i'liveland A l>'\vry 
(ono to till) 

FT. RILEY. KAN, 

\\iir Dept. 

(Sunday opening) 
Jioiiiiy Dunn 
•Peggy Vincent 

UALENBURG, ILL. 

Orpheum 

Alden A Sandella 
Brady A Mahoney 
La Gracioaa 
2d hair 



Johnaon Rroa A J 
Cath Sinclair Co 

(9-l«) 
P Bremen A Bro 
Dave A Trensia 
(One to nil) 

OMAHA, NEB. 

Empresa 

•Denyle Don A ■ 
McKay A Earlo 
•DrlHko A Earle 
Henry CataUno C« 

2d half 
•Edwards v I)ean 
Jithnny's Nt-w «'ar 
t'ath Slmlalr Co 
(One to Ji;i) 

FLOKIA, ILL. 

Orpheum 

Huis'h John. '.•on 
•rolcm A D'.nn/ 
Alibi a I.ui-as Co 
(Three to nil) 

Id half 
•Holt A L< onard 
Wurd A Vsn 
(Four to nil) 

QUINCY. ILL. 
Orpheum 

Paul Rahn Co 
Duly A Burch J 

Kevue Resplendent 
2d half 



HENRI MARGO 

asalated by 

MAIU2ARITA MARGO. ARDATH DB 

SALES and HKLENK BETH 

Direction E.AtiLE A iiOl^SMlTH 



Paul Rahn Co 
Daly A Burch 
Revuo Resplendent 

<iD FORKS, N. D. 

Orpheum 

(8-9) 
•Wheaton A Boyd 

GD ISLAND. NEB. 
Majeatle 

(Sunday opening) 
•Martini Singers 
•Hayes A Lloyd 
((Jno to nil) 
. 2d half 
•Denyle Don A E 
•Drlsko A. Earl 
Johnson Broa A J 

GREEN BAY, WIS. 

Orpheam 

1st half 
Eary A Bary 
Flanders. A Bhtler 
•Anderson A U'nca 
•Al Moore Co 

JOLIET. ILL. 
Orpheum 

I<ady Alice's Peta 
Faber A McGowan 
Royal Venetian 6 

2d half 
Paul Howard 
Tyler A Crollua 
Fulsom A Denny Co 

JOPIJN, MO. 
Eleetrle 

O'Malley A Maxf'ld 
•Alice De Garmo 

2d half 
Wild A Sedalla 
(One to nil) 

K'NS'S CITY. RAN. 

Eleetrle 

Ir<'n« Trevette 
A Pair cf Dcucea 

2d half 
Three Ainl)l< r Bros 
(One to fill I 

K'NS'S CITY, MO. 

Globe 

P'lty Reat A Bro 
(;rlndell .% Ehtner 

2d hr^'f 
•Hnrt A Htlene 
Mason A i'cott 

L'VENW'TIl. KAN. 
Orpheum 



Alden A Sandella 
Brady A Mahoney 
La Gracioaa 

RACINE. WIS. 
Rlalta 

Lawton 

Harry Bewley 
Al Mooro Co 
Miller I'acker A 8 
(One to nil) 

ST. JOE, MO. 

Eleetrle 

Hart A Helene 
Uave A Treasla 
Don Lanniny 
George Lovett Co 

2d half 
Bl Rey Sla 
Barle A Edwards 
George Lovett Co 
(One to nil) 

ST. LOUIS 

ColambI* 

Teddy 

Ada Weber . 
Harpland 
Moore A Shy 
(One to nil) 
2d half 
Wright A Sldelll 
•Cleveland A D'wry 
Grindell A Bather 
(Two to fill) 

Ctetuid O. B. 

Sealo 

•J A C Nathan 
J A J Gibson 
Harry Ollbert 
Milton Pollock Co 
Green A Burnett 
Earl Rial Revua 
I..ester 

•Cal Dean A Qirlf 
Rlalto A. . 

•MeOoods L'gleVl Co 
•O A P Hickman 
Letter Writer 
I.<o Beera •' 

Jimmy Carr Co 
(One to fill) 

2a half 
Aeroplane Olria 
Franklyn Chaa Co 
Edith ciKTora Co 
Miilla Bart 
(Two to nil) 

SfOUX FALLft, 8.O. 
Orphenai >* 

(4-6) 



DARL MacBOYLE 

Bxclualva Malarial of Bvary Deacrlptton. 

ON HAND OR TO ORDBR. 
Il« W. 4»tli St.. N. T. CItyi Bryaat t4«4 



M-7) 
Mnson A Scott 
Harvey Heney A G 
•Earle A Edwards 
Thrf-e Ambler Bros 

LINCOLN, NEB. 
Liberty 

.Tithnson Bro« A J 
•Eleanor Pie-ce Co 
Hayes A Ll.ivd 
Cath Sinclair Co 
(One to nil) 

2d half 
•Wsrd A Ze'ler 
•Wolfe A Ward 
O'Neal Sis A Bens'n 
Don Lanninff 
The Speeders 

M^SH'LTOWN, lA. 
Casino 

Connf>lly A Uadil'fe 
.McKay A Earl 

MILWAI KEE 
Majeatle 

Msson A Scholl 
O'Connor Girls 
F A E Halls 



•Edwards A Dean 
Johnny's N'w Car 
P Bremen A Bro 

(8-10) 
Jack Hugh'^s Duo 
•Steven Green 
Herbert Lloyd Co 

SO. BEND, IND. 

Palaca 

Larry Comer 

Annal>eile 
V A B Stanton 
Page Hack A M 
(One to All) 
2d half 
•Snow A .Slgworth 
•Demarcos A Band 
(Three to nil) 

SPRGFIBLD. MO. 

Eleetrle 

Wild A Hedalla 
(One to nil) 
2d half 
O'Malley A Maxfd 
•Alice De Qatmo 

TERRR NA17TE 

Hippodrome 



COUNT TRIX 

PERRONE and OLIVER 
a *'Song Symphony'^ 



in 



ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 



M-Mifo A Fl-lds 
.l>in!-i's Hau alls lis 
Will J Warl 
B*-!!" Montrose 
Bird <al>aret 

MINNEAPOLIS 

:th St. 

S!nr lair A CmT'Y 
•Dr.ii.Ur A H'r.<lii. 
•B'»!«y to Bow»')y 



' » nt s A T .yo nw 
'"arl Emiriv" Pets 
Sylktster A Va»»(e 

KMy 



A'rf'plano Giria 
Suil;)! A Str«ing 
*Den)arcos A Band 
Yorlie A King 
(Two to nil) . 

2d hslf 
Letter Writer 
V A E Stanton 
•r<iur (.irton Girlg 

TOPFKA, KAN. 



.NORIOI.K, NKIL 

Auilltitrlum 

('•'inid;t> op«'itlr>g> 
•Keati'.r Pierce (Jo 

((,**tntinMOd on P.ig^ 46f!) 






yp t r l iy 

Vfaaon A Sci.tt 
Harv«'y H» n«>y i <3 
•Esn*' A Edwards 
Th:e». AniblT Brot 

2d half 
Irene Trt Vft'e - 

Hsyes A Lioyd 
•E!ranOf Pierce ^ 



^ 



VARIETY 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



A BRAND NEW HIT FROM THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT 



i 



OUTWHERETHEBLUEBEGINS 



7 



THE QUICKEST Hit IN BALLAD HISTORY 

BY BERT GRANT, JIMMY McHUGH and GEORGE GRAFF, Jr. 

SEND OR CALL FOR YOUR COPY 

JACK MrLLS, iNc 



MUSIC 
PUBLISHERS 



152-4 West 45th Street, 

NEW YORK CITY 



CORRESPONDENCE 

Th« cititt under Correspondence in ihit issue ef Variety are 
•• follows, and on pages: 



BALTIMORE 



A3 



t 



BOSTON Cs! 

CHICAGO 41 

DETROIT 74 

KANSAS CITY 64 

LOS ANGELES 43 

MONTREAL 40 



NEW CnLEANG ( 41 

PORTLAND, ORE 64 

SAN ANTONIO . . . . . .. V^. ... . 64 

SAN FRANCISCO 40 

SYRACUSE 74 



WASHINGTON, D. C 



46 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Bert Lytell in the Lambs' gambol 
playlet. 'The Valiant," stands out in 
headiiiTing an other^vise ordinary 
program at tlie Orplieuin this week. 
Lytell's local popularity, through 
former stock engagements and pic- 
tures, guaranteed attendance which, 
combined with the excellent offe.ing. 
proved the banner attraction of the 
season. The act was enthusiastically 
received, terminating in a speech. 

Ilogers and Allen added further 
dignity with thtir voices and nicely 
arrang*^d routine. 'Max and Moritz.'j 
the chimpanzee turn, astonished and 
was hugely enjoyed. Whitfield and 
In|Jand provided comedy with chat- 
terxind their laugh "drop," next to 
cloflnng. Carlisle and Lamal revealed 
•omething new with a talking skit, 





IFEINBERG 

SUITE 504 >N leoWEJT 465r- 
pHONE-BRYANT ^ ^e 64' 

Brand Oper<i..Husiad 
Comedbf J nd^Aiir^^tilk 
Sjzrs in hdding Action 
J leturc 'Jheaires cfthi 



and registered. The Valentines, sup- 
plemented by a loop-the-loop con- 
trivance, closed well. 

Derf Howard did nicely at the 
l)iano, and Jones and Kllit, with a 
band, opened fairly well, although 
the mu.sician.s failed to make much 
of an impression. 

A good bill at the Pantages, topped 
by Josle Heather, who carved a 
separate niche for herself. "Noodles" 
Fagan and Elsie slipped through to 
a laughing success, augmented by 
little Mary's dancing. "Noodles' 
was forced out of the running after 
Sunday becau.se of illness. Palo and 
Palet, with their instrumental of- 
fering, caused a halt in proceedings, 
with the accordion playing seeming 
to be their best bet. Klsie Clarke 
finished well up, due to her manner 
of delivery. Kate and Wiley, con- 
tortionists, closed artistically. The 
Rollos opened. 



<9d. 



&cploitdlion 



Dancing is the prime factor In the 
current show at the Golden Gate. 
Williams and Vannessi delivered In 
the headline position to consider- 
able appreciation, while Stan Stan- 
ley and Joe Kane breezed by for 
thoir proverbial success. Babb, Car- 
roll and Syrell were not lacking in 
results, and Arthur and Morton 
Havel secured laughs all the way. 

Paul Montgomery In cowboy re- 
galia and a feminine pianist sup- 
plipd a high-class vocal routine in 
a baritone voice that connected, 
while the Bart\etts put matters un- 



If You Belong to the Profession 

YOU MAY BUY FROM US AT 

Strictly Wholesale Priccsl 

RICE FASHION SALES 

Johher.1 In T.inRprle and Hosiery, Canteen 
ixnd Novelty I3af(5, Jewelry, Perfumei, 
KarrlnffB, Ivory Novelties, etc. 

39 W. Adams St.. 4th Hoor. CHICAGO 



der way by means of their aerial 
trapeze work. 

Ackerman & Harris have acquired 
the Orpheum, Salt Lake, It is said, 
on a 20 -year lease. The same firm 
is said to be negotiating for a house 
in Denver, also In Los Angeles. 



Bud Schaffer who filled in for Will 
King at the Hippodrome for ten 
days following the sudden death 
here of King's mother acquitted 
himself well in the comedy lead. 



Preparations are 'being made to 
close the Imperial for two weeks to 
remodel the interior. It will reopen 
March 31 with "Bella Donna" as the 
feature. . 



Sibyl Bethal started rehearsals 
of a now act using people secured 
in San Francisco. . 



Because of the success of The 
Sherwoods and their singing orches- 
tra at I>oew'8 Warfleld this aggre- 
gation of musical artists have been 
signed up for another year by Loew- 
and win appear In his Pacific Coast 
houses. They are now in their 
fourteenth week at the Warfleld. 



The Ackerman & Harris all col- 
ored revue "Struttin' Along" at the 
Century will be sent on tour as 
soon as the Century run ends. The 
Century engagement will be ex- 
tended to ten weeks or more. 



Pantages theatre Is undergoing 
rejuvenation back stage. The dress- 
ing rooms are being dolled up and 
shower baths and other conveni- 
ences are being installed. 



Mamie Smith. Carolynne Snow- 
den, Frisco Nick, Susie Hurst and 
Jessie Derrick from "Struttin* 
Along" at the Century theatre are 
doubling at the Palais Royal on 
Fridays and Saturdays of each 
week. ^ 



Arthur Freed, composer, an- 
nounced his engagement to marry 
Renee Klein, non-professlonaL 



A dinner was given In honor of 
Jack Osterman by the Misses Hattle 
and Minnie Mooser at their Aladdin 
Tiffin Studio last Thursday eve- 
ning. 



Joe Goodwin is the president of 
the Joe Goodwin Music Corporation 
and not merely on the staff of the 
Campbell-Campana Music Company 
as reported. Campbell and Cam- 
pana are members of the Goodwin 
firm whose song hit "Kentucky, U. 
S. A." by Coleman Ooetz has given 
this new concern a dandy start. 




Matt Grau Is In San Francisco 
and announces he is promoting an 
operatic scheme alonr the same 
lines as the St. Loula mantclpal 
opera Idea. 



William MorrU, manager of 
Harry Lauder, staged a gold service 
dinner to Harry Lauder In the St. 
Francis Hotel here last week in 
honor of the golden wedding of the 
■tar's parents. The aged couple 
celebrated at the same time in 
Dunoon. Scotland. 



Mitch Leichter la arranging two 
musical tabloid companies to play 
tha valley and coast towna 



The Rex Reynolds Light Opera 
Company installed in the Oakland 
house by Pantages with a view to 
bolstering poor business has failed 
to accomplish ita purpose and 



closed after two weeks. The aggre- 
gation numbered 35 people. 

The house was using three acts 
of vaudeville with the opera troupe. 
Now the full vaudeville "program 
has been replaced. . . 



biir- 



pic- 
plc- 



MONTREAL 

By JOHN GARDINER 

HIS MAJESTY'S— Community 
Players. 

PRINCESS— Vaudeville. 

GAYETY— ' Hlpplty Hop." 
lesque. 

IMPERIAL— Vaudeville and 
tures. 

LOEW'S— Vaudeville and 
tures. 

PICTURE HOUSES— Capitol. 
"Third Alarm': AMen, "Me and Mv 
Gal'; Strand, "The Young Diana"; 
Maisonneuve. "Youth to Youth"; 
Mount Royal. "Hound of the Bas- 
kervllles"; Crystal Palace, "The 
Trap"; Regent, "Wife Against 
Wife"; Papineau. "The Silent Call"; 
System, "Fori;et-Me-*Jot"; Plaza, 
"Strangers' Banquet"; Midway. "The 
Fast- Mail"; Belmont, "The Scarlet 
Cur." 



Madame Emma Calve, distin- 
guished prima donna, will give a 
concert here early in April. 



At the close of last year's the- 
atrical season in June, the Montreal 
Theatrical Managers' Association, 
representing the 20 leading theatres 
in the city, offered to give a big 
testimonial benefit show for the 
combined charities of Montreal. 



The affair was indefinitely post- 
poned and never took place. At 
the last regular meeting of the Man- 
agers' Association they voted to re- 
vive the proposition, and the date 
was set for April 13. 



The Community Players opened 
at His Majesty's Monday night in- 
stead of Tuesday, as heretofore, be- 
cause there had been a strong de- 
mand for an additional performance 
of "Our Mr. Hepplewhite," by 
Gladys Unger. This piece was 
transferred to the 'first half of the 
week and played on all three even- 
ings. There was no performance 
Thursday, and Friday and Saturday 
evenings the Players gave a Stan- 
ley Houghton drama never before 
performed in Montreal, entitled "The 
Younger Generation." 



$ 



751 



IS a small price to 
pay for a trunk pos- 
sessing such quali- 
tle<* a<i tbose found in the 

TAYLOR XX 

TAYLOR'S ' 



CHICAGO 
2S E. Randolph St. 



NEW YORK 
210 W. 4tth8t. 






WANT A JOB IN THE 




A contract for two weeks' work at the Paramount 
studio on Long Island goes to the prettiest chorus 
girl at the dance of the 

PARAMOUNT PEP CLUB 

AT THE '- 

HOTEL COMMODORE 
on Friday Night, Mttrch 9 

TOMMY MEIGHAN and TONY MORENO 

WILL BE THE JUDGES 



Come around after the show Friday. 

You can get in free by asking for Nils Granlund at 
the door. It's a big party. 

There's a job for one of you, and a good time for all 

AT THE .. 

PARAMOUNT BALL 



I 



TRIANON ORCHESTRA 



Trianon Dance Palace 



I ' : ' . 



CHICAGO 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



VARIETY 



41 




.■ t 



' < . ■ . . ' 



AND 



-vf, . 



-■»! . '•* .' 



? ■ '■ ■ 







\ •,/ .• 



V'. 



'/'.'-' 



THE ONLY DANCING TEAM IN AMERICA SUCCESSFULLY HOLDING THREE WONDERFUL 



SPOTS IN THREE WONDERFUL SUCCESSES AT ONE TIME 



:?^\-^>'' 



■ ..•«,■••■.■.»;■.* ■.••■ »-■-' ' 



■.;'•■ < 



K' 
■"<, 



NOW APPEARING -^ * 7 

in "THE MASKED WOMAN" ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ " ^ i^ "THE WILD FLOWER" 

THE ELTINGE THEATRE THE CASINO THEATRE 



MANAGEMENT A. H. WOODS 
On at 9:35 P. M. 



MANAGEMENT ARTHUR HAMMERSTEIN 
On at 10:10 P. M. . 



And at THE AMBASSADOR HOTEL GRILL 

5Ut STREET and PARK AVENUE 
AFTER THEATRE 

UNDER THEIR OWN PERSONAL DIRECTION - 



• • * f^ 






CHICAGO 



Chicago. F'ob. 28. 

The extremes of vaudeville may 
oe encountered this week at the 
Rlalto, where Leon Kimberly and 
Helen Paige in "'Spring la Calling" 
present one of the most delightful 
numbers ever seen at that house, 
and where the "Wind Blew Inn" 
Jazz orchestra offers torture which 
recalls that recorded in the history 
Of the middle ages. 

Kimberly and Paige have an ideal 
act for the Rialto. 

The "Wind Blew Inn" syiicopators 



iCALCUTS 



THE STANDARD ENGRAVING CO Inc 

a25V^>it 39 Jf NEWYOKM. 



get* their name from a resort which 
has been much in the public eye 
through police raids, and possibly 
for this reason appear on a dark- 
ened stage so that none of the 
muslcianfl can be identified. It la 
noiso under the guise of Jazz, and 
unmerciful punishment for most 
theatregoers, although there were 
some people who seemed to like it 
and applause followed every 
number. 

The "Wind Blew Inn" syncopators 
opened the show. Bentley, Banks 
and Gay followed, which is a com- 
bination of a girl eoprano and a 
tenor and bass who play piano. The 
two men double at the Instrument 
and single now and then, and solos 
and trios which consist mainly of 
snatches of songs are offered. It is 
an arrangement by which high claes 
singers can get vaudeville atten- 
tion. Hubert Dyer and Co. present 
the' comedy ring act which has a 



EDDIE MACK TALKS: 

FINAL CLEARANCE SALE 
— SUIT OR OVERCOAT 

Values up to $75 



No. 123 



$32i0 



MACK'S CLOTHES SHOP 

MACK BUILDING 

JuBt a atep East of Droadway on 46th Street 

OTHER STORE: 1583 HROAD\TAY. Bet. 47th and 48(h Strccti 



place for Itself In vaudeville. The 
narrow escapes from a collision be- 
tween the man on the flying rings 
and the clown arranging the chairs 
is done so well that all imitators 
should etudy it carefully. Mowatt 
and Mullen combine nut comedy, 
club juggling and singing and make 
the combination entertaining. The 
manipulation of four clubs by the 
man, Just a bit. Is dandy. 

Ray Hughes and Pam followed 
with another nut act which Is en- 
tirely away from Mowatt and Mul- 
len. Hughes falls down on the 
«tage at every opportunity and 
tumbles down Into the orchestra, 
making many laughs, and play« 
upon the fact that Pam is a shapely 
miss. La Sova and Gilmore have 
quite an elaborate dancing act 
which la novel and highly enter- 
taining. Ward and King scored 
strongly with their dancing and the 
talk and whistling encountered a 
good reception. Fulton and Duray 
present rube comedy which la 
ridiculous rather than funny, but 
which obtained some laughs out- 
side of the outburet when the girl 
tumbles backward Into the water. 
Harry Garland (NeW Acts) Was 
liberally applauded. Kimberly and 
Palg^ registered the applause hit of 
the ahow. 



Kenneth Pitzpatrlck and Dlalr Mc- 
Elroy have gone to California on' a 
vacation. McRlroy will remain 6ne 
month, but Pltxpatrlck will be thfre 
three months. 

r, ': • 

t, 1 • - <♦ 
Johnny J. Jones, booking, .man- 
ager for Jones. Linlck A Schaofer, 
who has been III, was able to rep(^t 
at the office for half an hour Mon- 
day morning. 



The Orpheum at Grand Rapld.^, 
.Mich., destroyed by fire recently, will 
reopen shortly with musical stock 
and pictures. Harvey Arlington! 
who has managed the house for six 
years, will continue. 

(Continued on page 65) 



NEW ORLEANS 

By O. M. SAMUEL 
T ULAN E— Dark. 

ST. CHARLES— St. Charles Pk.y 
era la "At 9.45. " 

OKPHEL'M— Vaudeville. 

CTIESCENT— Vaudeville. 

PALACE— Va udevllle. 

STIiAND— 'The Christian." 
LI HEHTV— Jackie Coogan 
"Oliver TwI.st." 



In 



The Dauphine opcnod this week 
with a "tab" called "The Town I«'ol- 
lies." Other tabloid.s are scheduled 
to follow, prosperity permitting. 



Bessie Clifford closed at the Or- 
pheum Sunday evening and opened 
nt the Palace Monday, with the 
Keith southern timo to follov»*. It is 



the first time ah art has played the 
Palace Immediately foilowini^au en- 
gagement at the Orpheum. 



TN'- 



._->!• _C'T. 



The St. Charles Players plan to 
run all summer. 



Theodore Grunewald has sold his 
interest in the Uruncwald hotel and 
retired. 



EUGENE COX 

SCENERY 

1734 Ogden Avenuo 

CHICAGO 

Phone N»«lr7 ISOl 
ASK:— KNOX WILSON 





You have teen her face under the 
glare and ahadowsof stage lightings 
YoQ n«Ter saw her make-up 'but it 
was there all the time Artists oi the 
stage use make-up erf quality — the 
kind of quality that is Leichner's. 
Here are creams, powders, paints, 
and liquids for all folea-each one 
made for drtists who want the best of 
make-ups. Ifs there— all the time 
Use Leichner s— and be sure. 



At your druggtat or auppty houtm. 

L. LEBCHNEIR. 

milET PMPAMTIONSimI THEATRICAL MAKEUP 

Sof Dintnhuior*. GEO. BORGFBLOT A C0..1Mh St. and Irviog PL. New York 



PAUL 




'■'''-¥''hP:U-i'r:- ;:■;,.;■•■ AND HIS 

EDGEWATER BEACH HOTEL ORCHESTRA 



yi r.' 



STILL KNOCKIN' 'EM 



Edgewater Beach Hotel, CHICAGO 



48 



VARIETY 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



BADAU-NATAU CO. 



Elsie Gardener at Piano 



m 



*T>ANCE CLASIQUE" 



PERSONAL DIRECTION 

JACK FINE 



i 

:■¥'■ ■■■ 



Elbertha OWSLEY Roy 

PRESENTS 

"A PAPER PARADBE" 

: ' ■ ■■'■■■'' ■ WITH :"■■■-:.-.,-.■; 

LAWRENCE RICHARDS 

AND^ 

DONN BALL^~~~~^~ —JEAN PALMER 
BETTY ROSS GEORGIA RICHARDS 

RAE SAUNDERS JUNE JOHNSON 

HELEN NORMAN DOROTHY LE CLAIRE 

' Personal Direction JACK FINE 



WATSON TWINS 

AND 

JULES JENKINS' 
REVUE 

THIRD SEASON 

WITH 

JACK FINE 



Chicago's Sensation 

WIND BLEW INN 

Syncopators with 

BILLY RICE and GANG 



Discovered by Jack Fine 
Now Rialto, Chicago 



■ 



CHAS. J. WILLEMS, OFFICE MANAGER 





BOOKING EVERYWHERE 
NO ACT TOO BIG— NO SALARY TOO HIGH 

WIRE — PHONE — WRITE ^^ -^ 

■"■'■"'"■■■'"■■ "■^■■" ' '■ STATE 4988 :.■>■ -'.y,:'-''^ ■'■'''' 



1212-14 CAPITOL BLDG. 



CHICAGO 



JOE GRAHAM 
REED SISTERS 

AND 

JOVETA DARDON 

ASK JACK FINE 
HE KNOWS 



'TIPS and TAPS" 

Charles and Francis 
McGARY 

AND^^vC; ■■■'■■-■■■ 

■■•-.. ■'.,•<■ 

MARJORIE GILLESPIE 

THANKS TO JACK FiNE 



HARRY CORNELL 



AND 



FAYE SISTERS 



'''X '■ 



Management JACK FINE 



An Artist's Dream 



WITH 



JOYCE LANDO 

FLORENCE McaURiG and CO. 



OUR AGENT JACK FINE 



J-. 



HEWS OF THE SAILIES 

(Contlnueil from page 18) 

*'Seaward/* a yacht owned by Cecl! 
B. De Mille. and arrested Edward 
McNary, master, Monday on a 
charge of violating the prohibition 
laws. The film director recently re- 
turned from a cruise in the CSulf of 
California, but left the yacht a few 
days ago in charge of Capt. McXary. 
When the dry enforcement agent.s 
boarded the yacht at San Pedro they 
confiscated 80 quarts of liquor and 
arrested McXary. 



In his meRsatje sent to tlie Legis- 
lature this week re^jarding reorgani- 
zation of the New York state gov- 
ernment rjfiverr.nr Al Smith recom- 
mended the abolition of tiie picture 
censorship commission. 



A fire occurred in tlie film room 
of the Stanley, Tth avenue and 42d 
street. Tu^'sday evonini?, the audi- 
ence leaving without diPurder. 



argument with a male patron of the 
Palais Royale. a cabaret establish- 
ment in which she is interested. 



Mrs. Mary A. Barker, formerly In 
burlesque with Billy Watson, has 
started a breach of promise action 
for $50,000 against Charles F. Mc- 
Kinney of Newark. She alleges tin 
defendant proposed marriage last 
September. He denies the allegntion. 
declaring her action a farce. 



Tlie verdict of $12,500 obtained in 
January. 1922, in her actiojj for 
damages in an auto accident, by 
Reine Davies, has been uphelil on 
appeal. 



theatre manager at the request of 
the Lord's Day Alliance. Mills 
pointed out that he had complied 
with the law in every way. 



The John 'Murray Anderson mu- 
sical sliow has been roMiimed "Jack 
and Jill. " It wa.« orininnlly knowti 
as "The Cherry Chair." 



Magi-^trate Well In E.^sex Mtn-ket 
Court, New York, last week refused 
to entertain a complaint against Ben 
Mills, manager of Loew's Delancey. 
on a charge of violating the penal 
I law by playing Sunday vaudeville. 
Tlie magistrate dismissed a sum- 
mons that had been served on the 



A suit brought by C. C. Crafta, a 
picture producer, for $100,000 
against Edgar Rice Burroughs, au- 
thor of the "Tarzan" stories, for al- 
leged breach of contract, was with- 
drawn from a Jury last week and 
dismissed by Justice Erlanger in the 
Supreme Court. The court ruled 
that a contract did not exist. The 
defendant admitted selling Crafts 
the picture rights to "The Son o' 
Tarzan" and testified that the plain- 
tiff never accepted an offer made by 
him for the remaining stories. 



The Appellate Division of the Su- 
preme Court last week denied an 
appeal by A. L. Erlanger, the Forslx 
Theatre Co. and the George M. Co- 
han Theatre Co. from an order re- 
fusing to dismiss cTomplaints 
brought by Marc Klaw. The com- 



plaints charged Erlanger with "un- 
authorized acts" and violation of his 
duties as an offlcer of the Forsix 
Theatre Co. 



The Department of Labor in 
Washington last Friday gave out a 
ruling that Pat Somerset, an Eng- 
lish actor, against whom deportation 
proceedings have been pending, may 



remain in this country six months. 
The deportation proceedings were 
brought when the actor's name was 
linked with that of Eklith Day. 



Minnie Reisler, the wife of John 
J. Reisler, known as John the Bar- 
ber; their two sons, Morris and 
George, and her brother. Max Katz, 
(Continued on page 44) 



WeU-^romed Men mid Actors m 

SUKUK 




HAIR DRESSING 
It Keeps the Half tit place 

At Tour Droff Store*, or Scad f 1.00 to . 

T. NOONAN & SONS CO., BOSTON 




Porter Emerson P.rowne's 'Ladie.t 
for Siiie" is sclieduled to he brou?iit I 
to Broadway under the title of 
••Sold." i 

The Cre.s^'f'iit. a pictur*^ house on 
Boston road, between l6$ih and | 
167th streets, has been sold by the 
Komate Realty Co. to II. and S. 
Sonn. Inc. (.Hyman and Sidney II. 1 
Sonn>. 



THE DANCE 



A charge of disorderl/ conduct . 
against Evel.\n Xe.-!)it was dis- 
missed last Tl.nr.sday V>y County 
Judge William H. Smatiiers in At- 
lantic City. Mi.«5s Nosbit was ar- | 
rested Sunday, following an alle; . 



Laughs Are Necessary 

if vou expect to get .inywhere in 
vaudeville. JAMES MADISON S 
MONTHLY COMEDY SEKVICK 
furnishes brand-new and origii al 
laughs that have never been 
laughed at before. It is quite 
small in size, but to any enter- 
tainer getting $200.00 per week 
and over it is s^pr^me good 
value. COMEDY SERVICE N«>. 
11 is in active preparation. Will 
send the first ten tiumbers for 
$11; or any 4 for $r». Single num- 
ber.*'. $2. Yearly sul».«erii)tionH (12 
numbers), $15. Each nmnliet 
contains monologue and cross- 
fire patter and .^mart gags. 
JAMES MADISON 
14«3 Broadway New York 



A 



STUDIO 




SAMMY LEE 



'CLASSES IN ALL STYLES OF DANCING— ENROLL NOW 

PRIVATE LESSONS BY APPOINTMENT 

Mr. Lee, who produced the dance, and enwrnble. in "THE GINGHAM GIRL," "PEACHES," "LITTLE 
MISS CHARITY," "THE LITTLE WHOPPER" and other succetses, will al«> stage routines for musical 

comedy vaudeville and revue artists. 



FIFTH FLOOR OF THE 



:l 



EARL CARROLL THEATRE BLDG. 

50th St. and 7th Ave. . Circle 6690 NEW YORK CITY 

STUDIO ALSO AVAILABLE FOR REHEARSALS 



pr.Tvn:t-. 



%''fyjr, ,3x;~-v..-s.;'.v."i:;.ri£ii™»T"rvT..-»: 



:a>7Ubit'. TU? " -TJf 



Thursday, March 1, 19K3 



■•■;-♦.:• i- 



-:.'.'»/ 



::- 'jv.i.n 



'V 



"-=«.-'• • 




E T Y 






■>\ 



43 



r< I 



, : •■■>. 



THE 

H. ROBERT LAW 

. - Scenic Studios 

502 W. 38th Street 
NEW YORK CITY 



V r- 



. '• 



SETTINGS FOR PAUL 

WHITEMAN'S PALAIS 

ROYAL ORCHESTRA, 

LONDON 

HIPPODROME • 



Herbert Ward 
-Walter Har\ ev 

Tel. Longacre 0474 



..-. , J 



BALTIMORE 

By ROBERT F. SI8K 

AUDITORIUM— "Blossom Time." 
'FORDS— "Ladles for Sale." 

ACADEMY— "Abie's Irish Rose" 
(10th week, stock). 

LYCEUM— "Up in Mabel's Room* 
(2d week, stock). 

MARYLAND- Keith vaudeville. 

PALACE— Mollie Wimams* Show. 

GAYETY— 'Taxi Girls" (stock 
burlesque). 

FOLLY — Mutual burlesque. 

CENTURY— "Java Head." 

RIVOLI— "The Stranger's Ban- 
quet." 

NIXON'S VICTORIA~*\Vho Are 
My Parents?" 

Century Roof— "Cabaret." • 



With "May Time" and "The Bat," 
both many times repeaters, as the- 
atrical fare last week, business was 
fair, but not pherfomenal. "The 
Bat" opened fairly and had several 
big houses at the Auditorium, espe- 



SMARTEST FRENCH SHOES 

For On and Off Stave r^^ 

s»M««-« ■;^r\ 

•f Short 'J3i ^ * 

West 45th St., at No. 154 

Opp. I.yseum The*. B«t. B'waj tncl Citi A^e. 




•if 



rlally on tlie holidays, while "May 
Time," the new production, had only 
a fair week at Ford'.s. "The IJal ' 
claimed $12,000 on its fifth week 
here, wliile 'May Time" pr.ij.ably 
Kot $7,500 at Ford's, this due to good 
balcony trade. 



The old Sigrmund Romberg oper- 
etta, which has played h«*e many 
times, was not cordially I'^ceived by 
the critics, as its new production is 
anything but attractive, black dr.ip- 
eries being u.sed as background.^ 
against otherwise conventional 
scenery. The scene at Adelphine's 
Night Club was formed by the black 
velvet drape with several doorways, 
indicated by draped green silk, while 
the Identical arrangement was used 
in the last scene of the dressmakin.'^ 
establiithment, with pink Marion Kill; 
substituted for ilie gi-een. Green and 
Nancy Glbbs .sang the leading roles, 
and neither stood out particularly. 
All in all it seemed the present pro- 
duction of "May Time" is som**thinT 
which will not be suited for the bi^j 
stands on the .Shuberts' list, al- 
though it might do well in ilie 
smaller towns. 



der that, but built throughout th*> 
week and showed jjromiBe of doing 
a real business this week. 



"Ladles for Sale," Porter Emerson 
Browne's newest opus, is at Foi'd's 
this week in Its .«iecond week out. It 
was received with mixed comment 
by the iocal reviews. The production 
and the ca.<;t were given highest 
praise, but the play Itself was the 
subject of several oritical shafts. 
Character delineation was the chief 
fault. 




The Academy, witli "Abie's Tris'i 
Rose," is begJnrilng to exhaust its 
patronage and the big bourses are 
disappearing, until half a house i^ 
considered an audience. $7,000 would 
about cover their receipts List week, 
while "Up in Mabel's Room." at the 
New Lyceum, drew Just a little un- 




Tin: EXGLiari tillOP 



10 EAST 44TH STREET 



NEAR 
5th Ave. 



THE PERSONNEL OF Ti)e FLEMING OR^AN iZATION 

Publlshfil to ^c<iuaint the pubMf r.-Uh th« 
high type of n»en who conduct ihix bUH;iit«< 

DAMEI, M. FLEMING, GUfiRow. Scollaml; Manlln. P. T. 
KOBKKT «. HAMILTON, Vrt^.. formerl.v Mgr. of Win. Morgnn A Son- 
rLARENCR r. KLINR. Founder of th« rieniiii» orgoiiixatlon 
MARVIN H. R.\MBAY, formerly Ranita.T * Son. Hrooklyn 



=^ 




UNRESTRICTED CHOICE 

London Style Clothes 

FOR MEN 

KBI.KOT KNr.l.iaH TOP COAT.'^ 

ruUR-PlKOE r.OT.F Sl'lTS AND NOUKOI.KS 

SILK-T.l.VlOn TrXKDO.S 

BIO O'BRIEN UI..STEni5 

SACK HUIT.S IN SAXON YS— TWEE l>S 

ANI> BLUE UNFINISHED ,WOKSTKI>S 



"Abie" ha« one more week to go 
here, when a stock under the wing 
of Henry Duffy will take over the 
house and present "East Is West'' as 
the Initial offering. It is said that 
Mrs. Julia Lydig-Hoyt will play the 
lead In the new company, which ha.«? 
"Six Cylinder Love," "Whispering 
Wires'* and a few other good shows 
up the sleeve for the near future 
However, Oeorge Marshall's com- 
pany up at the Lyceum Isn't sleep- 
ing for next week. They do a new 
Woods melodrama, "Guilty," and 
have imported Hazel Dawn, Henry 
Daniel .and Robert Strang for the 
leading roles. They are advertising 
heavily in advance on it, and rumor 
.says It will have a courtroom scone 
some heavy acting and its fair shar«' 
of weepy stuff. All of which soundj 
good from a box-offlce point of view. 
Following this Mar.^^hall will revive 
"(Jetting Gertie's Garter" for a run, 
as the play had run eight weeks to 
big business when It closed hefoiv 
it being generally admitted that it 
had not exhausted its patrona.'^e 
Then the "Demi-Virgin," which hr 
win produce first at the Bclasco in 
\Va.shington, with Hatel Dawn in 
her old role, will come to Baltimore, 
and he has "Why Men Leave Honi", ' 
Bluebeard's Eighth Wife" and oth^r 
.■-hows of the same type In mind for 
I arly presentation. When the "Demi- 
Virgin" played at the Auditorium 
earlier in the seapon at a $2 top it 
(lid turna^'ay business, and at a $1 
rop'at the Lyceum, with Hazel Dawn 
lioading the ca.st, it looks just now 
like a gold mine. It all depends on 
how the ministerial censors, thf 
.self-appointed moral guardians of 
this holy city, act up between now 
and then. 



LOS ANGELES 

By ED. KRIEQ 

I'risco, -vvlio came h^re for u 
vmulevil'e Engagement, is dif^kn- 
■ Mg for a film starring job. 



37 



.50 



Regular price* 45.00 to 70.00 



.An extraoi'dina' y ujiptntuuity t'--" 
Mu^n who desire t'orrn<'t do'.hf'R of 
lii.stinction and Real lOnglivli qiialHy. 



NO CHARGE FOR ALTERATIONS 




Harry McCoy's suit ag.iinst Eva 
Tanguay comes up in the loojil 
• ourts this week. McCoy is suinji^ 
for alleged salary due. ., • 



Alex Pantages came back from 
.San Krancisco Wednesday., 



Ivy .Shrppard is leading womnn ni 
Kt'an'a theatre. Kngag^d liiis week. 



"The P.at" drew big bps!ne-s o'- 
.ts f.econd week at the Masoji. 1{« - 
<fipls almost totaled first w»ek». 



r.irmel Myers has not given >iii 
!i<i- stage ambitions. She ♦•>p'''ts 
to go in a new nroduction short 1\. 



/ 




WElDON.WIUIAMS&LICKt 



FORT SMITH. ARK. 



RENT 



ANY .\K\V SKT IN STOCK AT MODKR \Tr. 
( ll\R4;i:-_TilKN Di:iJLCX I KO.M 11 K- 
< II ASK I'UUE. 

y^y: HAVE .MANY ATTKAfTIVK STAOK 
SKTTI\<;s YOr MAY i MOO>i: KH<ni 



■mWTi SCENIC STUDIOS 

"SERVICE THAT IS DEPENDABLE" 

220 West 4Sth Street NEW YORK CITY 

Pbcre Cryant 6517 



Trip tohxrape 



IF you have been planning a trip to 
Europe, you can now have a six weeks* 
vacation on the sea and abroadyir on/y $4g5^ 
Send the information blank below for the 
special booklet, **Economy Trips to Europe,'* 
which shows how such a trip is comfortably 
possible for $495, gives you your choice of 
a number of attractive itineraries and contains 
a great deal of helpful information about 
travel conditions abroad. ;**v ^^vi, : ^^ 

The price of $495 covers among other 
things a round trip passage on one of the 
luxurious U.S. Government ships, operated 
to Europe by the United States Lines. On 
the famous "Cabin Ships," widely known 
for the speed and service that they offer at 
low rates, first and second class distinctions 
have been abolished. And cabin passage to 
English ports is as low as $120. 

Send Today} 

Mail the information blank today for the travel 
guide, ** Economy Trips to Europe," which will 
show you how to get the maximum return for 
your time and money spent abroad. Also get 
the handsomely illustrated booklet showing actual 
interiors of the vast Government ships that sail 
to all parts of the world. Learn in detail about 
the United States Government's splendid service 
to Europe. No obligation. Mail the informa- 
tion blank now, '--'■-• 



INFORMATION BLANl 
To'V. S. Shipping; Board 
Information Section LI. & cssaa Washington, D. C. 



rirasr srmi v>ithout obligation the U. S. Govfmmfnt literature 
ilrsoribcd above. I am ronsidcring a trip to Europe Q), to 
The Orient {J, to South Anierioa Q 1 would travel l»t 

riass n, 3d D- 



Ij I go datr «i!l be al)ouT, 
My Ni»:nt ...1. 



My Street No. ot K.F.D. 



State - - 




for further luformniion ri^nrJir.tr uultngi adtiress 

United States Lines 

4S Hroadway New York (.'ity -^ 



% 



Agennrt in Piincipol Citres 
Manaffitifr Operators for 

U. S. SHIPPING BOARD 



44 



VARIETY 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 




,:h..i\, ■-'• ' ^♦^ 



AND 




"STILL ARGUING*' 



1 



i^w^ B. F. KEITirS PAUCE, NEW YORK 



Direction E. K. NADEL, PAT CASEY AGENCY 



V 






KTWS OF THE DAILIES 

(Continued from page 42) 
win be brought up for trial In the 
Supreme Court on a charge of mur- 
dering Bertha Katz, a younger sis- 
ter of Mrs. Keisler, July 26, In 
Brooklyn. The four persons charged 
with the murder gave themselves up 
following the Bhooling which caused 
the death. of Miss Katz, and have 
since been detained in the llayraond 
Street Jail. 



The title of the new Olga Petrova 
play will be "Hurricane." with 
Lewis Willoughby playing the lead- 
ing role opposite the star. 



A decree of absolute divorce for 
Mrs. Gertrude Jennings Hlne from 
her husband, Francis Worthington 
Hlne, was recommended last week 
by John A. Ruston In a report sub- 
mitted to Supreme Court Justice 
Faber In Brooklyn. Dorothy A. 



Stolfos, a former chorus girl, was 
named co- respondent. The referee 
recommended Mrs. Hine be granted 
$250 a month alimony and the cus- 
tody of their three-year-old child. 



Pobby Ray, who appeared with 
the J^ew Fields' Sluibert unit "Kitz 
Girls" under the name of Gilda Gil- 
more, disappeared from her home 
Jan. 30 and has not been heard from 
since. The day she disappeared she 
informed her mother the was going 
to spend the night with a girl friend. 



Sylvain. considered the dean of 
French actors, having been with the 
Comedy Francaise in I'aris for 45 
years, has refused to be pensioned 
and re-appeared with the company 
last week in "Pere Lebonard," In 
which he first pl;:yed 20 years ago. 



The irarvard Dramatic Club will 
give eight performances in New 



MMfinmeffmA 



LITTLE 

RED 

SCHOOL 

MOUSE 



DOWN 

BY THE OLD 

APPLE 

TREE 



PARADE 

OF THE 



fit I 



SOLDIERS 



■ '. y . 



LITTLE 

LOST 

ROLLING 

STONE 



2ZSW44* 



^wnvonxMY 



r;f,«f 



Professional Copies FREE to Recognized Artists 
ORCHESTRATIONS, 25c. "PARADE," Full Band, $1.00 

L B. MARKS MUSIC CO, 225 W. 46lh St., N. Y. CIH 



York durinsT April, appearinflr in two 
plays with four performancea of 
each. It has been the custom In the 
past for the club tp give but two 
performancea each aeaaon. Upon 
the suggestion of the Theatre Guild 
and producing managera the added 
performancea are to be given this 
year. 



^ Gloria Foy returned to "Up She 
Goes" and Benny Leonard to "The 
Dancing Girl" thla week, both hav- 
ing missed performances on account 
of illness. 



"Pour Avoir Adrlenne," a comedy 
from the French by Loula Vemeuil. 
has been placed in rehearsal by 
Brock Pemberton. The featured 
members of the cast will be James 
Rennie, Florence "^Jdrldge, and 
K'rnest Cossart. 



Thompson Buchanan's "Mon Papa" 
has been placed in rehearsal by 
Oliver Morosco. 



Eva La Gallienne will appear in 
"Sandro Boticelll" at the Province- 
town theatre, New York, commenc- 
ing March 20. 



SPORTS 



(Continued from page 17) 
open hia tour in the Maritime 
Provinces and then work westward 
to the Paclflc, where be will play 
the artificial Ice rinks. 



ciplent of a benefit to be given at a 
loop theatre, Chicago, which will be 
managed by Dan McGinnty of Pu- 
ducah, Ky., formerly manager of 
"Lanky Bob" and J. C. Matthewa, 
another manager of Fltzsimmons. 

Mrs. Reiner Uvea at 2414 Rosedale 
road, but la now in the Michael 
Reese hospital. , 



Manager Richard J. Donlon, of 
Cohoes, N. Y., tossed a bombshell 
into the ranks of his fellow pilots at 
a meeting of the New York state 
basketball league when he an- 
nounced that he had released 
every member of his old team and 
had made arrangements with Lou 
Sugarman, manager of the Coates- 
ville club of the disbanded Eastern 
League to have the Pennsylvania 
five represent Cohoes In the future. 



The death of George Tebeau In 
Denver last week, after a short Ill- 
ness with diabetes, was a shock to 
h many frienda in Kansas City, 
where he owned and managed the 
Kansas City team of the American 
Association for many years. At the 
time of hia death he owned the 
Broadway ball park In Denver and 
the Association park In thla city. 
He is survived by hia widow, Mrs. 
Mary Rathman Tebeau, formerly of 
Louisville, and two children by his 
first wife. Since selling the Kan- 
sas City club four years ago Mr. 
Tebeau devoted hia attention to his 
Denver park. He was born In St. 
Louis and early in life became a 
professional ball player and organ- 
ized one of the first teams in this 
city. 

A match Is cooking for next May 
between Jack Johnson and Harry 
Wills for the colored heavyweight 
rljamplonshlp of the world. Just 
where "LU* Arthur" and "The Brown 
I'anther of New Orleans" are to 
mingle, has not been divulged, but 
it Is on tap If a battle ground can 
be found. Tex Rlckard Is reported 
ns ready to stage the bout provid- 
ing the state authorities of any of 
the states are willing. This elim- 
inates New York unlesa the nge 
limit which bara Johnson Is re- 
moved by the boxing commission 



An indoor golf cou;-se of 9 holes 
is to be Installed In the Great Hall 
of the Monastery of the Friars Club 
and a pro placed In charged to give 
lessons to the members. Tourna- 
ments are being arranged between 
the Friars and other theatrical 



Beautify Your Fac 
Vou mutt l<Mk aoo* to mak* 
flood Manv of tht "Profw- 
•ion" navo obtained and ra- 
talnao battof aart* b> havldi 
mo corract tboir featural m- 
ntrfeetloni and romavt bleia- 
Itho*. ContultatlAR fraa l^aa* 
'oaMnabla 

F E SMITH. M. D 

347 Fifth Avenue 
N. T. city Opp. VValdon 




cluba with prizes. It is planned to 
play about six tournaments. 



Major George F. Chandler, super- 
intendent of state police, has been> 
elected honorary president and com- 
missioner of the New York State 
league to succeed George K. Morris, 
who resigned because of press ot 
duties as chairman of the Republi- < 
can state committee. Morris was 
chosen as the Landia of the league 
early In the fall, but shortly after - 
was named chairman of the Repub- ; 
llcan state committee and has not *■: 



The guardian of a 
g€>od <xfmptexion 



for 



The Boudoir \^ 



The 



STEINS MAKE UP 



^Cs^ dookkt Upon Request/ ^ 

^^i\. STEIN COSMETIC ^0./^f ' 

^^^v -♦ao BROOME ^yjrwj 

l^'^v.^ N ■ w vo»"^.'''d^^ 



For the stage 
For the boudoir 








140 West 39th Street 
NEW YORK CITY 



Mrs. Tema Reiner, formerly Mra. 
Bob Fltzslmmons, is to be the re- 



P. DODD ACKERMAN, Designer 
D. FRANK DODGE, Representative 



* 




AND HIS ORCHESTRA 



PLAYING CONGRESS HOTEL 



A « 1 



• y 



CHICAGO 



Thursday, March 1, 1023 



VARIETY 



45 



^nz 



^THE GREATEST ATTRACTION IN SHOW HISTORY'^ 

-. . " . —N.Y.WORLD 




; ^ TRANSCONTINENTAL DANCING TOUR 

Furnishing a Complete Evening's or Matinee Entertainment, with Their Own Orchestra 

Dancing and Beauty Contests — General Dancing 



WIRE FOR BOOKINGS— OPENING MARCH 15th 



:>.■ 



' :■*• 



/ 





'■.'V 






/ 



110 WEST 40lh ST. 



Pennsylvania 3267-3268 



. A 



NEW YORK 

Great Neck 682 Mi: 



been able to devote any of his time 
to the sport Job, Major Chandler, 
who is a surgeon by profession and 
a lieutenant colonel In the United 
States army medical reserve corps, 
has been active in basketball before 
having been connected with a club 
In the old State league. He is an 
aggresfiive, progressive, forceful ex- 



FOR SALE, An Old Violin 

On the lnald« of which In a paper with 
the Inscription: Antonio Stradlvarlua, 
CremonensPH Faclebat. Anna 1716 A. 8. 

Tnqulr* C.EORGK MrDRY, 228 We«t- 
flcld ATenae, AoAonla, Conn. 



ecutive and If his hands are not tied 
by the league can be depended upoh 
to bring some improvement In the 
conduct of the sport. An announce- 
ment stated that Major Chandler's 
duties In the basketball circuit 
would be similar to those of Judge 
LAndis In baseball. 



/ 



The six-day bicycle races held at 
the Coliseum Feb. 11-17, the second 
event of the kind held in Chicago 
within a year, proved a tremendous 
financial success. The tickets were 
all sold on Thursday, Friday and 



RINGLING BROTHERS and BARNUM & BA!UY 

COMBINED SHOWS 

PEOPLE ENGAGED FOR THE SEASON OF J92S WILL REPORT AT 

MADISON SQUARE GARDEN, NEW YORK CITY 

at 9:00 A. M. of the day designated for their department: 

AERIAL PERFORMERS, with riggings .Saturday, March 17th 

ALL OTHER PERFORMERS... Tuesday, March 20th 

MUSICIANS. Big Show Band Tuesday, March 20th 

TICKET SELLERS and DOORMEN .Tuesday, March 20th 

FREAKS and SIDE SHOW PERFORMERS Friday, March 23rd 

All others not mentioned in this call will be notified by maiL 
MUSICIANS, Big Sl^ow Band, answer this call to:— 
MERLE EVANS, Room 905 Palace Theatre Bldg., 

New York City 

SIDE SHOW PERFORMERS and FREAKS to:— 

LEW GRAHAM, Room 905 Palace Theatre Bldg., 

New York City 

All oihrrs to RINCJLlNfi BROTIIEHS and BARM M A BAILEY, Bridgeport, Conn. 
OPEMXr. I'EBFORMANCE— SATIRDAY AFTERNOON. MARCH 24. 
V ACTUAL REHEARSALS START 9:00 A. M., TLESDAY, MARCH «0. 



Saturday, and there was very littlf 
paper out. 



Manager William H. Heplnstall. 
Jr., of the Albany Club of the New 
York State Ba.sketball League ha£ 
announced that the Capitol City 
court franchise is on the market. 
Manager Hepinstall told Vari- 
ety's correspondent at Albany this 
week that he is entertaining ofCers 
from Utica and Gloversville busl- 
nesH men and unless Albany men 
come forward and buy the fran- 
chise, the Capitol City will be de- 
nied professional basketball. Poor 
attendance has been given by Hep- 
install as his* reason for putting 
the franchise on the market. The 
team, the Albany manager said, is 
one of the highest salaried In the 
State League, and although it has 
been In first place, the receipts of 
the games did not meet expenses. 
The Albany team has been playing 
its home games at the State Armory 
In the Capitol City on Saturday 
nights, but has lost Its home-game 
nights four straight weeks due to 
other attractions being at the Ar- 
mory. . , ■ ■ ■'■■ ; . -■ — 7-'-* .. '■,^" 



MUSIC MEN "T 

Wendell W. Hall has become 
manager of the promotional de- 
partment of the Foreter Mumic Pub- 
lishing Co. He is the author of ^tx 
numbers, words and music, wl)ioh 
go to the Forstor catalog under the 
new arrangement. He had put out 
thene songs as the Dellwoods Music 
House. Hall was in vaudevill** 
three f^rasons and has appeared at 
most of the leading p.f rure housps. 



The Melody Publishing Co. of 
Buffalo filed a voluntary petition in 
bankruptcy Feb. 19, lisiting liabil- 



ities of $6,823 and assets of $38,777. 
Most of the assets are of doubtful 
value, such as a two-year contract 
to publish two songs on one sheet 
of paper valued by the company's 
officers at $25,000. Several bales of 
songs con.iisting of about 32,000 
copies are listed at $4,700. A mail- 
ing list of 1,000 names is valued at 
$1,000 and half a dozen unpublished 
songs are listed at $7,000. The 
actual currency of the concern Is a 
bank balance of $6.16. The com- 
pany was Incorporated two years 
ago for $pO,000 and a vigorous stock- 
selling campaign has been prose- 
cuted. The plan was for embryo 
songwriters to send In a song with 
a remittance of $45, for which they 
received a stock certificate entitling 
the holder to participate In the 
company's dividends and In the roy- 
alties on the songs which were pub- 
lished and sold. 



Mark CJoldman Is confined to his 
home with pneumonia. » 



Eddie Kamnetz (Kay) and Ber- 



nard Stern - (professionally Billy 
Bernard) organized the Kay-Stera 
Uuslo Co., but have decided to dls* 
solve their partnership. Abner 
Greenberg, attferney, has btn 
agreed on as arbitrator. Harold 
Dellon and Jack Stanley are takixiiC 
over the business. 



Stark & Cowan, Inc., has tbttv 
(Continued on paso 46B) ^ 



YOUNG SCOTCHHIAN 



Five feet tall, desire* to join r«YU« ofg 
what have you to offerT I do a tnt» 
claaa innper!ion«tlon of Harry Lauder. 
Win Invest $500.00 or fl, 000.90. Vnleaa 
on the level, save stamp*. Free Juna lat» 
192.1. Address all communications to 

SAMMY TYRRELL 

2111 Massachusetts Avenue, 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 




Tom Brown suggetlM 

a visit to the 

Tom Brown Music Co. 

State-Lake Bldg. (17 W. Uke St.) 
CHICAGO 

Everything for the Band and Orchestra 

Biicsohcr Rand Instrtinients and Saxoplioiies 
SchiuT \Vood\vind.s Geo. W. Ilaynes Flutes 

Lccdy Drums Paramount Banjos 

Gibson String Instruments • 



mm 



-BENNY-RUBIN- 



in "IDA WANNA" 



With CHA8. H. HALL 



Direction: HARRY WEBEA 



a 



VARIETY 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 




Traveling at a terrific speed, and gathering more momentum as she goes, this ''STAR" will strike B. F. KEITH'S COLONIAL, New 
York, and sparkle the week of MARCH 5th. 

CHAS. BIERBAUER, ^Guiding Star" 



LETTERS 



When senains Cor mull te 

VARIETY ttddreM Mull Clerk 

POSTCARDS. ADVBRTISINO or 

CIRCULAR LBTTERS WILL 

NOT BB ADVBRTI8BD 

LKITKRS ADVERTISED £11 
ONE ISSUB ONLY. 



Allen Ernest 

Bas'-cy Olady* 
Barker Bobby 
Betmont Ruth 
Bennett Syduer 
Bernejr T<ouia 
BUdye R^ 
Bfewater BobbI* 
Bootbly g[ Evaat 
Burnett Billy 

Callahan C A 
Caniia Mae 
Carlton Ethel 
Collins C.-trrl* 
Conner Ada 
Cumniings Uojr 

Davcys Tvro 
Deiro (iuidti 
DeMario Fiva 
Diamond C 

Fadl«*y Giadyv 
Fecarto Anthony 
Fisher Geo 
Forrest Atny 
Fouder Mable 
Frankenthal Albert 

OiiUlf^n Tom 
Qrahaiii Marff>« 
Qranville Udcl:)) 

Holton Goo 
Houlton I'eggy 

Jarvin Willard 
Jean«>(t Mile 
Jester Glen 



Johnson Hank 

Kenmore RoU«rt ( 
Kennedy Marcel 
Kerwin Mits M 
Kingsbury II 
Koslofr Miss 
Kramer Tk*u(« 
Kravatz Jack 

r.ane Todd/ 
Laakey Lottie 
Lawrence Chas 
Lawrence Margaret 
Leonard Albert 
Leonard A Germ'ne 
Leonard Jean 
Leonard Juno 

Mack Gill 
Maiinlng Tom 
Mason Edgar 
Mason A Colo 
Mulihoiand Ethel 

Neater Trankie 
Norris Nea» 

Parker Florence 
I'arker Ruth 
Patrowar Oscar 
Pholps Bob 
Poe L«'stcr 
Phillips Janieo 

Sage Verne 
Siisse fhas 
Schoflpld t'red 
Scott Koso 
Scott «id 



i^'Ms Kmile 
Sherman Cleo 
Stanley Geo 
Stuart Wilmo 
awlft Fred 

Tanner Harry 
Terrace I'earl 



Thco A Dandle* 

Waldcn Albert 
Walker Lillian 
Walsh Geraldtao 
Watson Caddy 
Well Wm 
Wellington Daro 



CHICACO OFFICE 



Allen Edna 
Amber Gertie 
Astor Mae 
Alfrie Yloietto 

Rarbee Beatrice 
Hrown Gil 
Bell Betty 
Buckley Mr A Mrs 
Brooks Anna 
Barnes Scewart 
Bentine Bill/ 
Bryan Lee 

Oatto Rhea 
Currien Yvetti 
Clarke Edw M 
Champitto J 



Duvries Sam 
Demmlng Mrs 
Day George 
Dunbar C'haa 
D'Soto E C 



fi 




Ehi brace tlia 

Hiihtit QsalitiM. 

AMuriai 

Lattlni 

tatitfactiea. 



ThMtrical astf Street 
Wear Slippsn. 

Pstent Colttkin 

Mith dull k id 
trimming; otttr 
tuod* with 
kid trimming 
le ai a t e h. 
a I I e brown 
Mtin wltb luede 
trimming t« match. 
Other medeii la crott er plain strap aflecti In 
all Icathsrs. 

Sizes : I ta 9, A te EE. Sand (or Catalof V. 

290 FIFTH AV. 1| 511 SIXTH AV. 
Both bet. SOih-Slst Mts.. NEW YORK 

JO'i> Discount to Theatrical Pcoitlc 




Fair Polly 
Flynn Thomas 
Freehand Harry 
Faye Thos Co 

Oaffney Girls 
Gibson Hardr 
Gibson V Miso 
Goldie Sadie 
Gordon Ray 
Guo A Hay 
Gibson Mrs G R 

Hardy A Gibsoa 
Healley Nell 
H&llo F^unice 
Ilarcourt Leslie 

Imperial Russian 3 

Jovcdah 

Kill Jack 
Kennedy Jas L 
Kellogg Myron 
Khaym 

Layman Viola 



Llcberman C'.aro 
Lee Bryan 
I.>ane Jean 
Larson Jack 
I.efr Nathan 
Lee Laurel 
La Vail Ida 
LaKrance Fred 

Murdock Miss J 
Meaktn Walter 
MclQtyre A Mrs 
Mattiie A Young 

Miltqn Samuel 
Marion Marcel'.e 
MacLean Alice 

Norton Barney 
Nielson Anabel 
Nathans Ca'^,)cr 
Newport Pearsoa 

O'Hara FIsks 
Onrt Dolly Mrs 

Parker Len B 

Regan Joseph 
Rice Malmie 
Robinson Harry T 
Regan Sydney R 
Riley Joe 

Simmers Cecil B 
Sigman Harry- 
Starr Joe 
Skclly James 
Sheridan B Miss 
Singer Dolph 
Schulfler Lliaa 

Tarry Bob 

Vandet Earl 
Vail O S 
Vardel Robert 
Van Jlmmie 

Washburn Peart 
White Bob 

Young Cy 



BURLESQUE ROUTES 



^1 






Uono" 5 Majestic 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

MACK WIRE PLY 

PROFESSIONAL TRUNKS 

Are on Display at tho 

Boston Baggage Company 

517 Washington Street 
BOSTON. MASS. 

Exclusive New England Agont. 
MADE BY 

The Neff Williams Trunk Co. 

1376 WEST. 3d STREET 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 



/P 




Tcial 



FAMOUS ARTISTS USE 

Reichert's Make Up Theatrical Cosmetics 

(Made in Germany) 

World ifnownoj and cclobratPd for Itn blending proper- 
ties, its coloring-H. etc. 

JULIUS PAULY, Inc., Sole Agentt 

36 East 2Ut Street, New York, N. Y. 

FOR SAI.K BY 
Appleton Pharmacy, 7S4 «th Are., N«w York 
<>eorge .Schiiiiilieim, lOU W. 46(h Mt., New York 
Wahh a Hon. 'ita N. Rth St.. I'liiladelphia, I'a. 
.1. «i. Japp & Co.. Main ond i^th Htn.. Cincinnati. Ohio 
Kf>t(lf>r Co.. 3.* W. WttHhington St., Chiragn. III. 
I hir^kgo I uNtume WorkM. 116 N. Irnnklin St.. f'hirngn. 111. 
Theatrical ( oslume Co.. S39 Muromb Ht.. Detroit, Mich. 
Carniviil (usiiime Co.. int W. Water SI., Milwaukee. WU. 

ARTISTH — .'•••>nd ua the numl»er of the gr.'.-i.'^e paint you uee 
and we will Kcnrt you a 4-ln. trial at ick liKATlS. 



(March 5 — Marcn 12) 

COLUMBIA CIBCUTT 

••American Girl" 6 Casino Brook- 
lyn 12 YorkvUle New York. 

"Beauty Revue" 5 Orpheum Pat- 
erson 12 Majestic Jersey City. 

"Big Jamboree" G Majestic .Jersey 
City 12 Hurtiff A Seamon's New 
York. 

"Big Wonder Show" 6 Gayety St. 
Louis 12 Gayety Kansas Citv. 

"Ron Tons" S Columbia Chicago 
12 Star & Garter Chicago. 

"Broadway Brevities" 5 Hurtig & 
Seamon's New York 12-14 Cohen's 
N^wburgh 15-17 Cohen's Pough- 
keepsie. 

•Broadway Flappers" 5 Yorkeville 
New York 12 Casino Philadelphia. 

"Bubble Bubble" 5 Kmpire 
Toronto 12 Gayety Buffalo. 

"Chuckles of 1923* & Gayety 
Kansas City 12 L O. 

Finney Frank 6 Miner's Newark 
12 Orpheum Paterson. 

"Flashlights of 1923" 5 Colurnbia 
New York 12 Casitio Brooklyn. 

"Follies of Day" 6 Grand 
Worcester 12 Miner's Bronx New 
York. 

"Folly Town" 5 Empire Toledo 12 
Lyric Dayton. 

•Giggles" 5 Empress Chicago 12 
Gayety Detroit. 

"Greenwich Village Revue" 5-7 
Colonial Utica 12 Gayety Montreal. 
"Hello Good Times" 5 Colonial 
Cleveland 12 Empire Toledo. 

"Hlppity Hop" 5 Casino Boston 12 
Columbia New York. 

"Keep Smiling" S Gayety Mil- 
waukee 12 Columbia Chicago. 

"Knlck Knacks" 6 Palace Balti- 
more 12 Gayety Washington. 

"Lets Go" 5 Empire Providence 12 
Casino Boston. 

"Maids of America" 6 Gayety 
Pittsburgh 12 Colonial Cleveland. 

Marion Dave 6-7 Cohen's New- 
burgh 8-10 Cohen's Poughkeepsle 12 
Empire Brooklyn. 

j "Mimic World" 6 "Gayety Boston 
[12 Grand Worcester. 

"Radio Girls" 6 Gayety Buffalo 12 
Gayety Rochester. 

"Record Breakers" 5 Lyric Dayton 
12 Olympic Cincinnati. 

Reeves .M 6 Oayety Detroit 
Toronto. 

"Kockoi.- .'. Casino Philadelphia 
U' I'.'tlace Baltimore. 

' S<»cial Mi.as" 6 L O 12 Gayety 
Omaha. 

••Step Lively Girls" 6 Miner's 
Bronx New York 12 Empire Prov- 
idence. 

"Step On It" 5 Empire Brooklyn 
12 Miner's Newark. 

"Talk of Town" 6 L O 12 Gayety 
St. Louis. 

•'Temptations of 1023" 5 Olympic 
Cincinnati 12 L O, 

"Town Scandals" 6 Gayety 
Omaha 12 Gayety Minneapolis. 

Watson Billy 6 Star & Garter 
Chicago 12 Empress Chicago. 

Wat.son Sliding Billy 6 Gayety 
Minneapolis 15 Gayety Milwaukee. 
Williams Mollle 6 Gayety Wash- 
ington 12 GajHity Pittsburgh. 

•'Wine Woman and Song" 5 
Gayety Rochester 12-14 Colonial 
Utica. 

"Youthful Follies" 5 Gayety Mon- 
treal 12 Gayety Boston. 



Broadway 



"GlrU from 
Scranton. 

"Hello Jake Girls " 5 Garden Buf- 
falo. , 

"Jazz Time Revu 
Indianapolis. 

"Jersey Lilies" 5 

"Jingle Belles" 
Wilkes-Barre. 

"Kuddlin Kittens" 
more. 

'Laffln Thru 1923" 
bany. 

Maidens" 



Lyric Newark. 
5 Majestic 

5 Folly Balti- 

o Majestic Al- 



Yoi k Jr 



Peoples 
5 Empire 



Town' 5 Bijou I'hila- 



"Midnight 
Cincinnati. 

"Miss New 
Cleveland. 

"Round the 
delphia. 

'Step Along" 5 Howard Boston. 

"Sweet Bay Bees" 5 CJayeiy 
Brooklyn. 

•'Town Follies" 5 Penn Circuit. 

White Pan 5 Olympic New York. 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 

By HARDIE MEAKIN 

"The Bat" back again, and frum 
box-ofHce indications seems like first 
visit. One Lenten attraction sure of 
enormous week. "Blossom Time" 
brought back to this house in less 
than six weeks, with big advance 
sale already. 



Be'asco has "The Spice of 1922," 
final attraction under Shubert 
vaudeville. Getting better business 
than 90 per cent, of those than be- 
fore. Marshall's stock company in 
"The Demi-Virgin." with Haze! 
Dawn, opens March 11. 



Garry McGarry's stock companv, 
with Jack Norworth as visiting star, 
opened Monday In "My Lady 
Friends,'" Got but fair start. 



National, "Music Box Revue." with 
one of highest admission scales ever, 
and packing them in. 'Good Morn- 
ing Dearie" next week (4th). 

Pictures— Columbia, "Jazzmanla"; 
Palace, "Making a Man"; Ria'lto. M. 



ANN LOWENWIRTH Says: 

^ AKIata who havo long eavagemeato Ib 
CniCAOO «rin enjoy • moro dI 
▼tolt by ataylBc at 

''CHICAGO'S NKWES-r' 

HUNTINGTON HOTEL 
4526 Sheridan Road 

IW CH ICAQCyS BXCI.USIVB BBCTIOlf. 
BTKBT BOOM With • PRIVATB UATB 

ONB BLOCK FROM L.AKB 

TirBMTT MINUTBS to All THKATaBB 
Bat 0top« mt Doer. Kzoellont Caf*. 

AirmAcnvK batbs 

WIBB rOB BBflBBTATIOMB 



CouA and "Kick In"; Metropolitan. 
"Fury." - 

(Jayety — "Maids of America. 

Cosmos-^"The Style Show"; King 
and Irwin; Leo CJree^wood and Co. 
in "Business Is Business'^; Reilly. 
I'teney and Relll> ; Kubelick and 
Carlo. 

Strand — Virginia Pearson, in i>er- 
son and film; Bell and I'.va; Xaio.v 
Royer and ^Co. in "Mary Lou"; 
Thciras P. Dunn. 



WINE-BEER WINS IN N. Y. 

AiWuiiy. N. Y., 1>'.». •JS. 

The He?>n1dicnn Judiciary Com- 
mittee of the A.'<^t4^lMy unuittirgly 
played dirct'tly into tho hands of the 
adniiiU!<tratioii and the pcr^ionnl lib- 
erty exponents when thi-.v amended 
the Walker-Donohuc K-;.soliilii>n pe- 
titioning Congress to modif.v the 
Volstead act to as permit tho sale 
of lieht wine.<=: and beer in this slate 
by providing that each men'bor tf 
Congress instead of just the mem- 
btrs from New York State i^hould 
receive a copy and that the Gov- 
ernor should transmit such resolu- 
tion. 

A resolution drawn along these* 
lines was the original suggestion of 
the personal liberty forces, but due 
to a mix-up the regular stock reso- 
lution was put in. The resolution 
as amended passed the Assembly 
Tuesday by a vote of 78 to 63, and 
the Senate today by a vote of 2^ to 
18. Its moral effect on the 40 other 
State legislatures now in session 
will be watched with Interest. 




NOW ON DISPLAY 

A New Collection of Spring Hats 
Including Some Smart Milans 

160 W. 45th St.. New York City 

Two Doora Eaat of Broadway 
I9«/* Oluaunt t* N. V. A.'s fran u N. V. A. 

ALSO TO PROFKSSIONAI^S 



MUTUAL CIRCUIT 






•'Band Box 


Revue" 


5 L O. 






"Flappers" 


5 L O. 








'French Models" & 


Gayety 


1.1 


luis- 


ville. 










'CSirls a la 


Carte" 


& Kmplre 


Ilo- 


hoken. 










"Girls from 


roUie«" 


• 5 Star 


Br 


ook - 


lyn. 











NOW READY— NEW CATALOG 

IH. & IVI. PROFESSIONAL. TRUNKS 

PRICES REDUCED— QUALITY IMPROVED 

SOLD BY THE FOLLOWING AUtHORIZED AGENTS 
NKW YORK— KAMI KL NATHAN-H. RJI HKVKNTH AVICNrK 



CHICAGO 
BARNC8 TRUNK CO. 

75 WEST RANDOLPH 



DENVER 

OEATHLOFF A SON 

72S IStk ST. 

OMAHA 

NEBRASKA TRUNK CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

VICTOR TRUNK CO. 

74 ELLIS ST. 

HERKERT & MEISEL TRUNK CO. 

»10 HANHINtiTON 8TRKFT .ST. LOUIS. MO. 



KANSAS CITY 

BOOK TRUNK CO. 

Ml MAIN ST. 



LOt ANGELES 

D. 8ILVERSTEIN 

7tll AND HILL 8T. 

CLEVELAND 

LONDON LEATHER SHOP 

403 SUPERIOR ST. 



Hal 




and ENGL 





■<».»■ * 



THE AUTHENTIC SCREEN DOUBLES OF HAROLD LLOYD AND SNUB POLLARD 
NOW PLAYING ORPHEUM CIRCUIT -^- ENROUTE EAST > < 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



VARIETY 



\ 



<L*4. 



: V'i.*;:' • 



YOUTHGLO 







Leading Beauty Stars of Stage and 

Screen Fame highly recommend 

■.-•',■■■'.■' ♦ ■' ' 

Youthglo Facial Clay 
V for its remarkable results 





••YOUTHGLO Fliould be a dully lial.it of 
all women who care to preserve tiny* 
appearance." 

/^ MISS MABEL NORMAND 

Famous Star, Mack Sannett % 



"I hem lily recommend YOITIIOLO. I 
always use It before dancing. It is both 
restful and rejuvenating." 

'* MISS FLORENCE WALTON 
Cclabratcd Dancer 



"After using other facial clayB I can 
recommend very pafelj' the merits of 
YOl'TIIGLO. I would not be without 11. " 

■ > - . '-,..» 

MISS ANN PENNINGTON 
in "Tha Charry Chair" 



"YorTIIGLO should ba used by avery 
woman who cares. It la part of my 
everj day toilet." 

MISS GRACE LA RUE 
Star of "Muaio Box Ravua" 



■ s.- 



Why 



pay more than $1 for Facial Clay? 

YOUTHGLO Facial Clay at $1.00 for 
twenty (20) treatments is the superior clay 
and cannot be successfully imitated. It is 
the only one positive complexion beautifier. 
Don't pay more for facial clay. Don't judge 
the quality of YOUTHGLO by the price. 
Money cannot buy a clay that will function 
and benefit your skin like Y'OUTITGLO — 
so why pay morcT 

Insist upon YOUTHGLO 

There is no other like it regardless of price. 
Try YOUTHGLO once and you will be 
convinced — and, like tliousands, you will 
continue to use YOU'l'HGLO facial clay. 

The proof of the superiority of 
YOUTHGLO is in the trial 

Special Offering 

YOUTHGLO Face Lotion 

VOITIKJT.O lACi; LOTION is a necessary 
>l<iji food a:id tonic, and h:i.s pained a p;i<^at i)oi)- 
ularity amoiiK VCHJTTKJLO Facial flay u.^ers. 

App^y VorTIKll.O VACK I.OTIO.V daily. It 

• 
forms a p«'tf»'ct Ijat^e for your face powdir. 

// 7/o/< tlrslrr Youthf/lo I'drv lot'on 
in n'ididoi) to fm^ial rlaij tuUl 1 .'>i'. moi'C 

FOR MEN! V 

Voii, Ion, can lie:K(it from uoni'eifiil Yid'TlI- 
<!•.<». \ot»r ^wtfhrr •+rf»i* wW g^tvH- y p >>'e y e u -tt-- 
V( M liici,*) laciai. ."M; ny m^-n an* ushi;:,' it i'-\ 
homr^. Its a wondeiful habit after a h«r«l 
day's work. Convinc** yourself. Sen<l f o\ipori. 






That Priceless Charm 
of Youth Is Yours for 



Tliat Beauty, that magnetic Oiarni of youth that rightfully 
belongs to ^very woman is NOW within your power by the 
simple use of YOUTHGLO Facial Clay. Women in all walks 
of life acclaim its superiority over all other clays (regardless of 
.price) because it has proven its worth by the results it has 
given to all its users. YOUTHGLO is a complete Beauty re- 
storer and requires no other lotions. It's the one positive com- 
plexion beautifier in the world. There is NO REASON NOW 
why every woman cannot have the Charm of Youthful Beauty, 
because 

What yeara have brought to your face 
YOUTHGLO will banish away 



Girls! 



Formerly Youthglo Facial Clay Was the 
Beauty Secret of Only a Few 

MarveJouM YOI'THciLO Is the Beauty secret of a l3eauty Specialist 
who ha.s traveled all parts of Europe In an untiring effort to perfect 
YOl'THOLO. After year.s it wa» actxymplitihrd, and it.M u«o ha.s 
helped hundreds of discriminating women to retain tljeir girlish com- 
plexions. So fitnnrlous have the result?!, been that umm'h of 
YOIJTHCJKO said it would be an act of humanity to give ever>ono 
a chance to benefit from this v:onderfut discovery. So Y<.)lTTH(;Lt>, 
tliat was the Beauty secr<'t of only a few, is NOW within the reach 
of everyone. Y(mi can now buy YOl'THOI/i Facial Clay for $1. 
Enough for 20 tr« atni#'nt.s. "JV.t. the first treatment alone will «hou 
tiHiirelnua re>;ijlts. What YOl'THCiLO is really worth cannot !»<■ 
est;inaled. What if will do for your face is I'I{l(i:fj:ss. 



FOR YOUR PROTECTION 

Tlirif i.> no ollicr facial clav likr YOLTlUiLO. ,^^k for ii 



> who want to stay young 

Women! 

who want to look young 
are now using 

Youthglo ■ ^ 

Facial Clay 

YOUTIIGLO. the pricclrss gift to humanity. 
poaUiveljj rcmoven wrinkleR, blackheads and all 
face blemishes. It i^lonoa enlarged poren and re- 
builds the Fa<^al tipsues. Simply npread on face 
and neck. As YOUTHGLO is drying (10 min- 
utes) you can feel ft silently massaging away 
the tell-talo signs of years. leaving the face 
.smooth and Arm as a child. Only YOUTH(;JX) 
will bring back to you that Prlcelepj, Charm of 
Youth. It not only corrects the.«*e facLil fauU«, 
but poHitivcly prevents them. 

YOUTHGLO IS positively guaranteed 
or money refunded 

Only $1 

for 8-oz. Jar— -enough for 
20 Beauty Treatments 

SEND COUPON NOW! 



r 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



•■.■:. v. 3-1-23 

YOITIIC.I.O l'KHI"\K\TIONf*, Inc., .., 

100 Fifth A»*.. New York. .N. V. Tel. Watkln* SOl 

Krirliijir,! fr.il >1, for wtiiih i-Una^ b^i.c! ni* S ox. jm 
CO tr'atTin n!f> t-f Yi MTHGI.o. >ly m<>n»>y bacU \t 
fniii* ilors n«>t si** Uto cornyl«^tA ■atiafartion 



-X*^ 



*l)y name, lusist upon it. If your dealer catmot suj)i»1y you. 

MAIL COUPON 



.^•10rr•« 



C.I y 



Tiifct< r's 



«••*•»• 



■sf 



#•?♦«••••• 



Narme. . . 

Writ- 



rmirif' rl«»ar!5" 1>» i-etv il 



\ 



.V^^<^W^¥Vy^^^VA^W\A/^/>^^^^»^^^ S ^^A^/>^^A^A^AA /* A^AAA^AA^^^^^^^A^^^^ . >Ar^^^^^^<^^^^VVV ^ />^W»^'^^^^^yV^^^VW^^V>^WVyw^ 



V;,- 



46b 



VARIETY 



Thursday, March 1, iWSHi 



E. F. ALBEE, President 



J. J. MURDOCK, General Manager 



F. F. PROCTOR, Vice-President 



B. F. 



' 'I 



KEITH'S VAUDEVILLE EXCHANGE 

(Palace Theatre Buildings New York) ■ , 

Founders 

B. F. KEITH, EDWARD F. ALBEE, A. PAUL KEITH, F. F. PROCTOR 
Arti«t8 can book direct addressing W. DAYTON WEGEFARTH 



, ,. '.y 



• .y*.V«.-VA V ^■V*^'* V^V* V*'V-«. V^VfcV^VA V vV-«L V V Vji 



AMALGAMATED 

VAUDEVILLE 
AGENCY 

1441 Broadway, New York 

Phone 1»E>iN8YLVANfA 3580 > 

BOOKING 12 WEEKS V , 

New York, Philadelphia, Washington, Baltimore 

and intermediate towns 






BOOKINC^EPARTMENT 
Palace "nkatre Building 
NEW YORK ■ 



EXECUTIVE OTFICES 

State-Lake Building 

CHICAGO 



THE STANDARD INDEPENDENT 
VAUDEVILLE AGENCY 

FALLY MARKUS 



1547 Broadway 

NEW YORK • 



Bryant 6060-6061 



GAIETY THEATRE BwDG. 



BERT LEVEY CIRCUITS 
VAUDEVILLE THEATRES 

ALCAZAR THEATRE BUILDING, * SAN FRANCISCO 

PAUL GOUORON 

EASTERN REPRESENTATIVE. WOODS TIIEA. BLDO., ClIICAOO 



Marcus Loew's 

BOOKING AGENCY 

General Executive Offices ' 

LOEW BUILDING ANNEX 
160 West 46th Street ^ 
New York . 



is said to possess an unusuallj' fine 
baritone that "takes" well on the 
wax. On one side of each disk will 
be a sons for which VaknMno has 
written the lyrics. Con Conrad did 
the melodies. The songrs are "Na- 
Ya" and "I'd Give a Thousand To- 
morrows for One Yesterday." 
Harms, Inc., is the publisher. 



Charles Lang of the E. B. Marks 
Music Co. had to cut a western trip 
short due to the death of his father 
in Minneapolis, 



ACKERMAN & HARRIS 

EXECUTIVE OFFICES: 

THIRD FLOOR, PHELAN BLDG. 

MARKET, GRANT and O'FARRELL STREETS SAN FRANCISCO 

ELLA HERBERT WESTON, Booking Manager 

SEVEN TO TEN WEEK CONTRACTS NOW BEING ISSUED. 



J. H. LUBIN 



James Kendis and James Brock- 
man have dissolved partnership a 
tho Kendis- Broclcman Music Co., 
Inc., the former having bought out 
I Brockman's interests. Kendis will 
[ continue business under the same 
style name. 

• ■ ', 

Billy De Beck's cartoon creations, 

I "Barney C.oogle" and "Spark i'lug" 
appearing in the New york "Amer- 
ican" and syndicated Heaj-.st papers, 
have been made the heroes of a 
"Barney Google" song which Jerome 
H. Remick Is publishing. The car- 
toonist drew the title page and is 
"in" for a third of the royalties 
with Billy Rose and Con Coniad/ 
the authors. , 



General Manager 



CHICAGO OFFICE 



NOW BOOKING ACTS AND TABLOIDS-^all or Write 




m »»i« M i 



dimtceVVaudevi 

AGENCY INCORPOPATCD 




1493 BROADWAY, Putnam BIdg., NEW YORK 



Phone 0308 Bryant 



-^ 



1602 Capitol Building 

SIDNEY M. WEISMAN in Charge 



KANSAS CITY VAUDEVILLE AGENCY 

J. C. MICHAELS, Mgr. 
731-732 New York Life Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 

Can always use standard acts for our vaudeville theatres. 
Want ttrentT more Feature Novrlty arts for oar 19^3 Circuit of Fairs. 



DISC REVIEWS 

(Continued from page 37) 

and favor ensemble rendition I© 
good purpose. 



\ , •> 



MUSIC MEN 

(Continued from page 4r.) 
following managers installed in the 
following branch offices: Min- 
neapolis, Jack Walters; Detroit. 
Chester Carpenter; Pittsburgh. Bill 
Schuyler; Chicago, Lou Fordan; 
San Francisco, John Heinzman; 
Boston, Nat Madison. 

In the new Howard-Clarlc produc- 
tion act at the Palace, Now York, 
tills week Joe Howard, when sing- 
ing the old ones with a male quar- 
tet, remarks to the boys he will sing 



a new song, his latest compo'^ition, 1 
of "The White House in Washing- ' 
ton and the White House In the 
Lane." Joe does sing it, and prob- 
ably three-quarters of the audience 
recognized the melody but could not 
place It. Joe must have been too 
busy that day to have changed any 
of it. But the lyric contained tho 
tip-ofP, for one line mentioned tlu- 
trail to the white house In the lane, 
when no doubt the word im- 
mediateb' recalled they were listen- 
ing to the identical air of "Long, 
Long Trail." 

Joe had better change the word to 



path. Some years ago when the 
late Meyer Cohen was a profes- 
sional manager he called in a news- 
paper fellow to listen to a new song 
Joe Howard had written. After 
hearing it the fellow «aid, "That's 

Havana. All right," said Meyer. 

"I'n not going to argue with you. 
but don't tell Joe; you will hurt hi? 
feelings." 



OEL'S 



One Moment West 
of Broadway at 
41 St Street 

TliA Rrnd<*7votiii of (he Leodiac I.lchtii of r.fteratnrc and (he R(aR;e. 
Ttie Best food and I::ii(er(ainineiit in New York. Muilo and Dniulnc 

^1 Our Special: A Sirloin Steak and Potatoes (Any Style) $1 

In the GRILL wivh SPECIAL RESERVATIONS for LADIES 



Charles Bradley, well known in the 
music publishing field, died suddenly 
Feb. 18 at his home In Dof^ton. 
although ailing from a lingering ill- 
ness for some time. He was up to 
his death Boston manager for Siia- 
piro. Bernstein & Co. His age is 
given at about 41:. A wife and four 
oliildren survive. Billy Morun will 
succeed to the part. 



The dispute over "Call Me T^^t•k. 
Pal of Mine," has been settled by 
Dixon & Lane, publisher.s, when 
they paid Lawrence Perricone. 
author, $2,750 for royalties. By a 
court decision last October of Cir- 
cuit Judge Hall, In St. liOuis. th( 
publishers were ordered to pay 
Perricone a royalty of half a cei\t 
a copy and 25 per cent, of the 
profits on the mechanical royalties. 
An attorney was appointed at that 
timo to find ojt the profits and to 
arrange a financial adjustment. 
Perricone, who U| a shoe worker. 



wrote the lyric during the war 
period. 

The title of the song got on the 
editorial page of a local dailj'. It 
read: "A St. Louis shoe worker has 
earned $'*.7r)0 royalties on his sone. 
Call Me Back. Pal of Mine.' This 
again teaches us how overtime can 
pile up in these modern industrial 
days." (.St. Louis Times.) 



' Rodolph A'alentino ha.s slgnrd 
with (he Lrunswicic phonograpli 
re(f)rd company to personally "can' 
two compositions. The screen star 



WHEN HEARTS ARE YOUNG 
(Fox Trot)— Paul Whiteman 
and Orchestra. 

JOURNEY'S END— Same— Victor 
No. 18985. 

Both these musical comedy num- 
bers, the "Hearts" (Goodman-Rom- 
berg), from "Tho Lady In Ermine," 
and "Journey's End," from "Up She 
Goes." are delivered It. Whlteman'a 
usual finished symphonic style wf 
syncopation. A number of odd In- 
struments, rarely carried by even 
the most pretentious of modem 
dance orchestras, are Introduced 
prominently for striking effects. 
The violins and a celesta make for 
a pretty echo effect and the bass In- 
struments feature tellingly. A two- 
piano effect also stands out inter- 
mittently. 



t*' 



LA PALOMA (Fox Trot)— Vincent 
Lopez and Hotel Pennsylvania 
Orchestra. 

PINAFORE SELECTIONS— Same 
— Okoh No. 4744. 

Here's a novelty dance record. 
On one side Lopez has arranged the 
familiar "La Paloma" ("The Dove"), 
by Yradier, Into a fox, ricli with 
Spanish atmosphere and colornig. 

The "Pinafore" side (Sullivan) Is 
a canned version of a number that 




PROFESSIONAL TRUNKS 

Back to Pre- War Prices 



Mail Orders Filled F. O. B., N. Y. City. . Send for Catalogue. 

Used tmnhs and shopworn sawplc^f of att ^itandard makes alnaif.t on hand 



[ 



SAMB. lumiis 



SOLE AGENT FOR H&M 
TRUNKS IN THE EAST 



529-531 Seventh Ave., New York City 

Phone: Fitz Roy 0620 Between 38th and 39th Str ets 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



VARIETY 



AAn 



has been a feature 
vaudeville routine. 



of Lopex'8 



THE BEST PLACES TO STOP AT 



YOU GAVE ME YOUR HE^RT 
(Pox Trot) — Isham Jones' Or- 

. chettra _^ . , 

THE SNEAK — Same— Brunswick 
No. 2350 

"You Uave Me Your Heart" by 
Ted Snyder la the theme song of 
Valentino's "Blood and Sand" film 
release and one of the best q| the 
"picture song" cycle. It's a worthy 
follow up to the Hcnsationally popu- 
lar "Sheik of Araby" and as Jones 
does it, is intriaiilng with its Span- 
ish fandango hokum. 

"The Sneak" probably intended to 
travesty the "Slu-ik" title is snappy 
and rhythmic, and pots to one hot 
off the vamp with a laughing trom- 
bone effect. The cornet too gets 
"hot" and a general spooky atmos- 
phere is workV^d Irito titi altogether 
catchy orchestration. 

YOU TELL HER— I STUTTER— 

Van and Schenck (Vocal) 
AWAY DOWN EAST IN MAINE— 
Same — Columbia No. 3770 
Van and Schenck's current con- 
tributions are fairly familiar pop 
songs. The stuttering number is 
characteristically delivered and the 
other, a bucolic number doacribos 
the charms of a New England home. 

I'M JUST A LITTLE BLUE FOR 
YOU — Charles Cinway (Vocal) 
LOVE SENDS A LITTLE GIFT OF 
ROSES — Harry Blake — Pathe 
No. 20814 
Two .sentimental ballads fittingly 
Interpreted by two different tenors. 
The "roses" number has been es- 
tablished the past few months but 
"blue" is comparatively new, al- 
though a worthy companion piece. 



COME ON HOME— Brox Sisters 
and Bennie Krueger's Orchestra 

BRING ON THE PEPPER— Same- 
Brunswick No. 2360 

The Brox Si.stt'ra' contributions 
this month from the house of Berlin, 
Inc., catalog are a blues and a rag 
number from the Music Box Revue. 
"Come on Home" is the familiar 
where-is-my-daddy ,idea with some 
bright new lyrical twists and ex- 
pressions by the Lewis and Young 
team. 

Arthur Johnson has made a tell- 
ing vo?al arrangement of the num- 
ber as he has done with "Bring on 
the Pepper." Both numbers are 
eomparulivfly iifw and thoroin lies i 
the distinction of the Brox Sisters' 
■ offerings — all thoir stuff is nascent 
and fresh sounding. • 



L^eonard 



Hotels 



Hicks, Operating 

AND 
CHICAGO 

Special Rates to the Profession "- ' 417-419 S. Wabash Avenue 



GRANT 



LORRAINE 



I'hone: Loiigucre 0114 — Bryant 4293 

THE BERTHA 



tieo. P. Schneider. Prop 

FURNISHED 
APARTMENTS 



COMPLETE FOR IIOC8EKKEPINO " 

323-325 West 43rd Street 



•■■'■ ■• !w- ■ ►■ 



CLEAN AND AIBl 

NEW YORK CITY 



rrlvnte Bath. 3>4 Rooiua. CMterlns to the comfort and couTcnlence of 

the |»rof«*Maton. 

8TEA.M IIKAT AND ELECTRIC I.ICJlIT fIS.OO CP 

. '■ .- ' - |> ' ^— - 

350 HOUSEKEEPING APARTMENTS 
IRVINGTON HALL 



355 WcPt 51 at Street 
6640 Circle 



HENRI COURT 

312 West 48th Street 
3830 Longacre 

HILDONA COURT • 

341-347 West 45th Street. 3560 longacre. 
1-2-3-4-room apartments. Each apartment with private bath, 
phone, kitchen, kitchenette. 

$18.00 UP WEEKLY— $70.00 UP MONTHLY 
The largest maintainer of housekeeping furnished apartments 
directly under the supervision of the owner. Ix>cated in the center of 
the theatrical district. All fireproof buildings. 

Address all communications to t .' 

CHARLES TENENBAUM 

Principal ofllce. Hildona Court, 341 West 45th St., New York 
Apartments can he seen ennings. Office in each building. 



Pioneers of Housekeeping Furnished Apartments 

(of the better kind — within means of economical folks) 



THE Dl I'LEX 

530 Went 43*1 Street 

Lonrarre 7132 

Tlire« and four rooniM with liath. 

Mmlem In every pwrtloular. Accoui.no- 

(late thre« or more adaltK. 

•12.00 IP WKFKI.V 



VANDIS COCKT 
141-347 Went 4M Street 
Itryant 7ei« 
Ohe. three and four room apartment* 
with kltchenetten. private bath and tele- 
phone. Directly went of Timeii 8qaar«. 
Koom urranirement rreatet almost o'lv- 
ttcy. 

KATKS: tl7.00 CP WKEKI.T 



Refer cominunUittion!! to M. CL.IMAN, 24t West 43rd 81.^ 



FiPTKEX STORY FIKKPROOF BUILDING ' 

HOTEL CLAMAN. EXCLUSIVELY FOR MKN occupylnir a plot 200)i76 on 4td 
Street, Just wcyt of Uroadway, containing 1,000 rooms with bath. Is Dearing com- 
pletion, and will be ready about Marc4i Ist, this year. 



The rates, nine to fourteen dollara weekly will afford any amploycs to enjoy 
the pleasures that only such places commanding bigher prices cao glva. Ulghcat 
standards will be maintained. 

Hotel Claman Is destined to lu-come a rendeavous where ths touch of homo 
will be felt tnmiediately one enters. It's tremendous lobby, mezsanlne, writing 
room and artistry will quickly appeal. No expense has been spared to maka thl* 
a monument to Clunian service. 



that sliould make for pleasing di- 
version these winter nights. "Jlmbo 
Jambo" Is a tale about a "bimbo" 
and the hero who didn't give a 
•dlmbo" about her. "I Was Mar- 
ried Up In the Air and I've Been 
Up>In the Air Ever Since" tells the 
story in its title. Both are excel- 
lently rendered by Mr. Murray. 



Billy Murray 



JIMBO JAMBO 

(Vocal) 
I WAS MARRIED UP IN THE AIR 

Same— Victor No. 18991 

A novelty comedy song couplet 



A VALUED EXPRESSION 
FROM 

MARY GARDEN 

Dear Mr. Alston: 

The shoes were perfect — 
Toil alir'aiift do surh sph.ndid 
icork Jor me. Ihaukst 

INCORPORATED 

THEATRICAL and CUS- 
TOM BOOTMAKERS 

CATALOG ON REQUEST 

17N. State St., CHICAGO 



MAPI ANN A (Vyaltz)— Hotel "bleve- 

land Dance Orchestra 
ROCKY MOUTAIN MOON— Same 
Okeh No. 4746 

Two popular waltzrs, smooth and 
warm in tlieir string and dulcet 
reeds arrangements, "Marlanna" 
(Joan (ilJbort) from "Lady In Er- 
mine" is strikingly intersper.'^ed 
witli .showers of .xyio iluunpings for 
contrast. • 

"Rocky Mountain Moon" Is a 
Kwingy waltz witli a leaning for in- 
termittent syncopation th.it makes 
it sound J'etohing to a degree. 



JOE IS HERE— Eddio Cantor 
(Vocal) 

HOW YA GONNA KEEP YOUR 
MIND ON DANCING— Same- 
Columbia No. 3784 
Two typical Eddie Cantor songp. 

"Joe Is Here" t Kalmar-Uuby) is 

ditty with some four or live chor- 




ARISTO HOTEL 

101 West 44th 61., New York 

in the heart of the -Acwnta* district 

FOR THEATRICAL FOLKS 

Rooms with bath $16 week ap 
Telephone 1197-119*1 nryant 



uses relating how Flo would act 
when her beau Joe would call, de- 
livered In Cantor's usual energetic 
style. 

The other number tells Its story 
by Its title, done in the comedian's 
undeniable peppy and snappy man- 

YANKEE DOODLE BLUES (Fox 
Trot)— Ladd^i Black Aces 

STOP YOUR KIDDING— Same— 
Gcnnctt No. 4995 

Ladd's jazzers are building up a 
following of Jazz dance specialists 
and are accordingly concentrating 
on that style of recording. "Yankee 
Doodle Blues" Is sold with consid- 
erable patriotic paprika. 

"Stop Your Kidding" is a straight 



Everything modern has been provided: barber ahop, raataurant, vaUt, and 
other featuroii, at moderate prlft-ii. \-} 

Reservationit can be made commencing February Kth. <> 

HOTEL CI.AMAN 
Temporary Offlre:— 241 WEST 43d HTKEET. NEW TORK. TeL: BBTANT Ttlt 



THE ADELAIDE 



754.756 EIGHTH AVENUE 

Between 4flth and 47th Street* One BlocJi Weet af Broadway 

Three, Foar'and Five-Kounn Illah-Cimie Famished Apartment*. 

Stnetly Prnfewiilnnal MKK <>KOW«ilt lliK<JKL Mar Fhoaaet Bryant Oflt-l 



APARTMENTS FOR RENT 

CENTI^^LLY L0<;ATKD. Just completo.1. 
conHiHtIng of two rooina, parlor, bedroom 
and bath, accommodate 3 people, alno 3- 
room apartment/! and bath; electricity, 
heal and up-to-date. All newly fummhod. 
cosy and homelike. Must be seen to be 
appreciated. Iteady for occupancy, 

804 Sixth Avenue 

Between 4^fh and 4«»h Street* 



tion. Its ingratiating three-quarters 
rhythm Is enhajiced by a sym- 
. pathetic violin obligato. "Down By 
' the Apple Tree" Is a kid song 
follow-up of *'The Old Swlmmlnc 
Hole" In which Billy Jones and 
Ernest Hare address themselves by 
their first names for n conversa- 
tional double number delivery. 

An appropriate suggestion of the 
"Shade of the Old Apple Tree' 
classic is worked in ne.-itly. Ahtl. 



THfK\} THE NIGHT (Waltz)— The 

Sercnadors 
RED MOON— Same— Victor No. 
18S96 

The Serenaders again deliver a 
fetching waltz couplet replete with 
distinctive warm and dreamy 
chords. "Thru the Night* 'Is by 
Frederick Knight Logan, composer 
of the famous "Missouri Waltz." i 
' which speaks for itself. 

"Red Moon" (Henri de Martini 
and Max Kortlander) la dis- 
tinguished by tinkling chime and 
bells effects. 



Harry Puck has Ju.st written tho 
score of a new musical play tenta- 
tively tit!od^"My I.ittlo Kskimo," to 
ne produced next season. Puck is 
now ploying in "Tangerine." 



KOTEL HUDSON 

$ 8 and Up Sinola 
$12 and Up Doubia 

i}{ot and Cold Water and Telephone 
in Each Room. 

102 WEST 44th STREET 

NEW YORK CITY 

Phone: BRYANT 7tt8-t» 



HOTEL FULTON 

(In the Heart of New York) 

$ 8 and Up Single 

$14 and Up Doubia 

f^Shower nnthn. Hot and Cold Water 
and Telephone. 

264-268 WEST 46th STREET 

NEW YORK CITY 

rhonet Bryant 0398-0S94 

Opposite N. V. A. 



WILLIAM L. GIBSON 

(GIBSON and CONNELLI) 
riioTOGK.iriiKn this .season bt 



43looa 

aitATS tAJiCSL»« « 



<IWIikrVw» 



«HlCAOO 

tTelipkias tsedo^ Hit 



MILLION DOLLAR RAINBO ROOM 

Clark Street, at Lawrence Avenue. CHICAGO 
MR. FRED MANN Presents 

KI)>Y.\Kn liKCKS KNTIKKI.Y NEW tiORtiEOl S PRODK TION 

"IN RAINBO LAND" 

Conuany of forty r'^or'" XMtlf th'^ most wonderful chorus ever som on a flo-^if and 
FRANK \VESTPIIAI> and His RAINBO ORCHESTRA 

FAMOIH DIN.VEnS AND A T.A I'AI'.TB SKKVU'D 



DUMBELL (Fox Trot) — Vincent 
Lopez and Hotel Pennaylvania 
Orchestra 

ONE NIGHT IN JUNE — Same — 
Okeh No. 4754 
Lopez, worthily la the Okeh's 

dance feature. He Is turning out 

some corking recordings. "Dum- 



FOREIGN REVIEWS 



THE LOVE HABIT 

. T 

London. Feb. 10. 
Seymour HiiJis is a r«»!narl;able 
actor, lie demonstriitrd MiJn .it tlie 
Royalty Wednesday ni^iit wlure hr 
presented, in aHsoclation with Ocn- 
nls Eadle, what is deK(Mib<"l on 
the program a« "A Piece of Im- 
pertin^'nce" nd.iptrd frrtm the 
French by Mr. Hi U.S. It is !!i(' old 
type of Frejicii farce full of 'asidt'H, "" 



Soo'er'i? -^i^^L^ .^^[d'-TrS- I''."!™]:'.?.?'/. «^'r'_<'.:' ,?M-..^-«I '.'». 



F'RIAR'S INN 

Van Buren and Wabash Avenues 

CHICAGO 

OWE ENTERTAINMENT DANCE 

Qur Steaks and Chops a Specialty. Table d'Hote Dinner, $1.25. 

:. V. M. TO 9::50 I'. M. NO COVER <ilAlt<;E. 

reaturing FRIAR'S SOCIETY ORCHESTRA 



^>4W>/: 



o/i^£'>?syry/i4/?/fh//9v:. 



DANCE 



rtWltfJ/'^^i/f?/'*^ WHERE Professfohal a^l 






HOURS 

Giticp/if 



and Lopez has worked In suggen- 
tlons of both these predecessors In 
an orchestration that la replete with 
novelty effects and variations. 

"One Night In June" (Lange- 
Klapholz-Snyder-Smith-Wheeler) is 
ample refutation of the bromide to 
many coojts spoil the broth. A rich 
colorful dance number this, adapted 
from Tchalkowsky's "June." The 
first two named are arrangers 
responsible for the adaptation with 
Ted .Snyder fixing It up for popular 
dance appeal. Smith and Wheeler 
did the lyrics nnd Lopez does Justice 
to all the collaborators — and then 
.some I 



RUggeRtIvenrs.»<, and in the hands of 
anyone but Mr. Ilicks probably 
would have made tiresome enter- 
tainment. 

A young marrird woman Is ovrr- 
come by heat at .a charily bazuur 
and faints In the •irm.'i of a 
stranger. lie carries her to a 



n«•i^hb()^ln^^ chemist's shop and re- 
vives h« r, and takes her In a cab 
to hrr home. The piece opens a 
month later during which time he 
has been besieging a virtuous wife 
with hi.s amorous attentions. He 
get.s into the house on various pre- 
texts and one afternoon aa the hus- 
band rings the bell, the wife ia 
compelled to hide him in the tele- 
phone booth adjoining the sitting 
room. While there he overhears 
the husband holding converse with 
the mi.stresH and this gives him his 
big opportunity. He announces 
himself as the discarded lover of 
the mlHtress and tells the husband 
that having been deprived of a 
home, the husband must In time 
provide one for him and insists that 
lie be made the husband's secretary 



I GAVE YOU UP JUST BEFORE 
YOU THREW ME DOWN— Phil 
Ohman and Harry Reser 
DON'T SAY GOOD-BYE— Same- 
Columbia No. 3785 
Phil Ohman and Harry Reser. 
pianist and banjoist speciall5;t8. are 
a pleasant disk record combo. It's 
a novelty In Itself nnd listens quite 
snappy. Both numbers are equally 
well suited for dance or Just straight 
diversion. 



DANIEL P. CONWAY and CO. 

45 PINE STREET 

^ INSURANCE ^ 

LIFE, ACCIDENT, HEALTH, AUTOMOBILE. COMPENSATION, 
FIRE, BURGLARY, PLATE GLASS, MOVING PICTURE 

SPECIALIST IN THEATRICAL INSURANCE 

INSURE YOUR STAR AGAINST HEALTH, ACCIDENT and DEATH 

YOU OWi: IT TO YOrU.STOLVE.S TO SEE OUR CONTItACT 

Phone JOHN 2465 



0. p. CONWAY, PrMltfMt 



ROCKY MOUNTAIN MOON — 
Charles Hart and Elliott Shaw 
(Vocal) 

DOWN BY THE OLD APPLE 
TREE — Billy Jones and Ernest 
Hare— Brunswick No. 2357 

The "moon" waltz aong is sold m 
.) manner only to be expected from 
the veteran Hart-Shaw comblna- 



A fiLA^g^JfeERgP $5 SALE 



STAGE and STREET SHOES 

Flats, Box and Soft Toe Balleta 



Mnll Orilrra 
Catalog Y 



OPERA PUMPS 

Gold and Silver Cloth. 

Black, White, 

Pink Satin. 

225 W. 42d St. 

NEW YORK 



- k.40 ' 



46<I 



VARIETY 



Thursday, March 1, 192 



under throat of tolllngr the wife. 
It eeonis Ii«hl inattrial for three 
hours. I>ut Mr. llicks )ias done 
well with this bare sk ;leton and 
hunif upon It no end of JocoHity, 
droll**ry, Imffnonery, tomfoolery, 
mummery, wit and quip, not to 
mention doul>le entendre, lie Koes 
through three hours blithely with 
tho five otlu r member.«J of the cast 
"feeding" him with smart come- 
backs. 

inck.«» brings to the role Just the 
refiul.«<ite cniitint-ntal t»'mpfiament. 
Dennis lOadie i.s not so happily cast 
as tho husband. ThlH is quite out 



of hl3 sphere but he gives an In- 
telligent performance. Frances 
Carson a.s the wife was prottily in- 
competent; Alix, Doralne handles 
acceptably the part of the husband's 
mistress and Claude Rain.s scored 
Htrongly in thf character role of the 
nilstress' dancing partner. The 
sixth member of the cant is Kliza- 
bet WatHon as the maid and she 
seemed clum-^y and ponderous. The 
KUggestlveness of the dialog at 
times Is pretty crude. 

The i)roducers have not made a 
very heavy investtftent as the three 
acts are played in one set and there 




C«>0O<8>0<H»>0C< 



NEW YORK THEATRES 



SAM H. HARRIS Attractions 

Harris 



SAM 
U. 



42d St . W. of Btray. 

Kvcninnji at «:?0. 
MatB. We<« -Sat. 2:20. 

OWF.N DAVIM' N«w PUf 

ICEBOUND" 

NEW TORK-.S NEWEST TRIUMPH 



imTTftW Theatre, W. 43 St. Ev». 8:20. 

The Sweetest Lava Story Kver Told 
S.\M H. HARRIS rresenU 

MARGARET LAWRENCE 

fa the New York and Londoo Sarre»ii. 
«<QrppCTC'» By Rudolf Dealer 8c 
OkUntIO May Edincton 

Stated by SAM FORREST 



New AiiMtordam Theatre — W. 4;d Street 

Evenlns* •:!&. POPL'l.AB UAT. VVEUNBSUAT. 

REfiff.AR IIATINEK BATUUDAT. 

A National Institution 

ZIEGFED FOLUES 



:30. 
:30 



MUSIC BOX THEATRE 

Wm* 4S(h St. Bt«. B:15. Mnta. Wed.-Sat. 
BAH B. HARRIS PrMenU irVINC BERLIN'S 

lUSIC BOX REVUE' 

StMfd b} HASSARD SDORT. 
WITB A GRCAT CAST I 



R'way * 4&tli St. Et*. 1:39. 
Mats. Wed. A Sat.. 2 -.SO 



GAIETY 

CHARLES DILLINGHAM Preaents 

LOYALTIES 

By JOHN GALSWORTHY 

Produced bv Basil D«an 
"SEASON'S BEST PLA¥."— Trtban* 

f\t\r%^ TIIEATRB. VI. 4ltb St. Eva. 1:15 
UUnl Mata. Wed. and Sat. at X:1S. 

MERTON 

OF THE MOVIES 

Xi>\ih Glenn Hunter — Florei ce Nash 

Harry Leoa Wilaoa'a story dramatised by 
Oe«. B. Kaufman and Marc Connelly 



We.<<t 45th St. Evps. at 1. 
Mats. Thur. &. Sat. at 2. 



LYCEUM 

DAVin B FLA SCO Presents 

DAVID WARFIELD 

as SHY LOCK 

IN SHAKESPEARE S 

•'MERCHANT OF VENICE 



EMPIRE THEATRE 2-r.tn JS 

Matinees Wed. and Sat at 2:^0 

BILUE BURKE 

In BOOTH TARKINOTON'3 

'^ROSE BRIAR" 

ALLAN DiNEHAKT * FRANK CONROY 

» ■■■■»■ l^^^.^ I I II W IM ■ I I I I I 

Rtri ACPn W- <<*h •s^- Eves. 1:30. 
DEsl^rVOK^Kl Mts. Thur. & Sat. 2:30 
"Sensational Success." 

— Darnton. Eve. World 
OAVin REI.ASCO PT»(i#nu 

LENORE ULRIC 

as KIKI 

A Naw Clinricter Bluily by ANDKE I'WAIlD 

1 ITTI 17 Thea.. W. 41th St. Evs. 1:30 
1-A * * l-Ei Matinees Wed. & Sat. 2:30 
r. Ray Comstock & Morrla Gest preaent 

POLLK PREFERRED 

A Novr Comedy by GUT nor.TON 

with GENEVIEVE TOBIN 

Staged by WINCIIEI.L SMITH 



UUl/uUn Mat*. Wed. St S.it. S 

GEORGE M. COHAN 

PrenentA the Hit of the Towa 

"SO THIS IS LONDON!" 

"A HOWLING SICCESS."— Eve. Post. 

I IRFPTV THEATRE. W. 42d St. 

«-«**'*-*^ * I Math. Wed. A Sat. 

"Best American Musical Play 
in the Whole Wide World" 

GEORGE M. COHAN S 
COMEDIANS 

ta the Nmv SoaK and Dance Shaw 

"LITTLE NELUE KEIiLY" 
BETTER TIMES 

AT THE 

HIPPODROME 

llANAcr^^F^'T— rBARi.F,.«< dii.linghaii 

GREATEST •I'ECTACLC EVER 

STAGED AT THE HIPPODROME 

MAT. DAILY. t:l5; EVES.. R:I5 

Fl TIMHP THE-ATRE, 4:nd St. West. 
UU I IIVMU Matinees Wed. & Sat.. 2:30. 

A. H WOODS Presents 

HELEN MacKELLAR in 

'THE MASKED WOMAN" 

With LOWELL SHERMAN 



GEO.prV|-f AN Thes.. H'way at 4*d SL 
M. V'V^lAi^*^ Mats. Wed.. Sat.. J:30. 

THE LOVE CHILD 

By HENRY BATAILLE 

Adapted for the American Stare 

By MARTIN lIROWN 

with a Notahl* Company, Incladlna 

SII>NEY BLACKMRR 

JANET HERCHER 

LER RAKER 



TIMF^ <\Q THMtrs. W. 4Sd .St Eres S 
I llVltO OU. Mst.. Tue«., Tl.uri. and i 



39. 
Hat. 




OOL. 



Ths Play Tliat Succeeded in Spits of ths Osvll. 



nmj A 39th m. Et« i:15 
Mats. Wrd. A 8at. t:U 



Knickerbocker 

HKNnr W. SAVAGE Offers 
A NEW COMKDr— WITH MCSIC 

THE CUNGING VINE 

with PEGGY WOOD 
Entire Orch.. $2.50; entirt flnt Bale, U.39; entire 
2d Bale.. jOe— avery Mi|ht. Ineludlni holldayi and 
Saturdays. For Mat.— All Orch. >2; all Bale. SI. 
Beit Scats NOW at Ban OWca. 



EARL CARROLL theatre. 7th Are. 

tHni- 1/Hnnui.U ^^ nrtieth street 

Eves. 8:30. Mata. Thurs. & Sat, 2:30. 

SCHWAB &. Kl'SSELI. nrin» You 

The GINGHAM GIRL 

with EDDIE nrZZELL 
Helen Ford Itertle Iteaomont 

I^iilfte Allen RiimscII Mack 

Alau Edwards .Amelia SumniervllU 

and the HK.ST CHORIS on BHOADWAT 



are but half a dozen of the cast. 
The combination of Messrs. Xlictca 
and Eadie aa iitars prove sufflciently 
potent to attract for a limited 
period. The local presa comments 
are mildly favorable. Jolo. 



WILLIE AND EUGENE HOWARD 

STARRINQ IN 

"PASSING SHOW OF 1922'* 



VIACRUCIS 

London. Feb. (. 

"Via Crucis" is another version of 
tlie old morality play, "Everyman," 
with theatrical accoutrements. It 
was produced by Relnhart at Salz- 
burg several years ago on a plat- 
form employing the ancient local 
cathedral as a background. The 
value of this setting as contrasted 
with painted scenery can readily be 
imagined. 

Sir John Martin Harvey is respon- 
sible for the Knglish presentation 
(which was adapted from the "Je- 
dermann" of Hoffmannstahi by 
Sybil Amherst and C. E. Whoeler> 
and presents him.self aa Martin Har- 
vey in the role of Everj-man. It is 
a rather erudite, dignifled transla- 
tion, despite irregular rhymed verso. 
Harvey reads beautifully the only 
lengthy role of the play, but evtn 
his magnificent rendition can hard- 
ly save the piece from a tedium an|l 
monotony that is irritating to all 
but those to whom such things par- 
ticularly appeal. 

The production is gorgoou.«»l.\ im- 
pressive, with a single setting — a 
flight of steps the entire Width or 
the stage, the various phases of th.* 
play's progression muterially aided 
by effective ligliting. 

•Via Crucis" opened at the Clar- 
rick Feb. 6 for three weeks. It 
should attract the many admirers of 
Martin Harvey in sutflMent num- 
bers to make it a profitable engage- 
ment, but is MOt likely to have any 
particular appeal for tho gonoi-.Jl 
run of theatrego^s. Jolo. 



Direction ME88R8. 8HUBERT 



OLIVER WALLACE 

WORLD'S PREMIER MOTION PICTURE ORGANIST, 

SECOND YEAR 

GRANADA THEATRE, SAN FRANCISCO 



JOHN 



SIDNEY 




A SMASHING HIT 

with "STRUTTING ALONG" 

The All -Colored Revue—- A Phenomenal Success at 
THE CENTURY THEATRE. SAN FRANCISCO. INDEFINITE 



NIIIT DE NOCES DE CHARIOT 

Paris. Feb. 1 ■.*. 

Such is tlie title of a roUirl:iiig 
farce, produced at the Theatre 
Cluny. Chariot Is the local name 
for Charley Chaplin, and the young 
man In the three-act farce by Alln 
Monjardin and Andre Denis i«« mado 
to imitate and resemble the i)icture 
star. It would be impossible to 
give the plot of this ofYu.sion, 
wherein a retired magistrate, 
anxious to have a good time on his 
own. is anxious to nvarry oft his 
daughter to a rlcjj man, wheieas 
the damsel 's ^mittfn with a xaude- 
ville performer made up like Char- 
iot. 

It Is the wedding night that con- 
stitutes the title. After Chat lot has 
Impersonated the Mayor at tho 
time of the intended marriage with 
the suitor provided by the girl's 
father. In this manner eomeho»v 
the true lover replaces his rival. 
Of course there is the usual bed- 
room scene so dear to the mind of 
the French farce writer today, with 
witness hidden behind a screen. 

Darbel, a slim looking chap, holds 
the role of the cinema comedian, 
while Mile. Colette d'Or, a corpu- 
lent lady, plays Zulma in a style 
reminding ua of the late Jeanne 
Bloch. The show may appeal to 
the local public in this quarter of 
Paris on the other side of the 
river. Krndrew. 



FRANK SIEGRIST 

AND HIS ORCHESTRA 

Castro Theatre, San Francisco, Indefinitely 



BOBBY(UKE)HENSHAW 

AND HIS 

ENCORE 

NOW PLAYING ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

Direction BILL JACOBS 

Jl MPING FROM DEN^'ER TO LIVERPOOL. KNCSLAND TO IM.AV A- 

ni-TEEN \VEEK8 ON MOH.*4' EMPIREt*. 

- Direction ERNEST EDELSTEIN 



SAILINC; MARril »l, MTK. lH.\JF.STir 



BOSTON SHOWS 



(Continued from Page 39) 
PANTAGES CIKCinT 



nruDV NlliirD^C thfa w. 4'vi st. 

ULnni PIILLLIV U i;a!>t of Itro^lwa;. 
THE SEL^TrXS Present 

(In r.-.fj'jnflii>u with A'loii>h Klauher> 

JANE as "JULIET" 



Cowl 



TIIK (IK FAT F.ST 

TKii Mrii or 

HKR ( AKFFK. 

NlRhti $1.00 (T $2.5-1 Tliii'-i. Mat.. 7r.c to $t! «0 

r»i nncr ifwaj a 4r,*h st. Efenirm tt sso. 

ULUDL ftlatiUM* Weil, and Sat. at 3:3». 

Good Balcony Seats at Bax Ome«: fl-SO. $2. $2.^0 

OLIVER MOROSCO'S MUSICAL COMEDY 

im mmw 

— "WOIIIDS MOST nK.\KTH ITL cnoRns"- 

Unlit.niUiM H w'a> I AU yca'B r.-so 
"Shakespeare- in -the -Movies" 

EMIL JANNINGS 

• nd (trent ( iitt in 

OTHELLO 



REPUBLIC *=*^ s^ • ^^ o' ^''»'- 

Mats. Wednesday and Saturday at 2:10. 
ANNE NICHOLS' New Comedy 

"ABIE'S IRISH ROSE" 

••THE PLAT TFAT PUTS 
•L" IN lltMOR" 

WILLIAM A, BRADV'.«) Ml'SICAL 
(■O.Ml!:i>Y TltlUMl'H 

"UP SHE GOES" 

"Takes first iirize amunt tiiiiHloal plays." 

— -Siciihen liathhuti. Sun. 

PLAYHOUSE 



W. 4Sth St. Evtt. I:|«. 
and Saturday 



S 



MARK 



TRA 



nD 



MINNEAPOLIS 

Pantairea 
Phil Latuslia 
Mack & CastletOQ 
nigra Mlshka Co 
Walter Weeins 
•.Sheiks of Arabr 
C'habot A Tortoai 

8T. PAUL. 
Paotacae 
Allen * Taxt 
Durka a Betty 
Dummies 

Princeton a Ver'n 
2 Pasquali Bros 

WINNIPEG 

Paatacce 

DeLyons 1 
Jim a Jack 



I.a Pine A P'mery 
Marrl'je vs l>ivor'e 
Itegal A Moore Cu 
•Hon I 

RECINA. CAN. 

Pantaxea 

(5-7» 
(Same blil p'.ays 
Saskatoon A-IO) 
Sensational Toga 
Five Chapinn 
Davis McCoy 
•In Chinatown 
Finely A lilil 
Willie Bros 
Travel 
(Open week) 
EquUir Bros 
CliicU Supreiiis 



EL>f Ek . ' 

to the 




SEA 

in 

SHIPS 



*» 



Rosa & Roma 
Lewis A Norton 
Joe Jackson 
Bob LaSalie 

SPOKANE 

P»nt»cea 

Schepp's Circus 
Hope Vernon 
Dewey A Kogera 
Cave Ifaa Love 
Jack Boran 
Harvard Holt A K 

SEATTLE 

Pantares 

Foxworlh A. Fran'.** 
•Alda Earl A Lew's 
Tony A George 
Charles Howard C>j 
•Five Jan.sleys 
Morla Sisters 

TANCrVKB, B. C. 

Fanta^re* 

Sheik's Favoritd 
Zlntour Bros 
Man Hunt 
Harry Bloom 

BELUNGILAM 

Paatacea 
Rial A Lind8troTr\ 
•Rogers Roy A B 
Virginia Belles 
Morrlscy & Young 
Eva LaRue 

TACOM.A 

Pantacea 

LaDora A Beck man 
a & E Parks 
Oklahoma 4 
Bert Walton 
Eva Taneruay 

PORTLAND. ORE. 

Pantages 
•P & J LaVolla 
Ford A Truly 
Three's a Crowd 
Stephens A Hollis'r 
Vardon A Perry 
Belleclalre Bros 

TroTel 

(Open week) 
Santiago Trio 
White & Barry 
Maude Leone Co 
ITarry Hines 
Hannaford Family 

SAN FBANCISCO 

Pant age* 

The I..uinars 
PhllbrIck A DeVoe 
Ruth Budd Co 
Sherman V:iri A II 
Valleclfa's Leopds 
Margaret Strain 

OAKLAND. CAL. 

Pantagea 

c:arlc & Story 
Noodles F'agan 
Richardson T\viti!i 
.Toaie Heather 
Palo A Palet 
ICale A Wiley 

LO.S ANCiELES 

Paiitages 

ri?rce A (Jott 



Krondway and 47tli Street 

A NATlON.\l, I.NSrrilF'noN' 



Direct Ion Joseph Plunkett 

CHARLES CHAPLIN 

In IIU 4 K4>el Laugh. "THE PILGRIM" 
NTRAND HVMPHONT 0IU:HEHTRA 

* C.MIL Ei'UL'.Vi: L'fc; Cv>aJui tor 



B. S. MOSS 

CAMEO THEATRE 

4Sd St., Jost East af HrottdwMy 

A HOOKINSON PICTURE 



Lillian Burkhart 
K niter A Ifeaney 
B A I. Hart 
Thalcro's Circus 
•Major Rhodes 

SAN DIEGO. CAL. 

Pantagrea 

Ward A I»ooley 
•Barnes A Hamil'n 
Norton A Melnotte 
Jack Goldie 
•Seven Algerians 
Rlnaldo Bros 

L'G BEACH, CAL. 

Pantagea 

•The Gladiators 
•Wilson & Addte 
Walter Brower 
rhoy Ling Foo 
•Canadian Band 

SALT IJ%KK 

Pantagea 

•(8-10) 
Nelson's Catland 
Jan Rubinl 
Weston A Ellae 
Reynolds Opera Co 

OGDEN. UTAH 

Pantagea 

Rowland A Meehan 
McFraland bia 
El Cota 
CheVenne Days 
•Bright A Gllck 

DENVER 
Pantacca 

Arnold A Florence 
Jewell A Rita 
Miss Nobody 
Harry Tlghe 
Havem'n Animals 
Gibson A Betty 

COLO. SPRINGS 

Pantagea 

(6-7) 
(Same bill plays 

Pueblo 8-10) 
H A J Chase 
Chernynoft 
Exposition 4 
Spectacular 8 
nobby liChman 
Ryan A Ryan 

OMAHA, NKIL 

Pantagea 

Leach WaUin 3 
Morgan & Gay 
Cecil Cunninghan: 
Byron Bros Band 

KANSAS C ITY 

Pnntages 

Alex Bros A Ev^l'n 
Ridiculous Ricco 
Maude Earle 
l'".ishion I'late M 
Hritt Wood 
TashiOH rronieii'de 

PiinlagpM 

WiMdrtiias 
Buddy Wuik-r 
<'htsholm A B( > n 
Jlronsoii A- HtMiff 
Greak Blac'i..«;tone 



i 1*". 



PHLSBURirS 
BEST 



Eventually, why not now? 
that goe* 

for :. '^ \ ■'■/:■:. 



LOWRY 

in hU new comedy 
Single 



INTERSTATE CIRCUIT 



DALLAS, TKWS 

MaJcMtir 

JAN CUIUS 



I'oley & Lelour 

.M.irlon Murr.i .' 
I'ish'^r A tliiiiH/."^ 



Little Billy 
Herbert A Dara 

FT. SMITH, ARK.^ 

Mnjestie ' 
JAW Hai« 

.Hig Friscoe 
•Jimmie's Joys 
(Two to fill) 

FT. WORTH. TEX. 

Majestic 

The Nagyfys 
Coffnian 4c Carroll 
Emilie Lea Co 
Edwards A Beasley 
CUcott & Mary Ann 
Tan Ar;ikis 

HOI STON, Ti:.X. 

Majestic 

rii(^ Cevenes 
.lason A Hurrigan 
Valerie liorgere Co 
Maxlleld & Gol :nii 
Th-« Volunteer.^ 
r^:f>y Shelly Band 

LITTLE ROC Ik 

Majestic 

\V H;C.; & Uru' 
I>r Tho!i>.pson 
.^i< Kri.st'oe 
Fi.'lds Kiini!/ I\.i,l 
(One to nil » 

'Jd hi»lf 
^■^JIlU Whiliii 1 ri 
i>v Tlionip.'oii 
H &■ A S»-y!i'.oiiP 
il<*nrv .Santry IS.iM.t 
inuf to Ji!l» 



tOlCLAHOMA CITY 
Orpheeas 

(Tulsa split) 
1st half 
The Phllmers 
•Murdock A Maye 
Primrose 4 
Whiting A Burt 
Four Tamakls 

SAN ANTONIO 
Majestic 

Berk & Saun 
Dunham A Omalley 
Green & Parker 
Thos i: Shea 
Swartz A CiifrirJ 
Harry Wat'n Jr Co 

Tl I.SA, OKLA. 

Orpheam 

(Ol;Ia. City Split) 

1st half 
Lambert & Fish 
Alma Ntelson Co 
Rinaldo 
Ch.'uulon ?. 
(One to fill) 

WICHITA. KAN. 

Orplirum 

Firxy Sistors 
Hufitoi) R,-»y 
M 1« Wnl'h.-ii! O 
Muri;.i(i .V (;alf« 
1' & .\ Heiuiini; 

2d half 
IC'rii* Ki-y.s & M 
llarvpy Ilancy A G 
.siiiii)s(»n Sr D«*an 
Swiff jt i;.-!ly 
Hyjtus A Mclnlyre 



;,< 



i 



ARE YOU GOINaO EUROPE? J 

flteninablp nceonimoAntlons nrrniiRril on all LInra. at Ainin (tfno^ 

Prlcea. Honta are Aolnit vrrj ffnil: nrrnriKr <-nrly. Pf»rrl|cn Alonefj 

boaffht nnd sold Liberty Honda boaebt and sold. 

- PAUL TAl'SiO A ION. 104 Rnat 14tb St.. New York. 



Phenet Star^wnnt Olsa-fll37. 



Thursday, March 1, t92d 



VARIETY 



Itfe 



'igf^'f...^ :^-^.Zii .''-tii^' ' . 

W. J. EMMETT 
'J. T, EMMETT 



■»'' f>' » 



DIXIE FOUR 



HERBERT BENSON 
GEO. McCLAIN 



■fv •■•:'! - 



TlioseYersa.t:ile B o y s 

STOPPING SHOWS EVERYWHERE— ANY SPOT— ANY TIME 

DirecUon PHIL BUSH 



■.)- 



FRANK RICH CO., inc. 

PRODUCTIONS 

EDDIE HUME and CO. . MINNIE BURKE and CO. 

HARRY CARR and CO. AVIS' NOVELTY DANCERS 

WM. MELBOURNE and CO. D'ALBERT QUINTETTE 

ETC., ETC. 



''i 



AFFIE TRANGER 

AND 

HIS COLLEGE (M ENTERTAINERS 

Mmic and Song— That's All 



■ 5.'- ' 



CUFF CLARK 



Imi^ressicns of Men You Meet 
Every Day 



"THE WONDER GIRL" 



TX A 



Spectacular Scenic Classic 

Vritt*n, ."Staged and rroUuced 

By HARRY DANFORTH 



HILL and DALE 



IN 



"Heel and Toe 



ff 



IRENE TREVEm 



I' 



CLEVELAND and 
DOWREY 

In a Satire on Present Day Conditions 

, "ARE YOU NEXT?" 

WrUtrn hy TKD ri.FVEI>AND and HARRY C. 

l>.%NFOKTII; Arrangrrd, Staged and Produced by 

IIAKKY V. DANFORTH 



WRIGHT and SIDELU 



KILTED 
KOMICS 



' ' Tv 



FOUR PEARLS 



IN A 



UNIQUE OFFERING 



COPELANDand 

BRAYTON 

"USE YOUR OWN 
JUDGMENT' 



CURRENT OF FUN 



WITH 



MME. BRUNELL and CO. 



LA SALLE TRIO 



<< 



SPEEDING IT ON 



y» 



POWELL-DANFORTH 
AGENCY, Inc. 

Suite 302, Loop End Bldg. 

^^ -_I^_ 177 N. State Street 

CHICAGO" ■■ '':_-^irK^: 

^ Phone Dearborn 3170 

Booking these amongst others the Current Season 



FERRIS DUO 



IN A 



Kaleidoscopic Offering 

Staged and Arranged by 

HARRY C. DANFORTH 



ANDRIEFF TRIO 

Clever Dance Offering 



POWELL-GILMORE CO. 

in Songs, Music and Dance- 
apation 



CHARLES and BURT 

Versatile Comedians 



MUX DAISY and 
STERN BROS. 

Fun in a Parlor 



^ 



PHESAY and POWELL 



What's the Use? 



mmr- 



,ZELDA BROS. 

IN ^. . -^ 

'•AERIAL FROLICS" 
Written, Staged and Produced by 

HARRY C. DANFORTH 

Orpheum Circuit Now 



Third Season in the West and Still Going Strong 

NEWPORT-SHRK 

AND . .:/.•..... 

■::■::- :^^v^'-- SUE PARKER la 



A Standard Act 
• A Great Circuit 



•*' • 



A Good Agent 
Great Treatment 



NUIl and VOID 



A Dippy Daffy Duo 



-v 



WUUe— DUNLAY and MERRILL-Bessie 



in "SO LONG BROADWAY" 



HapDV-MOORE and SHY-Emil 

\ 'V ::::■:;•'■ .'.-^s- . ,-;-^/- ■• \ ^ ,"■•"'■■■: -^ present :■ .•■ -:•/.;:■..■' V*",' ;:;;,:..- ':^: ; ■^■■\, 

; A Rare Combination That Causes Much Laughter in Any Spot on Any Bill Anywhere 



F''-' 



46f 



VARIETY 



Thursday, March 1, 1083 



WHYTAKElLU 
CHANCES? 




■■I I' 1^ 




AND 



SATISFIED CUSTOMERS ARE THE BEST 



REFERENCES 



A FEW OF OUR PATRONS 






ASK THEM! 





IN 




. • . J.. ^ Hi- J : 



CIRCUIT OF THEATRES, CHICAGO 

•■ ■ ' • ■*..'-,".» 

Playing High Class Standard Attractions of Merit 




ASSOCIATED BOOKING OFFICES! 
609 Wood's Theatre Bldg. 
CHICAGO 

Standard Atrtt Going East\ 
or West I 

What Time Have Ypu Open ? 

Booking Exclusively Palac* Theatre 

Detroit, Mich. 

Regent Theatre, Bay City, Mich 



ETHEL LINTON 
MAX HALPERIN 
DAN BACHMAN 
EDDIE CANTOR 
NAN HALPERIN 
MORRIS GREENWALD 
BILL DIAMOND^ 
EDITH DIAMOND 
TINK HUMPHREY 
MORT SINGER 
ASHER LEVY 
PAUL BIESE 
NAT KALCHEIM 
lltAE SAMUELS 
JAMES MICHELSTEADER 
WALTER DUGAN 
BILLY JACKSON 
SAM TISHMAN 

M. SILVER 

ED MARSH 
C. E. BRAY 

ERNIE YOUNG 

BILLY ELSON 

HAZEL GOODYEAR 

JOE FINN 

HARRY SINGER 

ZELAYA 

JACK MORTON 

PINTO and BOYLE 

NAT R0Y8TER 

BUDDY WALTON 

JESSE FREEMAN 

MOODY and DUNCAN 

MORRIS and MAY HUMPHREY 

JACK NORTON 

HENRY SHAPIRO 

SOL SAX 

JOSEPHINE EMINGER 

FRAN 



:....„...., LENORE WEED :.„..„; 

* JANET M£RLE 
MADGE LEON 

. FRANKIE KELCY 

GILSON SISTERS • 

HARRY ROSE 

JEAN GIBSON 

RUTH ETTING 
MARTY FORKINS 
WILLIE BERGER 
' MAX RICHARDS 

* CHARLES YATES 
WM. B. FRIEDLANDER 
LEW GREEZE 

IRVIN SIMON 
TIM KEELER 
PETE SOTEROS 
LEW HEARN 
ALMA ADAIR 
C. C. HAMILTON 
EVA MANDEL 
CHAMBERLAIN and EARL 
JESS BLOCK 
FRANCES DUNLAP 
DE WOLFF GIRLS 
GEORGE BROWN ,, 
HALEY GIRLS 
JACK LAIT 
NAT PHILLIPS 
ROCCO VOCCO 
EDDIE LEWIS 
B. B. KAHANE 
J. J. NASH 
PAUL SAVOY 
BENNETT SISTERS 
. GORDON and FORD 

H^ZEL KIRK 

BENNY DAVIS . 

K WEPHAL 



^^W£S^ 



K 



February 
Clearance Sale 

A saving of over SO^o 

on every piece of fur 

in the house 



\ 



AND GROWING WEEK BY WEEK 
AND YEAR BY YEAR 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



ELI JEWELRY 

STATE-LAKE THEATRE BUILDING GROUND FLOOR 

188 N. State St., CHICAGO 
WHY NOT GIVE HER A DIAMOND BRACELET ? 



Spedal Dueounttc 

the Ptof(t£sion^'^ 
Puts Rqiaired and 
I\cmodelcd^ 



New Unpublished 

Song Numbers 

We can supply you with th* kind of long 
material you want to Improve your act 
and we will gladly demonstrate those 
which may prove available for use. We 
give you an opportunity to use a eons: 
before It la atale. Call today. 

Room 404, Romax Bldg., 

245 West 47th Street 

(W. of Broadway), New York, N. Y . 

Welle?rFRENCH 
FOOTWEAR 

8* Soiartlir Oifferaet. 

The NewMt Parli 

VeriioN* is Sprinftlme 

Modcli. 

HARRY WELLER 

793-8thAv. V^r OpenEveningi 





DIAMOND VANf Y RI\r;.S 
nilACKI.KTM WATCIIKS 
llAKriNS ri.AfCJIFS 

lAVAIJFRF** MA.RI'I'INS 
IV It 1 M T W A T t II !•; S 



DIAMONDS 



i{i^:>iorNTiNf» 

Ki:M(»liKl.l.iN(. 
lir.SFTTING 

ni>is\s 

SH.f.l>TIONS 



Goods Reserved on Dejujsit 



Guerrlni A Co 

Tk* LMOni. snr 

Lar|«>t 

ACCORDION 

FACTORV 

«n tilt UnitMl Stata« 

Th« onl» ••■rtnry 

(hat makr^ an* iket 

>f Reedii — made M 

•^and 

«77>27» Cotumeu* 

Avaauc 

Har frtnrt*rm Cat 



'^[£Z5fe^^i:4 



THEATRICAL OUTFITTERS 



GEORGE 



DICK 



RATH BROS 



TOURING ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 






ACADEMY THEATRE 



Halsted at Madison St. 



CHICAGO, ILL, 



CHICAGO'S OLDEST THEATRE 

Now Playing Six Big Acts of V^audeville and First National 
Feature Pictures. Continuous from 12 Noon to 11 P. M. 
Playing Exclusive \V. V. M. A. and B. F. Keith (West) 

Circuit Acts. ■'''''■ '"■■ '■ < '■■/■ ':■'■'•/■.:/' /' ■ '. '-'-[.S-:. 

-- BIJOU ACADEMY COMPANY, Prop. 

JOE PILGRIM, Manager 

PAUL and LULA 

ARLEY 



SENSATIONAL SPECTACULAR 

BALANCING ACT f 

' . . . There are balancing acts ami balaru;ing ac-ls, but thise two 
youtiK people have hit on somethinR tliat is away from anything of its 
kind ever seen. It is 80 unusual that it scored one of the applause hit.^ 
at this theatre in competition with fmir good comedy acta. It combines 
daring balancing feats with corking good sliowmanship and is readv 
for the best of time.'— VARIKTY. 

Direction SIMON AGENCY 



1580 Broadway 



New York City i 



SIBYL BETHEL presents 
ETHEL PARKER and AL ALLEN 

i n "BITS OF PERSON ALIT Y^^ 

ED. LOFTUS at piano ^^^"" *" ^ 



KENNARD'S 
SUPPORTERS 

219 W. SKth Ht.. N. T. 

iMionr rM« K»y 9?** 

1 S^nrt for Ca'alf^rii* 



a 



IM.WINfJ OK I'll MM 11 MK 



Direction 



IKE KAUFMAN, East 



BILLY JACKSON, V/cli 



Thursday, March 1, IWS 



VARIETY 



y,' 



it,'. .. ..•. 



•. ■ •'.>: 



, ^ ' .:' 



ANNO UNCEMEN T--- 



.:'.' -.^.t 



-■■\'l--- ■■■ 



vr-^: -....V-^'v 



:-:-'l 






STANDARD ACTS DESIRING TIME IN 
(THE MIDDLE WEST CAN SECURE SAME 
BY WRITING OR WIRING DIRECT TO 

:^f],,;§-'.r^;^^v MR. a s. HUMPHREY v:-:,f^':::Kr-l'; 

\:/'M:?m^^^^ .MANAGER .,.Ji:'- = \::"^:';^vV;--^^'--^ 

v-n---:f£,'';::^;t::^:f't,,: Chicago - 



4 



.-V:« 



(■ / 



I 



'■ ...^ •■..-.» 



B. R Keith Offices 



,, >.'-r 



'■fL- 



i 



•> ■■'■■ 



,■• ■»• ; ■ 



MR. GLEN G BURT 

Booking Manager 



) ■ . ■■ ^ « i» r] « ^ I ' ". -M ' 



■'■i 



-*^ 



■'■'4 









.2 

.J 



... rr^ 

■ ■('II 







3 



••<* 



N 



State- Lake Building 

CHICAGO 



■(' : t 



' ■• ■>, 



:-y- ■■':■ 



^ 



-# ■ 



iW^^sinSi^&:^^^^ 



T-^sBSBWWwn^^B^^^^^^^MMM^^MIl 



"iBSg^^ isr2firi& :& iiR :aiT£u ajTiiiriiE^ ikuSrwaKftj 



.1- 

■ ..a 



46h 



• VARIETY 



Thursday. March 1, 1923 




A 

N 
D 




THE CONNOR TWINS 



JUST CLOSED A VERY SUCCESSFUL ENGAGEMENT AT THE 



PALAIS ROYAL, SAN FRANCISCO- 



TO OPEN MARCH 5 






AT THE 



MARIGOLD GARDENS, CHICAGO 



DON'T BE A SPENDTHRIFT 

SAVE YOUR MONE\— ._:,/;■, :-;:.;:^.... , ■ "y-:,-^-Ws'^,^ 

Every money order, express order, casliier's check that you are carrying around, you are losing money. Be- 
sides the temptation of window shopping and buying useless things. Just think of the many bad investments you 
liave made by having the cash money on you. Had you given the matter twenty-four hours* thought you would 
not have squandered that money. , 

Twenty-five Dollars a week deposited with us for one\ear would give you cash $1300— and $19.80 interest, 
wliich your money earned for you while you were working. You can open an account by mail and we will send 
you book with enough envelopes and deposit cards to watch your money grow. 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 
CHICAGO, ILL. 





AND 



•Ji ■','•■ ' '- 



HIS ALL STAR ORCH ESTR A 

Now Playing at SENATE THEATRE, CHICAGO 



306 Woods Theatre Bldg. 




PAOL.I 



CHICAGO 



Phone Randolph 1DQ5 



To those who rcahzc the vahic of having tlieir scenery and costumes created by masterful hands from designs especially painted for their particular act 
, or production I am wilHng to co-operate with ideas for those who reahzc the vahie of design. / \^^ ' 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



VARIETY* 



■ BJ I 



17 



THE 



••■^i ■ 



WESTERN Wr-^^ 

VAUDEVILLE 



'■-I' 



•THE 
SERVICE 
. THAT 
SERVES" 



The Vaudeville 

Booking Center 

of 

THE WEST 



MANAGERS' 
ASSOCIATION 



PROVIDING VAUDEVILLE. BILLS FOR MORE JHAN 150 THEATRES 



&'^': 



-.it' X 






NOW EXTENDING 

'"■■>•■■' .*■'■ ' - 
■ r . -' ■■■. "■':■"-.-. .■ ■^''>- , ; ,"■■; .■■■ 

ITS UNEXCELLED SERVICE TO THE 

* PACIFIC COAST ^ 



•^'■.::"C 



-. / • 



\ 



/*' 



T,: ■«■. 



.:.,e 



i^y 



■. . * 



. >■ ■ 



AND INTERMEDIATE CITIES THROUGHOUT THE 



WEST - NORTHWEST and SOUTHWEST 



CORRESPONDENCE 
IS INVITED 



FROM THOSE NOW RECEIVING BOOKINGS FROM OTHER SOURCES— AND 
THOSE CONTEMPLATING THE ADOPTION OF A VAUDEVILLE POLICY IN 
THEIR THEATRES 



■•,\: 



OUR 
CLUB DEPARTMENT 

SPECIALIZES IN SUPPLYING EN- 
TERTAINERS OF THE HIGHEST 
STANDARD FOR ALL 0CCASI0NS4 



OUR 
FAIR DEPARTMENT 

IS UNSURPASSED IN ITS RE- 
SOURCES FOR FURNISHING AT- 
TRACTIONS TO FAIRS, CARNIVALS 
AND AMUSEMENT PARKS 



' . . ■ v>-' 



BRANCH OFFICES f^M^S^F^ 



■^ 



SAN FRANCISCO 



ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO THE fVESTERN VAUDEVILLE MANAGERS' ASSN,, 

;\: ^,f .-f:';);; •:,x;.^ ;'■■; STATE-LAKE BLDG/^S:;;:;:-';;':': 

CHICAGO, ILL; ■■' ;■--■'»•"■"■■ 



■ ■• -if:. 



'* > i 



I 



48 



VARIETY 

"'■■■-■' 



Thursday^ March 1, 192f 



',11 . !■ in 



^ -■ 



CHARLES C. CROWL 



^' 



THIRD FLOOR 



WOODS BLDG. 



■■;y^ 



CHICAGO 



■ r.p- 



Booking exclusively with KEITH WESTEkN, WESTERN VAUDEVILLE MANAGERS' ASSOCIATION, 

JUNIOR ORPHEUM, ORPHEUM and AFFILIATED CIRCUITS. ' I 1 



Listed below are a few of the acts I am representing this season: 



■A »■ 



ORIGINAL JEWELL MANIKINS 
ARTHUR HOWARD and CO. 
HARRIS & GILBERT 

BERT HOWARD (Second season Orpheum 
time) 

FOUR HARMONY BOYS 

THE GLADENBECKS 

GALLOWAY and GARRETTE 

GLENCOE SISTERS 

CECIL GREY 

GULFPORT and BROWN 

FITZGERALD and CARROLL 

MERCEDES 

THREE EDDY SISTERS 

DIAZ MONKS 

ETHEL DARE 

SAMMY DUNCAN 

CONLIN and GLASS 

BILLY "SINGLE" CLIFFORD 

CARLOS and DEFRIES 

BARNUM? 



BINNS and GRILL 
BERNARD and Erma 
THE BIMBOS 
; E. T. ALEXANDER . 

* KARL KAREY 
FRED LEWIS 
JACKLIPTON * 
BILLIE LINGARDE 
^SPANISH GOLDINIS 
FRAWLEY and WEST 
THREE WHIRLWINDS 
UPSIDE DOWN STANLEYS 
FiVE DANCING SERENADERS 
THE RODEO REVUE 
- LEE MASON and STAN SCOTT 
MAN-KIN 
• MUDGE MORTON TRIO 

NORTH and HALLIDAY 
REED BERNARD and CO. 
SHAFER'S RUBE JAZZ BAND 
REXO 

EASTERN REPRESENTATIVE 



KANE, MOREY and MOORE 
SAWYER and EDDY 
LEW SULLY 
STURM BROS. 

DOROTHEA jSADLIER and CO« 
HARRY SYKES and CO. 
TEDDY 

TUSCANO BROS. 
VALLAL and ZERMAINE 
MARTIN VAN BERGEN 
WILL J. WARD ^ 

WARD and ZELLER ^ 

WALTERS and GOULD 
WESTON»S MODELS i ; 

JACK WILSON and CO. ' 

FIVE CHAPINS 
BEAGGY and CLAUS 
BOGERT and NELSON 
DELTON BROS. 
ROSE BENNETT 
DENOYER and DANIE 






.■•■fU 



•*. .a) 




X. WILTON 

PALACE THEATRE BLDG., NEW YORK CrTY 



HERE'S TO WESTERN VAUDEVILLE! 

LONG MAY rr FLOURISH!— AND IT WILL 

After booking with the Western Vaudeville Managers' Association for nearly a score of years, we voice these— 
our heartiest and most sincere congratulations. . • ' 

WHY? -^ ':--^:< ■'.:.:: ' ■ ■■;:^v:''''':^^^^^ "'''"'"'''■■""'■:; V--V 

Because the W. V. M. A. gives Service that Serves, offers splendid booking conditions and at all times evinces a 
keen interest in the theatres it represents. "^ 

KEDZIE AMUSEMENT CO. 

Operating Kedzie Avenue Theatre and Kedzie Annex CHICAGO 



■•jv 



FRANK THIELEN CIRCUIT OF THEATRES 



MAJESTIC THEATRE, BLOOMINGTON, ILL. 
ORPHEUM THEATRE, QUINCY, ILL. 

ORPHEUM THEATRE, GALESBURG, ILL. 
FOX THEATRE, AURORA, ILL. 

GAYETY THEATRE, OTTAWA, ILL. 



ORPHEUM THEATRE, PEORIA, ILL. 
ORPHEUM THEATRE, JOILET, ILL. 
RIALTO THEATRE, ELGIN, ILL. 

HARPER THEATRE, CHICAGO, ILL. 
PLUM THEATRE, STREATOR, ILL. 

BOOKING EXCLUSIVELY WITH THE 

VAUDEVILLE MANAGERS' ASSOCIATION 



THE SERVICE THAT SERVES PERFECTION IN BOOKING 



SAM TISHMAN, Booking Manager 
STATE-LAKE BUILDING, CHICAGO, ILL. 



Silver has the knack of booking an ordinary 'movie' house into an extraordinary temple of popular entertainment." — JACK LAIT 

Supplying Standard Vaudeville 
Attractions 



.Amusement Booking Representative 

FOR '-. ■■; 

AMERICA'S FOREMOST CHAIN 



OF 



PALATIAL PICTURE THEATRES 



MORRIS SrSILVER 

—w ITU- 
WESTERN VAUDEVILLE MANAGERS' ASSOCIATION 

STATE-LAKE THEATRE BUILDING CHICAGO, ILL. 



FOR SUCH l'RO.MINENT INTBRBSTfl AS 

BalibiD sod Kalz Tbeatres, CHICAGO 

N«wm.in Theatre, Kansas City. Mo. 

Stran<l Theatre, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

Marithfleld Amusement Knterpriaes, Chicago, III. 

noaeland-.State Th<-atre, Itoa«land. IIL 

Auerbach-Wolf Theatre*, Chicago, III. 

AND A nONT or OTIIKRH— WHY MOT TOVT 



^^ 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



VARIETY 



4d 



BOOKING EXCLUSIVELY^ 



WESTERN VAUDE 
!IUNIOR ORPHEUM 




BILLY 



B. F. KEITH (WESTERN) 

Founders 

B. F.KEITH, 

A. PAUL KEITH 

E. F. ALBEE 

F. F. PROCTOR 



'■1.^5: 



AGENCY 



C. S. HUMPHREY, 



■r"'i 



GENERAL 
MANAGER 



C. L BRAY. 



«(ENERAL 
HANAGER 

■e 



MILTON BERGER Associate 



CHICAGO 



• — w 

Suite 504, Loop End Building, CHICAGO, Phone Randolph 3382 



LARRY 
OMER 

EXTENDS CONGRATULATIONS AND 
BEST WISHES FOR 

;ONnNUED SUCCESS 

- —TO— ,. _„ 

B. F. KEITH CIRCUIT 

W. V. M. A. 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

ORPHEUM, JR. 

P. S.-^BILLY JACKSON joins in 
'thanking all BOOKERS and MAN- 
AGERS for their many courtesies. 



:% BOB ^-■^'' 

MURPHY 

and 

THE MAPLE 
SUGAR KING 



and-JERRY the WIFE 



Ruth 

Glanville 



World's Greatest 
Lady Saxophonist 



ASSISTED BY 

HAL SANDERS 

OPENING ON 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 
MARCH 12th 



BILLY 
BEARD 



.•f-t, 



.;r;ji 



...'■■•■; :-^ 



M PARTY 
FROM THE SOUTH 






ii. 



CLINTON SISTERS 

CARTOONING 

in DANCELAND 



v 



CREEDON and DAVIS 

I COULD SMASH YOU 

Booked Solid Until May 



CHARLES ROGERS and Co. 

IN THE ICEMAN 



I. :■'■ - 



CORTEZ SISTERS 

INTERNATIONAL ENTERTAINERS 

In a Foreign Revue " 



DON LANNING 

JUST YOUNG DON 



LESTER 

WORLD'S GREATEST VENTRILOQUIST 



MURRAY KISSEN and Co. 

In the Barber of Seville 

J "STILL SHAVING" 

JIM and GLADYS GILFOIL 

In a Flirtation Travesty Entitled 

"IT IS COMING TO THIS" 

PAUL RAHN 

in "THE VAUDEVILLE CHEF" 

ELSIE WEBER at the Piano 

NIOBE. 

AMERICA'S AQUATIC MARVEL 
New Act in construction for next 

season 

GUY WEAPICK 

The Guy Who Put the Punch in "Cow Puncher,** and 

FLORESLADUE 

World's Champion Lady Fancy Rope Spinner 

In "RIDDLES," Coming West Soon 

Always a Standard Act in Vaudeville— 
Always Up-to-Date and Refreshing 

THE FARRELL TAYLOR TRIO 

FARRELL TAYLOR, EDITH SWAN, TOM CARTER 



STERUNG ROSE TRIO 

in ARTISTIC AERIAL 

Athletic Achievements 






STEVE GREEN 

THE BLACK STREAK 

DALY and BURCH 

In THE HEIGHT OF IGNORANCE 

ANDY WILLIAMS and BILLY CLARK 

Selling Their Stock in Trade 

"HAPPINESS" 

BOOKED SOLID 1923-24 

RUBEVILLE COMEDY FOUR 

Klever Komedy, Klassical Komedians 

A Mirthquake of Rural Komedy 

CAITES BROS. ! 

Because They Can't Ride a Bicycle 



rr^=i 



i 



\ 



LAMONT TRIO 
BOB MURPHY 
JJfDERMOTT & VINCENT 

ITflF*- PARKER and BOYS 
Ea^^.V-^'^^N and COMPANY 
RAINES and AVEY 
SilSt-v.^P^^f'S and COMPANY 

It^oo'S.J^"-'"^ARY REVUE 
STARS OF YESTERDAY 
iK.y^r' BROWN GIRLS 
ISSirb »"«^ VERNON 
STONE'S NOVELTY BOYS 
AL TUCKER 

T Ji'^«^?°^E «•"«* BARRY 
THE STORM 

WILLIAMS and CLARK 



YOKOHAMA BOYS 

BILLY LANG 

THE MAGPIES 

WILL CUNNINGHAM , . 

BILLY O'BRIEN 

THE ARDELLS 

SCOTT and CHRISTIE 

MURIEL MARVEL 

CONNIE CLAXTON 

JACK ADAMS and TMOMPeONS 

THE FOUR USHERS 

CAITES BROS. 

CLINTON SISTERS 

CORTEZ SISTERS 

CRANDELL'S CIRCUS 

LARRY COMER 

CLIFFORD and STANFORD 

CREEDON and DAVIS 

DALY and BURCH 



DUCOS BROS. 

GLADYS DELMAR and BOYS 

ED and WYNNE 

MAUDE ELLET and COMPANY 

FAIRMAN and FURMAN 

FARRELL TAYLOR TRIO 

ETHEL, GILMORE and GIRLS 

HARRY GARLAND 

GIRL IN THE MOON 

STEVE GREEN • 

GLANVILLE and SANDERS 

JIM and GLADYS GUILFOYLE 

HUNNIFORD 

HINKEL and MAE 

SIX HASSANS 

HOLLINS SISTERS 

MURRAY KISSEN and COMPANY 

KILKENNY DUO 

JOHNNY KEANE 



KELLY and POLLOCK 
LIGHTELLE and COFFMAN 
ASH and FRANKS 
THREE HARMONY JACKS 
FISHER and SMITH 
WORTH and WILLING 
STANLEY and BURNS 
REED and TUCKER 
BERT and BETTY V,/HEELER 

UNUSUAL DUO 

ED and MACK WILLIAMS 
CLIFF BLANCHARD 
CARL and INEZ 
BOBBY VAN HORN 
MAY LORIMER 
TIM MURPHY 
RALPH O'HARA 
TOM MALLOY 
AMETA ■ 



\ 



ARMSTRONG and PHELPS 
AWKWARD AGE 
ANNABELLE 
BELL and CARON 
BOLLINGER «nd REYNOLDS 
BURKE LARRY and CLIFFORD 
BILL and BLONDY 
EFFIE BURTON 
WALTER BAKER 
-BILLY BEARD 



BERNIVICI BROS. 

COOKE, MORTIMER and HAVEY 

CANTWELL and WALKER 

DON LANNING 

GREAT LEON and COMPANY 

LARIMER and HUDSON 

GREAT LESTER 

LUCIEN LUCCA 




Control 




'..•; r-,. 



How the 

Affects the Box Office 

The old-time showman and the most up-to-date exhibitor agree 
on one point — the value of light as a box office attraction. Light- 
ing effects are greatly dependent on the controlling stage switch- 
board. As one successful exhibitor says — *it seems as if we con- 
itrol the crowd as well as the light!" - ^ 

The Major System is the only theater lighting control appara- 
tus in the world that is pre-selective, remote control, extended 
control, fireproof, fool-proof and capable of infinite variety of 
lighting effects. In no other system are the requirements so 
effectively fulfilled. It is used by hundreds of theaters all over 
the country, both large and small, and is indorsed by architects, 
theater owners and stage electricians. 

It occupies less stage space than any other, is simpler and 
(easier to control and gives longer, better service than any other. 

Major System Advantages: 

ricxibility ; preselection ; cumulative control; one-man 
remote control; flashless, noiseless switch operation; 
minimum stage space required; no fire or panic hazard; 
long life; can Tjc locked on or ofT. against unauthorized 
handling. 

The Major System can be installed in theaters now built with- 
out stopping the performance for a single day. Write now for full 
details and get your name on the list to receive the beautiful new 
book, **The Control of Lighting in Theaters," just being published. 




DISTRICT OFFICES: 



Detroit 

Minneapolis 

Cincinnati 

New Orleans 

San Franciaco 

Seattle 

Pittaburgh 



Dallas 

Kansas City 

Cleveland 

Chicago 

Los Angeles 

Philadelphia 

Boston 



Electric Co. 
St, Louis 



/? 



RIALTO 

THEATRE 

RACINE, WISCONSIN 



BOOKING EXCLUSIVELY 



WITH THE 




OTHER *'F-A" PRODUCTS 

Triumph Line of Safety Type, 
Standardized Panel Boards and 

Cabinets; 
Knife Switches; Safety Switches 
Hanger Outlets; Reversible- 
Cover Floor Boxes; A. C. and 
D. C. Distribution Switchboards. 



WESTERN VAUDEVILLE 
MANAGERS' ASSN. 

THE FINEST, FAIREST AN© BIGGEST 
BOOKING OFFICES IN THE MIDDLE WEST 

MVE YEARS OF 

GENUINE SATISFACTION 
COURTEOUS TREATMENT 

TIfK THEATRE M'HKRE THE ARTJ^T IS MADE TO FEKT. AT HOME 

Playing the Biggest and Best \ : 
in Vaudeville 

THOS. BURCHILL, Booking Manager 

WESTERN VAUDEVaiE MANAGERS' ASSN. 



GEORGE 



DICK 



RATH BROS 



Balancing on Solid Rock Again 



VIA ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 



'6 .■ 



* 



WIGS 



OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

Leichner & SteinV Make-Up 

The Kettler Co. 



'i 



wiUTi: I'oii I'JiiCE i.isT i;;' 



32 W. Washington Street 



CHICAGO 





still considered the best whip cracking act in show business; to prove our statement we are BOOKED SOLID for THREE 

/ CONSECUTIVE SEASONS 



EDr 




GORDON and IDA 




AY- 



In MIRTHFUL NONSENSE 



Touring KEITH and ORrHEUM CIRCUITS 



Direction LOU COLDER 



V- , 



Thursday. March 1, 1923 



V A il I E T Y 



di 






WOODS THEATRE BUILDING, CHICAGO 



• ■.• T..-*.- 



ROOM 306 



PHONE RANDOLPH 1965 



LEONA HALL'S RE,VUE 

in BITS OF 1923 - 



if ■■ '■'' 



•■■ ; . "^ 



.J ■■.■»- 



VV:-' 



MISS LEONA HALL, AMERICA'S FOREMOST LADY BUCK-AND-WING DANCER 

MISS VIVIAN CRAIG, Silver-tone Tenor MISS VIVIAN HALL, "Enough Said." 

DICK FAVER, from the South . MAJOR WHITE, the Minstrel Boy. 

LITTLE MARCIA WHITE, America'* Youngest and Smallest "Jass" Baby. 

Direction JOHN H. BILLSBURY . BOOKED SOLID UNTIL JULY 

Lee BRISCOE and AUSTIN Marguerite 



in BITS OF COMEDY, SONG and MUSIC 



Direction JOHN II, BILLSBURY 



By JOHNNY HYMAN 



. EVEN UTMOST CONSERVATION PERMITS THE STATEMENT THAT THE NEW ACT OF 

4 THE ERETTOS 4 

ON ALL WESTERN CIRCUITS, STANDS OUT AS THE MOST WIDELY DISCUSSED EQUILIBRI8TIC ACHIEVEMENT. HAVE ALREADY PLAYED THIRTY-SIX WEEKS. 



Direction JOHN H. BILLSBURY 



y 



■^ 



WEEK MARCH 4th, MAJESTIC, CHICAGO 



Y DATE BY DATE, IN EVERY STATE, WE ARE GETTING BETTER AND BETTER 

^^^^^^^^^^^^ I A FRAZER and BUNCE, Harry 

JOHN H. BILLSBURY said it with contracts. ' v^ In Their. Original Comedy, "SimUarity'* 



; SOMETHING REALLY NEW 

BURNS and FRANCIS 



V In "SEEING THINGS" 



yi * 



Direction JOHN H. BILLSBURY 



MARGRET and MORRELL 

Touring B. F. KEITH, WESTERN, ORPHEUM JUNIOR and WESTERN VAUDEVILLE 



in "THE TOURIST" 



Pilot JOHN H. BILLSBURY 



THE VOLUNTEERS 

NOW PLAYING A THIRTY WEEK ROUTE IN THE MIDDLE WEST 



Direction JOHN H. BILLSBURY 



Permanent Address — Box 495, Greeile, N. Y. 



ROYAL VENETIAN FIVE, 

"MELANGE OF MUSIC AND SONG" 



Direction JOHN H. BILLSBURY 



BOOKED SOLID UNTIL JUNE 



THE LE RAYS 

in "AT THE GOLF CLUB" 



Featuring THE ORIGINAL HEEL-DROP ARTIST 



Direction JOHN H, BILLSBURY 



3 ROMANOS SISTERS 3 



!■ -■..*< '-■: 



SPANISH MADCAPS OF THE DANCE 



PLAYING A ROUTE IN THE MIDDLE WEST 



Diredion JOHN H. BILLSBURY 



HAMLIN and MACK 



"THE TWO RECORDS" 

HAVE PLAYED OVER FORTY WEEKS IN THE MIDDLE WEST 



Direction JOHN H, BILLSBURY 



GLADYS HIGHT'S 



"Direction JOHN H, BHXSBURY 



SCHOOL OF DANCING ^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ >^^^^^ 

ACTS PRODUCED FOR VAUDEVILLE 

' ' ■-- ^__^:: Phone WABASH 3789; 339 S. WABASH AVE. 



J. C. MACK & COMPANY 
K. T. KUMA & COMPANY 
FIVE BALIOTS 
EMMA EARLE 
LEIGHTON & DUBALL 
JACK HANLEY 
. FENWICK GIRLS 



FOUR GIRTON GIRLS 
McCONNELL & WEST 
SEVEN 80LIS BROTHERS 
HAZEL GREEN &. ORCHESTRA 

INTERNATIONAL SEVEN 
BROWN'S 8YNCOPATORS 
BOB FERNS A COMPANY 



HILL & QUINNELL 
BEN HASSAN TROUPE 
TYLER A ST. CLAIRE 
8A\rON A FARRELL 
THE PATROWARS 
THREE TAKETAS 
ECHOES OF SCOTLAND 
SIX ANDERSON SISTERS 



DE MARIA FIVE ^. 

FISKE A FALLON 
HENODEE TROUPE 
FRIES A WILSON 
DEGNON A CLIFTON 
SEVEN O'HARTS 
PARAMOUNT FOUR 
PRINCESS LEONA A CO. 



52 



j^^ 



!■ II «• iJiil .1 



in I 






^^^^iL^JlVtat^^f^'l[y23 



ERNIE YOUNG AGENCY 

WILLIE BERGER, Booking Manager ^ 

Suite 1312-1313 Masonic T^nple Building, CHICAGO 



■.y^ 



AFEW OF THE ACTS WE HAVE HANDLED THIS SEASON ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^■; 

JOHN ALDEN and SANDELL SISTERS, THREE HARMONY ACES, HARRY L. COOPER and CO., LEO HALEY, DREAM 
DOLL PIROUETTS, KURENZE and VONIA, SEATTLE HARMONY KINGS, GEORGE LASHAY, GENE GRANESE, 

GRADUATION DAYS, TRENELL TRIO 



WADE BOOTH 




"A singer of extraordinary ability/*— BUFFALO, N. Y. - !: ■ : ^^ . ' - 

"Displays several exhibitions of good training." — RICHMOND, VA. 

"I^isplays a voice far above par for this sort of entertainmeent." — INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 
*'lle appears to have a monopoly on vocalism." — GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. „ 

"Possesses musical capability and delivers with hearty style."— MUSICAL COURIER, NEW YORK ( I TV. ;* 
"Wade Booth doesn't >inj^ often enough."— BUFFALO, N. Y. -■■.:•- 

"One of the best sinj^cri in musical comedy heard here in many davs." — ERIlil, PA. - " 

"Sings with intellij^ence."— NEWARK, N. J-. ' '. • ' • V \ \ 

"A voice of artistic merit."— BALTIMORE, MD. : ^ : ; • ' ^^ • 

"A neat, clean-cut ai)pearing young chap possessing a highly cultivated baritone." — VARIETY. 

"Wade Booth is captivating every member of his large audiences with his rich, colorful baritone." — NEW ORLEANS 
"Wade Booth is taking his audiences by storm." — NEW ORLEANS. LA. 

"Wade Booth's baritone voice is adding to his admirers every night. His voice is one of great richness and range, the 
great as to mislead people into thinking that he is a tenor."— ERNIE YOUNG'S REVIEW. NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

t impressive scene in the show."— GEO. WHITE'S SCANDALS OF 1920, LOUIS 



"His 'Idle Dreams' was the most impressi 

Management ERNIE YOUNG . ^ • 

NOW BEING FEATURED AT THE MARIGOLD GARDENS, CHICAGO 



s\ 



, LA. ; , 

range being so 
TLLE, KY. :^ 



Virgil-.-"THE FLORENIS"-Blanche 

EUROPEAN POSEURS EQUILIBRISTS r 

NOW PLAYING ORPHEVM CfRCUIT 

■■ JIM '• 

THE WRESTUNG BEAR 



THREE KIMIWAS • 

NOW TOURING ORPHEUM, JR., W. V. M. A. CIRCUITS! 

Fred-MOORE and KENDALL— Le<^ 

in "AT THE STUDIO" ! 

Assisted by EVELYN SLATER Now Touring Orpheum Circuit 





ARNOLD 



Playing Langdon McCormick's spectacuIaiT melodrama 





Touring B. F. KEITH and ORPHEUM CIRCUITS 



Direction LANGDON McCORMICK 






Circuit of Theatres, CHICAGO 

THE UTMOST IN VAUDEVILLE AND PHOTOPLAYS 

Booking in conjunction with the PANT AGES Circuit, 1106 N. American Bldg. 

WRITE OR WIRE YOUR OPEN TIME FOR LOCAL BOOKINGS 

H. F. BEAUMONT, Booking -Manager 



vaa 





IDSETS 



Eastern Representative— HARRY WEBER 



Proving the biggest draw of the year. Booked 
solid over B. F. Keith (Western), W. V. M. A. 

and Interstate Circuits 

Personal Management of BABA DALGARIAN 



E :. '. TtfiMdf^iM3fyt»,ln^9«g 



,, ,V.A RIET Y 

1 ^, t I I , , i , I I 1 



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^ '.:.■■%'< 



■I.:-' 



V •' f*'J. 



ATTRACTIONS 



CAPITOL BUILDING 



.% 



'-^ 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



.!'■;■■ 



BALTIMORE HOTEL, Kansas City, Mo: 

CENTURY ROOF, Baltimore, Md. 

GRUENWALD CAVE, New Orleans, La. 

MARIGOLD GARDENS, Chicago, 01. 



I 



■ *• . ' 



S 



•PATSY ALLENA 

■ - *. 

•HAZEL KIRK^ 
•AL GARBELLE^ 



MARIGOLD 



BALTIMORE HOTEL, Kansas City, Mo. 



-FROLICS 

Direction E. GEO. WOOD 






•ANN GREENWAY^ 
•EILEEN^ 



CAVE f 



GRUENWALD HOTEL, New Orleans, La. 



FOLLIES OF 1923 

FRED BACHMAN, Manager 



■ ■ 5S 






•EDDIE MATTHEWS^ 
•ELIDA BALLETS 

■i ': '.■■■■" Direction 

"■■■':" MISS ELIZABETH FRIEDMAN 



PASSING 



CENTURY ROOF, Baltimore, Md. 



PARADE 

WM. RANKIN, Manager 



Jf FEHNOVA BALLET-^ 
^ DANNY SHEEHAN ^ 



AND 



•. / 



Jf BETTY PLACER 
^CONNOR TWINS Jf 
Jf FRANK LIBUSE^ 



ARABL\N 



MARIGOLD GARDENS, Chicago, Ul. 



NIGHTS OF 1923 

EDGAR SCHOOLEY', Producer :. 



} 



, STAFF 



FOR 

ERNIE 

YOUNG 

ATTRACTIONS 



WM. BERGER 



EDGAR SCHOOLEY 
CARL YOUNG 
FRED BACHMAN 



General Mgr. 

Producing Director 

Elastem Rep. 

Traveling Rep. 



STAFF 
-FOR- 



■;i-" 



ERNIE 

YOUNG 

ATTRACTIONS 



u 



VARIETY 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 > . 



■M: 




MAURICE L. 



' • 1 1 



AND ARTHUR 



GREENWALD 
ANDERSON 




307 WOODS 
THEATRE BUILDING 



PHONE 
RANDOLPH 
5102 - 

VAUDEVILLE'S BIGGEST PRODUCING FIRM^ 

•■' :''"^7lV' -■,'•■:/ ;■ REASON ^ ■ ■• ■'''^- V^--;"^! .-. 

MORE ACTS working— MORE PEOPLE employed— MORE TALENT developed— MORE TWINS than any 

other like firm in America : - 



FRANKIEKELCEYandCO. 

in ^'BRAZIUAN HEIRESS" 

—WITH— 

JACK LEROY, JOE DUNN, PAT KELCEY and Girls 

BOBBY JACKSON and CO. 



—WITH— 



' DON FRAZIER, BILLIE MAY, MAUREEN HUNT 

in "EGCENTRICrriES^^ 

Day by day, in every way, wc's getting ready for the two-a-day 



BOBBY 



GERTRUDE 



EARLE-RIAL REVUE 

— WITH— 

KOHN and DEPINTO, GEO. BROWNING, BERNICE ST. JOHN 
Scoring Successes Successfully and Consecutively 



MILTON 



MAUREEN 



SYLVIA- DAYNE and CO 



-WITH— 



—BETTY 



v^^^- DOLORES TWINS 

in "STOLEN MOMENTS'' 

Lyric» and music by ARTHUR ANDERSON 

"A PAIR OF DEUCES" 

— WITH— 
MABEL and MAUDE RAYMOND and RALPH 

NEWTON-TWINS — WOLFE 

The ONLY act with TWO SETS OF REAL TWINS in show business. 
Topping all bills most successfully and doing business for all theatres 

ELEANOR PIERCE 

HOWARD BAKER— STUART SAYRE 
in "A DANCE GAMBOL" 



JACK 



ROSE 



BRODERICK-WYNNandCO. 

BURDET SOWLE 

in "YOUTHFUL PERSONALITIES" 

Rounding out a wonderful season, thanks to GREENWALD & ANDER- 
SON, Orpheum, Keith and W. M. V. A. 



HUILBERT 



RENE 



CENE-MIGNON and Co. 

; HARRY SIGMAN, Pianist 



BERNICE 



ZELMA 



JERRY 



O'Neal Sisters and Benson 

S ; "THE SUNSHINE KIDDIES" 

Watch us grow — the talk of the West. Special material (lyrics and 

and music) by JERRY BENSON 



:}^..\ 



CHARLES 

HICKEY 



DANSOUTIES 

— WITH — 
DOROTHV PEGGIE 

, HART PENN 

in "COMICAUTIES" 



JOHNNY 

POAT 



MANNING and YOUNG 



—WITH- 



THREE BARSTOWS and LOUISE VERNON 



—IX 



« 



A TRAVELOGUE IN SONG AND DANCE" 



/ 



"OUR FUTURE HOME" 

' -■ —WITH— 

LOU HOWLAND and DENSMORE SISTERS 



NATALIE HARRISON 



—WITH— 



Allan Blair, Patricia Grey, Frances Deegan 

in "ARTISTIC PEP" 



FLORENCE ANDERSON 



- 1 X- 



in "THE PRIMA DONNA" 



HALPERIN-SHAPIRO 



^ A G E N C Y~ ^~~~ 

State-Lake Bldg., Chicago 
EXCLUSIVE REPRESENTATIVES FOR ALL OUR PRODUCTIONS 



'#w« 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



VARIETY 



HALPERIN - SHAPIRO AGENCY 

190 No. State Street ^^ t CHICAGO i 



CHICAGO 



THE FASTEST GROWING AGENCY IN THE WEST 



•¥' 



BARON 



COUNT 



EMERSON AND BALDWIN 



y V 



HAL 



VIVIAN 



CHAMBERLAIN andEARLE 



J V 



DRISKO "» EARL 



•"3 



yO 




MILLS '"DUNCAN 



*% 



^ 



s 

E 
R 

V 
I 

c 



I 
\ 
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I 

1 



ANY ACT DESIRING TIME FOR THE COMING SEASON 

OR WOULD LIKE TO FILL THE 

BALANCE OF THIS 

SEASON 

SIGN THE AUTHORIZATION SUP AND SEND IN 

IMMEDIATELY 

1~ "jAlSiN^APiRf ~ 

::yU:h--.''-:-y-^-y'''' 'A G E N C Y , -, V :•■.':■%*./:- 'v 

,190 No. State Street, Chicago 



A 


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■■J 


1 






O 


. ■ ■ ■''>'■■ \. ■: 

■•■''.■ ■■.• • / - ♦ ■ 

■ :■ ft •;■ . - ■ ■■' ; ■ 




N 


■ ■ ■■''. ''■''- '[. ^ ■ ■''■".■ 





./ 



,* . ■ ■'. 



YOU ARE HEREBY AUTHORIZED TO BOOK OUR ACT ON THE WEST- 
I ERN VAUDEVILLE, B. F. KEITH WESTERN, ORPHEUM AND ALL 
■ AFFILIATED CIRCUITS FOR THE YEAR OF 1923. , I 



I 
I 
I 

1 



.. :--^ 



I 
I 



Artist Sign Here 



I 



Permanent Address 



JACK LAIT 

ROMAX BLDG., NEW YORK 



PRODUCERS WE REPRESENT 

HUGH HERBERT 

223 Lefferts Ave., Kew Gardens, L. I., N. Y. 



GREENWALD and ANDERSON 
WOODS THEATRE BLDG., CHICAGO 



MORRIS GOLDEN 

160 W. 464 ST., NEW YORK 



BECKER and SAUBER 

225 W. 46th ST., NEW YORK 



NAT PHILLIPS 

ROMAX BLDG., NEW YORK 
OUR NEW YORK REPRESENTATIVES 



SMITH and FORKINS 

1562 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



WaUAM MORRIS AGENCY, he. 

1499 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



WHY NOT YOU ? 



All«ii*t Ch«7enii« MlnjU*It 

Aiulriu aod Geori* 

ArtiMt'i nrMia 

l«r«vo, MkJifUnl and TruJIIU* 

Ititiiieriok. Wran tad Coiui>ai>r 

Croti and Baoloro 

Fl»e Crane* 

ConicU and Faye R!it»ri 

Ch«ni»»rla;n and Kari# 

t'Jiii(]v*irk and Taylor 

I>ai)a and [/>'hr 

KrfoM't 0.ttllili>« 

Hdtihf Hirl<» p .1 T'lrnini'T 



lEBionaa ■nd ItaUtwte ' 

i'rancM and Hentt 
tnanaxaa and BUpIaioa 
Cor Haradoo 

Oibaoo 81«t«n and Conpau/ 
(}«n« and II1(oob 
Harrr OUbait 

Urabaa, RMd flivton and Dard«a 
L. Wolf* OUbart and OoiapaM 
8lx HarlMulBi 
KddU Hlil 
llarrla and Bolly 
Halowa'an 
NaUUa Uarrtton tad Comptay 



Kd 

R«nnl« Harris tad Conpiny 

WMld^ HaU 

"Indoor flporta" 

Itobby Jackaoa aad Conpaay *■ 

Ilob Jonea 

Jack lAirf and CroweU SisUn 

I<an« and Harpar 

Llord and Good* 

Bpeakar Lcwia 

llob MOU 

Our rutura noma 

U'NMl Slrt«rt and Jarrr BtOMa 

Raoard and Weat 



JLtm Rom , . 

Rojal Kavua 

Hal Hprlngford and Rtorao niit«ra 

Jo«»phln* Wortb and Cooipan/ 

CU»j«rt WeJIt » 

intir Walah 

Wataon. Jmklna Rafua 

Carton's ItnTua 

Ilacer and Ooodvla 

Hyncopallon 

Drlacoll and Karl 

PliU Adam* and CompaM 

Andy and Nmlie Uailuw 

I>aIx>rto and Uarry 



Tltrr« Tlollos 

Cdrrtrr and MrWtlflami- 

<°u(u«r anil II^'fTmari 

MarUin aixl Howard 

Francis l<rMnlr 

Harry Haw and Hl*t4<r 

KiiK*l and MAralmll 

l.ii'ky and llnrrls 

l-rf-ildlfl Rom 

Yip Yip Y'spiankerx 

M«rk» snd Wllfm 

Klhpl Kelirr nod Chu'iiS 

Ktrl ItUI Krviir 

I rank urid i::h>-i Halls 



inia LaVall 

->iti l<o«*ry ^— ai^Ba 

' Mahon nht^n 
vlakpr and llodford 
\AMt lirrMiwdoU and Compit' 
Viislln and Inrlanaf 
.\r<>und thp Map*' 
tllix k an>l I>unl«p 
'"iiii I^trrU>s 
I <j<7 Ifruih • 

' 'iMik and I'ohnn 
i Ixrk an>l Manr . ^ 

'>..*v-^ If" 
; •<iK\ It r. :■< J? ■ : ,;, - .. '■; 



Vi' 



56 



V A R I E T y 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



MICHIGAN 



CIRCUIT OF 



THEATRES 



* .^■ 



.'.^ ■* ^ ■ 



VAUDEVILLE — PICTURES — ROAD ATTRACTIONS 



OWNED AND CONTROLLED BY THE 



— '.'■• I 



BIJOU THEATRICAL 
ENTERPRISE COMPANY 

MAIN OFFICE: 704 City Bank BIdg., Battle Creek, Mich. 
C///CAGO OFF/C£; 500 State Lake Theatre Bun ^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ - 

^ DETROIT OFFICE: Film Building 



W. S. BUTTERFIELD, President 



E. C. BEATTY, General Manager 



ISHAM JONES 



AND HIS ORCHESTRA 



COLLEGE INN 



Sherman House, CHICAGO 



DOC BAKER 



LIGHTNING CHANGE ARTIST 



—IN— 



ii 



Flashes 



yy 



Direction HARRY WEBER "^ 

- Management MOORE-MEGLEY C(X 

The Rip Van Winkle of Vaudeville 
New Act in Preparation for Next Season 



CISSIE and GEORGIE 








.♦"•' 



IN 



A DANCE FANTASY 

THE THRONE OF TERPSICHOREAN 



Written by NEVILLE FLEESON and ALBERT VON TILZER 



Touring KEITH and ORPHEUM CIRCUITS 



SCENERY 



The FABRIC STUDIOS, Inc. 



SCENERY 



All Ne^TTSi-k P apers Conceded the JOE HOWARD-EVELYN CLARK REVUE as the Most ^ 
Gorgeous Ever Produced in Vaudeville. We Furnished All Scenery and Eifects 

COME TO OUR STUDIOS AND SEE WHAT WE ARE DOING 
416 So. Kedzie Avenue CHICAGO Phone Nevada 7194 



WQ'rw»»wr' 



'<'r -Ti,, 



•cr, : /-u (;■• -^ 



"^ V-""" '*"" 



■y r ■ '■ ■r> 



'•^i.' "i-v 'V^it; 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



VARIETY 



57 



rr-e^ 



THE 



SIMON 



AGENCY 



INCORPORATED 




MURPHY 



THE PEOPLE' 





if • 

I 

Hi 



■i> ->« 




IC E 



". ' •■ ■ -,%■'■■■ 



: Speeches compiled by DARBY AARONSON ^ 3 ; 

NOW COMPLETING A SEASON'S BOOKINGS IN THE WEST 
OPENING AUGUST 19th AT MINNEAPOLIS FOR ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

BOOKED SOLID FOR SEASON 1923-24 



/, :■''>■.' •■■r' ; ^ 



C H A R L I E W I L S N 

^THE LOOSE NUT' 

NOW ON 33rd CONSECUTIVE WEEK FOR THE MIDDLE WESTERN MANAGERS 
OPENED ON ORPHEUM CIRCUIT, WINNIPEG, FEBRUARY 12. BOOKED SOLID UNTIL 1924 



rr*. 



CATTP (\r lie AKIN, BELLEW, AMBROSE. LOOMIS, SINGING THEIR WAY OVER THE ORPHEUM CIRCUIT, ACCOM- 
rUUIl Ur UJ PANIMENT the SIMON AGENCY 



HON. ANDY GUMP 

Presented by JACK PONIC 

EXCLUSIVE RIGHTS TO PRESENT ANDY GUMP and THE GUMPS IN VODVIL 



THE SIMON AGENCY 

Book and Act Done by 

DAVE FERGUSON 



1923-24— ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 



A R L E Y S 

SENSATIONAL PERCH ARTISTS 

1922-2a— JR. ORPHEUM, W. V. M. A. and KEITH TIME 




■•!.(■ 



THANKS TO THE SPLENDID EFFORTS OF THE SIMON AGENCY 




J A DA 

CHESTER— ALLEN— O'BREIN 

THE PEPPIEST IN VAUDEVILLE 

Now on 135th Consecutive Week. Open Orpheum Circuit March 19 

Skippers: Simon Agency, Weft; Harry Weber, East 



ROSA DONATELLO Presents 



CARNIVAL OF VENICE 

A RIOT OF ENTERTAINMENT 

BOOKED SOLID 



FRED 



MARIE 



WHITFIELD 



AND 



IRELAND 



SIMON AGENCY, West 



ORPHEUM CIRCUIT NOW 
BOOKED SOLID 



HARRY WEBER, East 



MR. MAX ROSE' presenU 
MADAME ROSE in 




SIMON AGENCY, ^WEST 



A REMARKABLE DISPLAY OF FEATHERED INTELLIGENCE 



PAUL DURAND, EAST 



SUITE 807 



WOODS THEATRE BLDG. 



CHICAGO 



X'.-. 



i-: '-. 



dOOKING EXCLUSIVELY WITH 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

B. F. KEITH VAUDEVILLE EXCHANGE ( WESTERN )- 

JR. ORPHEUM 

WESTERN VAUDEVILLE MANAGERS' ASSOCIATION 

AND ALL OF THEIR AFFILIATIONS 



58 



VARIETY 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



V, 



THE SIMC 



INCOl 



'-■■.■ •■«■ ■■-'; 



ii 



THE GOLDEN BIRD 

PRESENTED BY 

LORRAINE EVON 

ONLY ACT OF ITS KIND ' 



ff 



DALEY - MAC and DALEY 



BOOKED 
SOLID 



Wm. Armstrong and Maudie Smith 

in "THE SlOjOOO ANKLE" 



EARL and EDWARDS 

BOOKED SOLID 



THREE MELVIN BROS. 

SENSATIONAL GYMNASTS 



« 



BUD" FAGG and WHITE 

in "AFRICANOLOGY'V 



a 



JULES" 



LEWIS & GORDON, East 



With a Surprise Finish That Has Fooled Thousands 



SIMON AGENCY, West 



KENO, KEYS and MELROSE 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT NOW 



BARTHOLDI Presents 

BIRDLAND FOLLIES 



DANCING KENNEDYS 

BOOKED SOLID, ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 



West 
SIMON AGENCY 



THE FOUR ORTONS 

VAUDEVILLE'S GREATEST COMEDY WIRE ACT 



East 
LEW GOLDER 



"«MES" SEYMOUR and JEANETTE "taylor" 

"THE MIDNIGHT STEPPERS" 

. BOOKED SOUD 

• _ 

McGOOD LENZEN CO. 

EVERY DAY AND EVERY WAY WE ARE GOING BETTER AND BETTER 



STANLEY, DOYLE and RENO 






PRESENTING 

HILARIOUS HARMONY 



SIMON AGENCY LAY MAN 3l1Cl BAR I ON FLO ZIEGFELD, jr., 



Vaudeville 



Productions 



SYNCOPATION 
FESTIVAL 



E. D. STROUTS 

NINE MIUTARY HUSSARS 

>1 



AMERICA'S FINEST 
in PURPLE and GOLD 



./■^/ 



George and Paul Hickman 

in "DARKNESS and DAWN" 



BOOKED SOLID UNTIL 1924 



I,. 



Suite 807, Woods Theatre BIdg. 
t CHICAGO 



II Thursday. Nlarch 1, 1^23 



VARIETY 



=a= 



u 



)RATED 







•* :. , 



J. C. LEWIS JR 



*■.- 



■'•■ V 






■■■\ . 



AND 



/ 



:\ 



MAXIME 



; ^i 



f 






•■■•■■ ; 



• SUPPORTED BX 

MISS ARLETTA LEWIS and J. C. LEWIS, SR. 
, in "WANTED A DADDY" 

A SINGING AND DANCING SKIT 



SIMON AGENCY, West 



HARRY WEBER, East 



CAMILLE TRIO 

THE ORIGINAL 



CATHERINE SINCLAIR and CO 

in AN ATHLETIC POT POURI 



^CTAVIA HAND WORTH and CO 



.,-i'-; 



in "TWICE A WEEK" 



By JOHN B. HYMER 



. : NOW ON HIS 

16oth CONSECUTIVE WEEK 



ROSINI 

THE MASTER MAGICIAN 



IT'S NOT WHAT YOU SELL, 
BUT HOW YOU SELL IT 



8AM <- CLARE LOUISE 


"DAVE O'MALLEY ' 


LAWiON 


:.■.;■.>'* • •',■•■■;•■ 


HYAMS and EVANS 


':■'"■.. AND . • , . ■ "^y' ■.r'^-'-^^'o''^" 




•' ■ , • 


:■ *,. ..... .. ............ 

:, .■■^ • ■■ - IN ■■ ■ 


HARRY MAXFIELD 


V THE MAN FROM 

' V •' :■■■ ' 


.-'■.....K- 


"THE QUAKERESS" 


THOSE COLLEGE LADS - 


"JUGGLONIA" 





VAUDEVILIZING 
LONGFELLOW'S POEM 



THREE ORIGINAL REGALS 



•THE VILLAGE 
BLACKSMITH- 



>.. 



NORRIS 

LATEST SIMIAN OFFERING 

MONEY LABORERS 
and COAL MINERS 



NORRIS 

"SPRINGTIME FOLLIES" 

' with CAL NORRIS 

in AMERICA'S PRINCE OF WALES 



♦ .1 



PRISCOLL, LONG and HUGHES 

THE IRISHMEN \ 

WITH ' ■ ^ ■'. ■ ' 

ITALIAN VOICES 
Booked Solid, Thanks to Ferdie Mayer 







^ A FRIEND 

BELMONTS CANARY OPERA 



MqWNALDTRIO 

CYCLISTS OF MERIT 



A'. 






DANIELS and 
WALTERS 



ALWAYS WORKING 



LADY ALICE'S 

:^:-^-': PETS^'^ :-:■: 



CAPT. TREAT 

Presents 

"SEALO" 

THE SEAL WITH THE HUMAN BRAIN 
BOOKED SOLID 



BARRY and LAYTON • 



> THE ALL AROUND BOYS 



WORKING SOLID 



HANAKO JAPS 



West 
SIMON AGENCY 



lEast 
PAT CASEY 



SAMAROFF and SONIA 

NO OTHER ACT LIKE IT 

'- ■■' '■ '-^v •.^.' '.'.'■ ..■■.; 

SPELLS CLASS, NOVELTY and 

CLEVERNESS 



BOOKING EXCLUSIVELY WITH 



ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 



JR. ORPHEUM 



•I. ■ •• 



B, r. Kl.irU \.\l I>i:\ILLb KXiUANGK (WICSTKKN), V.h^TI'KS VAl I»I,VII LP. M \N.VOKR.V ASSIK lATIO.N AMI Till. IK Ai IIMATIONS 



eo 



VA R I E T Y 



^^iimsAfy;iAa^iii'i]im 



THE 



SIMON 



AGENCY 



INCORPORATED 



THE FOLLOWING ACTS WERE BOOKED BY THIS AGENCY DURING SEASON 1922-23 



FOUR ACES 

THREE ARMINS 

ARLEY and GIBSON 

ALEXANDRIA ;/ 

SENSATIONAL ARLEVS • ■ 

ANDRIEFF TRIO 

ADRIAN 

GREAT LEWIS and CO. 

NEAL ABEL 

ALLEN and LEE - v ; 

WM. ARMSTRONG and CO. 

AUSTRALIAN WOODCHOPPERS 

BELMONT'S CANARY OPERA 

LEO BEERS 

BROOKLYN COMEDY FOUR 

BIRDLAND FOLLIES 

BISSETT and SCOTT 

HARRY BREEN 

BIRD CABARET 

BARCLAY and CHAIN 

BEEMAN and GRACE 

BELL and EVA 
ETHEL MAE BARKER 
BARRY and LAYTON 
BARBER and JACKSON 
BURKE and DURKIN 
CAMILLE TRIO 
EDITH CLIFFORD 
CHIEF BLUE CLOUD and CO. 
CZIGANE DANCERS 
CARLISLE and LA MAL 
CHOY LING FOO TROUPE 
CAPMAN BROTHERS 
CHRISTIE and BENNETT 
CLINTON and CAPPELL 
COLLIER and DE WALDE ' 
CARSON and GIRLIE - --- 

CASTING CAMPBELLS . 
CARNIVAL OF VENICE ^ 7— 
CAMERON and O'CONNOR 
COLEY and JAXON 
CREIGHTON and DARE 
CRAFTS and HALEY 
FRAWK DE VOE 
DU FOR BOYS 
DANIELS and WALTERS ^ 
DUNLEVY and CHESLEIGH 
DRISCOLL, LONG and HUGHES 
DIAMOND and BRENNAN 
JOE DE KOS TROUPE 



EDMONDS and LA VELLE 



THE ESPINOSAS 

EARLE and EDWARDS 

M!SS ELLY 

EL REY SISTERS 

FRISCO 

FOUR OF US 

DAVE FERGUSON and CO. * 

FAGG and WHITE 

DOUGLAS FLINT and CO. ^ 

WALTER FISHTER and CO. V 

GEEHAN and GARRETSON ^! 

PORTER J. WHITE and CO. 

GOLDEN BIRD ;; V 

ANDY GUMP . - : * ' 

PEPITAS, GRANADOS and CO. 

LES GELLIS :, 

HIRSCHOFF'S REVUE 

HIBBETT and MALLE 

WALTER HASTINGS and CO. 

HANAKQ JAPS 

HYAMS and EVANS '■:■'/:'■:%:■ 

NINE MILITARY HUSSARS 

OCTAVIA HANDWORTH and CO. 

HANS HANKE T " ^ ! ' 

BOB HALL 

HERRON and ARNSMAN 

DAVE HARRIS and BAND 

HICKMAN BROS, and CO. 

JEAN JACKSON TRIO • 

JARVIS and HARRISQN , ' 

JAP, THE WISE HOUND v 

JA DA TRIO V 

KANE, MOREY and MOORE 

KALALUHI'S HAWAIIANS 

KENO, KEYS and MELROSE • 

DANCING KENNEDYS 

FRANCES KENNEDY - 

KAT^ and WILEY 1 

JOE and MARTIN KENNEDY -^ 

KNIGHT and KNAVE 

LA PALERICA TRIO 

LADY ALICES PETS *. • 

NATE LEIPZIG 

JERRY LAWTON 

LISTEN LESTER 

LYMAN and BARTON 

PAT and JULIE LE VOLO ' 

J. C. LEWIS, JR., and CO. 

LA FRANCE and BYRON 

LA BERNICIA and BALLET 



CEO. and MAE LE FEVRE 
LEONARD, ANDERSON and CO. 
LEE and CRANSTON 
McGOODS, LENZEN CO. 

McDonald trio 

MacRAE and CLEGG , 

MacKAY and ARDINE ' 

MILLERSHIP and GERARD 
GLAD MOFFATT 
GEO. AUSTIN MOORE ' -, 

VICTOR MOORE and CO. 
GYPSY MEREDITH and COV ^^ 
TOM MILS '• 

FOUR MUSKETEERS 

--'"• '-t- ■'..'■■ 

MARMEIN SISTERS ^ ' 

- ■ -' '' ' ■'•" V. *■■■ 

BERT and FLORENCE MAYO 
SMILING BILLY MASON 
MARTINA and MAXMILLIAN 
MISS MERLE; 
SENATOR MURPHY 
BEATRICE MORRELL SEXTETTE 
MINIATURE REVUE i . 
THE WILHATS ■■'^^' '':/:' -'^:/;'--'- 

MICHON BROTHERS .'■■,l^'y-'-y--^ 
JUGGLING NELSONS 
NORTON and MELNOTTE 
NEVINS and GORDON 
NADA NORRAINE ' ^ 

MLLE. NADJE 

PAISLEY NOON and CO. " • 
NORRIS' SPRINGTIME FOLLIES ! 
NORRIS' SIMIAN WORKERS ^ . 
GEO. OKURA and CO. 
JACK OSTERMAN .: ; 

O'MALLEY and MAXFIELD ; 

FOUR ORTONS , 

OLIVER and OLP - -^.__. u^:.!: 
PAN AMERICAN FOUR ;,:^f v; 

J^LANTATION FOUR '•■^\ .■:".: ' ;•'-,;;,; 
PRIMROSE FOUR 
BORIS, PETROFF and BALLET 
HUSTON RAY 
RICE and WERNER 
CHAS. and MABEL REIFF ' 
PETTY REAT and BRO. 
SEVEN FAMILY TROUPE 
RAMSD^LLS and DEYO 
ROSIE RIFLE and CO. ' , . 
FOUR ROEDERS 
FRANK ROGERS . V - 



AL LESTER and CO. 



RIALTO and LA MONT 



EDDIE ROSS 
FOUR READINGS 
THREE REGALS ' i 

RICDON DANCERS 
ROSSOW MIDGETS 
"CARL ROSINI and CO. * C ; 
SNOW and SIGWORTH 
HARRY and KITTY SUTTON 
SMITH'S ANIMALS ^^ ^ 
WILLIE SOLAR 

CATHERINE SINCLAIR and CO. 
AL SHAYNE , v ;. ^ 
SANTUCCI '[■'■^■-^^^^^^^^^^ 
SHATTUCK and O'NElL ! ' 
SANTIAGO TRIO 
SHRINER and FlTZSiMMONS 
SEYMOUR and JEANETTE 
SELBINI and GROVINI 
SEALO 

WM. STANTON and CO. 
CEO. STANLEY and SISTER 
SAMAROFF and SONIA ; 
SHADOWLAND : , 

THE SEEBACKS 
SWOR BROTHERS ■ 
STANLEY, DOYLE and RENO 
PAUL SYDELL and SPOTTIE 
SOUTHERN HARMONY FOUR 

TUSCANO BROTHERS 

* ■'■■.'■■'■'.■ 

U. S. JAZZ BAND 
DON VALERIO and CO. ■ 

VAN and BELLE ^ * 
WARD and VAN ' .: ; ^ 
THREE WILSON GIRLS 
WHITFIELD and IRELAND 
DAVE WINNIE ; " 

WILLE BROTHERS ^^±__:l^'^ 
CHAS. WILSON V ^ 

ZUHN and DREIS 
CHANDON TRIO ^^^^"^^^^ 
JOHN and NELLIE OLMS 
WILLARD JARVIS REVUE 
PAGE HACK and MACK 
AL FIELDS and CO. 
VINCENT LOPEZ' ': 

LAMPI ORCHESTRA 
BEBAN and MACK ; 
CHAS. IRWIN 
THREE MELVING 
McKINLEV SISTERS 
JACK NORTON 
■PIATIVE iiPd NATALIE — ^ 



V.' 



. 't--.:: 



f ■ 'J 






SUITE 807 

WOODS THEATRE BIDC. 



CHICAGO 



BOOKING EXCLUSIVELY WITH ORFHEUM CIRCUIT 

B. F. KEITH VAUDEVILLE (WESTERN) 

JR. ORFHEUM 

WESTERN VAUDEVILLE MANAGERS' AS3'N 



.Xhufsday, Jyiarch I, 1923 



Y A R X E;T Y 



in-^ 



; 
I 

I 
\ 



I 

I 

\ 

I 



3 •* 



\9JV\9rs*Ji'.^jys*j:\''^*J:,'<9^'^*K<,'i9,/^i^^^^ 




■xM 



■^^ 



Edward R. Litsinger 

CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF REVIEW 



r" ■■ ' 



■■»•■ . 



'■/■ 




V. 



' ( ■'■ 



'V . 






y ■ '■:'■":* 



/ 



;.» 



f 



-if 



' ^ 



Takes this means of thanking his thousands of 
friends in the sliovv business^ for their support 
and co-operation in his recent campaign for 
Mayor of Chicago. ( 

: :?^ EDWARD R. LITSINGER. 






• J. . ■■ . 



I ' . ; ' 



«■■.■ 



mmw^s^ss^M^. 



: Ha iiL iiZ iK SJf^^jn^j^j^^C'^^ jj SiS ^ll ^^ ^ 3i £.'lSrSi ti^LL aS liJi IjdTgar^ujj 



62 



VARIETY • 



X -I' 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 






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Thursday, March 1, 1923 .. *^; 



VARIETY 




64 



V A R I ET Y 



•Thursday, March 1 1, ,1928 



KANSAS CITY 

By WILL R. HUGHES 

SHUHEKT— Tho Gold Diggers." 

CAVKTY— The JJig yhow." . 

0U.RDi:X— IJiidgu Musical Stock, 
tntletlnlte. 

OKl'UKrM— \'au(levillc. 

MAINSTUHKT -Vaudeville. 

PA NTA( ; i:s -Vaudeville. 

(^L()I!K — \ ijinleville. 

IIOYAL- Stiaiiger'a IJaiH|Uet," 
film. 

Ni:\V.MA\ Java Head." Jllm. 

LlUi:ilTV Tlio Girl I J.ove," 

I'liotojilays at the vaudeville 
houaes: ' Niiuty and Xine," Maiii- 
sireet; "Tlu- Woman Con(|uers," 
I'aii'.ayis; •Tiif rritsoner," Globe. 

Tlu' !)»> .MitooM and their band 
and Wayne aiul Warien, both act« 
featured on ihe .Mainstreet bill last 
week, wore .s«'en not lonj^ a^o on 
the Orpheum bill". This is one of 
the few rtiuriis of Orpheum act.s for 
the sea.son, although there were so 
many last year that it was notice- 
able, and nome uf the regulars even 
suggested that it might pay to wait 
for them ai the "baby" hou.se. 

The drawing power of "The Hat" 
was conelUHi\ ely demon.str.ited last 
week witli th*' drama playing its 
third weeiv in two .seasons at the 
Shubert. Monday night the erowd 
was one of the smallest c»f the .sea- 
•on. but Tuet«day the takings 
jumped over ;J.")Ot>. and continued to 
increase until capacity was the rule 
the latter part of the week. IJusi- 
ness at the other houses was on 
and off. Tlie Or|)heum enjoyed a 
good, t^teady business with the 
matinees holding up nicely. The 
bill at tiie Mainstreet also developed 
a mo«5t satisfavtory draw, and tiiis 
big hoii.se wa.3 ta.xed at many of its 
performance.s. The sensational 
business of the week was enjoyed 
by the Pantages, where "The Third 
Alarm" picture, with its unusual 
publicity, and endorsed by tiremen. 
city officials and others, proved a 
l«al money-getter. 




Week of March 44 will be dark at 
the Shubert. there being nothing 
available to send in. Week of 
March 11 will see Walter Hampden 
in a repertoire of Shakespearean 
plays. lOighl diff(>rent offerings 
will be presented in the nine per- 
formances .scheduled. 



If the plans of the promoters of 
Fairylan<l. the new amusement park 
being construrcted here, go through 
M'ithout interruption, the new place 
will be ready for the public the 
middle of June. The plans call for 
a music i)avilion 118 by 240 feet and 
m, dance floor 1S5 by 300 feet. 



"The Gold Diggers" was given its 
first Kansas City showing at the 
fcjhubert this week. 



SAN ANTONIO 

By A. WRIGHT 

P.OY.n — Kdna Park Players In 
"The Prat." 

MAJLISTIC — Interstate Vaude- 
ville. 

EMPIRE— "Dr. Jack" (film.) 
PRINCESS "Just Tony" (film.) 
PALACE— Opens March 2 or 7 
(film.) 
KIALTO— "I'oolish Wives" (film.) 



Barbara EaMarr came here In 
person to appear in The Princess 
for the week and ran Into m.any 
difnculties. The first storm broke 
when she found out the Tom Mix's 
picture, "JuMt Tony," was the at- 
traction Instead of her picture. 
Then her manager, Mr. Sawyer, got 
in bad with the press for not let- 
ting the feature writer of "The 
News." Mary Carter, see her when 
she call«'<l tflling her to return 
Later. Then came a fight over 
whether the Hudson people or the 
I-iexlngir.n agemy were to have their 
ear used. Frank P.ryant, manager 
of the house, had his hands full. 

Lent does not seem to h.ave af- 
fected l)UHinosH althciugh this is a 
blgr Catholic city. 



The Edna Park Players have be- 
come so popular a larger house 
will be given tiiem shortly, possibly 
Princess, now undergoing remodel- 
ing. 



The Wort ham Shows pulled out 
of winter <iuart' rs here for Loredo, 
Ter.. for tluMr first engagement of 
Ihe new season. 



PORTLAND, ORE. 

By JOSEPH G. KELLEY 

Dixie Harkins. a Lyric chorus 
girl, drove a small touring car into 
collision with an h*e wagon at East 
Sixth and Grand .avenue at 5:30 one 
morning last week. Ml.ss Harkins, 
with Polly Wilson, al.so of the I..yric. 
and li. J. Kildall. manager of the 
Astoria, Astoria, Ore., lind Harry 
-yHvey, an H4'i4»r were returning from 
an all ni^ht party at the Twelve- 
Mile houso. V. hen the accident oc- 
curred. Tl^e car belonged to Kil- 
dall. Miss Harkins was driving, ac- 
cording to Silvcy, because both he 
and its own-.r wi ro too highly In- 
toxicated to take the wheel. None 
of tl»e cccuiKints of the car was 
hurt. 



A su!t« for .$L'0,000 has been filed 
ain^>i the Southern I'ucilic railway- 



ROSS WYSE 



and 



WYSER 



Featuring TONY • 

THE LIYIN' BLOOMIN' WONDER 



M'm. Jacobs Acrnrjr 



THREE WHITE 




. .' \ 



ORIGINATORS OF 
COMEDY BASS VIOL 

' and : ■ 



MAMA IN THE AUDIENCE 

BOOKED SOLID UNTIL 1924 OUT OF CHICAGO OFFICE 
Thanks to Sam Kahl and Our Own Agent 



BUI Jacobs 



WILLIAM JACOBS 



We wish to thank you for booking this 
entire seaaon for ua over the Weatern 
Vaudeville Managera' Aaaociation, Jun* 
ior Orpheum and B. P. Keith (Weatern) 
Circuita. Alao pleaae cxpresa our appre* 
elation to Mrs. Cooke for all she haa 
done fur ua. To the bookcra of th* 
above circuita. who made thla auRceas* 
ful seanon possible. In conjunction with 
your most cfflcifnt busInoMS methods, ws 
are also grateful , 



HARVEY, HENEY 



AND 



GRAYCE 



TMa 



ALL BOOKED 



-,». - .' tf: j w : r 



BY 



WM. JACOBS 

AGENCY 
WOODS THEATRE BUILDING 



FLANAGAN 



and 



MORRISON 



FOUR 
CAMERONS 



"A LESSON IN GOLF " 



Wm. Jacoba Agency 



LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON' 



JOHN 

and 



Waa. 






WINNIE 
HENNINGS 



THE KILL KAKE KOUPLE' 



Wm. Jacobs Agency 



ZELAYA 



•«i .— 



ir. 



Booked Solid Orpbemd 
: Circuit 



Win. Jncoba .%geiM>7 



I 



PHIL GOLDEN 



AL 



COSCIA 




VERDI 



• AT ■ 



STRINGING COMEDY 

.« • . .., Wm. Jacobs .\gencjr 



^^uridiy: rttr^h'l, irfjfs 



' \,f 



V A R Vhi i'Y 



m 



■■Sf'tr' 



HUGHIE CLARKE 



BOOKED SOLID SINCE SEPTEMBER FIRST 



WIULIAM JACOBS AGENCT 



BERT and HAZEL 

THE SKATELLES 



WILLIAM JACOBS A<JENCT 



Julian FOX and MACK Doral 

— IN— 
SONG AND DANCE CREATIONS , 

AN ACT OF MERIT 

WILLMM JACOItH AfJENCY ■ 

COLUNS and HILL 

AN ORIGINAL COMEDY VARIETY ACT 



WILLIAM JACOBH AtiENCT 



MLLE. 



CHA8. 



LA SQVA and GILMQRE CO. 

IN 
"DIVERSIONS De VOGUE" 

WILLIAM JACOHS A<;KN(V 



DOREE'S CELEBRITIES 



., ■ ':':* 



WILLIAM JACOB8 AOENCT 



GRACE AVER and BRO. BILLY 



ORIGINATORS OF 



EGYPTIAN DANCE ON SKATES 



y . 



WILLIAM JACOILS AGENCY 



JACK 



PEGGY 



KNEELAND and POWERS 

•■ ,.■•- —IN- 
SNAPPY MOMENTS 



WILLIAM JACOBM AGENCY 



When better barrel jumping is done 

ROSE, ELLIS and ROSE 

World's Best Barrel Jumpers. 
. ^ . WILL DO IT • 

• WILLIAM JACOIIH AGENCY 



L F: CORRADINI'S 



.>J 



ANIMAL: 

WILLIAM JA< OHM AGLM V 



^ 



pC2i5 



Vv 




ALL BOOKED 



—BY— 



JACOB 



AGENCY 




'.■)l 



"You've seen the rest, now play the best 

MAHATMA 

THE MYSTERY GIRL 

Without an Equal 

WILLIAM .lACOHS A<JE\C Y 



O'CONNOR SISTERS 



WILLIAM JACOBS AGENCY 



\ 



FOXWORTH and FRANCES 



TWO DARK AMERICANS 



in "A WEE BIT O' DIXIE 

WILLIAM JACOBS AGENCY 



»» 



^:rrTf 



HOLDEN and GRAHAM 

in VERSATILE ORIGINALITIES 

Originators and Patentees of Colored Shadowgraphs 



WILLIAM J\<OBH A<JEN<Y 



(i 



MOGRE and FIELDS 

BLESSED WITH IGNORANCE" 

:. A WILLIAM JA<OnS AGLN< Y • ,; 



LYLE and VIRGINIA C 

rilPJSKNTlXO TIIEIH NKW N(»VKI.TY ' . ), 

"The Kid of Captain Kidd" 

Cool<cd Solid fcr Thirty-five Consecutive Weeks for Orpbcum, Jr. 

W. V. M. A. and B. F. KEITH (Western) 

WILLIAM JACOBS AGENCY 



ISHIKAWA BROS. ' 

JAPAN'S NOTED HAND EQUILIBRISTS 

, :; WILLIAM JACOBS AGENCY " v 



MONOHAN and CO. 

SKATORIAL ARTISTS 

. WILLIAM JACOBS AGENCY 



NIPPON DUO 



Versatile Entertainers from the Land of the Rising Sun 

WILLIAM JACOBS AGENCY 



A LAUGHING SENSATION 

EDWARD J. LAMBERT 

Assisted by MISS MINJMIE FISH 

in "YOUTH and BEAUTY'' 

BOOKED SOLID KEITH znd ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

WILLI \M .1 \( ons ac;e\cv 



NELSON'S 



PATIENCE 



WILLIAM J\CC>im Af.FVfV 



'■'* , i 



by FrankI* Darling, who arp4»arMl 
in the DIuo Mou«e theatre in Ir«>ne 
(Castle's Fashion Promenade offiicil 
as a prolog to •\silm ShouIdor«." 
The suit Is a result of an acoident 
occurring: at Medfurd. when the 
train gave a HUddt-n lurch and M »m 
Darling was thrown to tFu- flon:-, 
suffering a broken no.'<e and other 
Injuries as jji result. She was un- 
able to appear in the revue in I'ort- 
land after the accident, and de- 
clares in her suit that three physi- 
cians have told her the Kcar o» her 
nose will bo permanent. ■■■ -t 



Vaudeville has b«>en cancelled at 
the Haker and'the theatre ha;s pom* 
back to a Kiraitfht musical conjedy 
ba^ls. 



I 



MAXHELD and GOLSON 

THAT'S A WERRY GOOD IDEA ' 

UlLLIAM J.\(OltS AGENCY 



BOSTON 

By LEN LIBBEV 

It may liave been the effect of tile 
abandonment In this city of the at- 
:enipt of the Shuberts to play vaude- 
ville or it may have been something 
else, but the fact remained the cur- 
rent sliow at Keiths is far from 
reaching the standard of the bills 
when the battle was on, even 
though the Keith people never ad- 
mitted officially that d battle ex- 
isted. 

On her last appearance here Ve- 
nita cSould held a good position, but 
jiot the spot position, and on the 
same bill was an act of exceptional 
merit. This week Miss Gould Is the 
headliner, for at the Monday after- 
noon show the act that was billed in 
the next-to-cloaing position was af- 
fected seriously by the sudden — and, 
it was said, tempo.-arj'— illness of 
Vivienne Segal. Harry Carrol tried 
to carry the act alone, with anything 
but .satisfactory results. 

-Miss Gould was off to a grnod *:tart 
and held it all the lime. Her imper- 
sonations in "one" far exceed In 
quality her single full-act bit, when 
she docs an imitation of I>enore 
ririch In "Klkl." Few Bostonians 
that attend Keiths have seen this 
actress or the show, and therefore 
the imitation loses much of its value. 
althouKh in a way that also helps it. 
Her newest bit here, the imitation 
•»f (Jllda Grey, was a wow from the 
start, and using it as a closing num- i 
h<T sho took pU>nfy nf bows, C*i 

J^'n lU-yer in his trick bicycle acif^ 
opens til*' show. He i.s one of the 
n'gulnrs at the house, and doing his 
single for an opening had no diffi- 
culty. It Is many weeks since a 
tramp bicycle act has been seen, and 
therefore it was welcome. Why he 
per.sists in doing an encore that is 
mostly bunk after closing utrong 
with his routine will always remain 
a mystery to the writer. 

Alice an<l Mary McCarthy, billed 
as 'Two Little Girls in IJlue," were 
under double handicap. They fol- 
lowed tlie Duncan Sisters, who led 
tJjc show last week, and on top of 
th.it were well below standard. The 
girls are not th^re as singers, an«l 
one Is plainly below par as a dancer. 

Doris Humphrey's Dancers were 
nt'Xt. This act is of the esthetic 
<lanre variety that had such a run 
in vaudeville houses some seasoh.i 
back, bnt wnlcli has lost consider- 
able of its nttracllon since Jazz and 
orchestras have become so promi- 
nent. The irirls dance about as well 
as the ordinary run of ballet d;infers. 
no brtfcr. and the dancrs as thej' 
are con.'- trusted hold nothing star- 
tling in the way of oiipjlnality or ,, 
novelty. As a result it becomes a ' 
bit tiresome, 

Mcl/iughlin and Evans. nr»t, 
were here earlier this or the laltfr 
part of last .season. They were the 
ilrst touch the house reroived of 
anything re.il in the comedy line, 
and glad to get it. The priir got 
away better at the Afonday matinee 
than ever before here and did a 
couple of encores, one good and una 
fair, 

.lim McWllliams in his piano act 
followed Mi.ss (Jould, His act is 
about 90 per cent, porsonallty, and 
he has the ability to meet that call. 
Jir> hiu\ tliern re.u-hlng out of tlu*lr 
seats for his stuff, although it w;is 
not cJiaj)ge<l greatly since last here, 
and he clf»sc(i r>Hpefially stron^c. 

Mrs. One Hufjlsc.". .«ind her com- 
pany in a sk«'tc]i built alont^ ratlier 
c«.nv«'ntit>nnl lines had plenty of 
eomf'dy. and this act ripjdes ah»ng. 
Sox: to rinsing. Carroll tried his 
l»r.«t t<» fill in tlio gap on the iiro- 
grani. I'.laiK-he Sherwood and Iter 
liroilnr rlu.sfd f'lO show. 

.\ l«*aner houso at th'* M«^>riday 
rnatinoe than tho previous w«*#'k. and 
nothing to indicate that this wr-'k , . 
wouhl be a repetition of kint, who'i 
thr> honso was caparlty from on^' ^nd 
to fill' otli< ;•, with telf'phidie on.lrrs 
taboo. ' 



CHICAGO 



^"**iil?i 



I Knilo.f \ .ileiillno Is wr'.l repre- 
•:r'Mt»'d on the I'alare bill t; .s week 
.Did puts Dr. Cowe in the ha<-k- 
" ' •• *''" moment, for th»-M' 



mi p 
uroiind for the 
ire only three mere pl.iys t»n thct 
)ettM'-and-bfttf»r stuff wliile VaT- 
•ntino is rr i)r»'sented in name by 
'lis form<"r wifo. .Tf.'in Afker, who 
excliitms a s she drinks ;i 
n h.r playle!. ' Hf-t'*- ^ l*> 



■ ^king ly 
•orkla!! 



thfi .'^hi<;<!'' Val»^-iitino is m»-nfioned 
'oy IW'Ih- Hak»'r In a Potip, the oth*'r 
•K-adlipe ffatn?-!', and he Is Intper- 
'onated In tho darir>lfi£f portion of 
•ho rilc«r and Doiigljis n«it l»y 
'^Joortr*' Haft. 

Tt is hardly lik'lv that tho Or- 
tduiim circuit could have know^ 
\nlrnt:no would be In t^fin the 



r 



M 



VARIETY 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



i^ 



i.'. 



r- 

r- 



•ame week that Mrs, llodolf \alen- 
tfno was heaJlincd ai I lie I'alme 
and so the i)re.«entutiun of hiT art 
at this tiiiJ'' muat be utlribut»Mi to 
luck. It the i)l:»cli..^ of the Pilon- 
, and Douglas act on t^ic Fame bill 
|p was not premeditated thai in uii- 
other stroice of hick. 

The Palace slr>\v of v.iuv acts i" 
atronger from a strictly vaudeville 
standpoint in its early f.aturts 
than in its last four acts. Tlic tir;;t 
r»ve iiun>b£r.^ move rJor.;: j'>«' <>t»oiu I 
as nicely a.^ a show could he framed I 
and wliile the f<»ur act.s which com- 
plete the hill do not keep ism tills 
progression the fa»t that Delle 
Baiter is a great local favorite anii 
that George Kockwoll is a nut 
comedian who would not consider 
failure .curries over the latter pan 
of the show to a succtshful con- 
clusion. Th.^ Jean Acker f^ketch is 
i.othing wortl.i' of con.sideration as 
a playlet, but when it is the veliicle 
"Which Introduies a t-hiek's wife it 
becomes a different matter and it 
must be said to her credit thi-t Mi><.s 
Acker i.s perfectly at home on the* 
stage and carries off her role ad- 
mirably. 

The Dancing Kennedys do not 
make a good closing ncf. The i)re- 
tense that the electrician is at 
fault, which gives opportunity for 
the dancers to sing a little ami pro- 
Vide a comedy touch might 
Strengthen the act for any other 
spot on the bill but in closing it 
8>ows up the .show and prevents the 
splendid dancing from getting its 
lull appreciation. 

MacPwae and Clegg open with a 
bicycle and unicycle offering which 
Ijermlts Miss Clegg to do the major 
part of the riding and the best 
tricks done awheel are the more 
entertaining when presented by an 
attractive girl. Macltae's comely 
Is uniformly good and .^ome of the 
things he doef--. suoh as the dancing 
fun on the small wliee'., arc e:c- 
ceptional. 

Les Gellifi attract attention when 
their et is displayed and while 
there was the least delay Sunday 
afternoon in getting it ready, this 
did not kill ai»precialion^ of the 
stage picture. The singfng and 
talking opening is a little slow to 
those who see ttie act for the tirst 
ime, but after the little fellow i^ 
itroduoed and they get down to 
acrobatic and ri-'sley ' work the act 
is a dand\. Th? crowd demanded 
an encore and was rewarded by a 
whirling of one man on the other's 
shoulders, whiCh ts possibly the 
best thing of its kind known in 
vaudeville. 

Pllcer and D.iuglas finished to 
such insistent applause that they 
did a bri'^f encore and attempted 
another. 

D, D. H. made a curtain s: eech 
in v.'hich he ob.'^erved that three 
times in Chi'-ago within a short 
time wa.s going strong, but there 
is no dan.^er of tirinq; of him. His 
20 minutes went wliirling by at the 
opening riitinee. lie has .'<»me 
new material wh.i'Mi evidenc -; i i- 
clination to Iteep alireast of the 
times and his lunmaking from first 
to last is proniMlive ol the deei>est 
enjoyment. 

"Wayne and W.irren in "The Cas; | 
Car," by I'aul Gerard Sniitn. hav • 
a number composed in th»» major 
part of talk and relieved bj- bur- 
lesque dancing and by aeroJatio 
accomplishment as a comedy end- 
ing. Tile i=i»eeial set gives tie* t.ilk 
atmosphere and Miss Warren has 
comedy nielliods which are a relief 
when compared to the average 
vaudeville comedienne. 

Miss I^aiccr sang he\>'M Si»nps. 
Her kidding with Dan J. Ilu.s.so, tii.' 
orchestra lead<M", as a iirelim nary 
to one song, was highly enjoyed. 

Mrs. Valentino has capable sup- 
port for her playlet, an indic'-ment 
of the male vamp. ,She ix a pri-tty 
girl with hlat k bobbed hair- and 
wears an attractive rot>tume. I: 
Is an act which will please people 
yielding to the draw of her n:ime. 

Rockwell and Fox IV^IU against 
odds in next to closing spot on 
such a bill, hut there i.s n' resist- 
ing Geofq'» Piock Well's insisteiit ap- 
peal and he soon had the cr'uvd 
lai'.ghing right and liaislud a fttjiid 
hit. 

T!io I'nriMg Kennedys IcMiigiit 
the performance lo a clo.-e. 



JACK ROSHIER and MUFFS 



\i: 



tli • 



The Majestic h.as :i parlieu!aily 
good siiow for this weelv v.itll 
••Ivubeville"' (10 men) and The Ciioat 
I^ester u^ the big features. On 
Sunday Al K. Ifall and company 
were put in as one t>f the two extra 
acts to work Sunday only. The ait 
tilled in the day between the State- 
Lake in Chicago and ClevelaJTi. 

Page niid Green opened with a 
ronu-dy acrobatic act whieh i^ eri- 
r>:»rtalnii!g throu.Thout and which 
finishes with a three hiah taiile 
wobble and a somersault baclc- 
wards of;' th.e table a^• a linish 
stead of the e*;potted fall of 
three tabh -. 

Ilf)se f^ Hail s:i\\ix four songs \r 
pood \oi; e and made tiuiie a liit 
in second pia-e. Migj;es;inK t'> rln 

t^ "- ! *" *'f «"n.l..iill.- titbit it nviV be 

fooli.'h t») pas.< II ji the -siiu^i,. 
woman" on the ordinarj- \av!d".\ ill- 
bill. 

Frank and Kthel Halls has a coin- 
♦»dy sMt \x nil li eats ui> linie sati^;- 
faotorlU' ar (1 places talk on a bill. 

The M aiton-.Tewell troupe h.ave 
an ideal presentation of jiigglin-r 
offering it in sr)ecial set and vvitii 
singing ami daiiving Irimniinj; 
Which almost conceals the real na- 
^ture uf the aft. The fast c!u^» ex 



THE DOG CONTORTIONIST 



■i' ■ .('v ■>■ 






IVm. Jarubs Agrntf 



BEN NEE ONE 

THE MANDARIN MINSTRELS 
1 Out of 400,000,000 



THREE WEBER GIRLS 

BOOKED SOLID 



Wm. Jarobk .%Krnry 



%Vm. Jae«li« Agenej 



BStSssasxzmcEap' 



ALL BOOKED 



BY 



WM. JACOBS 

AGENCY :v. -■:;.■- ,.;■•:. 
WOODS THEATRE BUILDING 



-S' 



-4 ' .- 



;/•: 



JACK and FLORENCE HUGHES 

BOOKED SOLID 



^ :v 



^Vm. Jacub<i Agency 



THEY LAUGH 



HARRY 



THEY SCREAM 

AT 



THEY YELL^ 



RUTH 



■f^' 



SULinfAN and MEYERS 

Their Comedy Automobile Novelty 

'THEY AUTO KNOW BETTER" 



LAUREL 




"THE CHUMMY CHATTERER" 



Wm. JH('ob<* AgenvT 



RAY 



CHAS. 



MAXSON and BROWN 



"ODD BITS OF ECCENTRICITIES" 

First Appearance in Vaudeville 



•: - ■''-■-x' 



Wm. Jarob9 Af^ner 



WILLIAM and MARY ROGERS 

•■■;■■ :i:;^:.ry'^ ■>":': "UTERARY DI-JESTERS" : ■ :■ :'::i:;:^^^^ 



Wm. J»cob» Agenpy 



HAPPY HARRISON'S 

ANIMAL CIRCUS 



Win. .Inr«>l»n .\K<*iiry 



CHARLES OLCOn and MARY ANN 



\^'ni. Jncolii .\spu</ 



ARTHUR LLOYD 

HUMOROUS CARD INDEX 



^Vm. ,1 i< '>i>s Acnrjr- 



MLN GEIGER 



%> III. (IttriUiH .\geiicjr 



••. ... y^-: ■.•■;• v.^-" 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



.VARIETY 



67 



ff 



Representing 



Acts with 



V 



ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 
B. F. KEITH (Western) 

ORPHEUM, JUNIOR 
WESTERN VAUDEVU.ll 

MANAGERS' ASSN. 



and All Their Affiliations 



■ %■ 



WILLIAM 

JACOBS 



'Jte 



Chicago 

Representative 

for the Following 



New York Artists' 
Representative 



CHARLES BIERBAUER 



't^^ 



AGENCY 



>« 



307 Woods Theatre BIdg. 



:ik' 



CHICAGO 



L 






J 




JEW FITZGERALD 



HARRY FITZGERALD 



LEW GOLDER 



E\RINELU, LTD. 



MORRIS & FEIL 



7- 



ROSE & CURTIS 



F.10YD W. STOKER 



■»,, 



■■'r 



' h-'''. . '■' I'l. 



■■■■■'■■} 



BOBBY 'UKE' HENSHAW 



And ENCORE 



ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 



nir«i(lMi BILX. JACOBS 



TOM KERR-EDITH ENSIGN : 

in *TIDDLE UP" 

■ By THOMAS F. SWIFT 

:•';' ■."WM. JACOBS AGENCY 

SimEY CHAPMAN 



in "MORE TO BE PITIED THAN CENSORED" 

AS A GENUINE SWISS ALPINER 



W*f. JACOBS ACENCT 



ADELYN JASON and 
HELEN HARRIGAN 

NOW PLAYING THE INTERSTATE TIME AFTER 
A SUCCESSFUL TOUR OF T»E WEST 

UM. JACOBH AGENCY 



AEROPLANE GIRLS 

BACK IN THE WEST 



WM. JACOBS AGENCY 



PAGE and GREEN 



ECCENTRIC SILENT FUNSTERS 



WM. JACOBS AGENf V 



MURPHY and LOCKMAR 

in "TWEET, TWEET, TWEET' 



Ji:" 



MM. JAfOBM AGENCY 



KURT and EDITH 

KUEHN 



m a Ccmedy Classic 

with Melody 

and 

Pantomlmicalisin 

WM, JAfOBH AGEN"^ 



Bennett and Lee 



BII.UAM JACOBS ACENCI 



HARRY KAHNE 



chanpe of th« two men It excep- 
tionally KOoil. 

Moojo and Fields repistned with 
talk and with filnKinR and dancinj? 
in which the occontrlc slips of one 
of tlio pair biinK down the houKe. 

' KulteN ille" was a particularly hig 
hit hero on Sunday ni^ht and the 
liaiul nunil.nrs were (^uiie as en- 
tluislastkally received as the com- 
edy. 

Al K. Ilall and company made the 
usual lauKhlngr sucress of this art 
in 'next to cloj*ini<" positit.n nnd 
ihe only departure fimi the ofter- 
inj? feen recently at J'alace and 
Stute-Lako waa tl»« nso of %nm<9 
uf the Pnes from "Rubeville" 

The McKinley Sflstois doHed the 
bIh.w will) a Hin^inif and dancinu 
rfvuo in whloh foui* Rlrla appear 
th-mj^h the act is mninly dependent 
en th^ efforts of a girl ?lnKcr, who 
joins in a Jazz danco at the finish. 
A Kill at piano does very little, 
start in.cr a solo at one time and play- 
ing? aci'ompaniment on occasions 
for Inief periods There are two 
Kirls who do two dances, who prob- 
iibly are the MeKinley Sister!*. The 
act does not begin to compare to 
the song and dance revues general- 
ly seen at the Majestic. It might 
be rearranged to advantage. 

Paul Itahn and company in "The 
New Cheff" pets away from the 
uKual run of such offerings and the 
offerlnR is commonduble on this 
score, \)\\X the act needs develop- 
ment beftre it will get to the best 
houses. This act 5«as s^en at an 
earlier performance. 



The new Le Claire at Mollne. 111., 
opened Feb. 114 with pictures. Ernie 
Young's Marigold revue, with 13 
people. Including Fowler and Tam- 
ara. AVade Booth, Florence Holland 
and Kileen Daner, Benson's orches- 
tra led by Don Bettor, Hejen Jef- 
frey, concert violinist, and Metro- 
politan quartette consisting of Mary 
Melllsh, Venl Warwick, Nicola Zer- 
olii Miul Henri Scott. S. T^ Levip 
is manager. The house has 2.000 
Heats. The theatre is built in con- - 
noction with a hotel and artists 
jiJayi'ig the theatre also appeared 
»t iho Wintergarden in the hotel. 
F. L. Cornwell, who operates the 
Delmonte at Kt. Louis, has the New 
Le Oalre. The special attraction 
for week of Maich 4 will be Al.'i 
.Swrcis Singing band. ,. ._ . -<«| 

■ ■ . ■» 

The Palace, Mollne, 111., receritly's'^ 
de.str(yed by fire, will be rebuilt 
and it is announced that It la ex- 
pected to reopen within rIx weeks. 
Ben* F. Wheeler, who had taken a 
four > ear's lease the day before the 
lire. Jm.s agre* d to lea?e the neviy 
rebuilt house for that period. 



The Incomparable 
Mentalist 



At the first show Friday night 
were some empty seats at the 
.Ani» rii-an, where six acts of vaude- 
\llle. Aesop's FabP>s and a news 
wcclvly are offered at 1:5 cents dur- 
ing the week and generally to ca- 
pacity business. The acts are se- 
« ur« d at small money for try-out 
!•• rformances \vhlch enables the 
jjfft rins of such a bargain in vaude- 
ville. The show for the last half 
of last wctk was up to tho usual 
; t.'itulard and interesting as it Is the 
Mrvt Association showing of Peplto, • 
.the disclosure of a new a«*^ by Ham 
and Jaek (Joold and tho Klmlwa 
.Tai>8— an art worthy of a place on 
Ihe/biggcj-t bills. 

Pepito really does imitations but 
ju< seats them a.s a clown and Intro- 
<lu( es a comedy stunt with an atito 
which is the predominant hit of the 
act. The special drop shows a 
dcBcrt and an abandoned nn?o. After 
some comedy in which an imitation 
of a dog barking; la a part, Pepito 
removes his comedy suit. handin<( 
it to a woman assistant, and then 
Is dressed in a clown suit In which 
it is easier to get around, with 
heavy clown makeup *)ut no w'g— 
a noticeable absence. Ho fools 
around with the auto a time getting 
many laughs. 1I« then concludes 
with imitations of xylophone, dog 
barking, chkken and rooster, cow, 
pony, aeroplane, crying baby and 
the trainer of lions, in the latter 
using a whip nnd a sort of mega- 
phone. Pepito has the makings of 
a flandy act. 

Sam and Jack CJoold followed 
with a new act. Charles Ward and 
• ompariy l;i "Babies" held third 
placf and provided more laughs 
than the av«-rage rk'-tch. Moorit 
and Fields open wifti the Conroy ■ 
jind l-»'.Maire -inean mines" taik.—^ 
liew to rnany th<atreKoers of this 
d.iy and which th« y put ov-r splen- 
didl>'. 'i'licy conclude with one 
<l;iii'ing whih' the otlur plays a 
)>url»yque Klld trombone. The 
dan<er h.'is «oino ccj-eutrlc steps of 
Uie kanuaji.o vaiinty that ought to 
e.-«jiM'h liiin ;n shoudum. Duvjil 
.'ind .*<; nior.ds \n 'Their I'list Quar- 
rel" Hipg only fairly well but th^y * 
have .1 line of talk framed so ih.it 
tiic y i)!«;iv«' in spite of this. The 
Kimiwa TIn-ce r'celved ;i big hand^^ 
lor tii»Mr stag*' setting al the open- ' 
iiiii; and offer»>d the usual routine rif 
.);tp a'-tH with barrel manipulation 
»'.\ fool ju;;;^brs with tlw comedy of 
.'•hno«t dropping the barrel, an<l 
ending with a clinjb to balcony on 
aa i n tlii.LU Aui m ;t n d a I t i u X . %\',Ck^ 



tlouli. 



UM. M4 0B«> Ai.ENf V 



The number of applicants to ap- 
l-v^ -fn" .III am.'iteur picture at 
J/o^n s I»el}ir,.'ey. Nt w Vork. last 
•Saturday nt'^'ssitated tlte police 
reserves being called out to keep* 
I lie c.'owd in o.'der. 



^•*^*^^^v*B3P3^ n^UHyiuut* JV«iii7v 



68 



VARIETY 



:<!.£:« 



,'■ ■ ' 'r, , * a" , ■ . " ^ — - 

Thursday, March 1, 1928 



.v. 



; V . 



WE BUILD AND FINANCE THEATRES INFOLVING 'A MILLION^ 
- DOLLARS AND UPWARDS 



■».•••■ 



>'•-■■:• 



LONGACRE 

ENGINEERING 
CONSTRUCTION CO 




. V ■ ■ ■ 
■* ■.•■ 



,.• t~''~i r;\ ' 



345 Madison A\enue 
127 North Dearborn Street 



NEW YORK CITY 

■ ■'■■- '". ■■" - ,' ' .' ' * . '■■ . '■ ■ ■'.' ■ '''■ ■' -' 

CHICAGO, ILL 



■ .' I •*' '■ 






TAKES THIS MEANS OF THANKING CHICAGO FOR ITS WONDERFUL CO-OPERATION 



AU REVOIR 



UNTIL NEXT SEASON 




HENN NG ANNA 



Featuring PAT COHEN in "JUGGLELAND" 



Direction BERNARD BURKE 



Playing ORPHEUM-KEITH CIRCUIT 



F^rai\lc WestpHal 



AND HIS 



■•iV .V- 



i ■ 



t 



■fr, ,/ 






■.'•'&». 



^■ 



\ •*"• 



RAINBO ORCHESTRA . 

Third Year at Rainbo Garden*, CHICAGO 
MAKING RECORDS EXCLUSIVELY FOR COLUMBIA 



:j 



Thursday, March 1, 1823 



VARIETY 



I 

I 

I 



I 



I 



I 
i 



i 



i 



I 



^ 



I 
I 



EAGLE & GOLDSMITH Present 





/ 1 



MARGARITA MARGO, 



TINTS 



ARDATH DE SALES, HELEN BETH 



IN 



AND 



TONES 



■~v 



This space reservtd for an not thut do^n not cure t6 h«v« fh« 
name mentioned for fear of cettinc too much bookings 



■',v 



MACK & VELMAR COMPANY 



IN 



"A Writing Room Wrangle" 







I 






I 



I 



1 



I 

I 



I 



iSJ 



I 

I 
I 



i 



(55^ 



WERNER AMOROS TRIO 

"LOVE'S FOLLIES" 



Sj^i^: 



SINCLAIR and GRAY 

A CYCLE OF YOUTH 



HUMBERTO BROTHERS 

ENTERTAINERS DE LUXE 



Genevieve 



Beatrice 



SID LEWIS 



JUST A HIGH-CLASS MAN 



BROWN and LA VELLE 

IZZATSO 



THE FOSTOS 



LIMBER LIBERATORS OF LAUGHS 



DAVIS and 6RADNER 



HARMONIE 



MORRIS and MAY HUMPHREY 

DANCING ROUND t4EW YORK 



WALTER and MAY SIEGFRB 

IN A HOME RUN 



Delia— Karl 



LARKINS 



SPECTACULAR THRILLING SENSATION 



i-.rt" 



George Downey and Gertrude Claridge 

IN 

l'^::;':'^;-. •■:■:,: . :■;•••:;■ ^ "wait and see''^ •■ " 

Eastern Representatives, HUGHES & MANWARING 



i Suite 504 



EAGLE & GOLDSMITH 

177 North Slate Street _--^^ 



i 
I 

I 
I 



I 



i 
I 



.^ 



1 



I 



1 
I 



I 



i 



£HICAGO I 



BookinK Exclusively KEITH, ORPHEUM, JUNIOR OKI'HEIM, W. V. M. A. INTERSTATE 

Western Representatives of PAUL GERARD SMITH. Inc. 



i 



70 



VARIETY 



Thursday, Marclf 1, 1923 



A GOOD BOOKER 



•i 1' . 





'■•c, 



CELLO 



Jene Jerome— Suzanne France: 

AMERICA'S YOUNGEST OPERA SINGERS 

' < 

GOOD TIME 

W. V. M. A. and B. F. KEITH (WESTERN) 



PIANO 






FRANK 



HARDY BROS. 

"THEY TALK WITH THEIR HATS" 



JOE 



GOOD ACTS 

ANY THAT I HANDLE 




Y 




MANY THANKS TO 

THE W. V. M. A. 

B. F. KEITH (Western) 

ORPHEUM JR. 

FOR THE ENJOVABL'E SEASON 



MILLER, V 
PACKER 
and SELZ 



a 



THE GROUCH KILLERS 



ft 



BARilY [. JOHNSON 

Plays, Sketches, Music 
AUTHOR OF 
"Putting It Over" 
"Never Touched Mc" 
"Brother EIk»" 
"Roses Are Red" 
"Hell and Toe" 
"I GotU Have Meat" 




ROAHINO 



AND 



BARREHE 



IN' 



'MARRAUCIA GOING UP" 



JACK and JESSIE GIBSON 



in "A CYCLE OF SMILES AND THRILLS 



Jf 



PHONE I 

CENTRAL 654 



JACK GARDNER AGENCY 

304 LOOP END BLDG., CHICAGO 



177 N. State Street 



/ 



T 



• II 



T, T 



• II 



T, ■ V T 



I • 



TSIE G 



• !• 



-BYE 



ROCCO VOCCO 

HAS MOVED THE CHICAGO OFFICE OF 





Inc 




TO 



/ 



■'■.■ ' 



167 NORTH CLARK STREET 

(OPPOSITE HOTkL SHERMAN) 

and is "Crying For You" to come over and hear "When The Leaves Come Tumbling Down," 
'Tou've Got to See Mamma Every Night" and a wonderful collection of FEIST HITS 



% • 



ft 



YOU CAN'T GO WRONG WITH ANY 'FEISr SONG" 



il 



Thursday! IVfarcti' 1 1923 



VARIETY 



71 



AURIOLE CRAVEN 
The Dancing Violiniste" 



ROGER E. MURREL 

STANDARD VAUDEVILLE PRODUCTIONS 

308 Woods Theatre Bld^. CHICAGO, ILL. Phone Central 3228 



BERNICE ST. JOHN 
Prima Donna Pianiste 



HENRY OATALANO ^ 

(THE INIMITABLE ARTIST) 

in 9 Timely Revue of GIb"^ 

with Mn.DREn DA VIES; 8 STCIUI BIRT11R8: AI. niHIIOP 



BOBBY 



IIAUD 



FEMX 



MAUD-' 



—RAY 



KENTON TWINS WOLFE 

MABLB— — RALPH 

Management, GREENWALD & ANDERSON 



ROBERTS-CLARK— RICE 

in "EVERYTHING" 

■ 1 ■- 

THE DANCINCJ 8rNBKASl 

FRANKIE KLASSEN 

HARRY and GRACE 

K E E S L E R 



HENRY ANTRIM aiid Co. 



WITH 



II\ZET> MOORE, SrZANE BLAIR. LEO KABLIK, 
nnf) KTHKL I-^*(ODO?i 



!N PREPARATION 

SWEET SIXTEEN REVUE 
BRUCE MILLER and CO. 

in "THE WORLD 'AGIN' HER" 



ii 



BIRD 




OF PARADISE 



ff 




WITH 



CHALFONTE SISTERS 



S-A 



IN THEIR NEW ACT 



Written hy J. STANLEY ROYCE 



5 RAINBOW'S 

^ END 

"THE REA1.M OF FABLE 
AND FANCY" 



Direction, TOM POWELL 



MARCUS 



AND 



LEE 



in ^RIARRIED" 



A LArfilllNG MATTER 



AMBLER BROS. 

AMERICA'S FOREMOST EQUILIBRISTS 
THE ACT SENSATIONAL 

Direction " ^ TOM POWELL 

MR. VALENTINE VOX 



f 

'i' 



I 






THE ULTRA-HUMORIST 



ORIiilNATOR OF SINCiXG IX TWO VOICES SIMILTAXEOISLY 



HERBERT 
UOYD 



ASSISTED BY 

LILLIAN LILYAN 
WALLACE and WEIR 







Good? 
)oleop^ f 

WESTEU.. .. .'«i„>KAlATlVE, 

TOM POWELL 



TOM 
POWELL 

AGENCY 



CABBY 
BROS. 



\ 



"WITH THE TOYS 



ft 



W. T. M. A. 



KEITH WESTERN 



See TOM POWELL 



BILLY 
DOSS 



'The Tennessee Roustabout' 



Direct loa, TOM POWBLL 



IRENE MARY 

STUART GIRLS 

SONGS, PERSONALITY and CURLS V 

Direction y Material by 

TOM POWELL f: CA^ DeVOLL 

JACK GEORGE DUO 

TOM POWELL • PILOT In the West 



J^J 



V MASON and SCHOLL 

"JUST A GOOD ACT WITH A GOOD AGENT" 
Direction TOM POWELL 



?■■■ 



JACK LEE 

"A PHONEY RECITAL" 

Master of Ceremonies— TOM POWELL 
"MUCH OBLIGED" 






f. ■■ 



r 



:.^ :: 



^^THREE BOYS'V 

PEP, HARMONY AND JAZZ i^^A^! 

W. V. M. A. "■ i «nd. B. F. KEITH'S 

TOM POWELL LEWIS & DAVIS 

'^ West East 



BILLY 
DOUGAL 

TED 
LEARY 

_^ SONGS 

MUSIC 

• SMILES 



. / 



ADA WEBBER 



"THE LITTLE ARISTOCRAT OF SYNCOPATION" 
Direction TOM POWELL 



DIRECTION, 

TOM POWELL 



' . ANDREW LYDON 

i . —PRESENTS— . 

^ 'DREAMS^' 

PLAYING KEITH AND W. V. M: A. 
TOM POWELL JAS. E. PLUNKETT 

West — .^ ^ ^ East 



INEZ HANLEY 

■ ■ ■■—IN— 

PI ANOGRAMS 



BEWARE! 






OF AN ACT NAMEO SMITH A >!'<; ARKY. 
THKY ARE l'llt\Ti;s; THIA' WKICK 
< AKillT AT Tin: >IA.IKSTH , THEA.. 
( I1I('A(;0. nOIMi THE LATE <iKO. 
PRIMROSE SOFT-SIIOI': DANCE. AM) 
A MAN IN THE ACT, KNOWN AH 
Mi< KEY M«<;\RKY WAS DOlNCi CiEO. 
WIIITF/S HI IK- \Nn-Wl\<i 1>AN< E. 
TIIEV WERE M MMONEO TO ATI'LAR 



AT THE riTY HALL (W. V. M. A.), 
ANI» THE ,11 IX.ES tSAVK THEM A 
YEAR. THEY ARE NOW I)OiN<l 
TIME, ANI> MUST REPORT TO THE 
i>ROSE<X'TIN<» ATTORNEY (TOM 

I'OWEM-). EVERY WEEK THEY FILL 
Ol T A Hi-i;E SLIP ANH Al-TEK THEIR 
TIME IS W THEY MIST HE <i<>OI), 
OR THEY WILL HAVE TO COME 



BACK AND 

NOW. I W»H TALKING 



DO 



ANOTfIRR YEAR. 
TO HMITH a 
M«<JAKKY. ANH THKY SAII>, "IT IN A 
«iOOI> THINii THAT THKY ARE NOT 
IN NEW Y<HfK WHEN THE HI C K- 
AND-WINO TOl RNAMENT COMES OFF 
AS THEY WOriJ) STEAL Al-L THE 
STFI'S THEY COI LI> AND CHE THF^M 
IN THEIR ACT." WARNING TO BK- 



OINNEIW— IF TOr HAYK ANT BTFFfl 
OF YOI'R OWN. GET THEM COPT- 
RIGHTEIL I DON r LIKE TO KNOCK 
ANYHODY AH KMITH A M GARRY ABK 
I'ERHONAL FRIENDH OF MINE — I 
DON'T WANT THEM TO KNOW WHO 
WROTE THIS. HO DANCERS. BEWARE. 
YOL'R FRIENDH," 

HMtTH and hlcOATtHY. 



The ORIGINAL OLDTIMERS Act 






JOHN E. GORMAN-CHAS. UDELL— CHAS. WHYTE- BILLY GOLDEN— BILLY TATE 
NOW IN 2ND YEAR W. V. M. A., ORPHEUM AND WESTERN KEITH CIRCUIT 



< 72 



S VAlI^IBTY 



3=C 



jHThHrs4a,i^^^^q<j J^^^923 



JOHN 





BOOKING EXCLUSIVELY WITH WESTERN VAUDEVILLE, KEITH AND ORPHEUM CIRCUITS 

SOME OF THE ACTS I AM REPRESENTING 

DRAPER AND HENDRIE, FARNELL AND FLORENCE, PAUL HOWARD, HARRY BEW- 
LEY AND CO., JENSEN AND BELL, BILLY BARLOW, BELL AND LECLAIR, LA COSTE 
AND BONAWE, JOHNNY MAHER, LEHOEN AND DUPREECE, JAMES KENNEDY AND 
CO., MICAL5 AND PAULIE, MILTON AND LEHMAN, MASCOT, OTTO, BARDELL AND 
OTTO, THE PARKERS, REED HOOPER REVUE, SMILES AND STYLES, ROTH AND 
SLATER, SHERMAN AND DELL, WOLF AND WARD, SEVEN FLASHES, SEYMOUR 
AND HEALEY, MUSICAL SHERMANS, JOSEPHINE WORTH AND CO., WILD AND 
SEDLL\, KRESS MOORE FOUR, MURRAY MACKIE, LAYDEN AND BURKE . 

* ♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦4 ♦♦♦♦♦4»»»» ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ - : 

Good Acts Wanted at All Times^nter views Daily Between 12 and 2, and by Appointment 

- ; ':•'::>. :■.. ..'•■ ■; '■■., .'■ -"• . ■ ■ ■" / ■ . ■ ■ .■ '•■■,-'■■ "■>■ ■'■ - " '•■■ . "' '•*' ■ ■'• '^ / ■■. /•'■"•"" ■■■-'."■' ": 

"■' »♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦4444444»444 ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ , ■■- ••'•■.•^ Z^- ■ . ■^•^^ ' " v,. o^^^^^ 

Always willing to give constructive criticism. This service is free. I have helped others^ so 
why not you? _ J ■ ' ; ';■ :.; -'^v : ; x, : ^ :• A^' • • • :'^-^ - '■■ ' 

4-»"M-»4-4 4444444444444444444444444444444444444»4444 ^■^♦♦♦^♦♦♦♦♦^ i '^ - * 

Wanted: Clever People for Next Season That Would Like to Be Featured With Headline Vaudeville Acts 

»-»♦♦♦♦» ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦44444444444444444444444444 4 4 44 4 444 4 4 44444 44-»4-»' .1 

-a: 177 NORTH STATE STREET >;: ■:•:t^:■:::•■ ■7:1.'"'^^^^^^^ 

,.■''".*.'■■■.'.;.■■■•';■•■ Room 600, Chicago ''■ \ "'■ :.^ .• ^. - 'V'^V'^. ;.■:',;:•■-■■; V;.'^'.',\: "■'■ v; ':, ^ *>v •:' 

Phone Central 8126 



/p 



FRANK 



WALMSLEY 



AND 



MAE 



KEAMG 



HUGH JOHNSTON 

"COMEDY TRICKSTER" 

FOURTH CONSECUTIVE SEASON 

For W.V. M.A. and B. F. KEITH 

WESTERN EXCHANGE 



FULTON and 



MACK 



VAUDEVILLE'S 

REPRESENTATIVE 
— ATHLETES 



ED C. 



HAYES 

and 



LOIS 



liOYD 



t( 



BEFORE AND AFTER'' 



^ 



CHARLES YATES * ; 
Presents 

SOL WAGNER 

AND HIS 

SOCIETY SYNCOPATORS 



ON OUR WAY EAST- 
WATCH FOR US 



BILLY 



MILLER and CO. 

IN ' 

"THE SIGN POST" 

WITH 

MARGUERITE JOHNSON and 
WILLIAM E. GLADSTONE 

BOOKED SOLID 



JESSE FREEMAN AGENCY 



BILLY 



^^^vT^ CHARLES YATES 

■ ■''■'■ ■.■;:„' : ;. manager 

ARTISTS* REPRESENTATIVES 

1413 Masonic Temple 



Central 0246 



CHICAGO 



ALSO REPRESENTING 

Ctrlim* and Himbtr; Cal OeaiT and Co.: QMrt* 
and Howard; Nora and SIdnoy KeKogt; Maa* 
aad Mallory: Mtrley Siitort; Naivoyi: Nald aad 
Rfuo: Myron Porl and Co.; RIehardwi Broa. 
and Chorio: 8taa Stanlay; Skolly and Holt: 
WyomlBf Four: Buddy Walton: Calvin aad 
O'Connor; Castlor and Beatley Twint: Hubart 
Oyer and Co.: Froar,, Baitott and Froar; Gar« 
don and Oelmar: NoU McKlnloy; Maek and 
Srantloy; Story and Clark; Edwardi and Alton; 
Mardo and Romo: Wtbor and Elliott: Wyatt'l 
Ladf and Laui**: Statford and Louiu: Johnny 
ainicr and Oanclna Oollt; Murot; Chapman'o 
Highlanders : Evani. Mtro and Evani; Fayo aad 
Thomas: Paul Kirkland: Morrlan't Caaiaoo: 
Robb and Whitman: Wendsll and Meohaa; Low 
Cantor Productions: Leo Zarrell and Co.; Cap- 
man and Capman; Roder and Brown. 



BATCHELLER 



and 
HAZEL 

VERT 



FRED 



KITTY 



SWIFT and DALEY 



IN 



"LET'S GO" 
GOING STEADY 



A Comedy and Afusical 
Divertissement 

ALWAYS WORKING 



• BILL 

KIRKWOOD 
and CO. 



-IN- 



"A Vaudeville Round-Up" 

A Western Episode, Consisting of 

!!;:r??r»SK"* WORKING 

Whip ('r»cklas f f vra*«*a*ivp 

< oriirt .SolM OTI? A I\\7 

l)«m-ln»««d MtAUl 



FRANK SHEPARD 

"BUNKOLOGY" 



ASSISTED BY 



"THE ROYAL GOOF" 
SOL WOLI ER 



EVEYN 
PHILLIPS 



Wishes to Thank 

MR. SAM KAHL 
MR. GLEN BURT 
MR. DICK HOFFMAN 
MR. SAM TISHMAN V 

MR. TOM BURCHILL 
MR. GEORGE LUKES 

For their courtesies and 
kindness extended to her 



J 



i 2 »tWrrfatfj?; itf arch' 1; f<923 



'^* V'k R^I^E t Y 



" jr? ¥J> ^ 



i4 Spectacular Novelty 

JONIA'S 

HAWAIIANS 

*The. best and classiest Hawaiian act in 
, Vaudeville"— VARIETY 

•:' ... ■ ■;• .;■; .■:■■■■'' ' ■ " ' 

Opened Aug. 4 — Booked Solid Until May 
Orpheum, W. V. M. A., B. F. Keith (Western) 

iBrowii, Gardner 



• ■• . ' ■ 



ROY 



La PEARL 



The World's Greatest Athlete 
? A SURPRISE NOVELTY ? 



Who said "Nothing New Under the Son"? 

WAIT tXTIL. YOl SKK 

SOPHIA 




AND HER 

MAGIC LAMP 

ASSIST i:u »v 

PAUL D. LOr.AN 



-■4 



BOOKED SOLID 



Gorgeously Unusual 
Scenic Effects 

AND 

Costumes 



All Special Material 

MY 

Chas. J. Burkhardt 

AM) 

Sophia Wilson 




U 



Burnett 



HAVE RE-UNITED 



Eastern Representative 



Western Representative 



LEWIS & GORDON HARRY SPINGOLD 
Our Quaker Dance Fully Protected' 

BILLY and EDDIE 

GORMAN 

Sing and Write Their Own Song Hits as Well 

as Write Vaudeville Material for 

Vaudeville Acts 



W£IR and CREST 



PROVING THEIR WORTH 



IN 



CHARACTER COMEDY IMPRESSIONS 



DOUGLAS mm 

and COMPANY 

in the Laughing Sketch Hit of the Season 

- "I WANT MEAT' 



FERGUSON and 
SUNDERLAND 

BFTS OF JWUSiCAL COMEDY 



Manteli's Manikins 



IN 



LE PETIT CABARET 

A MANIKIN MUSICAL COMEDY 



WALTER G. PERCIVAL 
RENEE NOEL 

in Their New Comedy Classic. 

"THE EMPTY ROOM" 
Western Direction HARRY W. SPINGOLD 



A ''REAL ATTRACTION'r 

ORIGINAL— BEAUTIFUL— ARTISTIC 

Vera Sabina 

Assisted by MAURICE LEON 

AND -■■-•' ■ < 

SPANISH MARIMBA BAND 



KINZO 



On the Last Lap of Second Season of Splendid 

Treatment by the Orpheupi Circuity W. V. M. 

A. and Chicago B. F. Keith Through Personal 

Supervision of Mr. SAM KAHL 

Direction HARRY W. SPINGOLD 



JO£ MELVIN 

ROLLED MY HOOPS 

TO A SUCCESSFUL SEASON 

REDDINGTON 

AND GRANT 

* THOSE BOUNCING BFU HOPS 



BALTUS TRIO 

WORKING— THANK YOU 



SILVER and DUVAL 

New Act in Preparation for Next Season 

Booked Solid This Season, Thanks to 
HARRY W. SPINGOLD 



De Witt and Robinson 

Presenting 

"THIS 'N THAT" 

Now Working for the Western Vaudeville 

HARRY W. SPINGOLD, Representative 



WILL MORRIS 

^^THE NUTTY CYCLIST' 



ANATOL FRIEDLAND and CO. 

HACKETT and DELMAR REVUE :^ 
^EMMA CARUS 

LEWIS and GORDON PRODUCTIONS 

RENEE ROBERTS GIERSDORF SYM- 
PHONISTS 

LEW and PAUL MURDOCK 

BILL ROBINSON - 

OAKES and DELOUR 

BERT FITZGIBBONS 

CRAWFORD and BRODERICK 

AN ARTISTIC TREAT ^ 

MRS. EVA FAY 

WAYNE MARSHAL and CANDY 

WARD and WILSON 
> TELEPHONE TANGLE - '' 

^ KAY, HAMLIN and KAY 
' RAYMOND WILBERT ' 

COLVIN and WOOff 

STANLEY and BIRNES 

SHAW and BERNARD 

ESPEand DUTTON 

BARBETTE 



Harry W.;Spingold 

^ ::•-:-:■':•' : AGENCY. ,^: 

Suite 308, Woods Theatre Bldg. 

CHICAGO 

PHONE CENTRAL 3228 V 

14 YEARS OF REAL SERVICE 

TO HIS MAJESTY THE VAUDEVILLE ARTIST 
A FEW ACTS I HAVE REPRESENTED THIS SEASON 






FRESCOTT and HOPE EDEN 
POWERS and WALLACE 
BETH BERI and CO. 
GALETTI'S MONKEYS 
MIGNONETTE KOKIN and CO. 



ADAMS and GRIFFITH « 
GALETTI and KOKIN 
BESSIE REMPEL and CO. 
HARRIET REMPEL and CO. 
WELCH, HEALY and MONTROSE 



CLIFFORD WAYNE TRIO | 
LILLIAN GONNE v^ 
ROY LAPEARL " 
PARKER BROS. 
FORD and PRICE ' 
SULLY and HOUGHTON 
FISKE and LLOYD 
GAUTIER'S TOY SHOP 
PEGGY BREMEN and BRO 
WM. EBS and CO. 
CAflSON and WILLARD 
GORDON and GERMAINE 
ELIDA MORRIS 
WM. SEABURY and CO. 
MONROE and GRANT 
HIGGINS and BATES__ 

JOE BENNETT 
NED NORWORTH and CO. 
HAVEMAN'S ANIMALS 
GREEN and MYRA 
EDWIN GEORGE 
MARGUERITE PADULA 



W' f 



74 



VARIETY 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



f^. 



I: 



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V- 

15 









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mV 





AGENCY 



AND A FEW OF THE ACTS I HAVE REPRESENTED THIS SEASON 

Suite 1608, Masonic Temple Bldg. CHICAGO 



■^r 



JERRY and HER PIANO GIRLS 

VAUDEVILLE'S MOST BEAUTIFUL OFFERING 



f«.t 



LEO 



Flanders 



AND 



GENEVE 



Butler 



Sidney 
Landfield 



Very Successful 



Brady 



AND 



m 



A Vaudeville Concert 



Mahoney 

Wholesale Dealers in 
"Wow^" 



BOOKED SOLID 




HAMEL SISTERS 



LA PETITE PARISIENNES 



) 



TWO HOT BOYS 



SHANNON 'nd GORDON MOWATT «d MULLEN 



"BITS OF HITS" 



SONGLAND'S NEW DISCOVERY 



Olga Kane and Co. Don Quixano and Co. 



T«E YOUNG SPANISH BARITONE 



i 



ROSCOE AILS 

MABEL HARPER and CO. 

BOBBY McLEAN and CO. 

FLORIDA FIVE 

BILLY SCOTT and SISTERS 

BYAL and EARLY 



JACK BENNY 
CARL EMMY 
MELONETTE DUO 
WALDRON and WINSLOW 
FRANK FANON ^^^^^ 
DANO and LOEHR ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ S 



SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

By CHESTER B. BAHN. 

WIBTINO— First half, dark; laat 
half half, "Land O' Romance," with 
Fiske O'llara; next week, "Cat and 
Canary." 

TEMPLE— Vaudeville. 

STRAND— All week, "The Flirt .*< 

ROBBINS— ECKEL — All week. 
"Robin Hood." 

EMPIRE— All week, "Roll of -the 
Soa." 

CRESCENT— First half. "Man 
Who Came Back." • 



Tlili^ next time that Manager 
Frank Sardine of the Cresccnl here 
books a dope film with a lobby dope 
display, he'll put the lattor under 
police guard. The Crcsce 't last 
week had "Life in Chinatown" and, 
to boom it, used an ettective lobby 
display, a glass showcase holding 
"guns," hop pipes" and other arti- 
cles essential to the drus user. Sud- 
denly, Sardine heard a crash. Ho 
reached the sidewalk in time to see 
a fleelnff figure. An inventory 
showed two hyperderrnics had been 
stolen by the raiding dope addict. 



Buckley -Ferguson 
Inc.. of P.inghamtoii. 
work on the first of 
movies depicting the 



Productions, 

has started 

12 one -reel 

methods of 



fraudulent stock promoters. Mary 
MacLaren and Sydney Deane with 
"Huby KIslo" Ftrguson have the 
leading roles. 



Syracuse dramatiir critics, for 
once, were united in tlie.r estimate 
of Porter ICmerson Plrownc's 
"Ladies I'or Sale." olTered at the 
Wioting tlie last half of last x^fek. 
Ttie local reviewers saw little hope 
for the play. 



Although Jackie Coogan failed to 
reach Syracuse until SuFiday lie wa.s 
hofit. in spirit at lea.'^t, to several 
thousand Syracu^'e youngsters Sat- 
urday morning v.hen Jackie enter- 
tained his friends at a special free 
scr<'ening of "The Toll of the Sea," 
at the Empire. 



Franklin H. Chase, dramatic edi- 
tor of "The Journal," and dean of 
local critics, is getting to be almost 
as great an attraction as a show 
hereabouts. Back from a world tour 
that covered more than a ' year. 
Chase is making on the average of 
three addresses a week before dif- 
ferent societies, clubs and organiza- 
tions. 

DETROIT 

By JACOB SMITH 

OARIilCK — Marjoric Kamheau in 
"The Goldfish." .\e.\t. "Purple 
MaJ<k." 

NEW DETROIT— "Thank You." 
bJext. "Captain Applejack." 

MAJESTIC— "She Walked in Hep 
Sleop." Next. "House Next Door." 

SIH'BERT - MICHIGAN — "Tlifl 
Charm School." * Next, "The Bad 
•^lan." 

SHFBERT - ni-rntolT — "Thw 
Midnite Revels." Next, "The Rose 
Girl." 

ORPHEl'M (C. H. Mile.s, Proj).) — 
RothwoU lirowne; Boys of Long 
Ago; Fred Stoddard & Co.; Lewis 
iSc Rogers; Welling & Jordan; De- 
witt and Robinson; Follette'a 
IMonkeys; Keating & Ro.es. Noxt 
week. Senator Murphv and Yvctte. 

MILES (C. H. Mllew. Prop.) — 
Billy Kelly & Co.: Four Lamays; 
lone & Kingsburj-; Abbott & 
White; "Welderson Sisters and 
Selma Braatz. 

REGENT (C. H. Miles, Prop.) — 
"dh. You Sheik"; Clay Crouch: 
Berg Sisters; Harry Seymour and 
Co.; -Oniccr V()i<es and l>on; Hal- 
kins* Silhouettes; Fargo and Rich- 
ards; Burt Shepherd. 

COLONIAL (Warren A- Cohen, 
Props.) — Lllla Shaw and Co., head- 
I line. 



«r 



Ferry Field theatre's new policy 
of vaudeville success first week. 
Bills changed twice a week. 



Lester 5Tatt, who owns the 
Strand. Flint, has taken over the 
Orpheum. Both are fir.^t-run pic- 
ture houses. Charles Garfield re- 
mains in charge of the Orpheum. 



\ 



13 



E151S151S15IS151SISISTJ51S1S151 



1 




ViCTOftY 

■ EVARTVILLE. 

JTHAND 

E^AMTVILLE 
rORTVWNE 

CAPITOL 

CLINTON 



LiSrL5T5lJl5T5lEn5t5l5lST51filSlSU 



Gl5T5l5I515IS\5lfilSl515Un5Lq\51515lJ515lgl5l5l51^^ I ElSlSlSlSL'TlSISlSlfriHlSlglSlglSI 



ONJXDLIDATED 

^ QR.POR.AriON 
0PER.AT1NG INDIANA'J TINEJT TiiEATR.CJ' 



VAUDEVILLE - PliOTO PLAXrvROAD PR.ODUCTIOhD" 

GENCR.AL OrnCEJ* 

n^CORniCK E>OlLDING 'CHICAGO 




LIBERTY 

TERR.E HAUTE 

JTRANJD 
KOKono 

naR.RAY - 

— RCHHOND 

naR.R,ETTE 

RICHnOND 



GlSlia5l5T5TSlSlS15I5TJ515l5l5l51515lfri51515I5l515lS^^^ 




G15I51515X515151515I515I5\SISI5\51 



ISI 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



VARIETY 



T5 



^v.- -• 



=» 



1 






; 1 ■•'.■■/ 



A • • ♦- 



-*•'*; . 'i.-Y-i-::^- 



•• ■ ,* 






If. 



■\ '- "-- 




HJf WESTERN VAUDEVILLE MANAGERS' ASSOCIATION and the 
B. F. Keith (Western) are the largest booking offices in the entire West. 
The B. F. Keith Western interests with their forty-five theatres and 
around eighteen weeks through Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky and Michigan 
make it possible for the bigger and finer attractions coming West to not 
only break their railroad jump but make it possible to play some of the 
finest theatres in that section of the country. This time is so closely dovetailed into 
what comprises the Orpheum Junior, the W. V. M. A. and their affiliated circuits 
that an act does not lose even one day in travel. The Orpheum Junior and Western 
Vaudeville Managers' Association time books approximately one hundred and fifty 
theatres. For the average priced act running from two hundred to four hundred 
dollars per week forty weeks can easily be given; to the acts getting from five hun- 
dred to fifteen hundred twenty weeks can be given. There is no other circuit west 
of New York that can give the continuous tiipe, the small railroad jumps, the beau- 
tiful theatres that these two circuits and their affiliations can give to the actor. 

More acts have been placed on the B. F. Keith Eastern Circuit and on the 
Orpheum Circuit from the West this year than the last five years combined. To 
play the two Junior circuits of these two large parent organizations is the stepr 
ping stone "To the Big Time." ' 

It is with a great deal of pride that I can tell to the profession that 1 book 
exclusively with the WESTERN VAUDEVILLE MANAGERS* ASSOCIATION, 
THE B. F. KEITH WESTERN EXCHANGE and all their affiliated circuits, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Artists, if you are contem- 
plating spending a season in the West get 
in touch with me and I will be pleased to ^ 
serve you with the same satisfaction that 
I have given in the past. Mv references * 
are anv of the acts mentioned below. 



/ Respectfully yours ^ 

MAX RICHARD 

. AGENCY 

1413 Capitol Buildins" 



r 






jj... 






"'""■S^ 

^""'"'^C 



WHITE 
BROS. 

The 

I Tip Top Boys 




WALTER NEWMAN 

in the Comedy Success 

"PROTITEERING'' 



COOPER $ SEAMON 



European Novelty 
Equilibrists 



ELLIOn and WEST 

SOMEBODY'S CHILDREN 



"SLIM" 

GRINDELL 

AND 
CORYL 

ESTHER 

PRESENTING 
'*A Study in 
Thinology" 



CHARLES 

GERARD 

and 

ca^ 

Wizard of the 
Piano 



BERRI 

and 

BONN! 

"Frivolets from 
the Follies" 



SAM K. 

OTTO 

and 

ESTELLE 

HAMMER 

♦'The Duck 
Hunters'* 



MARTINI 
SINGERS 

Two Real Vocalists 

With Soncs, Old and 
New 



ANDY JOHN HELEN 

FRANCIS ROSS DUROSS 

in "A LITTLE OF THIS.AND THAT' 



ULOYD 

Connelly 
and 

LOLA 

Radcliffe 

in « poiii* comedy 
musical offaring 

I "Sax-Accordia" 



KE IVIORG AN and DeF'OREST \A^OOL 

in "OH, MY GOODNESS" 

Assisted by MARY STOCKWELL, BOBBIE GALE, ARTHUR CURREN 







^ESi 



7€ 



VARIETY 



Thursday, March 1, 1823 



EAST IS EAST AND WEST IS WEST 



WITH 



HOPING THE TWAIN SHALL MEET 



"OUT-CAESARING CAESAR'' 

THE MOST SENSATIONAL LAUGHING RIOT IN SHOW BUSINESS 
A TRAVESTY ON THE WORLD'S GREATEST LIGHTNING-CHANGE ARTIST 





EASTERN 

CAESAR RIVOLI 

365 West 46th 3%. 
NEW YORK 



IN WHICH ALL THE ACTS ON THE BILL TAKE PART -^ 

MADE POSSIBLE BY THE COMBINATION OF THE TWO ACTS 

CAESAR RIVOLI and AHEARN and PETERSON 

A SURE-FIRE BUSINESS GETTER FOR ANY HOUSE 

' V MA NAGERS INTERESTED COMMUNICATE WITH 

:'■' / 



KINDEST REGARDS TO OUR 

WESTERN FRIENDS 

MANAGERS, PRODUCERS and AGENTS 



WESTERN 

BILLY JACKSON 

Loop End Bldg. 
CHICAGO, ILL. ; 



Phonet: Dearborn 5922 and 0230 



OPEN SUNDA YS 






ALEX SCHWARTZ 

117 No. Dearborn St., CHICAGO 

Opposite Cort Theatre 



ORIGINAL LITTLE HUNGARIAN RESTAURANT 



OSWALD 




WOODSIDE 
KENNELS 

WOODSIDE 
LL 




•?■• 



r 



DON'T FORGET AFTER THE SHOW 

ALEX SCHWARTZ 

PASTRY SHOP 

The Beat of Everything to Eat 

* 

70 West Randolph Street, CHICAGO 



CONGRESS 




HARRY 



SMITH 



GEO. KALALUHFS 
HAWAII ANS 

PRESENT 

"EKEIA," the Tropical Beach 
Dancer 

in "PASTIMES OF HAWAII" 

Direction: SIMON AGENCY 



AND 



STRONG 

' JACK 

Golden Voices From the Golden West 
Direction LEE STEWART 

P. S. — Working Day and Date with Yorke and King 



BACK IN 
VAUDEVILLE 
JUST TO 
MEET GOOD 
OLD FRIENDS 



WINSOR 
cCAY 




CHICAGO HEADQUARTERS 

FOU LADIES OF THE STAGE 

Expert Haircoloring, Artistic 

Ilairdressing, Marcelling,-etc. 

NESSY BEAUTY PARLOR 

15 East Washington Street 



"EU," the Jeweler 

TO THE PROFESSION 

Special Discount to Performer* 
WHEN IN CHICAGO 

State -Lake Theatre Bldg., 
Ground Floor 



R. R. TICKETS 



CUT RATES. 

BouKht and Sold. 

DAVID I,YON8 

Licensed R. R. Ticket Broker. 

Telephone Harriiion 897H 
ill 8. Cl.AKK ST. CIIICAO O 

EDWARD GROPPERTinc. 

THEATRICAL 
WARDROBE TRUNKS 

IIOTKL NOnMANDIU IlLDU.. 

« K. cor .IHtb A B'wnr. NYC 
PIIO,\P,< PITWROV i%H4fi 



INERS 

MAKE UP 

Est. Henry C. Miner, Inc. 



M 



Operated by the YANKEE AMUSEMENT CO. 

-.t LEO STEVENS, General Manager , 

State and Congress Sts., CHICAGO 

PLAYING BURLESQUE REVUES 

24 — Chorus Girls — 24 
10 — Principals — 10 ^^^ 

4 — Big Time Vaudeville Acts— 4 

PLAYING TO CAPAQTY 



THE BEST IN THE WEST 

SCHULDER'S 

SEA FOOD INN AND ASTOR CAFE 

172-4 North Clark Street 

CHICAGO 

N'pxt to .^h^rmnn Hotel Telephone FRAXKMN Ifil 



NOTICE— VaudeviUe Acts 

We Maka a Specialty of Vaudeville Scenery. Just Finished New Act for 
Mori Singer. Ask: Gibson and Connelli. 

EUGENE COX 

1734 Ogden Ave. CHICAGO Phone Seeley 3801 

Famous SHIRT HOSPITAL 

SHIRTS, UNt)ERWEAR AND PAJAMAS MADE TO ORDER 

EXPERT REFITTING AND REPAIRING 

SPECIAL RATES TO PROFESSION 

142 Mason Street, SAN FRANCISCO 



JEANETTE 



HARRY 



^ACKETT 



A 
N 

D 




Completed Successful QRPHEUM TOUR, Week Feb. 17 



^- V«"" " 



>••■ 



Direction RALPH FARNUM— ED. S. KELLAR Office 



Thursday, March 1, 1923 



■...'a ./'^ 



VARIETY 



77 



# 



# 



I 



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MEET 



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''W,,', .i**-*'- 




^^: 



DON'T T y^ TO TWOm irlB NIfc 










yrAos 

WITH ,, 
THB ' 

AND 

tVfllOIN 




JWIYOU UP JUST Ml 



IHREWJOSS!!!! 





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DOKCTTUINK 
yOULL B € MISSED 



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^ NEW YORK OFFICE 

. vA Strand Th«atr« BIdo. 
^^^ BR0ADWAY«*47th St . 



JOE HILLER 

PROF. MG-B.. 7— 




T&ateam SerHaS Skyder 



78 

f. . -r. 



VARIETY 



, «, .1 .J,, 



Thursday, Marck 1, 1923 



THE 



ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 



OF 



Va u d e V i 1 1 e T h e a t r e s 



BOOKING OFFICES 

ft. 

PALACE THEATRE BLDG. 
NEW YORK, N. Y. ; 



EXECUTIVE OFFICES 

STATE-LAKE BLDG. 
CHICAGO, ILL. V 



.. X-. 



PRESENTING the best in clean, wholesome and diversified entertainment 

•■• in every large city west of Chicago — where jdie ORPHEUM is a household 

word, synonymous with vaudeville at its best and amusement for the entire 
family. ^^ • >■■ •.'■;--,:--'^ : ■...yv,. _,,-,,: .;■^,;^^■^.^^ ,■;..; 

X EMBRACING 



PALACE MUSIC HALL. CHICAGO 
STATE-LAKE THEATRE. CHICAGO ' 

PALACEORPHEUM THEATRE. MILWAUKEE 
ORPHEUM THEATRE. ST. LOUIS 
ORPHEUM THEATRE. MEMPHIS 
ORPHEUM THEATRE. NEW ORLEANS 
ORPHEUM THEATRE. KANSAS CITY 
HENNEPIN-ORPHEUM THEATRE. MINNEAPOLIS 
ORPHEUM THEATRE. ST. PAUL 
ORPHEUM THEATRE. DULUTH ' 
ORPHEUM THEATRE. WINNIPEG • 
GRAND THEATRE. CALGARY 



ORPHEUM THEATRE. V7\NCOUVER 
MOORE THEATRE. SEATTLE 
HEILIG THEATRE. PORTLAND 
ORPHEUM THEATRE. SAN FRANCISCO 
ORPHEUM THEATRE. OAKLAND ^ - 
ORPHEUM THEATRE. LOS ANGELES 1 
CLUNIE THEATRE. SACRAMENTO : 
WHITE THEATRE. • FRESNO ' 

ORPHEUM THEATRE. DENVER , 
ORPHEUM THEATRE. OMAHA> 
ORPHEUM THEATRE. DES MOINES 



ALSO OWNING AND OPERATING THE FOLLOWING POPULAR PRICED THEATRES: 



MAINSTREET THEATRE. KANSAS CITY 
GOLDEN GATE THEATRE. SAN FRANCISCO 
HILLSTREET THEATRE. LOS ANGELES 
MAJESTIC THEATRE. CHICAGO 
ENGLEWOOD THEATRE. CHICAGO 
MAJESTIC THEATRE. MILWAUKEE 
RIALTO THEATRE. ST. LOUIS , 

PALACE THEATRE. NEW ORLEANS 
SEVENTH STREET THEATRE. MINNEAPOLIS 
GRAND OPERA HOUSE. ST. LOUIS 



\ 



LINCOLN HIPPODROME, CHICAGO 
AMERICAN THEATRE. CHICAGO _!: 

PALACE THEATRE. ROCKFORD 
MAJESTIC THEATRE. SPRINGFIELD 
ORPHEUM THEATRE. MADISON 
ORPHEUM THEATRE. CHAMPAIGN 
COLUMBUS THEATRE. DAVENPORT 
EMPRESS THEATRE. DECATUR 
ORPHEUM THEATRE. SIOUX CITY 



AND 



THE WESTERN VAUDEVILLE MANAGERS* ASSOCIATION, State - Lake 

CHICAGO 



Bldg,. 




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V A B I B T y 



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MAURICE L GREENWALD and JAMES O'NEAL, Inc. 



PRESENTS 



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"PLANTATION 



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DAYS" 



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• -7'- ' . Jill f 

.:-, . ( •• ■'- 



I he All Colored Revue Which 
Created a Furor in the West. 
The Snappiest, Fastest Show 

Ever Produced. 

Sailed for ENGLAND Booked by ALBERT DE COURVILLE 

Direction M. S. BENTHAM 



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EASTERN DIRECTION 

HARRY WEBER 



WESTERN DIRECTrON 

SIMON AGENCY 






sn .*rt^is .■ ;.'r^cjy%':' 



• «. „ ■ 1 1"**! • '(,• 



. 'V.*'*'^*' 



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PRICE 20 CENTS 






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rubllflhed Weekly at IS 4 We«t 4Cth St.. Neir Tork« N. T., br Varl«tr. Ine. Annual aubacrlptlon |T. SlngU copies 29 centa. 
Entered aa second class matter December 23. 190S. at the Poit ORlce at New Tork, N. T.. under tha Act of March S. 1179. «■ 



VOL. LXX. No. 3 



^ .> 



NEW YORK CITY, THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 1923 



48 IMAGES 



•%. *«•»• 



VARIEITS NEWS SYNDICATED 



^»— *- 



• • 



MSS RAMBEAU QUITS A. E A. IWIRED ||||[[KLY|CHINESE OPERA COMPANY OF 3l 



COUNCIL OVER aOSED SHOP 



Acts Promptly When Informed It It in Earnett on 
Proj^otai to Enforce Issue Now — ^Augustin Dun- 
can Takes Her Place 



*' - < llarjorl^ Rambeau resigned from 
the Equity Council last week when, 
according to report, in a controversy 
«,t a meeting, she was informed 
Biquity intended to go through with 
its "closed shop" policy. 

'W Miss Rambeau is reported there- 
upon to have expressed her dis- 
pleasure and tendered her resigna- 
tion to take effect Immediately, 

Augustin Duncan, director of the 
Equity's 48th Street theatre, was 
.elected to the vifcancy created by 
Miss Rambeau's departure. 



FEMALE IMPERSONATORS 
VERY ABUNDANT 



I Three on One Vaude. Show — 

"Service Acts" Partly 

Responsible 



I 



I: 



!* There are more female imper- 
sonators in vaudeville tliis season 
^ than ever before, according to the 
V vaudeville booking men. Three Im- 
/personators on one bill at a split 
week house recently is viewed as a 
record. 

The numerical strength of the im- 
personators was heavily swollen fol- 
lowing the war, when recruits from 
the ranks of the many service acts 
': entered vaudeville and remained. 

The disintegration of the service 
, act and the laying aside of the uni- 
f,' forms seemingly did nothing to dc- 
''lete the ranks of'the imper.sonatora, 
|;v who reformed Into two-act combi- 
nations, single and the latest ciaze. 
"working in front of a band. " 
An Idea of the number of aspirant.s 
I; for the wig and skirts may be 
gleaned from statistics compiled at 
one of the large middle^vestern 
naval syitions during the war. When 
a call was issued for aspirants for 
femininp attire for an entertain- 
ment, 125 re.sponded. 



fei: 



PAID OFF IN BOOZE 

A vuudt'ville article this wcoli 
queried her acquaintances, 'Want 
-to buy any booze?" 
_ QuL'hlioncd whethftr- bootlcKcinc 
was her avo.ation. .she explained tlse 
proforrtd lirjulds came into her pos- 
session as salary for services ren- 
dered at a .\>w York supper club In 
the Columi.iiH Circle district, a.s th» 

"to 



nianaKement lacked the wherewithal 
pay oiV th" tiicyf. Instead, she 



'HOd lic;\s In lifiuor. 



COLORED CIRCUIT WFTH 
HERK AS GEN. MGR. 



Syndicate Attractions Operat- 
ing 40 Stiows and 20 
Houses 



With the Incorporation recently of 

the Syndicate Attractlona* Circuit, 

Inc., at Albany, N. T., for |100,000. 

the plans that have been under way 

for the last year to organize the 

negro shows and houses of the 

country have been consummated. 

The circuit will have 40 weeks of 
playing time with 20 houses. The 
sliovvs are to be played by colored 
companies, around the circuit twice 
each season. 

Headquarters have been estab- 
lished in New York, where a rout- 
ing office is in course of organiza- 
tion. -Robert Levy Is president of 
the now circuit. Levy was for- 
merly connected with the manage- 
ment of the Lafayette, New York, 
for a number of years. Negotia- 
tions are under way whereby I. H. 
Herk, of the Alflliated Booking Cor- 
poration, tlie booking concern that 
handled the routing of the Shubert 
units until recently, will become the 
general manager of the Syndicate 
colored circuit. 

The negotiations with Herk call 
for the Syndicate circuit booking 
the colored shows to make Its offices 
in the suite in the Robertson -Cole 
building now occupied by the Affil- 
iated. Tlie deal is to be settled this 
week. 

Among the houses lined up for 
the colored circuit are the Attucks, 
Norfolk. Va.; Douglas, Baltimore; 
Howard. Washington; Howard. 
Richmond, and Lincoln, Newport 
(Continued on page 37) 





TO 




T 



T 



■■««*•.• 



Universal News Association 
Solves Problem of Ade- 
quate Reports on Theatre- 
dom by Arrangement to 
Transmit Digest of Variety 
Columns to Millions of 
Readers — Desire to Cor- 
rect Defects of Individual 
Theatrical Correspondence 



INFORMING THE PUBLIC 



WITH REPERTOIRE OF 406 OPERAS 



Seattl# Reports Foreigners Rank With Metropolitan 
J- or . Chicago^ Opera — Salaries Paid by Year — 31 
Artists — Going to San Francisco f6r Run - 



REAJL ALASKAN PICTURE 
WILL BE MADE THERE 



500 Citizens of Far North Sub- 
scribe — Tired of Alaska 
Films Made in Calif. 



\ 



STONE'S FIRST DONATION 



Gives $100 to Methodist Episcopal 
Church in Spokane 



Spokane, March 7. 

The fir.st donation made to a 
church .by Fred Stonel 'after his dec- 
laration in Butte. Is said to have 
been to the Rev. L. Morgan, of thf 
Central M. E. Church In this city. 

Stone ^ent the minister a check 
for $100, mentioning it was his dona- 
tion from the receipts of "Tip Top" 
here as pe^ the pledge mado by him 
in Butte. 



Variety l*tely mentioned an an- 
nouncement regarding recognition 
by the great American dallies of 
this newspaper's unique and inter- 
natonal titanding as the medium 
and purveyor* of theatrical news — 
world-wide theatrical news. Va- 
riety Is now In position to make 
public the first link between weekly 
theatrical trade Journalism and 
daily news publications in all the 
70 years of American papers de- 
voted to the amusement field. 

Through an offer from the Uni- 
versal Service, a telegraph syndi- 
cate of international standing and 
importance, serving the leading 
dailies in principal cities of the 
United States, Variety has been for 
six weeks filing with it weekly a 
(Continued on page 21) 



Portland, Ore., March 7. 
For the first time In picture his- 
tory a big Alaskan production is ac- 
tually to be filmed in Alaska. It is 
organized by Portland business men 
and backed by Alaskan money. 
Lewis J. Mooman of Portland is dl- 

(Contlnued on page S7) 



* Seattle, ICarch T. 

The Chin«M opera companx at tl^ 
stock theatre here now landed la«c 
week at Vancouver, playing a ahort 
engagement there. They present a 
different opera each night. The 
company has a repertoire of 40« 
operas. It will play Portland for 
one week, then proceed to the 
Broadway, San Francisco, for a run. 
The company does not Intend to 
travel east. 

Its people are paid by the year. 
Salaries run to $9,000 for the star 
and up to $S,500 for choristers. 

LaUt night the company sang 
"The Emperor's Concubine." It Van 
from seven until midnight. Stage 
hands change sets without drop or 

(Continued on page 25) 



MADE PLOHN CONFESS 



Out Alt Night So Told Folks He 
Waa Married 



ENTERTAINERS AND 
HOSTS ON U. S. BOATS 



That tlie U. S. Shipping Board is 
counting strongly on the amuse- 
ment angle as part of Its service 
is evidenced by the engagement of 
Harry Rose to act as master of 
ceremonies and special host and 
entertainer on one of its liners dur- 
ing the summer months. Whether 
it is the Leviathan is not speci- 
fied in Rose's contract, v/hlch calls 
for $250 per performance, with 
at least four shows to be stgaed, 
plus a first-class cabin for his wife 
and baby. The working arrange- 
ment is that Rose be permitted to 
fill In his working hours on shore 
between embarkation across the 
Atlantic. Rose's first engagement 
following the Initial trip is at the 
Metropole, London. 

Paul Wlilleman has already been 
announced to sail on the Leviathan 
.lune 1 to furni.sh special music and 
supply iKinds for four other Sliip- 
ping i;oard liners. The Idea of spe- 
cial hosts* may also be npyll^d to 
ail tiieir steamors. 



Early this week Eddie Plohn, 
general manager for George M. 
Cohan, announced to friends that he 
was married. He admitted the 
ceremony was performed six months 
ago but he kept it a secret, both 
he and his bride remaining in their 
respective ho.nes. r 

The revelation came when Eddie 
did not go home last Saturday ntght. 
His family a^ked him so many 
questions about it he finally decided 
to break the news. Since Eddie 
married, he said lie remained out 
all night about eight times but for- 
gets how he squared it the other 
times. 

The bride was formerly Mrs. Mil- 
dred Beam 'Harrison, a widow. She 
was on the stage for a brief time 
and was professionally known as 
"Sunny" Harrison. 



DEPRIVED OF TITLE, 
CORSE PAHON SORE 



•f .;f 



Known as "America's Worst 

Actor" for Over 20 Years; 

Lawsuit Threatened 



AFTER MAGAZINES 



Richmond, Ind., Orders Racy Pub 
licationa Off Newsatandt 



Indlanapoll.*', March 7. 

The prosecutor, Frank Strayer, 
of Itlchmond, Ind., has ordered the 
local newsstands not to offer for 
sale the publications knowrt^ as 
"Hot Dog," "Whiz Bang," "Jlm.fam 
Jemfl," "J Confe.-.M," "T.illl.r." Vy- 
jamaa," "True Confn.s.Mi(jn.s," "The 
Flapper." "True Stories" and 
"S«cw'ts." 

Richmond Huthoritic*< early tills 
season started a fi^ht ovi-r tlie 
Sunday film question. With ll»af 
out of their 'way they h;iv»» tiniuMl 
to a ci uaade on the racy m:\'_i i/.i'.v -i 



Corse Payton is "America's worii« 
actor," Corse aax^ He has beea 
that for to years without opposition, 
according to Corse. .,': ^ 

Corse is aore. As a champion 
Corse believes the ethics provide he 
be challenged before bis title may 
be lost. Yet it In threatened Cor*»e 
alleges through the publicity re- 
sulting from the Gallagher arid 
Shean action, wherein the court d»*- 
clded those two actors now in "The 
Follies' are neither unique nor ex- 
traordinary. ■-: 

Corse alludes to tha ''song -act" 
as "a couple of comparative new- 
comers." That they personally dis- 
paraged themselves on the witness 
stand and those who testified 
against them did cven.jiiore to 
make it believable there are none 
HO bad as they are actors. Corse 
thinks was hitting him below the 
belt. He wants a contest for the 
title of "America's Worst" If there 
Ih any doubt existing over Just how 
bad an actor he Is. 



I <<r••lnl>^t MjU<t« of StA«» 
.\tttnr for Uuiiu-tt aiiil Mm 

W* lnvitt CompirlMn tf 
■ 0*i(f«, Prtc«*«4 Work»iiniht0 

BROOKS-MAHIEU 



I I :; O'vray T--! I'.miH 



-.H.l 



M V City 



VARIETY'S LONDON OFFICE - r* A R I F Q & St. Martin's Place, Trafalgar Square 

\^ l\ D la Ca iJ 2AQfi R«v»fit Thnrs 



2096 Regent 



LONDON'S THEATRES RENTING 
FROM $2,000 TO HOOO WEEEY 



Fifty Per Cent Profits in Town and on Tour Also De- 
manded — Condition Similar to New York's — 
London Theatre Owners Favored by Americans 



"While the prices quoted for 
theutie rentals in New York are 
larger than those generally prevail- 
ing in Ix)ndon. The capacities of 
the houses here are smaller and 
hence could not command such big 
guarantees. In order to get into 
London with a show it is impossible 
for an outside producer to break In 
without guaranteeing anywhere 
from ll'.OOO to J4,000, and in addition 
to give Ihc lessee of the theatre, in 
most instances. 60 per cent of the 
profits of the show, in town and on 
lour willioiTt the theatre own<^r 
risking one penny. 

As a consequence there are com- 
paratively few legitimate produc- 
tions by outsiders, most being made 
by those in some way connected 
.with London theatre management. 

The wise American producer hav- 
ing a native hit suitable for Eng- 
land, knows the cond.tion and sel- 
dom, if ever, disposes of the Eng- 
]i.sh rights to any management that 
cannot command a London house, 

Charles B. Coclfron probably con- 
trols more London theatres than 
anj' other English manager. ^Vhen 
he went to New Yoik recently he 
was enabled to select the best. He 
made deals willi such representa- 
tive New Yoik producers as George 
Cohan, Sam Harris, Arthur Hop- 
kins. David Belasco, The SeUvyns, 
etc. Grossmlth & Malone have an 
arrangement with the Erlanger, Dil- 
lingham and Ziegfield syndicate. 
Sir Alfred Butt, through the ex- 
tensive control of thtatres here, 
has usually been able to get many 
of the American success for Eng- 
land, but does not seem to be com- 
peting as strongJy as in the past. 
For many years he had the call on 
the Klaw & Erlanger productions, 
but seems to have permitted this to 
pass to Grossmlth & Lauriland 
(which later developed Into the 
Grossmlth & Malone Corporation). 

Kecently a vaudeville agent, who 
has a number of shows on the road 
here, attended the fvrst night of 
"Merton of the Movies" in New 
York. At the end of the second act 
he approached George Tyler for the 
English rights. Tyler quoted him 
a price, the agent accepted, and 
offered his check at once, where- 
upon Tyler said he would close the 
deal later. The agent sailed for 
home several days later without the 
contract and on arrival here found, 
Robert Courtneidge. who controls 
a couple of West End theatres, had 
secured the piece for England. 

Even so successful and thorough- 
ly established an attraction as the 
"Co-Optimists" is obliged to rent 
the Prince of Wales in order to 
come into London with a new edi- 
tion. 

A simil.ar situation is prevalent 
with the revue producers who tour 
Kngland with their twice nightly 
revues In the variety halls. The 
Important variety circuits owning 
the desirable houses where these 
shows can make money, allot routes 
to the successful producers of this 
style of entertainment year In and 
year out, without the producers sig- 



1TII.F.TTK 

KERSHAW 

r,u.\nANTr Titu.sr r») 

122 Kiflh Avenue New York 



nifying very far In advance what 
the attraction will be. It Is under- 
stood the favored producers will put 
forth a first-rate revue entertain- 
ment, in return for which they are 
given regular routes where they are 
reasonably certain their shows will 
yield a profit. 



- KARNO GAVE IN 

Charged with Repudiating Standard 
Contract; Controversy Adjustefi 



London. March 7. 

As Fred Karno seemed pointed for 
a direct clash over the standard 
form of contract, he got toge'her 
with the trade unions of the the- 
atres and the controversy was 
amicably adjusted. 

Karno was formerly of the Tour- 
ing Managers' Association. Eleven 
chorue girls alleged they were dis- 
charged ^or complaining. The 
unions took up the matter, when 
Karno agreed to reinstate them at 
their former salary and to confor.m 
witli the etandard agreement. 



'*BAD MAN" CLASH 



Gallery Booed at Finale, with Re- 
mainder of House Resenting It 



London. March 7. 

A peculiar situation presented 
itself Saturday night at the finale of 
"The Bad Man." The piece through- 
out had tremendously scored, but 
when It finished for an unfathom- 
able cause the gallery started to 
boo. The remainder of the audience 
resented the upstairs display. With 
the ending the company took 10 
curtain diiils. 

Mathe«on Lang in the tltfe role 
slightly burlesqued it as his inter- 
pretation. 



HUSSEY AND DEMPSEY 

Comadian Rapraaanting Champion 
Abroad^'*Plantation Daya" Saila 



"Plantation Days," the colored 
show engaged for Albert de Cour- 
ville'a London revue, "Monkey 
Glands,'' and the cabaret at the 
Empire, aailed^ aboard the Finland 
laet Saturday. The organization 
had been held up a week because 
of a delay in the forwarding of the 
English labor permits. Accompany- 
ing them were James. O'Neal, who 
with Maurice L. Greenwald con- 
trols the show, and Irving Tishman, 
a vaudeville agent who bought in 
on "Plantation Days." 

Jimmy Hussey also got away last 
Saturday, also aimed for the de 
CourviUo Bhow. Huseey carried 
with him authorization to act 
abroad for heavyweight champion 
Jack Dempsey. His credentials 
were signed by Doc Kearns, Demp- 
sey's manager, and one letter was 
addressed to George MacDonald, the 
London sports promoter. Hu.seey 
said he was empowered to arrange 
for several bouts for Dempsey, who 
may box Joe Beckett and possibly 
Carpentier in London. 

Hussey figured the Dempsey con- 
nection would be a publicity aid 
for his profeseional appearance in 
England and expected to be met by 
sporting men at Southampton. He 
has been friendly with the cham- 
pion for some time and, although 
abroad last slimmer when Dempsey 
was scouting there, he did not ap- 
pear on the stage. Hussey played 
the London music halls with Jack 
Boyle about- eight yeare ago, at 
which time he aided In writing a 
revue called "September Morn," 
produced by Edelston & Burns. 




ACROBAT KILLED REHEARSING- 

; f Paris, Feb. 24. 

A young acrobat named Cardinal 
waa killed instantaneously yester- 
day while rehearsing a somersault 
at the Belleville place, Paris. 

Ilia spine waa broken when turn- 
ing into a fall. He had appeared 
here at the Oiympia and Nouveau 
Cirque. 



RADICAL AMUSEMENT CHANGES 
OBSERVED BY WM. MORRIS 



Details Trip to Coast and Return — ^Joe Schenck and 
the $ Sign — Three Musketeers of Chicago— Lady 
Lauder as Speechmaker 



By WILLIAM MORRIS 



THE TILLER SCHOOLS 
OF DANCING 

143 Charing Cross Road 
LONDON 

Director, JOHN TILLER 

- RHINESTONES 

THE LITTLEJOHNS 

226 West 4Gth St. New York 
r h I . u f IIKY ANT 433-> 

PEGGY O'NEILL 

THEATRE ROYAL 
DAfnmrltrt, Inn Ion 



Yes, we had a wonderful trip 

to the coast. Tbci principal reason 

for Mrs. Morris and myself for going 

west to- bid Sir Harry and Lady 

Lauder a bon voyage on their trip 

to Australia. 

1 left New York Jan. 16; was mot 
in Chicago by Ellis GlicUman, Im- 
presario of the Jewish theatre, and 
Richard Pick, once impresario of 
the Chic.ipo Oporti Company, but 
now makinp billions in Insurance. 

When in Chicago I never fail to 
call on the "Three Musketeers" 
Jones. Llnnick and Schaeffer. A.nron 
Jones showed me his nPW million 
dollar ofUccs in the McVickers 
tho.ilro liuildinK". they are wonder- 
ful, and so is the theatre. Thi.« is 
a Wonderful thealie. <'quipped to 
meet all orcasio^ns. Although it w;l^ 
early in the morning, crowds wrro 
already tryiiiR to get in. 

Wo left for Ia>s .Angeles intending 
to precede Sir Harry's company by 
ten days. an«l also to be on time 
for the (»pcninp of Sid Grauman*s 
nc^' $5,000,000 theatre. Sid is a 
rrrr.'it frllow, nut] has two of the 
• inrst "!!"\<.' p" I' ' - ynu ran ser. His 
lI(il)y\v(H)d ill. aire is a great show 
place, not nlone the interior but 
a'so the etitra»)eos to the Lobbien. 
Doug Fairbanks in "Robin Hood" 
was ill Its .Sixteenth week, and 1 
iinjlcrHtand the picture was th.en 
doing over 11 S, 000 weekly. 
The opfMiing of (Jraimian's Met- 



ropolitan, Los Angeles, waa a huge 
success. The price that night was 
S5 for every leat. Thousands were 
turned away, and aa It seats a little 
over E.OOO, It waa not a bad night 
for Sid. Everybody, but President 
Harding waa there. To give all the 
names would use iip all of 
"Variety." There were many 
speeches: one by Jesse Lasky, also 
by Sid Grauman, wjth whom every- 
body shook hands, and Were In turn 
ki.ssed by his wonderful mother. Sid 
lovea his theatre, but oh, how he 
loves his mother! 

To call his theatres movie thea- 
tres la a misnomer: I think the 
name of "Palace of Entertainment " 
would be a better one, , 

Outside of the 10-cent houses, I 
think the straight movie days have 
gone. There are very few Fair- 
banks, Chaplins, Plckfords and 
Grimths, to make drawing cards 5- 
woeks In the year, and for this rea- 
f<on, these wonderful palaces will 
in addition to the movie feature, 
draw from every branch of enter- 
tainment to make a program strong 
enough to fill th(«:e Theatres, esper- 
ially, a» tiM» «ui>vriui- Ihkihvh of eii- 

. (Continued on page 41) 



OTHER FOREIGN 
NEWS 

On Page 38 ■ 



The Old War horse is working 
again and making them laugh. 
Many thanks for all letters, tele- 
grams, phones, etc. Absolutely too 
numerous to answer. 

FRANK VAN HOVEN 



RADIO ABROAD 



Situation Now Similar to Over 
Here — Price Talent 



London, ^larch 7. 

The "listening in" boom is likely 
to hff checked here. The Marconi 
company and the general post office 
are at logger-heads owing to the 
fact that they each tliink they are 
not getting enough money out of 
it. At present each takes 60 per 
cent of the 10 shillings license and 
both want more. 

Meanwhile all sorts of shops have 
gone in for selling apparatus and 
parts and every small boy Is a po- 
tential pirate. One big. filnrj renting 
concern is doing more business in 
wireless than it Is In films and all 
the theatres are broadcasting their 
shows. 

Artists are working from Marconi 
House but are apparently not be- 
ing paid for their services the com- 
pany probably thinking the adver- 
tisement enough; the artists are be- 
ginning to think otherwise. Their 
advertising is also free. 

The morning and evening papers 
struck and refused to publish the 
daily programs free but the "Pall 
Mall Gazetee'' struck out and devot- 
ed spaco to the announcing 
they had exclusive "broadcasting 
announcements." The rest of the 
press then gave In, reinserted the 
ads., and also got out special bills. 

The public are also growing res- 
tive and grumbling. One thing 
widch Is annoying them is the atti- 
tude of the clergy who have man- 
aged to get "broadcasting" prohibit- 
ed during the hours of Divine serv- 
ice on Sundays, Just the time when 
most people are desirous of using 
the Instruments. Another thing Is 
the matter of expense and the al- 
leged Inadequate return. For In- 
stance a man with a crystal set 
Is limited In range and restricted to 
one program and even If he has a 
two valve set gets little better aerv- 
ice, the real usefulness coming when 
from £70 to £80 has been spent. 

All makers and sellers of appar- 
atus must pay a percentage to the 
Marconi people who have an abso- 
fute monopoly. 

Officials of the company and the 
post office are prowling around 
looking for pirates and the first has 
Just been captured and fined £2 and 
costs. Inquiries among people own- 
ing sets found one man who had a 
license. 



BEVIVAL DOES BETTER 

London, March 7. 

Marie Tempest has done better 
with "The Marriage of Kitty" re- 
vival at the Duke of York's. 

It was fully accepted when pre- 
sented, to replace Miss T^-mpest's 
frost, "Good Gracious, Annabellel" 



Blackwell Bound for Vienna 
London, March 7. 
Carlyle Blackwell is going to 
Vienna, where he will make two 
pictures. 



Thursday, March 8, 192* • 

COLORED SHOW WAVT* 
DUE FOR LONDON TOWN 



Empire Turns "Plantation" 
Cabaret Through Price; 
Signs Another ^ • 

London. March 7. 

When Sir Alfred Butt rejected 
the Sam Salvln proposition of l.SOO 
pounds (16,000) weekly for the 
"Plantation" cabaret show on 
Broadway, Charles B. Cochran Im- 
mediately announced he had se- 
cured that attraction for the Pa- 
vilion. 

Meantime Butt engaged another 
colored attraction from the StafiW, 
said to be "Plantation Days." It' 1ft 
reported having sailed from l^^t(r 
York last Saturday. Butt wants'Yt 
for the Empire show. ••' 

While this dark talent rivitry 
proceeded, the Hippodrome was '3n 
negotiation with still anotri%r 
American colored group. ' 

During the scramble the Actors' 
Association, according to its cus- 
tom, registered the usual protest 
against "a foreign invasion." 

The London Common Council Tiaa 
granted Butt's Empire a cabaret 
and restaurant license, with meals 
and entertainment to be provided 
In addition to the revue Butt In- 
tends presenting there. The lootl 
and show will be on exhibition 
three times daily, at (, 7 and after 
the night performance of the show. 

Cochran has been advised by 
counsel that If he can secure tlii^ 
co-operation of the S<ilvin« he luis 
more than ah even chance to enjoin 
Butt 'from using the title "Planta- 
tion" on the gi|U)unds it Ui an In- 
fringement by inference. '^f<f 
■ i-.- 

The sailing of the "Plantation" 
cabaret revue has been postponed 
from this month to around April 15. 
The all-colored troupe, including the 
orchestra and Florence Mills, will 
give their initial London perform- 
ance at the Pavilion. .i nh. 

ALHAHBRA'S ACT 'r^ 

• . Paris, March t.' 

March 9 at the Alhambra will 
appear Alexander and Clotilde Sak^- 

haroff. " ' 



SAILING APRIL 15 FOR S. A. 

Paris, Feb. 22. 
The French company recruited t)y 
Mme. Raslml with her Ba-Ta-Clan 
revues to tour six months In South 
America will leave here April 15. 
Mile. Parlses will be the first star- 
to go out, and the troupe will be 
strengthened In June by Mme. MIs- 
tinguett and probably Earl Leslie. 
Louis Hillier has been appointed 
orchestral conductor and will ac- 
company the troupe during Its en- 
tire trip, until next October. 



SAILINGS 

Reported through Paul Tanslg Sl 
Son, 104 East 14th street: 

Marcfh 3 (from Now York for Lon- 
don), Grace Hayes (President Hard- 
ing). 

March 10 (from New York for 
London), Dora Dean (Johnson and 
Dean) (Majestic). 

March 3 (from New York for Lon- 
don): 

Irving Tishman, James 0'Nlel» 
Raymond Thomas, . Cliford Carter 
and wife, Harry Irons. Archie L. 
Ware and wife, Archie Cross, Dan- 
iel Howard. Jtterling Grant, Bert 
Hall, Cecil R^rs and wife. James 
P. Johnson and wife, I^eonard Har- 
per and wife, Joe Sadder and wife^ 
Ethel Dukehill, Bernice Wilson, Ad- 
die Frazicr, McDowell Sisters. I* 
Ja<:kson, J. Stevens. C. Brown, Bill.r 
Rickman, Susie Brown, Helen 
Wright, Peggy Bernett, Frank 
Woods, William Brand, Addlngton 
Major, George Stamper. Richard 
Curry, Arthur Jackson, John Boslcy. 
Curry. Arthur Jackson, John Bosley, 
W. Steptoe (Finland). 

March 7 (New York to Paris) 
George Maxwell. 

Feb. 24. — (Boston for Liverpool) 
Joseph Furrlngton of Beggar's 
Opera company, London, and Mrs. 
Farrington. (Ansonia.") 



In This Issue 

PICTURE NEWS 

^ WILL BE FOUND 

ON PAGES 26 TO 31 



FOSTERS AGENCY, Ltd. 



I 



i 

>i 



w 



* 



GKOKOE FOSTER 





8. "' 



RRT FOSTER ^^| 



We Place All the BIGGEST ACTS in England 

COMMVNICATK TimOUGn WILUAM UOKRIS ACiKNTV. IXC. 



/ 



14t0 BROADWAY: PCTNAM Bl'II.DINO 



NEW HOnm CITY 



r 



Thursday. March 8, 1923 






'.X^ vv 



LEGISLATIVE 



IS'C 



RADIO SERVICE AT $2 MONTHLY; 
CW. HOUGH REAUZES TALENTS' VALUE 



President of ''Wired Wireless" First Acknowledged 
Importance of Capable Entertainers — ^Wired 
Radio, Inc., Subsidiary of North American Co. 



^■ 



C. W. Hough, president of Wired 
Radio, Inc., a aubsldlary of the 
North American Company, 60 
Broadway. New York, has been suc- 
C<9»8fuUy conducting experiments 
With his new "wired wireless" re- 
Cijlver on Staten Island, N. Y., for 
the past two weeltd. Completion 
this week will moan that the Kys- 
tem of electrical entertainment 
made possible through the ba^iv^ 
patents of Major (Jeneral George O. 
Bquler. chief signal officer of the 
U. S. A., will open a new avenue of 
revenue for the profession. 

Mr. Houc'h TTjites that he fully 
realizes the reason his or^ranizatlon 
U being met WJtii so much approval 
is because he is ♦he first to recog- 
nise the value and lmpi»'"tnce of 
entertainmrut and cipablo -.alcnt 
iu this venture. He rea^izo.j that. 
just like the phonograph when 
every singer "canned" his ci* her 
voice just for the novelty of it. this 
gratis service by talent is weari.v? 
off and that real artists demand 
and are entitled to real revenue for 
'tfeeir servirp.s. 

"with this in mind Mr. Iloush will 
Utilize the leading theatrical trade- 
paper as a medium to solicit ♦•lonti 
when plans are formulated for the 
final execution of the system of 
broadca;4ini, Th? will take ton-'c 
months to accomr lish. 

The wired radio receivers, a 
compact device perfected by Mr. 
, Hough, the radio and electricrjl ex- 
" pert of the North American Co., 
from Gen. Squler's patents, will be 
leased %2 monthly to include en- 
tertainment service with a few cents 
. more for the loud-speaker receiver. 
If sold outright the prico will be 
ISS-50. The elimination of all bat- 
teries with its attendant acid hole 
burns In clothes and carpets and 
their petering out at the most in- 
teresting portion of the program 
are among th? advantages of wired 
wireless. 

A complete booking organization 
will take care of talent datc^ with 
four centralized broadcasting sta- 
tions to be maintained in key cities 
with a possible net work of nation- 
al wiring making it possible for 
nation-wide communication. 

Mr. Hough cites tentative figures. 
Taking Cleveland for example, 
which city of 800,000 population 
the North American Co con- 
trol* on Us electric light, 
heat and power end, Mr. Hough 
says that were only 6 per cent of 
the residents to sabscribe for the 
service at $2 a month, It meanj an 
$80,000 gross monthly Income f>r 
that one city or almost 11.000.000 
a year. 

Monday morning one of the Shu- 
herts' representatives visited Mr. 
Hough to try to put over a publicity 
stunt with the new "wired wireless" 
Idea when it becomes practicable 
Other theatricals have evinced In- 
terest following last week's Variety 
story but it is the Hough Idea to 
put this on a strictly commercial 
basis. 



IND. LETS THEATRES ALONE 



Legislative Session Adjourned With- 
out Damage in Theatrical Interests 



Indianapolis, March 7. 

The theatrioal Industry in Indi- 
ana can mosey along for a couple 
of years without fear of State re- 
strictive Ifgi.slation. The se.s.sion of 
the State lefjl.slation closed Monday, 
■without having infiictod any dam- 
age on th«\iirf«, beyond a minor 
set l>nfk in Indianapolis hou?*" 
alone (Uif to passage of the bill pr->- 
hibitiiiK ih- b.Mlng of the lnd;;ina- 
polis i^iMcdway luco on M<in<.rifil 
day, thtr.'l»y cJiminatinEj consjib'v- 
ablo busi(ic.,s from the 100. 000 or .'^o 
race \i5,itur« \\\,o ahvav?» .^p.nt ;iii 
ev^^ning or twnrin tho city. 

Tho ^e.'-sif.ii wstft in.nrkfil .1 . one 
unusually pl.-a.sjr.jr ^p the tli- uri 



u iniiiisti y. J,, that it was tho .t;»'n 
eral t.-Mjib-ncy to let it alone. Thf 
only .s.'tinis I'lreat nKainst the liu 1- 
ness wa«» ,r) Senator St. .He'.s mnvU- 
censorship hiii.- termed the 'most 
▼Iclous bill • before the Assembly by 
some members, it did not even get 
to first ba^e, however. 



FEWER SONG PLUGGERS 
AT SIX-DAY RACE 



First Time in 16 Years — 

Publishers' Economical 

Move 



It's a strange slx-diiy bike race 
being ground out at Madison Square 
Garden this week. Patronage early 
in the week was not up to stand- 
ard, and the call in the Itroadway 
agencies was off. Those In attend- 
ance didn't know what was missing, 
but the music publishers did. Feis?t 
of the publishers assigned song 
pluggers to the event. It is the 
first time In 18 years that the pop- 
ular song element has been so litt' •■ 
in evidence at a si day race in 
Xew York. J ;; ^ ' " 

Though they stated there was -lo 
formal agreement, the publishers 
explained they had decided "plug- 
ging" numbers at the long grind 
didn't mean anything and cost too 
much. As a matter of economy 
most passed it up. 

Heretofore it has cost each pub- 
lisher about 1500 for representation 
at the six-day affair. Tickets cost 
$125 for the week, and the half 
dozen pluggers from each office were 
paid |5 a day. One of the pub- 
lishers was willing to send men to 
the Garden provided they be ad- 
mitted free. The grind management 
declined. 

The publishers said the passing 
up of the bike race was in line with 
the policy of economizing at this 
time of the season. 



VA. FEES INCREASED 



Bill Introduced to Harass Exhibit* 
ors— Opponents Denounce Measure. 



Richmond, Va., March 7. 

An amendment to the picture cen- 
soring measure was Introduced Into 
the Legislature late last week. It 
calls for an increase of fee for each 
1,000 feet of film examined by the 
censors from |1 to $2 and authorizes 
a charge of 50 cents each on edu- 
cational and religious film, new ex- 
empt. The salaries of the censors 
are Increased by the amendment 
from $2,400 to $3,600 yearly. 

Opponents of censorship are de- 
nouncing the amendment and clam- 
oring for the abolishment of cen- 
sorship In Virginia. 



ENDOWING HOSPITAL BEDS 

Chicago, March 7. 

A fund to endow beds In the Chi- 
cago Osteopathic Hospital Is being 
raised and was given Its first Im- 
portant boost by Eddie Cantor at 
the Apollo when a benefit was 
staged. Theatrical cases which have 
gone to that hospital have received 
treatment from the physicians 
gratis in the. past, but this fund will 
provide beds. 

The hospital Is located at 5230 and 
5250 Ellis avenue. Members of the 
profession wishing to avail them- 
selves of treatment at that hospital 
may address Dr. 01i\'t;r C. Foreman, 
27 East Monroe street. ", 



REGULATING TEMPERATURE 

Indi.tjiapolis, March 7. 

During the spring-like weather of 
last week the city's sanatorlan. Dr. 
Herman (J. Morgan, advised all the- 
atre mriTi.ijror.s to maintain rm oven 
temperature in tlieir houses, urour.d 
70. 

J')r. Morgnn stated oveiho.'itlni» in 
s';nio w lys is \vnrs«- ihari uiid'-i Ju-at- 
jng for the health o£ ino attending 
I>ul>lic. 



DErEAT SUNDAY • FILMS 



Albnn y . ? . '. Yn ai.irnh 7 . 



.Sunday movies WiH not be showi 
iti M'Mlianic.sviU*.'. N. Y., a proposal 
til permit thoni beini; d»M<-ared by a 
Note of three to ono at a s|>^cial 
f1«»rtion held last week. 

The determined oppo<»Ition of all 
the churches did it. 



NORTHWEST MANAGERS 
FIGHTING 10 P. C. TAX 



Conditions There Complicated; 

Amateurs Driving Out 

Professionals 



Theatrical conditions In the 
northwest are In the most com- 
plicated stages ever seen. In one 
third of the cities in Oregon shows 
are closed Sunday, while in Wash- 
ington the State Legislature Is at- 
tempting to Impose an additional 
10 per cent state tax on admissions, 
which would virtually put many 
theatres out of business. Unim- 
proved financial conditions and un- 
foreseen cold spells, the worst in 
years, has not helped managers. 
However one finds them taking an 
optimi.ntic standpoint, increased bills 
and added attractions at decrea.sed 
admissions, erection of new theatres. 

Laws have been passed ^n the 
northwestern states proljibltlng 
questionable carnival companies, 
eliminating chance games and mak- 
ing the "auspices" gag passe. In- 
stead they have turned their atten- 
tion to numerous county fairs and 
celebrations and stunts that are new. 

While actors have been driven 
from work by the onslaught of ama- 
teurs entering the field and stock 
companies closing, there has been 
work for all In new fields opened, 
such as hotels, clubs, picture thea- 
tres, cabarets and dance halls add- 
ing entertainment. 

Imposition of a 10 per cent, state 
tax on theatre tickets is belnj? 
fought In the state of Washington, 
as proposed In S*iate bill No. 134. 
It would drive out of business the 
majority of small theatres In the 
state and cut the receipts of the 
larger houses to such an extent that 
some of them will be forced to close. 
Over 200 persons engaged in the 
theatrical field crowded the Senate 
chamber and gallery during the 
hearing to join in the protest. 

A survey made of the busine?.< 
done by theatres show that they 
make on the average a profit of less 
than 15 per cent, on their invest- 
ments. Collection of taxes cost 2 
per cent. It would not be possible, 
even though patronage did not de- 
crease as a result of the state tax, to 
take 12 per cent., the tax, and the 
cost of collecting It, out of 15 pw 
cent, profit and permit the theatres 
to continue perdting. 

The Legislature in Oregon Is said 
to be awaiting the outcome of the 
state tax in Washington, and threat- 
en to Install the same primarily to 
raise funds for the Oregon worlds 
fair. . 



H. 0. H. QUITS TOO 



Shubert Uptown Unit Houss Wil 
Bs Booked By Fally Markus 



The Harlem opera house discon- 
tinues as a Shubert vaudeville house 
this week when the unit "Troubles" 
clo.'^e.s there Sunday. Commencing 
Monday the house Installs straight 
vaudeville playing 10 acts a full 
week booked by Fally Markus. The 
straight vaudeville will be played 
on a three shows a day basis, with 
the admission scale topped at 75 
cents for the night performance. 
The Shubert units have fc«en play- 
ing the house at Jl.lO top during 
the week and $1.50 Saturdays an<l 
Sundays 

The Harlem opera house, own^^d 
by Loui.s r.reihi and under the 
m.'niagcment of Jnhn H. McCarron. 
has been pl.iying the Shubert unit 
shows on a sharing agreement. 
With the .str.iight vau'loville, the 
man igf ment will conduct an active 
• ampaiirn to revive the f(»rmer poj)!;- 
lai-ity of tlie li.'in.««» as a vaud«'vi!l«- 
^taifl, whi*. h dwindled during th'^ 
wcek-^ the .*^iiubert .shows w-t.* 
I»l;(yed. 



CRESCENT. B'KLYN. IN STOCK 

'J'iie .■<iui!>"M'< have itas«*d tin- 
r'rtscent, Brooklyn. commentitig 
.\l)ril 'J to Henry Duffy f»r 8to< k. 

The Crescent is the Shubert unit 
hou.se over the bi idge. 



.»-->:>.^-.-.r.::; : :v-:ii •■r:<-:-::i::'^ 







EDNA AUG 

ia "DAT DRKAM8" 

K«ith*s 106th Unusually Good 
"Time passes quickly at B. r. 
Keith's 105th Street Theatre this 
week because the program there 
keei).s you Interested and amused 
every minute. There is something 
about every act that lifts it above 
tiie usual run of vaudeville num- 
bers. For instance, there is Edna 
Aug and her company who present 
a charming little playlet concerning 
the day dreams of such a prosaic 
cliaracter as a scrub-woman. Kdna 
Aug plays the role of the scrub 
woman in the opera house, and her 
dream is to sing opposite the great 
baritone. When she does this — in 
the dream — considerable good com- 
edy ensues. James Moore, as Signor 
Camixinelle, sings several songs 
surprisingly well." — CLEVELAND 
PLAIN DEALER. ' ; . 

Keith's 105th Street 
* Edna Aug, comedienne and emo- 
tionalist extraordinary, tops a vau- 
deville bill unsual for Its sustained 
merit at B. F. Keith's 105th Street 
Theatre this week. Miss Aug and 
her company in their little 'Day 
Dreams' comedy sketch show true 
dramatic technique." — CLEVE- 
LAND NEWS. 



EQUAL RIGHTS BILL 



Pa. Legislature Has 0ns Less 
Meatu'rs for Fans 



Harrlsburg. March 7. 

Representative John C. Asbury, 

Philadelphia, one of the two colored 

members of the House, last night 

introduced the equal rights bill that 
caused much debate and some ill 
feeling during the session of 1921. 

The bill would give negroes the 
same rights as white persons in all 
places of public accommodation, cn- 
trytainment, edu»\atIon or amuse- 
ment. It provides i)cnalties for ho- 
tel men and theatre owners and 
others who refuse admission to per- 
.<^.ons because of race, color or creed, 
the penalties ranging from $100 to 
$500 and one month to six months 
imprisonment or both, at tho dis- 
cretion of the court. 

The measure will probably be 
given a public hearing because of 
the demand from colored persons 
who have a large vote In many of 
the cities, but it will *not be given 
the prominence that the V3l\ meas- 
ure attracted 

Miss Martha O. Tomas, Chester 
county, one of the eight women 
members of the House, last night 
introduced a bill atilb.orlzing county 
commissioners to appropriate 
money to any incorporated agri- 
cultural or horticultural society 
within the county. This measure, 
if passed, would aid the county 
fairs materially. 

The House has now before Its 
appropriations committee two bills 
sponsored by Representative O. D. 
Stark, Wyoming county, the ono .ip- 
proprlating $100,000 for the en- 
couragment of agricultural fairs 
for the appropriation period of 
1923-1925. and the other for a simi- 
lar purpose covering the last bien- 
nium and carrying a like appropri- 
ation. It Is not likely that either 
will go through with th<»se amounts. 



VAN AND CORBETT SET 

Billy B. A'an will Join a legiti- 
mate show and Jim Corbett will 
remain In vaudnvillc at the termina- 
tion of their partnership, due as 
.-«oon as their proi-enl booliings ex- 
pire. • 

\'an will be Included In the casf 
of tho n'»w Erl.inger i)roductlon. 
which l.s srheduipd for opening nl 
tlie New Amsterdam, New York, if 
the "I'ollies" ever moves out. and 
('orl»ett will tearp with Jack Norton 
for a continuation m the twice daily 
houses. 



mih bfif ob.'<jlrJb'f r'tfrOcTtVtcff-' 



mmm 

STUDIOS OF 

STAfiE DAIKIMC 

229 West 4Sl!!StNcwVbrk 

i/W^'-'^'-W. Fr/ 3299 3r,^f- 



SUNDAY SHOWS WILL BE 
STRAIGHTENED UP SOON 



Agitation Continues and Police 
Orders Go Out—^Sunday 
' "Acts" in Demand 



A jcr.eral straightening MXi of all 
vaudeville bills in New York by 
the bookers In the larger agencies 
for next Sundaj as the result of 
last Sunday's Sabbath closing cam- , 
paign resulted in an unusual de« ', 
mand for acts known a decade affo 
as "Sunday acts," this week. 

'Sunday acts" as they were for- 
merly termed during a lengthj 
period when New York vaudevlil« 
houses were forced to confine them- 
selves to a straight concert program 
comprise singing turns, monologlsts, 
musical acts and sketches that do 
not need props or scenery other 
tha-n the regulation house Interior. 
Any turn In fact that does not In- 
clude dancing, Juggling, acrobatics, 
wire walking, etc.. qualifies as a 
"Sunday act." 

With from five to seven acts af- 
fected In most of tl>e New York 
houses through doing acrobatic 
stuff, dancing and other banned 
specialties and necessarily rubbed 
off the bookers sheets the agents 
were put to considerable scurrying 
around to dig up turns that would 
meet the requirements. 

This Sunday from Indicallons th« 
lid will be down hard and fast on all 
the houses playing Sunday vaude- 
ville. The word went out from tho 
New York police last Sundajr to 
'•straighten up the shows." Some 
did after a fashion. With the slirna 
pointing to another drivo of wldor 
scope than last Sunday by the Sun- 
day closing reformers the vaude- 
ville houses generally in New York '* 
will trim their sales accordingly. 

Activity by the Sunday closing 
crowd is looked for in Brooklyri,- 
next Sunday also. 

Before Magistrate Ryttenberg In .;, 
the 64th Street Court Monday 
morning, J. Herbert Mack, manager 
of the Columbia, N»rw York, was dis- 
charged on a Sunday complaint filed 
by the patrolman on pos^ Sunday 
evening. It Involved Shone and 
Squire, a mixed two-act on the Co- 
lumbia's Sunday bill. The act was 
also .«-nmmoned and likewise dis- 
mis8..d. The ch.arge was dancing 
and abbreviated costume. Leon 
Laski appeared for the theatrf, with 
Maurice Goodman and Sentor 
Walters of the Keith office (which 
books the Columbia Sunday show) 
representing the artists. The mag- 
istrate said no evidence of a viola- 
tion of any law had been presented, 
with the Assistant District Attormy 
in court agreeing. 

Mr, Goodman called to the atten- 
tion of the magistrate the decision 
rendered by Judge Moses H. Gross- 
man in an action by the People of 
the State of New York versus B. 
F. Kahn, tried In January, 1918. A 
portion of the Judge Grossman de- 
cision reads as follows: 

"From a reading of He<-tion 2152 
it will be observed that the prohi- 
bitions contained in chapter 501 of 
the laws of 1860 have been mate- 
rially lessened. The word 'inter- 
lude,' equivalent to what is now 
known as 'playlet* or 'sketch,' and 
the sweeping comprehensive word»— *- 
'or any other entertainment of tho 
stage or any part or parts therein* 
contained in chapter 501 of tiie lawfl^ 
of 1860 are omitted from section 
2152 and in place thereof the pro- 
hibition by express words of feats 
of strength, such as 'wrestling, box- 
ing with or without gloves, sparring 
contest, trial of strength, or any 
part or parts therein,* and 'club per- 
formances' and acts of 'exercise' is 
added. 

"The 'playlet' or 'sketch' and a 
variety of other performances, such 
as singing, playlnff of mn«»lcal in- 
struments, mimicry, monologs, duo- 
logs, Illusionists, ventriloquhts and 
innumerable other acts fall outside 
of any classification contained in 
the statute. Section "laj In relation *- 
to dancing prohibits only 'ballet,* 
'negro or other dancing' and 'rope 
dancers.* Were it the legislative 
intent to prohibit all forms, styles 
and clas.'^es of dancing upon the 
vtfige on Siindoy it would have been 
p.ipy to have enacted It In the statute 
in bo many words. The statute, in 
f'Xt)ress terms, either could havs 
r.roliihii. J 'danf.par' fflP — Tt>esldef~" 
i);illet) 'negro and otlier dancing.* 
i'.iiling this, it is clear that tho 
piohibition of all dancing wa« not 
intended. Indeed, it would bo dif- 
(Ifult to credit the Legislature wim 
•so extreme an Intention." 



VAUDEVILLE 



V'^':! 



t ' '.'•?■ -'rWi^'Jli , 



Thursday, March 8. 1923 '\ 



GEO. PRKTS 5-YEAR CONTRAQ 
IS CANCELED BY 1HE SHUBERTS 



Claimed Price Breached Agreement When Leaving 
Central, New York — Contract Carried Sliding 
Salary Scale of $700 to $900 Weekly 



The Shuberts h.ive decided tho 
flve-year contract held with them 
by Georgie Price Is cancelled. A 
breach ia allOKed by Price when 
he "walked out" of the Central, 
New York, two weeks ago just be- 
fore the Monday matinee, alleging 

he had been Improperly billed. 

The Price-Shubert agreement 
gives Price a sliding salary scale 
during tlip terra, starting with $700 
weekly (this season) and reaching 
1900 weekly while in a production. 
It provides when Price plays in 
vaudeville under the direction of 
the Shuberts he shall receive |200 
edditiona] a week. 

Price wns assign«Ml as extra at- 
traction for the Lean-Mayfield 
Shubert -owned unit show, "The 
Blushing Bride" at the Central. 
Reporting at the theatre Price com- 
plained over the absence of his 
"name in front of the house.. His 
contract contained, he said, a clause 
saying that when he appcartrd in 
vaudeville he was to be the head- 
line. Following a controversy, will) 
the management unable to soothe 
Price, he left the ihealre and did 
not return. 

Variety last week In Its Inside 
Stuff on Vaudeville stated that fol- 
lowing Price's departure as though 
anticipating a legal action, Price's 
name had been placed in front of 
the Central, a photograph taken of 
it and the name immediately re- 
moved. It was not known whether 
Price had had the forethought to 
take a photgraph of the billing be- 
fore his name was temporarily put 
up although that could have been 
secured at any other time during the 
week. 

Mr. Price could not be located 
during the week to obtain his ver- 
sion. 



ORPHEUM'S BILLS UP 

Vaudeville Shows Booked For Coast 
Said To Cost $7,500 Weekly 



San Frnncisco. March 7. 
From reports and talk about the 
Orpheum Circuit's big time vaude- 
ville bills that will be seen on the 
Coast are to be different in their 
])layinR complexion from the for- 
mer shows; also will cost more. 
One bill now partly announced to 
appear here at the big time Or- 
pheum will have a salary li.st 
iimounting to $7, COO for the week. 



The bill at Keith's Palace. New 
Vork. last week is .«!aid to have <'0st 
over $10,000. The current bill thor' 
Is reported costing 18.500. 



SYLVIA CLARK BOOKED 

Orpheum Circuit Engages Another 
"Shubert Act" 

Sylvia Clark, former Shuhort 
vaudeville act, has ])een routed by 
the Orpheum Circuit. She opened 
Sunday (March 11) at Kansas City. 
Miss Clark was formerly a big time 
"."ingle" turn on the Keith and Or- 
pheum Circuits, leaving last kch.soji 
to join the Jones & Green Shubert 
vaudeville unit, "Spice of Life," 
whi< h closed K«veral weeks ago. 

Miss Clark is the fifth former 
Shubert act to he reinstated by the 
r^rpheum. Others were Irene Cas- 
tle, Adele liowland. Steppe and 
O'Neil, and "Max and "Sh^itx," 

TWO EVENTS FOR ELTINGE 

Seattle, March 7. 
Julian Eltinge was arrested h« re 
'ast week on his arrival from Vin- 
eouver on a charge of having liquoi- 
in his pos.se.s«=ion. He spent his sp.nre 
time while jdaying the Orph^ urn 
here cif-arinp: Iiimsi.If of the Fed- 
eral eharRfs against him. In-i- 
Cenfa'ily, t'.e impcr-on:Kor broke ali 
IHUIUK'M irctiitl.'^ at lU i! OiplU ' ij r n 
during the week. 



UNIT ISHOW WITH $60 IN 
BOX OFFICE, AHACHED 

Marx Bros.' '•20th Century" 
Looked for Deficiency Due 
From Shuberts on Guarantee 



Tlu? Four Marx Brother.^ arrived 
in New York Monday, leaving the 
equipment of their "liOth Century 
Revue" at the Murat, Indianapolis, 
under a.: attachment levied against 
the sIk w. 

The Marx boys r-ame to New 
Voik to secure ;i loss en»^iuntered 
by tliem for their last two weeks 
on the Shubert vaudeville unit cir- 
cuit, the loss having been guaran- 
teed to thorn by the Chicago rcpre- 
.sentative of the Sliuberts. The de- 
IJciency was said to have been 
about $1,900, and the Marx' were 
reported to have claimed they had 
spent around |T5 in phono calls 
from out of town trying to secure 
it from the Shubert people. 

Krantz and White sued out the 
attachment in Indianapolis, where 
the unit .«ihow was dosing a ihree- 
dny run. Playing to $2 top, there 
was $60 in the box ofilre Saturday 
night, when tho attachment was 
eerved. The Marx Brother.^ ordered 
a vefund and called off the per- 
formance, but the deputy sheriff re- 
fused to lift the attachment on the 
box office. Someone dug the money 
from somewhere and returned it to 
the few cash patrons. 

The guarantee was issued in Chi- 
cago to Charles W. Morganstern. 
tho manager of tho unit, as the 
Sliuberts exprci-sed a desire for the 
"20th Century" show to play Cin- 
cinnati and St. Louie in their 
hou.se.«5. The Marx' declined to pro- 
ceed further wiiliout a guarantee, 
which was given, but at the In- 
dianapolis finish the Marx boys had 
to return the company to New York 
at a cost and loss to them of about 
$1.C00 more. The guarantee is dated 
Fob. 10, last. 

The Marx' have a production 
project under consideration, with 
capital to hack them in It. They 
also have an offer from a Pacific 
coast producing firm to appear out 
there in the summer. 

Krantz and White were formerly 
of the unit show. Thoy attachc<l it 
!n Cleveland come weeks ago, al- 
leging a salary balance due them. 
Formerly the partners in the show 
't was eald Kranfz and White would 
not stand any share of ihc los.ses, 
I'aving the . wt. 

The •'20th Century Revw^' was 
!lr--t called "Hollywood Follies." It 
had one of the mo.«!t wohlily exist- 
ences of tho many wobbly Shubert 
unit productions. Several owners 
and managements have b.n-n repre- 
sented in the operation of the unit 
witii ea«h recording a loss. 




ORPHEUM PILING UP ACTS 
OF STANDARD REPUTAnONS 



Many Bookings Made for Western Territory of Well 
Known Vaudeville Turns — Booking of Features 
Well Advanced Into Summer 



TISHMAN SUSPENDED 
UPON ASS'N'S ORDER 



RAY PEREZ 

Sta^o director of C. B. MADDOCK'S 
ATTRACTIONS, among which arc 
•Tin: SON DODC.KR" and FIFTY 
MILF.S FROM BROADWAY." 



come out at 9 o'clock the audience 
grew resiive an<l th^re wfre calls 
from I he 75 or .'.o in front for "ac- 
tion.** 

Man:«g«='r Nelson CJ. Trowbridge 
<»f tiie M»n-at held scveial confer- 
ences with C. W. Morgansttrn, 
repi-escntative of the Marx brothers. 
M«)rgar stern declaretl that if the 
df'pwty took the box otfice receipts 
th.' company would imt go on be- 
cause there wou!d be no money left 
for th»» actors. If the deputy would 
release the money the show would 
go on. ■■ ■•; ' ■,.:■■, ■ . , , , ••;:■■ 

The deputy refused and the show 
was called off. I'atrons were asked 
to go ta t^e box offlce and get 
their money ))ack. The deputy 
callrd a halt. He said ho had no 
[)Ower to permit thf management 
to give back any of the money he 
had taken from the box office. 
Trowbridge consulted his attorneys 
and money was produced from 
.'somewhere to pay back the cus- 
tom er.<'. 

Then the deputy sheriff discov- 
ered that less than $25 remained for 
the show, it is said. 

Meanwhile th# atiat'hement order 
is scheduled for hearing here 
.March 19. I'nless a Sfftlement is 
made the goods will be stored until 
the court acts. 



RUBE'S PROTEST 



Srys Tishman's "Releases" A.-e 
Gags Out of Bornstein\i Show 



New York. JTarch 3. 
Editor A'ariety: 

I take exception to the "Hokum 
Bucket" department In this week's 
Vaiiety. otherwise known as "Tish- 
man's Relea.ses." 

I have been producing burl**sQue 
siiows for 12 >ears, yet this fellow 
has tho nerve to take gags out of 
my show. It has taken me 12 years 
to collect them hi order to make 
people laugh, and he publishes all 
my sure-fire gags in one issue of 
Variety. 

Henry Dixon feels wos.^e iiuta 1 
do. as you have published every- 
thing out of his unit Kxccpliw*- the 
intcrnji*vion •id .ne ^os^'e^. x am 
not j>osuIve, but 1 believe Dixon 
had his show copyrighted. If he 
did, I am going to help liim get 
back the OO cents he paid for it. 

Unbe Bernstein. 



Booker for Thielen Circuit — 

WIthW.V. M.A.I 5 Years. 

Placed Orpheum Act 



Chicago. March 7. 
Sam Tishman, booking managei* 
in the Western Vaudeville Manag- 
ers' A.ssociation for the Thielen Cir- 
cuit has been suspended upon an 
Association order, to take effect 
Saturday. It amountrt to a dismis- 
.sal since Thielen ha.s been advised 
to seciire a new booiiing manager. 

Ti:<hman booked Williams and 
Wohus into Tliielen's Orpheum, 
Rloomington. 111., without permis- 
.sion of the Orpheum Circuit. Thf 
Orpheum Circuit had penciled in 
I'le Knglewood, Chicago. 
Tishnum's prior contract 
hla refusal to release the 
the Rloomington fngage- 
Ori)heum w^s obliged to 
in substitution 



the act for 
Owing to 
and upon 
turn from 
ment, the 



secure another turn 
at the EuRlewood. 

A standing rule in the Orpheum- 
Associdtion offices liere for years 
luis been tliat before any booker 
used an Orpheum act, permission 
should be re«iucsted of the Orpheum 
Circuit. 

The order of suspeu'^ion for Tisli- 
man came from the Orpheum Cir- 
'cuti offices at this end. 

Ti.-ihman had been connected with 
the Thielen Circuit aiid As.sociu- 
tion for 15 years, starting with the 
Association as an office boy. 



»[ARRUGES 

Frank Funes-S, of the Jane Cowl 
'Romeo and Juliet" company and 
special correspondent of *'La 
Pren.sa," a South American Spanish 
publication to Amelia Hutter Kuh- 
ran, Viennese dancer. 

Herman Ruby, songwriter, to 
Edna May Ruv:an, non-professional. 

Harry I'at Kerwin and Jacqueline 
Tallman, vaudeville partners, at 
Michigan CJty, Jnd., March 2. ]Vfi8s 
Tallman recently obtained a divorce 
from KddJe Tallman, stjigf carpen- 
ter. 



No admission could be secured ^ 

at the Orpheum circuit's booking 

offices in New York this week that ; 

any change had occurred In Its * 

booking policy. Within the p^t 

three weeks report* of booking%4»f 

standard vaudeville turns for tlM 
< ircuit's western territory havtt 
been frequently heard. 

The Orpheum's bookers said they 
have been proceeding ;ts u^ual»to 
nil their bills from Chicago to the 
coast and back to Chicago without 
noting any untoward engagements. 
Rookings are said to extend iato 
the summer with many immediate. 

A li«t of recent Oipheum book- 
ings, however, of better' known ^ 
names cojnpiled ami lately placed "2 
carries the following names: Leo-i^ 
Carrillo, opening Mart a 17 at Den- ' 
ver; Frank Mcliityre in tho "Uitz" - 
sketch, Kansa.s City. March \ft;i 
Fanny Rrice and \h*f Duncan Sia- 
ter.s (previously reported); Mltty 
and Tillio; Hal SUtlly. opening this 
wce'x in Denveri Vera tiordon and^ 
Co., Wellington Cros.s a)id Co., The" 
Cans DOS, Max Fi;^h«>r's liand (fnjm 
San I'Yanclsco), Del^yle Alda and 
Co, Jeart Adair and Co. in "The 
Cake Eaters"; Howard and Clark 
• three-act, with production act off 
for pi-esent). • <,i^ 



SPIEGEUS SALES 



m 



T4)niorrow 



(Friday) three steps 
will <.H.cur in the Max Spirgel bank- 
ruptcy case. At 9 30 in the morning 
!he office furniture and fixtures In 
Spiegel's office in the Strand the- 
atre building, 1679 Rroadway, will 
be sold by auction. An hour later 
at the storehouf'e at ''27 West 37th 
street, another auction of Spiegel's 
theatrical properties', .«*« tnery, etc., 
will be held. The.«;e latter include 
the props of the Nor.i Rii^es show, 
"Queen o' Hearts " and of Spiegel's 
defunct Shubert >niits. 

At 11 the same morning the next 
examination of witne.«ses by Ref- 
eree in Bankruptcy Harold P. Coffin 
will be held at his ofMee, 217 Broad- 
way. 



Nan Hatperin on Pmn Circuit 
N.in Haljtfrln ha^- ;ic'jf pled a loijte 
ever 111" I'antages Circuit and will 
#<pen M.irch 12. She was booked 
by her }iu.<^}»and, AViHiam R, Fried- 
laiulev, who has two former unit 
•how.^- now playing the Pun liouses. 



Indianapolis, M.uch 7. 
Fifteen minutos before the rur- 
tain was sche<1ulrd to go up at 
the Murat S;Uurday evening a 
drjmty sheriff arrived and attai-hed 
the box office, .*:cenery and cos- 
tumes of "The Twentieth Century 
Rovue." The performance was called 
off and the Four Marx Brothers, 
owners of the Betty Amusement 
«'ompany. ar-' trying to work out 
of the tribulations Harry Kranz 
and Al B. Whito, former (Comedians 
with the show, caused when they 
til'd .suit for $1,490 in allfg. d b;ick 
salary. 

White and Kian/. alleged the 
.'Ml.try is due for engagements io 
I'.uiTalo I'iit.sburRh, S\ asiiington, 
Chv«'Iand and Chicago. ^ 

A\ liilc tlio iiudieiift' awaiftd In 
wuiuh r the deputy ^^ll'>l•i^L' went 
about the front of tliu theiilrv and 
back ?:t ng e . appr.ti.siiih whntivri - h e 
could find that belonged to Die 
comp.iny. One by on.) the «ltops- 
and props wero txhibitrd to the 
et1le»'r and .'in nssist.int who valued 
them. Choius j^irls were trotted 
out and th6lr costumes appraised 
t>n thrm, .^ixtren Hawaiian outfits 
were valued at 2'} cents each. 
Whon the orcho.'^h-a had noi even 



•SPICE" STAR UNIT 

New Shubert Circuit Show Running 
Away Ahead 



POEM ON THE OLD-TIMERS 



■4 



Wrilfrn T't) Quhiry h'ilby af\d puhlishul sOine yrArn nno in a IiontO%i 
paper : 



THE HOWARD ATHENEUM 

By QUINCY KILBY 

Im tlK"* faraway Onyy when the weather was r»::e, 
We attended to business, each man in his line, 
l^ut whenever it stormed or incea.«:.'tntly showered, 
We would shut up ilic office and go to the Howard. 



ft 



At the Coward Atteneum \nere was always something doing. 

Often Maffitt antl Bartholemew were seen in pantomime, 
JIughoy Dougherty would make ;i speech, the world's events reviewing. 

Or we'd hear tJus Williams singing "Oh, what lots of funl' an4l 
"Crime."' 
Delehanty ar*d his partner Tommy HenAler in their dances. 

Maybe "Love Among the Roses" or "The Apple of My Kye,' 
With Leona Dare, the graceful, always l.iking fearful chances, 

On the little wliite trapeze that hung so everlasting high. 



Xcwark. N. J.. March 7. 

Tlie newest Shubert vaudeville 
unit show, now owned by Kdward 
Jj. Bloom .ind at the lyi.\'»l Shubert 
this week, seems .to be the likeliest 
of all the unit productions. 

Its the "Spice of 1922' attraction. 
written by Jack I«iit and which 
folded up a.s a legit attraction In 
t:hi. igo, rei)roduccil by Bloom for 
the unit circuit. In Philadelphia, 
where it open«vl, the show took the 
:ieason'3 lecord for the Chestnut 
Strert opera hou.se, doing over 
$13,000. and last week at the 
}it'l;i.'?(^o, Wa.^hinRton. did nearly 
$11,(*00, mi.-^sin!; flie record of that 
liouso by $S0. 

Mondiiy nlRlU at the .'^huUerl 
RrriKkl and JJurt gavt; in ilielr no- 
tice. They may leave Saturday un- 
UtS^ recimsirlfiiinnn hv ;n>t a^\ 



Denmnn Thompson. Stuart Robson, young Nat Goodwin, Billy Barry, 

(jSeorge S. Knight and Minnie Maddern, Liter all succes.«ful stars, 
Harry Kennedy, I'at Rooney. two Kernalls, both John and linrry, 

Barney Fagan, Horace Wheatley, each could dance to beat the carl 
Harry Watson. Charley Ellis, Tojiy I'astor's Combination, 

Adah Rickmoi<d"s shapely ligure in an up-to-date >»u;i« s<iue, ; ., 
Both the Clinetops and the Rigls, fritsichorean sensation — 

Oh, a Howard show would ]ny you for a whole month at the desk. 



ni.'ir.agement is givrn to it. 

■ Spice" nrxt work pl.iys the C< ij- 
ti.il, Xew York. 

BIRTHS 

Mr. and Mrs. Kdward M^Cauley. 
son. The father ia I'iiiladeliihia 
majnger for .)«rome If. R'nii.k ^